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WITH THE REGION’S MOST POWERFUL 3T MRI, THE ADVANTAGES ARE CLEAR.

When it comes to MRIs, a stronger magnet delivers a clearer image. Our new 3T MAGNETOM Skyra, the only one in the River Region, is the most powerful magnet clinically available, delivering the highquality images your doctor needs to make a more confident diagnosis. Its advanced technology also provides a faster, efficient MRI exam – and its Open Bore design helps prevent that “closed-in” feeling for kids and adults. It’s the clear choice for you!

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1825 Park Place, Montgomery, AL 36106 (334) 834-3671 • JacksonImagingCenter.com June 2016

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HealthNEWS

June 2016

for Boomers and Beyond

Dehydration

Summer time, thirsty time During the long days of summer, it’s natural to think about watering your lawn and garden, the houseplants, and the pets. But what about your need for water? Getting plenty of fluids every day is essential for good health. Water is in every cell in the body. It helps regulate body temperature, cushions and lubricates joints, protects sensitive tissues, and assists the digestive system. Most people can meet their need for water by drinking when they are thirsty and consuming fluids with meals. But with hot weather, vigorous physical activity or an illness, your body needs even more water.

The need for hydration You need water to replace what your body loses through everyday functions— such as sweating, going to the bathroom and exhaling. It’s essential to replace lost fluids to avoid becoming dehydrated. Among the symptoms of dehydration are dry mouth, weakness and dizziness. In athletes, dehydration may also lead to muscle cramps.

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Being thirsty is a signal that your body is already on the way to being dehydrated. It is important to drink fluids even before signs of thirst appear and to drink more than your thirst demands.

Getting plenty of fluids the healthy way When quenching your thirst, take care in choosing what you drink. While beverages such as soda and sports drinks do contain water, they are also high in sugar and calories. Along with water, other healthy choices for keeping well-hydrated include: • Fat-free or low-fat milk. • Unsweetened, 100 percent fruit juices. • Unsweetened iced tea or coffee. • Fruits and vegetables with a high water content, such as watermelons, grapefruits, apples, lettuce, broccoli and carrots. When you do choose water, you can give it a kick by adding a wedge of lemon or lime. Individual water needs vary widely, depending on factors such as physical activity, exposure to heat and age. Some people need to restrict fluids because of health conditions. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the amount of water you need each day.

Talk to your doctor about more ways to stay hydrated. If you don’t have a primary care provider, please call The Jackson Clinic at 334-293-8888.

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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

June 2016 Volume 6 Issue 11

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.” Carl Bard

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 8 Publisher’s Letter 10 Listening to Music 10 Side by Side Singers 11 Healthy Hearing Casey Gonzalez 12 The Power of Play...for your grandchild Leigh Anne Richards page 44

Features

44 Create Your Own Adventure

40 Women Share Secrets

Travel Trending with Kathy Witt

Leadership, Business, and Life

54 Lesley Stahl

Becoming Grandma

Now You’re “In the Know”

18 Friends for Life Pet Photo Contest 19 How to Match Your Burger to Your Wine 22 Taco Festival at The Train Shed

Departments 18 This and That

14 What President Trump means to your money Brandt McDonald

52 {12} Things

Solutions for Bored Boomers

48 Greg Budell FROZEN

24 GETTING TO KNOW YOU Michela King 26 BOOM! Cover Profile 31 Ageless Designs, New Hands Furniture by Henry Frazer

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COVER PROFILE

32 Valuable VA benefit? Ask an Elder Law Attorney

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34 MBC Heart of Dixie Tournament 2016 page 18

37 Mom doesn’t want longterm care insurance... Ask Nancy 38 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Seaweed Snacks? 39 10 Tips for Taking Better Videos with Smartphone

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page 47

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51 Dating Coach: 10 ways to spot a good guy or a jerk

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 6398 Eastwood Glen Pl., Montgomery, AL 36117. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2016 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

You’re the Greatest The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Associate Editor Kelly Watson

kelly@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

As many of you know my wife Jackie passed away at the beginning of this year. My heart remains broken and will be forever. I’m fortunate to have two wonderful sons and daughter-in-law’s who wrap themselves up in my life so I’m very seldom alone. It’s a good thing to be a father and have your children’s love and with my recent loss of Jackie, my children are loving me in a special way…they are caregiving for me while my emotional wounds can begin to heal. They get me and that makes me feel like the greatest dad in the world… thanks for loving me guys, you’re the greatest! In this month’s issue we have the privilege of profiling Henry Frazer. I met Henry a few years ago through my late My son James, his wife Christina, Jackie, me, my son Jason, his wife DeAnne wife Jackie, who had known Henry for many years. Henry was Jackie’s late husband, Jim Maloy’s business partner. Henry is a southern gentleman and a very accomplished furniture maker, which seem to go hand in hand. His furniture is of such quality that he will be exhibiting some of his collection this month at the Landmarks Foundation’s Old Alabama Town. I highly recommend getting to know Henry in his Q and A this month and by all means take some time to see his exhibit. Both experiences are worth your time.

Lisa Copeland Henry Frazer Casey Gonzalez Tiffany Higginbotham Carole King Jessica Klinner Brandt McDonald Nancy D. O’Reilly, PsyD Leigh Anne Richards Nancy Stein Wina Sturgeon Raley L. Wiggins Kathy Witt

Cover Photography Kim Bethea Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472

As usual, we have some great columns from our community of writers including Greg Budell’s unique take on a recent experience he had that will blow your mind. Brandt McDonald dips into the political arena this month and ponders what a Donald Trump presidency might mean to our financial situations. Leigh Anne Richards has a guest columnist, Tiffany Higginbotham, who is a Physical Therapist that helps explain the importance of play for your grandchildren, you may want to share this column with the kids! There’s plenty more to sink your reading teeth in so sit back, relax and spend a few minutes enjoying this month’s issue of BOOM! Finally, please share your thoughts with me through email or text, you know I love to listen! Also give us a like on Facebook/RiverRegionBoom. If you haven’t read the Digital & Interactive BOOM! online get a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com and we’ll send you one to test run. Happy Father’s Day, let them love you!

jim@riverregionboom.com

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Design & Layout Lake House Graphics

Distribution

Network Delivery

Printing Publications Press, Montgomery, AL 334.244.0436 publicationspress.com

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

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Listening to Music can lower your dementia risk

human brain and enhance cognition, but this was the first study to uncover the molecular mechanisms behind those effects.

Remember how Baby Mozart was supposed to turn your infant into a genius? Turns out that listening to classical music does in fact boost the brain, and at any age. According to a new study from the University of Helsinki, the dulcet tones of Brahms, Beethoven, and other classical musicians enhance genes involved in motor behavior, learning and memory, and the release of the happy brain chemical dopamine. “Sound is important in evolution to protect us, and music is also sound,” explains lead researcher Irma Jarvela, MD, PhD, associate professor of medical molecular genetics at the University of Helsinki. Several of the genes that get dialed up in humans are also known to be responsible for song production in songbirds, a link that highlights the possible role of sound perception and production in survival across species.

Ways Music Can Heal You In the experiment, classical tunes also seemed to modify genes, in particular a gene known as SNCA, that control the death of neurons, seen with diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. “By affecting dopamine pathways, music silenced the genes that are risk factors for dementia,” Jarvela says. Earlier research has shown music performance to cause structural and functional changes in the

Researchers, publishing in the journal Scientific Reports, looked at brain scans of professional musicians before and after they played two hours of classical music, and compared them to scans of musicians who did a non-musical activity. Although this experiment looked at the cognitive changes in the classical musicians themselves, Jarvela believes that at least some of the changes, certainly to the SNCA gene, occur in listeners as well. And as to whether other genres of music have brain-boosting power, Jarvela suspects that jazz, with its imagination, improvisation, and creativity, could also have an effect on gene expression. Possibly hip hop, too. (c)2015 Prevention magazine Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The Side by Side Singers are dedicated to sharing music to keep our minds strong. Music can improve our mood and boost cognitive skills. We invite those living with Alzheimer’s or dementia and their care-partners to join us for 8-week sessions each Tuesday, 1:00-2:00 pm at First United Methodist Church in Montgomery. The music we sing ranges from Sinatra to Elvis. photo by Mickey Welsh/Montgomery Advertiser

SIDEbySIDE singers singers

Please contact Jack Horner at ivortickle@aol.com or Laura Selby at 834-8990 for more information. 10 BOOM!

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NO FEE, PLEASE JOIN THE FELLOWSHIP!

First United METHODIST CHURCH

2416 W. Cloverdale Park Montgomery, AL 36106 334.834.8990 www.fumcmontgomery.org

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May is Better Hearing Month.

10 Common Hearing Loss Symptoms

Hearing loss is a widespread condition, affecting nearly 50 million people in the United States. Changes in our hearing don’t typically occur all at once. Rather, hearing loss symptoms appear over time. Do you or a loved one sometimes have a difficult time hearing? Consider these questions:

1. Are you embarrassed to talk openly about not being able to hear? 2. Are you cutting out activities that you used to love because you cannot join in fully anymore? 3. Is your inability to hear co-workers affecting your job performance? 4. Do you have difficulty hearing friends and family in noisy places like a restaurant? 5. Are you feeling cut-off from your young children or grandchildren because you cannot hear their high-pitched voices? 6. Are family holidays a strain because so many people are talking at once? 7. Do you frequently ask people to repeat themselves? 8. Is there a ringing or buzzing in your ear? 9. Do you often complain that people talking

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are mumbling? 10. Are you having difficulties understanding people on the phone? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, consider getting your hearing checked as soon as possible. Living with hearing loss not only compromises quality of life, but may also impact your overall health.

Healthy Hearing By Casey Gonzalez, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA Montgomery Hearing Services

Treatment

Hearing aids are often prescribed to improve hearing loss—but may people don’t know what to expect. Misperceptions run rampant about bulky, whistling, old-fashioned analog devices. The truth is, hearing aids have changed dramatically from a generation ago—from outward appearance to internal technology—making them more appealing

and effective. Advanced hearing aids act as mini-computers, offering better sound quality than ever in multiple listening environments. Wireless hearing aids are another popular innovation—sound from your TV, computer, MP3 player or cell phone is streamed right into your ears. Best of all, today’s digital technology has enabled smaller devices, some so tiny they rest completely in your ear canal, virtually undetectable when worn. Casey Gonzalez received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Disorders from Louisiana State University, and earned her Doctorate of Audiology degree from Louisiana State University Health Science Center. Casey holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech and Hearing Association and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology.

Free Hearing Screenings

Montgomery Hearing Services is offering free hearing screenings and demonstrations of hearing technology. For an appointment, call (334) 651-0663.

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Guest Columnist, Tiffany Higginbotham, Physical Therapist and Owner of Body Logic

The Power of Play...for your grandchild

We learned in last month’s article that exercise has numerous positive effects on our aging brains. This month, we will look at the opposite end of the age spectrum and talk about how exercise and purposeful movement can change a child’s brain. We tend to think of learning only occurring in our brain, and don’t really understand how critical movement is to that process. All learning utterly takes place in the brain, but it is through movement that learning really occurs. All of us are born with a set of primitive reflexes in our brains that make us neurologically normal. These reflexes make our bodies physically do things automatically until our cortex (high brain) is mature enough to accomplish this on its own. These reflexes are what make us go through normal developmental sequence, what we refer to as motor milestones. This is why we all sit up and crawl and walk at approximately the same time in our lives. When a child goes through normal developmental sequence, and spends adequate amounts of time playing on their tummy, they establish the necessary skills to move on to the next developmental level. They then begin to creep on their bellies and finally come up onto all fours and crawl. Crawling up on all fours, where the right arm and the left leg advance forward at the same time, is what we call a normal cross-crawl pattern. This pattern is the first real coordinated movement that we do as humans, where we are coordinating the left and right sides of our bodies simultaneously. When we use both sides of our bodies at the same time, it begins to connect the two sides of our brain hemispheres, thus better organizing our brain. Crawling also allows these reflexes that we mentioned earlier to “go to sleep” in our brain and allows our postural reflexes (which we have for life) to emerge. A child really needs to spend approximately 4-6 months crawling up on all fours to accomplish this. We always say “crawling is critical” and it is the foundation on which reading, writing, and attention are built. It begins to organize our brain in a way that facilitates all future learning and processing. Another area of concern for me as a physical therapist, is the total change

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in play behavior over the last several years. Children just do not play the same anymore. We have changed from having to beg our children to come inside, to having to force them to go outside. Even as little as 15 years ago, you would have never seen a child who could not swing, skip or do a

The pull of gravity on this system allows us to know where we are in space relative to me and relative to my surroundings. We know that when an astronaut goes into space and leaves the earth’s gravitational pull, they lose all sense of where they are. They cannot discern what is up, down, front, back, etc. If I don’t know where I am in space, then all spatial relationships begin to break down from that point forward. I would literally be living with no point of by Leigh Anne Richards reference. A child with an under developed proprioceptive system would never be able to tell you, “I feel like I just don’t know where I am in space,” but that is exactly forward roll. It is now almost an epidemic. what their little brains might be feeling. Just like crawling is critical for your brain We predominantly begin to develop this and learning, normal play is equally critical. system, initially through tummy time, A child needs to run and jump and spin to preparing and strengthening those muscles develop sensory systems that are absolutely along our spine, and then through rough essential to learning. Two of these systems and tumble play. A child’s body needs to are our vestibular and proprioceptive feel the sensation of activities such as: systems. pushing, pulling, landing, falling, etc. If we over parent and alter their environment Our vestibular system is basically our inner so much as to try and insure that they will ear. Anyone who has suffered from a never fall down and get hurt, their little bout of vertigo definitely understands the sensory systems will suffer greatly. I am a important role of this system. It is basically physical therapist and have certainly seen our sense of balance and ability to “feel tons of nasty injuries from careless, unwise righted”. We develop this through running, activity, so I am certainly not endorsing jumping, bouncing, rolling, spinning, that. However, we need to let our children hanging, swinging…PLAYING. A child needs be children and to play normally. We need to be doing all of these things regularly in to let them push their limits ever so slightly order for their vestibular system to give and be willing to let them fall down a bit. their brain normal feedback. Believe it The amount of sensory input back to a or not, the highest form of balance is the child’s brain when they do what we call ability to sit perfectly still. If we allow a “climb and crash” behavior is absolutely child to move a lot early, we give their necessary. This is how a child actually learns bodies and brain the skill to be able to what their limits are in the first place. A sit still later. Otherwise we might be in a child needs to jump off something just scenario of, “I can sit still or I can listen, but a tad too high and think “Uh, that was a my brain just won’t let me do both.” So the little too high,” This helps develop their next time your grandchild is driving you proprioceptive system which then gives crazy, spinning around in circles trying to them that critical reference point that they make themselves dizzy, remember that they desperately need. are developing their vestibular system. Most therapists and educators will tell The proprioceptive system is very similar you that we have all seen an increase in and works very closely with the vestibular processing and sensory issues in children system. This is truly our sixth sense and it over the last several years. There are is our only sense that is active 100% of the numerous theories as to why this might be, time. Our proprioceptive system is housed but I feel that it has been a bit of a perfect in our muscles that run along both sides of storm rising. Let’s say baby boy Jack did not our spine as well as in all of our tendons spend adequate time on his tummy and and ligaments in and around our joints. was placed in too much “baby equipment”.

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Maybe Jack did not crawl long enough or in a normal pattern. Jack then becomes a preschooler and is in an environment where he is predominantly sitting rather than playing. He spends the majority of time at home in front of various screens (TV, IPAD, XBOX, IPHONE, etc.). Jack then becomes school age and the cycle continues of more emphasis on early reading requirements with cut backs made to both recess and physical education. Jack is left with a body that is uncoordinated, has poor core strength and balance, and a vestibular and proprioceptive system that did not mature through normal development and play. Jack might be smart enough to compensate for all of these deficiencies, but some kids are not. Jack’s cortex (high brain) should be completely freed up to just learn and store information in the right places. However, his high brain continuously gets diverted to help his low brain do things like sit still in his chair, hold himself upright, hold his pencil, track his eyes...things that Jack’s high brain should never really have to do. It is a constant scenario of “robbing Peter to pay Paul” and it catches up with most kids eventually. There is a huge correlation between physical and cognitive readiness to learn. When I watch a child move, it gives me a little window into the organization of their brain. When our bodies work better, so do our brains. So a child who is uncoordinated, exhibiting fine and gross motor delays, poor posture and balance, may be telling us that they have an immature central nervous system that may not be ready to learn. In the past we relied on children “developing

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their bodies” through normal play at home. With the emergence of technology constantly at our children’s fingertips, this is just not the case anymore. So, what do we do?! What is the answer? Obviously more research needs to be done to support the case for purposeful movement and its effect on our brains. I and Dr Erin Reilly, AUM Kinesiology professor, conducted a six-week study at a local school’s aftercare program. We had children ranging from 4-12 years of age that spent approximately 20 minutes, 4 x a week, for 6 weeks performing group exercise. The movements were all “purposeful”. We combined typical therapeutic concepts that address the systems mentioned above, as well as normal motor skills that you might see in physical education. We saw an 11-month increase in the children’s mental age in just six weeks. Even the children that had no physical deficits upon initial screening increased their mental age. Based on this research we developed an exercise class called Brain Pump™, which we regularly run at Metro Fitness. We play fun music and games that specifically target all of their sensory systems as well as elevate their heart rate to a level that research shows the brain is most stimulated. It is in an enriched environment with other children and seems a lot more like playing than exercising. So what does this tell us? Children need to move and they need to move a lot. We need to put our babies down on the floor and let them creep and crawl and we need to send our older children outside to play.

Parents and grandparents should limit the use of technology and baby equipment. I don’t think that gaming systems or baby equipment are inherently bad for our children, but what is your child or baby NOT doing when they are playing video games or sitting in that exersaucer? There is no judgement here. I am the first to admit that there have certainly been numerous days that I have over utilized baby equipment and technology just to keep my sanity as a mom of three. These things are helpful and are great additions when used in moderation. But sometimes we as humans intervene a little too much. Let your child move and play naturally as they would without baby equipment and technology. Their brains and bodies intuitively know what they need and they will do it automatically if we will just let them. This creates a child with a coordinated body and an organized brain that gives them a foundation and love for both moving and learning that we just can’t separate. Because after all, our heads are actually attached to our bodies. Tiffany is a physical therapist and owner of Body Logic PT and Wellness, an outpatient PT clinic inside of Metro Fitness. She treats people of all ages with orthopedic and neurological deficits. To learn more visit bodylogicpt.com.

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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What President Trump means to your money Donald Trump has beaten what is probably the best list of GOP contenders assembled in modern history. As he so often reminds the public, he systematically beat 16 other highly qualified candidates. And, remarkably he did it rather easily. Both the Republican and Democratic leadership sit in disbelief at his meteoric rise to the nomination. Simply put, Donald Trump tapped into an all-out revolt by the American Public. America First is a theme and a message that is resonating across the land and seems to be gaining momentum. Going back to 2000, the United States has stalled economically and has only gotten worse under President Obama. Wages have hardly budged for the average working class family; Average GDP growth has barely touched 2%; and foreign affairs has been a complete debacle under both President Bush and Obama. The political system in the United States seems broken and the people of this country have lost faith in Washington and those elected to represent them. They have simply had enough. Hence, Donald Trump appears to be the man that a growing number in this country believes can fix these problems. Recent polling suggests Trump and Hillary are neck and neck as of June 1st, 2016. But what does a Trump Presidency mean for the U.S. economy and Wall Street? As for the economy, Mr. Trump says he wants to aggressively lower tax rates for 99% of the citizens in this country. He wants to re-write the tax code to make it fairer and less complex for both individuals and corporations. Certainly, this is a vote in favor of capitalism – leaving more money in the hands of the private sector to determine capital investment as opposed to more redistributive policies currently in place. He also wants to dramatically eliminate onerous, burdensome, and completely

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unnecessary regulations that are strangling corporate America. The current regulatory environment is like a noose around the free-enterprise system that has only gotten tighter and tighter over the last eight years. He has also stated that he wants to go through every federal department and cut unnecessary spending. The two areas he wants to increase federal spending are the military and U.S. infrastructure. As with is always the case, Brandt McDonald the devil is in the details. But, based on his general position surrounding the two most important domestic economic concerns, Mr. Trump appears to be on the right side of taxes and regulations. We do not have a money supply problem. This country has enormous liquidity. The problem we have is that money is not moving at a fast enough pace. Taxes and regulations are almost always the enemy of capital formation. It’s like rolling out Secretariat at the Kentucky Derby and putting a 350 pound jockey on his back. The Federal Government is too big. If Mr. Trump can make good on his promises in these areas then we should be able to get growing again. Rising wages should follow soon enough. A growing economy with an increase in the real rate of return means naturally rising rates and higher stock prices.

Financial Thoughts

Foreign policy seems to be the one area where he has struck a nerve with the American people and it’s the basis of his slogan “Make America Great Again”. Obviously, the most significant campaign theme from the get go was “we will build a wall and Mexico will pay for it”. This brand of Trump early on in the campaign set the stage for his campaign momentum and it acted as a foundation for continued bombastic rhetoric about

going after the Chinese for taking advantage of America and taking our jobs. He then went after ISIS and claimed that he would crush them almost single handedly. America wants a fierce, take no prisoner President again. They want a leader who will look Vladimir Putin in the eye and deliver a message that the United States is a country to fear again. Mr. Trump has haphazardly tapped into President Reagan’s unique ability to communicate with the masses around a patriotic theme of free enterprise capitalism and America First in all things – jobs, the economy, immigration, the military, etc. There’s no question that the U.S. is a powerful force and an influence that must be dealt with in the world. But Trump believes we are too spread thin and have no business in nation building. He prefers to focus on U.S. domestic policies and rebuild America and infrastructure. But, he must be careful when talking about tariffs and protectionism. Protectionism and isolationism has never worked well in the past. Negotiating better trade deals is one thing but outright trade wars are another. The biggest issue as I see it is whether or not Mr. Trump can orchestrate a winding down of the current currency wars going on around the world. Every major country continues to try and defend its global trade market share by devaluing its local currency through bizarre quantitative easing mechanisms. The United States has always been the engine that pulled the rest of world out of economic malaise. The problem in recent years is that U.S. joined the rest of the world and embraced socialism – leaving a void of economic leadership - the raw power of free market capitalism. If Mr. Trump can

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succeed in getting that restored the rest of the world would gladly hitch up their wagon. There’s a long way to go until the general election. But, I happen to believe Donald Trump will be our next President. To be clear, I did not vote for him in the primary; however, he is most likely the best option at this point. Hillary is a weaker, more predictable, more of the same candidate. Her message has simply lost its luster in a country that is trusting of no one inside the old guard. So, as we prepare for life under Trump, let’s all hope that he can deliver on the things that matter – less government spending; better, higher paying jobs; reducing the nation’s debt; and a more stable global economy. Here at McDonald & Hagen, we are always monitoring global events and the current Presidential election. As we draw nearer to the general election, the financial markets will most definitely begin to “price in” the new President and his/her policies. It should be an interesting ride. We are here to help you navigate the volatility and the long-term implications of the next four years. As I always say, until next time, remember to never run with the herd, always be thankful, and look to the future with anticipation of what’s yet to come. Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager MBCapitalWealth.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com or 334.387.0094 Securities offered through LPL Financial Member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The economic forecasts set forth in the presentation may not develop as predicted and there can be no guarantee that strategies promoted will be successful.

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i

This & tHAT

John’s Alabama Single Malt Whiskey Honored with Southern Living Food Award. John Emerald Distilling of Opelika, Alabama was informed that their John’s Alabama Single Malt Whiskey was a Southern Living Food Award winner. The Alabama Whiskey will be featured in the June edition of Southern Living along with other winners in the spirit category. Jimmy Sharp, master distiller, commented “We are excited for our whiskey to be worthy of Southern Living’s award. From the very beginning we have been dedicated and have strived to make a whiskey that would make Alabama proud.” “Having such a great magazine as Southern Living validate our hard work really means a lot, we will just keep on making Alabama’s whiskey for us Southerners and the L-R: John Sharp, distiller and co-owner, Jimmy Sharp, Master Distiller rest of the world to enjoy.” said John Sharp, distiller and co-owner of John Emerald. John Emerald Distilling Company has been operating for two and half years in downtown Opelika, Alabama. Their award winning spirits continue to introduce the world to Alabama spirits. For more information see: johnemeralddistilling.com or facebook.com/johnemerald

Montgomery Humane Society Friends for Life Pet Photo Contest Our 18th Annual Pet Photo Contest kicks off on June 1st, 2016 when we will begin accepting photo submissions of your pet. This year we have made it easier for you to enter and submit your pet’s pictures(s). You can enter online at montgomeryhumane.com and submit your picture (the file should be 3300 pixels by 2550 pixels or 11″ X 8.5″ at 300 dpi). When taking the picture make sure it is at the highest resolution. All entries will be placed on our website montgomeryhumane.com and you may vote for your favorite entries online. Each vote costs just $1, with the top 83 animals earning a place in our 2017 “Friends for Life” calendar. Get your friends, family co-workers to vote for your pet! If you need a professional photo of your pet please contact Diana at Pet Pawtography, 334.590.1875 or petpawtography.com , to schedule your photo session during one of the “Friends for Life” photo sessions.

Get Your Affairs in Order, FREE Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop Wednesday, June 29: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30 - 3:30 pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334.625.6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com.

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BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

How to Match Your Burger to Your Wine There seem to be two schools of thought when picking good wine for your burger: overthinking and underthinking. In the former, you can get all scientific about meat char levels, fat ratios, rareness vs. doneness and then try to target the wine with the right amount of tannins, age, and alcohol levels. (Holy complicated.) For the latter, it’s an anything-big-bold-and-red approach. (It’s just a burger after all.) But there’s a middle ground: Loosely matching your wine to burger toppings. The toppings, after all, tend to make the burger. And whether you’re a fan of basic lettuce-and-tomato or more elaborate get-ups, there’s a wine out there for you. Here’s a basic guide: Topping: Lettuce and Tomato, Pair with: Cabernet Franc, Why: Most commonly found in the Loire Valley, France, this red tends to be lighter with some herbal notes, which means it’s great with fresh veggies and charred-grilled burgers. Topping: American Cheese, Pair with: Lambrusco, Why: The bubbles will help cut through the fat and the fruitiness of the wine will be a good complement to the mild flavor of American cheese. Topping: Bacon, Pair with: West Coast Pinot Noir, Why: Pinot Noir that’s been aged with just a touch of French new oak, as is common in American versions, tends to have some smoky notes that work well with bacon. Plus a more robust bodied wine that can handle big flavor. Topping: Blue Cheese, Pair with: Zinfandel, Why: With something as assertive as blue cheese, you’re going to have trouble locking in a perfect match. So maybe go with a fruitier style of Zinfandel. The wine will be as bold as the cheese and have a slight sweetness that can help smooth things over. Topping: Sautéed Mushrooms Pair with: Nebbiolo, Why: Mushrooms are a natural pairing with earthy, acidic Nebbiolo, a red grape grown in Northern Italy. But the Italian wine labels can get confusing: look for wines labeled Barolo, Barbaresco, Gattinara and Roero to find a Nebbiolo-based wine. For more information visit bottlenotes.com/the-sip/

M3: Manicures, Massages & Merriment On My Honor Girl Scout Alumnae Association and the Girl Scouts of Southern Alabama will host the M3: Manicures, Massages & Merriment at Virginia College, 6200 Atlanta Highway, on Friday, June 10th at 5:30 – 8:30 pm. M3 is a fun and relaxing evening of pampering, savory appetizers, exciting silent auction items and specialty cocktails inspired by Girl Scout cookies. Local bartenders will create their best Girl Scout Cookie inspired cocktail and cookie pairing. A panel of judges will choose the “Best in Show” Award winner, and guests will judge for the People’s Choice Award winner. They will enjoy delicious food donated by local restaurants and caterers from the River Region, and receive wonderful manicures and massages by Virginia College School of Cosmetology and School of Massage Therapy. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased online at girlscoutssa. org/specialevents/index.php. Questions? Please contact Melinda Stallworth at 334.272.9164 ext 2802.

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Hospice of Montgomery’s Kentucky Derby Annual Benefit

Dressed in elegant Derby attire are Peggy Marshall and Robin Lewis

More than 500 guests and donors recently gathered in their “Derby” best for Hospice of Montgomery’s Kentucky Derby Annual Benefit fundraiser at Montgomery Country Club. The event, chaired by Julia Wilson, was a fun-filled afternoon affair with a VIP pre-party, post-position horse draw, exclusive silent auction, hat contest, funny money gaming tables, hors d’ oeuvres, music, fabulous prizes and, of course, viewing of the Kentucky Derby! Funds raised at the annual benefit help provide counseling and bereavement services to families, community education seminars, and care for terminally ill patients, regardless of their ability to pay. Hospice of Montgomery is Alabama’s first hospice and the only independent, nonprofit hospice care provider in the River Region. They have been providing services for patients and their families in our community for over 30 years. For more information contact Hospice of Montgomery at 334.279.6677 or visit hospiceofmontgomery.org

Montgomery Catholic Names Kevin Ryan the 2016 Charlie Harbin Award Winner Kevin Ryan was honored by Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School as the 2016 Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award winner for his service to the school. The Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award was established by the Harbin family and is awarded by the school to recognize those selfless individuals who have significantly served Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School and exemplified its values in their lives. Kevin Ryan has been actively involved at Montgomery Catholic for more than 30 years. He was a member of the Class of 1968 attending Queen of Mercy and then Catholic High from grades 7-11, but missed his senior year when his father was transferred with the military. Kevin and his wife Kathy returned to Montgomery in the late 1970’s where they became active members at Holy Spirit. They chose Catholic education for their three children: Kyle ’99, Kristen ’99 and Katy ’00 who all attended our St. Bede campus and then graduated from Montgomery Catholic. Kevin’s service Kevin Ryan ‘68 pictured with his wife Kathy and daughter Kristen ‘99 to the MCPS community began in the late 1980’s, He served as a PTC member, Booster club member, as Chairman of the School Board and on numerous committees, he was a Legislative Convention and Clean-Up day volunteer, he acted as our school Basketball, Soccer, JV and Varsity football announcer, he volunteered to set up for Athletic events and was always willing to help set up sound for our events. After retiring from a lifelong career in computer systems, Kevin acted as the Faith Formation Coordinator at Holy Spirit from 2005 until his retirement in 2012. He is an excellent example of a great Catholic volunteer because he gives of his time and talent out of love for the school, its students and families. His presence, positive attitude, and willingness to help are an inspiration and good example for us all.

Eagle Scout Project Benefits Community Theatre The Wetumpka Depot Players, now in their 36th year, exist with the mission to entertain, educate and reach out to the community. That mission is fulfilled by countless volunteers who work tirelessly to support the area’s oldest community theatre. Wetumpka Boy Scout, Clayton Wells Hutsler from Wetumpka Troop 50, recently received the prestigious rank of Eagle Scout after completing a project that benefited the Wetumpka Depot Players. Wells identified the need for more storage and organization at the Depot’s offsite storage facility that houses costumes and props from productions over the last 30 years. He put in over 60 hours of work to build shelving and recruited volunteer support to help for another 180 hours. “We are Hutsler pictured with Depot Board Members thrilled with the results of Well’s project,” said Kristy Meanor, Executive Director. “The From Left, Mariella Easterling, Craig Sheldon, Carol Heier, Hazel Jones, Hutsler, Jeff Langham, Warren Jones shelving units that Wells built and the amount of organization he achieved during his and Carolyn Osborn project have been a real ‘game changer’ for us. It was impressive to see the Scouting community come out to support Wells.” For more information on how to volunteer and be a part of the Depot Players community call 334.868.1440. For ticket information and all show schedules visit wetumpkadepot.com. The theatre is located at 300 S Main St in historic downtown Wetumpka.

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Montgomery Lions Club Annual Cycling for Sight Ride Montgomery Lions Club is holding their annual Cycling for Sight ride on Saturday, June 25, from 8-12. This year’s ride is sponsored by the Montgomery Bike Club, Ability Sport Network at Huntingdon College, and Creek Casino Montgomery. The ride commemorates Helen Keller, a native Alabamian, who courageously challenged Lions Club members to become “Knights of the Blind in the Crusade against darkness”. The Lions accepted her challenge and their work ever since has included sight programs aimed at preventable blindness. Please join the ride and become a Knight of the Blind and stop preventable blindness! Choose either a 21 mile or 45 mile route and enjoy the beautiful rural roads of east Montgomery County. You will be supported every mile of the way with mechanical and SAG support along with fully stocked rest stops. Breakfast and lunch will be provided to all riders. Ride starts & ends at Tallapoosa Lakes Convention Ctr., 1501-A Dozier Road Montgomery, AL 36117. For more information, call 334.356.1180 or visit montgomerylionsclub.com/cycling-for-sight.html

Montgomery Business Confidence Leads State for 13th Consecutive Quarter Job creators and businesses continue betting big on Montgomery as Alabama’s capital city ranks highest among Alabama metro areas in the Alabama Business Confidence Index (ABCI), a quarterly examination of business executives’ optimism published by the University of Alabama Center for Business and Economic Research. The report, which measures quarterly economic expectations by polling business leaders across the state, is a leading indicator of economic success and progress for the coming months. Montgomery business confidence rose to 57.3 points, again outpacing Mobile, Huntsville and Birmingham. Montgomery has led the statewide ABCI for 13 consecutive quarters. “Our job is to prime the pump for job creators – both those existing and those looking to relocate to Montgomery – by creating a climate for success and putting the right infrastructure in place,” Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange said. “Our job creators and local business owners are the ones making it happen day-in and day-out, and the fact that we have ranked highest in the statewide survey for 13 consecutive quarters means we’re doing something right in the River Region.” View The University of Alabama Center for Business and Economic Research’s full report at cber.cba.ua.edu/abci/results/Montgomery_ABCI_Q2_2016.pdf.

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SummerNight Downtown Art Walk SummerNight Downtown Art Walk takes place Friday night June 10th, 6-10 pm. This arts festival transforms downtown Auburn into an arts district, featuring the work of local and regional artists, live musicians, street performers, food and drink vendors, and children’s activities. During this event downtown merchants and restaurants remain open after regular business hours and people of all ages are encouraged to take advantage of this great opportunity to shop, dine and relax while enjoying the arts in downtown Auburn. Artists will have works on display and live musical entertainment is provided. For the first time, this year’s SummerNight Downtown Art Walk will kick off with a walking parade beginning at Pebble Hill and pre-parade party! Ending at Toomer’s Corner, the parade will officially start SummerNight. In addition to the arts festivities, SummerNight Downtown Art Walk also includes a culinary contest. The SummerNight Committee encourages culinary artists to display their talents through a cookie contest. SummerNight is free to the public and open to all ages. For more information, visit auburnsummernight.org.

Taco Festival at The Train Shed Lightning Line is bringing the state’s first Taco Festival to Montgomery Saturday, June 18, 4 pm! They will have a wide assortment of tacos from your favorite local joints as well as food trucks from all over the state. I know what you’re thinking…this can’t get any better. But it is! They are also bringing in a large contingency of Alabama’s breweries to offer up their best beers for this event. A portion of the proceeds are going to EAT South! Montgomery’s Union Station Train Shed, 300 Water Street, Montgomery, AL 36104. More Information on website: facebook.com/LightningLineMGM

Montgomery Antiques & Interiors Welcomes New Manager Montgomery Antiques & Interiors is pleased to announce that Andrew Thrash has been named Store Manager. Andrew has both a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Management and a Master’s Degree in Business Management from Faulkner University. In his position as Store Manager, Andrew will work with the 22 dealers who showcase their collections at the gallery, which features a superb collection of antiques as well as unique items for interior decorating. Andrew is available to assist clients of Montgomery Antiques & Interiors to select the perfect furniture and accessories to warm the home or to dazzle the office. The gallery is located at 1955 Eastern Boulevard, Montgomery, Ala., 36117. Reach us by phone at 334.277.2490 or visit us online at montgomeryantiquesandinteriors.com.

Big Fish Paddle Come paddle around Jackson Lake Island, walk through the town of Spectre, the old movie set of “Big Fish”. View the beautiful scenery, enjoy a picnic and spend time with friends. You may be lucky enough to meet the pet goats too! Pack your favorite picnic and drinks and enjoy a day of relaxation and fun! There is a private boat ramp, fishing, swimming, camping, tents or trailers, covered pavilion, screened in Tree House with ceiling fans to get away for any bugs, swings and so much more! Be sure to bring you folding chairs or a blanket for the ground. A bath house is also available. $3.00 charge at the gate house. Be sure to tell Mr. and Mrs. Bright that you are there for the “Big Fish Paddle”. The end time only depends on you! Family and children are welcome. Sunday, June 5, 2016, 10 – 5 pm. Cypress Ln, Millbrook, AL 36054. More Information at facebook.com/JacksonLakeIsland/timeline

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Wicked the Musical in Birmingham Appearing June 22 through July 3rd at The BJCC in Birmingham. Wicked: The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and book by Winnie Holzman. Wicked looks at what happened in the Land of Oz... but from a different angle. Long before Dorothy arrives, there is another girl, born with emerald-green skin-smart, fiery, misunderstood, and possessing an extraordinary talent. When she meets a bubbly blonde, their initial rivalry turns into the unlikeliest of friendships... until the world decides to call one “good,” and the other one “wicked.” WICKED has been hailed by The New York Times as “the defining musical of the decade.” Time Magazine cheers, “if every musical had the brain, the heart, and the courage of WICKED, Broadway really would be a magical place.” For tickets and info visit bjcc.org

Cloverdale Playhouse Presents Strip Talk on the Boulevard The Playhouse presents an exciting new work in its very first production! Beginning June 16-19 and June 23-26. This witty, brazen comedy focuses on a first day of friendship. Marty, a high school English teacher, meets Sally, a high school dropout managing a drugstore on Hollywood Boulevard. Marty is lured in to Sally’s off-kilter world, sharing the woeful story of her former marriage, when they are interrupted by the entrance of Morgan, a musician (who calls himself “Raw Sex”) and Sally’s “word dealer” who charges her by the word for help with her crossword puzzle habit. A battle of the sexes ensues, embellished by wild word play and a reenactment of the “real” version of the Adam and Eve story. These free spirits in the drugstore help Marty understand that honest friendship can exist in the unlikeliest places. CAST: Sally - Sarah Adkins, Marty- Sarah Worley, Morgan “Raw Sex” - Johnny Veres and Jeremy - Zach Vines. Recommended for ages 14 and above. For tickets and info visit cloverdaleplayhouse.org

The Mulligan Brothers and Roman Street in Concert

The Mulligan Brothers and Roman Street will perform live at the Montgomery Performing Arts Centre on Friday, June 17th at 8:00 p.m. For more information, visit mpaconline.org. Also visit romanstreet.com and mulliganbrothers.com

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GTKY: GETTING TO KNOW YOU

Michela King

Medical Aesthetician @ River Region Facial Plastics

GTKY: Tell us a little about yourself… Michela: I was born and raised in Montgomery. I share my hometown with my husband, Dr. Zeb King, a veterinarian at Taylor Crossing Animal Hospital. I have two children, Ragan (7) and Waylon (5). GTKY: Why did you choose skin care as a profession? Michela: I chose this area of skin care as a profession because of personal acne issues when I was a young girl. I was going through all those normal hormonal changes that caused acne, which also caused me to have low self-esteem. I love helping people look good, which in turn also makes them feel good. It’s happiness for all! GTKY: What area of skin care are you most passionate about?

patients with sensitive skin. These peels are amazing and give phenomenal results. We also have started treating thicker blue veins on the body with the Cynosure laser. Our advanced laser hair removal setting is achieving results with fewer treatments. GTKY: Skin care is reaching an 11 billion dollar a year market; how do you differentiate SkinMedica® versus other brands to your clients? Michela: As we age, collagen production diminishes, skin becomes thinner, and elasticity decreases which causes facial sagging, fine lines, and wrinkles. SkinMedica® products are scientifically formulated and clinically tested to rekindle your skin’s youthful appearance. Our products go to work as soon as they are applied. SkinMedica® chooses proven ingredients such as growth factors,

Michela: I love to do more advanced treatments, which give immediate results - such as Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), lasers, chemical peels, and DermaPen® (micro It’s DermaPen® season! needling). It’s also important Purchase 4 treatments and receive SkinMedica® to coach your clients through TNS Recovery Complex, TNS Ceramide and a routine at home with a good, the NEW lighter formulation SkinMedica® high quality, physician grade Sunscreen SPF 47 FREE! skin care line to maintain the results achieved with our inoffice treatments. antioxidants and retinoids. Antioxidants enhance the natural appearance of GTKY: What new ideas and treatments your skin by helping prevent free radical have you brought to RRFP? damage. Michela: IIt’s been fun to implement new GTKY: According to a recent GCI trichloricetic acid peels. These deeper Magazine Poll: Only about one-third peels are for resilient skin suffering from (35%) of the respondents aged over-60 acne scars, dramatic wrinkles, stubborn said they used anti-aging products in melisma and poor skin texture. We the prior three months. What advice have another new peel to treat rosacea

can you give a client who is switching to physician grade skin care versus overthe-counter brands? Michela: Over-the-counter skin care lines aren’t nearly as strong, and therefore, cannot provide satisfactory results. Most of us are looking to smooth skin texture; remove hyperpigmentation, brown spots (sun damage), acne scars and the most dramatic…wrinkling of the skin. Many consumers do not understand that overthe-counter products are not required to have clinical studies performed. Only “medical grade “ products available at a doctor’s office or physician directed medical spa. SkinMedica® products must go through an extensive testing and approval process to ensure effectiveness, and oftentimes, they are priced the same as name brand lines found in department stores. GTKY: What is your skin care motto? Michela: “Break Up with Your Make Up” I act my age sometimes...but look my age - never!!

Please contact us via email at Doctors@RiverRegionFacialPlastics.com with your questions or comments!

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Henry Frazer, Furniture Maker & So Much More This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Henry Frazer. Except for a few very cold winters in New Jersey, Henry Frazer has been part of Montgomery longer than most folks we know. He is a Southern Gentleman, a man of the arts and a very skilled furniture maker. Henry is also a successful businessman and community servant. Many of us are experiencing the aging process and Henry seems to have a good perspective on what that should look like. His advice is “never give up”, which works at any age but it’s especially helpful when you realize, you’re never too old to dream new dreams. Recently, Henry shared some of his life’s story with us, it’s both interesting and inspiring, we think you’ll enjoy getting to know Henry as much as we have.

Mary and Henry enjoying their step granddaughter’s Presentation Ball at Montgomery Country Club

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Henry: I was born in St. Margaret’s Hospital here in Montgomery 76 years ago. I attended Bellinger Hill, Baldwin and Sidney Lanier schools. I met my wife Mary at Lanier during my senior year. We went to different colleges, but continued dating when we were at home. I went to Ole Miss (the University of Mississippi)

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and was graduated in Pharmacy. Mary was graduated from Huntingdon College. We were married in 1964 in First United Methodist Church (Mary’s home church) by Dr. J.R. White (from the First Baptist Church) and Methodist Minister Dr. Joel McDavid. I worked as a pharmacist mostly at McGhee Bros. Drug Co. on Dexter Avenue next to Chris’ hot dogs. We bought our first house in Gay Meadows in 1966. After one monthly payment on the mortgage, I received a letter from my draft board informing me that they intended to draft me within 6

months. Not being a “Rambo” at that time I joined the Army Reserve unit in Wetumpka and simultaneously applied to the U.S. Public Health Service for a direct commission into that branch of government service. Three months later I was approved and by the stroke of a pen by some Colonel in Atlanta I went from an E-3 (private) grade in the Army Reserve to an O-3 grade (captain) in the USPHS. I thought I would probably be assigned to one of the USPHS hospitals. However, I was told that I was one of 27 pharmacists and 51 physicians who

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I went back to were ordered my company in to Arlington, New Jersey and Virginia to be completed 10 “on Loan” to years of service the Bureau with them. of Medicine of the U.S. BOOM!: You are Food and Drug the president Administration and owner of where we aided Drug Research in the review and Analysis of an influx Corporation, could of New Drug you share how Applications your company (NDAs) got started and submitted by the what services you pharmaceutical The Frazer Family, L-R: Henry, Mary, Cassie Price (step granddaughter), Stephen Price Jr. (step grandson), daughter Susan, Ally (granddaughter), daughter-in-law, Starla, son John, sister-in-law, Bowie and brother Hugh Frazer Jr. provide? industry. This was due to the 1962 Kefauver-Harris At age 35 with two small children we Henry: After 12 years of living away from Amendments to the Food & Drug Law leased our home in New Jersey and family and lifelong friends I decided to that required drugs to be not only rented an apartment in Atlanta where setup my own company here in 1978 safe but BOTH safe and effective for for two years I attended Mercer and was and Drug Research and Analysis Corp. the indications for which they were graduated. There were only 8 people was born. By the grace of God, we have prescribed. During that time my son, in my class that year. After graduation been here 38 years and have been a part John, was born at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. of over 50 new drugs that have been During my years at the FDA I worked approved by the FDA. These include closely with several senior physicians, drugs for hypertension, arthritis, one of whom left the FDA and asthma, migraine, post-operative accepted the medical directorship of pain and antibiotics for infectious a research oriented pharmaceutical diseases, among other indications. company. Upon my discharge from For 20 years I had a partner, Dr. Jim the USPHS he called me and asked Maloy, who died unexpectedly in me to join him and help bring that 2007. After that my son, John, left company’s new drugs to the market. I his position as AstraZeneca’s research accepted and we moved to Cincinnati monitor for the Southeast to come where my daughter Susan was born and help me continue our research in Christ Hospital. The company later program. Today I have semi-retired. moved to New Jersey which was too Henry designing furniture legs in his wood shop I can go to work late and leave early cold for Mary and me. One day in on certain days even though I continue a Drug Information magazine I saw an to prepare and dispense parenteral announcement that Mercer University drugs when needed. John runs the in Atlanta was establishing a graduate day to day management of our staff, program for pharmacists who desired to many of whom have been with me continue their education toward a doctor 15 to 18 years. They each know their of pharmacy degree. At that time there responsibilities and importance of the were only 4 schools in the United States work we do and do not require microthat offered that level of education and management. degree. I applied and was accepted. My company gave me a leave of absence BOOM!: You have a very unique hobby; without pay. Henry has made 50 pieces of furniture, this is a “sideboard” you are a furniture maker and from

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would you describe this sense of renewal York and found a book detailing how the looks of many of your pieces, a very in your life? Any advice for the rest of us museum quality antique furniture was gifted one. Please share with our readers seeking renewal? made and why it lasts so long. From that how you began this hobby and what it book and has meant to Henry: My renewal in life came twice: several you over the once when I decided to go back to school other years? We at age 35 and later when I walked out do-itunderstand from under the corporate umbrella of a yourself there will be large pharmaceutical company with all books an exhibition its benefits and started Drug Research I have of some of & Analysis Corp. In making those two made your furniture decisions I came to believe that I had over 50 starting in rather fail than to wonder all my life if I pieces of June, could you could accomplish what I really wanted share some of Henry’s son John with wife Starla and their children Cassie and Stephen Price to do. As we age I’ve come to believe the details of what we do each day is important this exhibit? because we pay a day of life for it, what furniture, some 2 or 3 times. Over the we accomplish should be worthwhile years it’s been my R&R from the office Henry: Making furniture as a hobby because the price is high. and an alternative to playing golf on began when I was a teenager. A manual Saturdays. arts class at Baldwin Jr. High School BOOM!: What are you most passionate taught me to use a lathe and jigsaw. about? Landmarks Foundation has asked me My father bought me one of each and to allow them to display some of my I set up a shop in our garage. I made a Henry: When you asked “what is my reproductions. Many of the pieces are couple of lamp bases on the lathe and passion” in this life it brings to mind inlayed with crotch mahogany, satinwood my mother proudly displayed them on what I believe to be the most important and walnut. They are assembled a table in our den. One of those lamp decision we all make in our lives: what according to the line drawings in the bases is now in our basement. The lathe our relationship is to books previously has found another home but I still have our God. I guess my mentioned with the jigsaw. After my marriage and until passion today is the dovetail and we moved to New Jersey my hobby study of theology mortise and lay dormant. In our early marriage we and the history and tenon joints. I am acquired used furniture of different styles development of the pleased to help and from different eras. My mother had Christian faith. I them in any way. mostly Victorian furniture which Mary have also studied I have served on didn’t care for and her family had country some of the other their board for pieces that had been handed down from world faiths starting 25 years and as several generations. When we visited with the teaching president several Colonial Williamsburg Mary said she liked of Buddha, Judism, years ago. I that style of furniture. In New Jersey the Islam and Latter hope people will winters were what we considered brutal. Day Saints. As you visit the exhibit The snow at night would bury your car by compare each of and will become morning. Our house had a full basement these to the New more interested so I set up a wood shop in one corner to Testament Christian in historic occupy my time between 5 o’clock on message you pray preservation Fridays to 8 o’clock on Mondays. During for guidance for in our city and one of our few trips into New York we the one you believe appreciate what Daughter Susan, granddaughter Ally and husband Mike visited Israel Sacks Antiques and Mary God wants you to has become a saw a sideboard like what we had seen follow. I am sticking with the Christian timeless style of furniture. at Colonial Williamsburg and said that message and the belief in the Doctrine was what she wanted. It only cost $8,000 of the Trinity. That along with the death BOOM!: Many people as they age in about 1970!! That was a little strong and resurrection of Jesus makes or breaks are experiencing a renewed sense of for a young couple in their early married the Christian message and separates it purpose, new goals, or new careers, how years. I visited Dover Publications in New

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from all the other religions. I have read the teachings of St. Augustine, Martin Luther, Erasmus, John Calvin and James Arminius, the latter two who argued over the extent of the grace (unmerited favor) of God. I believe in Paul’s writing in Ephesians 2:8 which says,” we are saved by grace through our faith, and not that of ourselves, it is the gift of God so that no man can boast”. BOOM!: How do you like to relax and wind down from a hard day’s work?

but never continue to drink anything alcoholic after our night meal. BOOM!: Favorite vacation spot? Any travel dreams planned for the future? Henry: Mary and I have been blessed with the opportunity to travel far and wide. When you have been to the museums in London, Paris, Rome, Florence, the Hermitage, the Prado, and seen the sphinx in Egypt and the Great Wall of China you have seen many of the wonders and art treasurers of the world. Two of my fondest memories were at the statue of Christ in Rio de Janeiro and the pyramids in Cairo. I would like to go to Istanbul, Turkey and the Holy Land, but now is not the time to go to those destinations.

Henry: After working all day at the office Mary and Henry in Egypt, front of the Sphinx or around the yard Mary and I enjoy watching the 5 BOOM!: You have given back to the or 6 o’clock news, often with a glass of River Region Community in many ways. white wine for her and either a Diet Dr. Please share with us the importance of Pepper or a Buffalo Rock ginger ale for community service? What organizations me with an occasional ounce of bourbon are you currently involved with? added. We both enjoy that time together

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Henry in wood shop sanding a piece of inlay for Tilt-Top Table

Henry and Mary standing with a Tilt-Top Table Henry made

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Kunstler, G. Henry: Twenty plus Harvey and years ago I read others. I one of Bart Starr’s decided I books about his would rather life in Green Bay in have a good which he states that oil copy than each of us should a print even if work toward making it cost a few the place you live dollars more. a better place for I constantly everyone. When look for other I’ve been given prints that I the opportunity to might like to serve I have tried have copied in to be attentive to oil. I also have the needs of our some originals community and Henry with Granddaughter Ally Henry with granddaughter Cassie Price by artists like work toward a satisfying tenure Montgomerian, Margarite Edwards, wherever I served. My past and BOOM!: Because you work with your Louisianan Jerry Haynes, Arizonan Carole present service includes 35+ years as hands in furniture building does that Theroux, Edna Hibel and several others. a member and past president of the make you kind of a “Handyman” around I learned very early to buy what you like Kiwanis Club of Montgomery and of the house? and not what other people like. its Foundation, 25+ years on the board of Landmarks Foundation and one of Henry: I suppose so. I am a tool man. BOOM!: You have been part of the its past presidents, past president of When I need a special tool I buy it and Pharmaceutical industry for many years Medical Outreach Ministries, 10 years wait for a second or third opportunity to and many people would say today’s on the board of the Central Alabama use it. At times I am an amateur plumber, drugs have enhanced all of our lives in Community Foundation, the latter 5 electrician or painter. If I cannot fix the many ways. What’s your take on the years as its president, and presently problem I call the paid professional. Pharmaceutical business? on the Joint Public Charity Hospital Board as its treasurer. I have enjoyed BOOM!: Give us three words that Henry: The pharmaceutical industry all these associations and look forward describe you? has discovered and developed so many to continuing to serve these and other drugs that have prolonged the lives of so similar ones in the future. Henry: “Never give up” or in one word, many. Our staff of nurses, pharmacists “persistence”, so my wife says. and physicians enjoy offering patients BOOM!: What is it about living in the in our research trials the opportunity of Montgomery/River Region area that you BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies or receiving a drug that will not be available like? other activities that grab your attention? to other patients until 2 or 3 years later. A few drugs are truly bell-ringers, that is Henry: After you have lived in other Henry: Other than reproducing furniture they are safer and more effective than parts of the country and have contended I have come to appreciate some of the those presently on the market for a with the often unpleasant climate and paintings hanging in museums around given indication. There also are “me-to” traffic, you realize how fortunate we the country. When John Connally, former drugs that are proved safe and effective are to live in Montgomery and what a governor of Texas, sold off much of but are only developed for marketing great city this is with its environment his household furnishings and art, we purposes to compete with a successful and cultural opportunities in the arts, learned many of his painting were copies product of another company. Once a drama, and musical fields. We have 7 of the original work. I found a man in company develops a new product for a institutes of higher learning in our city for a Chicago suburb that was (is) a master particular indication every drug company the education of those who wish to take copyist and have commissioned him to wants to develop a competing product. advantage of the opportunity to improve copy several original works including That’s how they make enough money to themselves. some by Renoir, Bouguereau, Millet, continue developing new drugs. Only

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about 1 in 40 drugs that begin clinical evaluation ever reach the market. The cost to bring a new drug product to the market is multi-millions of dollars. Much of that money goes to pay for the expenses in the development of other drugs that undergo evaluation, but do not ultimately make it to market.

Old Alabama Town Exhibit: Ageless Designs, New Hands Furniture by Henry Frazer June 24 - August 19, Monday-Saturday 9:00 until 4:00 301 Columbus Street, Free to the public

BOOM!: If you weren’t in the pharmaceutical business what would be your dream job? Henry: If I were to attempt another occupation or hobby I would like to either be a teacher or own an art gallery. I, of course, would only buy art that I would like to hang in my own home and hope others would like what I like. As a teacher in my church’s Sunday school or Sunday night training sessions I enjoy passing on some piece of information that is new to those in the class. I usually tell them if they didn’t learn anything new that day I didn’t do a good job of preparing the lesson. A teacher’s job is to teach, not to only review old information. BOOM!: You and your wife, Mary, have shared many years together, what are some of the special ingredients to your successful marriage? Henry: Mary and I have enjoyed and shared our affection, love and commitment to each other for 52 years. We both appreciate every day we have together. I tell her daily I love her and kiss her every night. We want to thank Henry for sharing his story with us and showing us around the furniture making

As a child, Henry Frazer, a native Montgomerian, enjoyed building and repairing things around the house. His father purchased a jigsaw and belt sander, and Henry enrolled in manual arts classes at Baldwin Junior High School. It was not until after his formal education and marriage that he returned to his love of woodworking. While furnishing his first home, he and Mary, his wife, visited Colonial Williamsburg and decided that the early American Tilt-Top Table with inlay Colonial style of furniture of such cabinetmakers as Duncan Phyfe, Chippendale, Hepplewhite and Townsend was what they were searching for. Eventually moving back to Montgomery, Henry established a home workshop and began to experiment constructing some of these early furniture forms he had researched. Through the decades, he and Mary continued to search Cellaret antique shops, museums, and publications looking for cabinet forms that they liked and that Henry could reproduce. Henry uses a variety of woods in his work usually rescuing discarded wood from dumpsters.

process. A special thanks to Henry’s wife, Mary, for sharing her beautiful home and inspiring Henry to make beautiful furniture. If you have questions or comments for Henry, you can email him at hfrazer@ drugresearch.com As always, thanks to Kim Bethea from Total Image Portraits for her professional cover photo of Henry. I think Kim made Henry feel special! If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to jim@riverregionboom.com

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Heavily inlaid Chest of Drawers

Today, Henry has produced over 50 pieces of furniture, sometimes copying a favorite piece for himself and one for each of his two children. These exhibit pieces represent his evolving woodworking skills and attention to detail. He does not sell his work and continues to seek examples of period pieces that he thinks are worth being copied and come within his woodworking capabilities. For more information, call 240.4512

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Are you eligible to receive this valuable VA benefit? One of the privileges of serving our country during a time of war is the potential eligibility for VA Pension benefits. These benefits are particularly valuable for veterans over age 65 who have large medical expenses, including prescription drugs, treatments, and even assisted living or in-home care. Recently, the VA has quietly taken action to attempt to reduce the number of Veterans who can qualify for these benefits by changing the rules.

While there is no specific formula to calculate what is excessive, the older the applicant is, the fewer assets they can have before they will be considered excessive. Many veterans are incorrectly informed that they cannot ever qualify for these benefits, but often that information is not entirely correct. Sometimes a veteran or surviving spouse may qualify after undertaking some estate planning with an attorney. While attorneys cannot charge veterans to prepare or submit a pension application, a VA Accredited attorney can assist veterans by evaluating their case and making recommendations regarding future qualification.

to be so under the proposed regulations. However, the proposed rules cap the “reasonable lot area” that the home sits on at 2 acres, a limit that does not exist under current law. Rural veterans will of course be treated unfairly under this rule. The VA also hopes to impose a Medicaidstyle penalty against veterans who have transferred property within 3 years before applying. Currently, no such penalty exists.

These VA Pension benefits are generally To illustrate: A married Veteran applies available to wartime Veterans (and their for VA Pension with an aid and attendance surviving spouses) who meet certain criteria. allowance. The monthly benefit he is trying Before 1980 the Veteran must have served to qualify for is $2,120. During the past 3 at least ninety (90) days of active duty, with years, the Veteran contributed $10,000 to at least one day being during a “wartime The Wounded Warriors Project, a nonprofit But as mentioned above, these rules may be period” (as set by Congress). After 1980, organization. He also gave his only child about to change. the Veteran must have generally served at $1,000 on each birthday the past 3 years. least twenty-four (24) months of active duty, with at least one day As a result of the being during a wartime period. In charitable contribution addition, the Veteran must not have the cash gifts to Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop and been dishonorably discharged. her child ($13,000 total Wednesday, June 29: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm in 3 years), this Veteran A Veteran must also be “disabled” would be penalized for at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This in order to receive this benefit, but 6.13 months when he educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins anyone over age 65 is automatically applies for VA Pension covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living deemed “disabled” for purposes of under the new rules. wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, determining eligibility. Of course, If this same Veteran bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care permanent and total disability at any was not married, the age also meets this requirement. penalty would be even and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. If the Veteran or surviving spouse longer—11.3 months. Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at has additional medical needs, then During the penalty www.redoaklegalpc.com. additional monetary allowances the Veteran would not may be awarded, like an “aid and receive his benefits. attendance” allowance. This penalty would apply to all transfers, The proposed VA rules changes include unless the Veteran could present evidence creating a one-size-fits-all number for The Veteran must also meet certain financial that a transfer was the result of fraud, determining the maximum amount of net requirements. The Veteran must not have misrepresentation or other bad act in the worth a veteran can have in order to qualify, income in excess of the current maximum marketing or sale of a financial product. currently $117,000 (adjusted annually for benefit amount. However, “income” for inflation). In addition, the proposed rules VA purposes is determined after deducting If you know a veteran or the surviving would include income in the applicant’s any unreimbursed out-of-pocket medical spouse of a veteran with substantial net worth calculation. In other words, if expenses. So, for example a veteran seeking unreimbursed healthcare costs, now is the a Veteran has assets worth $117,000 and a $1,700 monthly benefit, who receives time to investigate whether they may qualify receives an income of $2,000 per month, $2,500 in monthly income, but has $3,000 in for this valuable benefit. After all, it may the Veteran’s “net worth” is calculated at assisted living and prescription medication about to become much more difficult. $117,000 + $24,000, which is well over the expenses, would have an income for VA “net worth” limit allowed. Raley L. Wiggins purposes of zero. Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com A primary residence, whether or not the In addition to the income cap, the current 445 Dexter Avenue, ste 9000, Mont, AL 36104 claimant resides there, is an excluded asset law provides that a veteran or surviving www.redoaklegalpc.com for calculating “net worth” and will continue spouse cannot have “excessive” assets.

Attend Free Workshop

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Only 5% of potentially eligible Americans over 65 are receiving a valuable VA pension benefit . . . are you one of them? FREE EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP

Estate Planning, Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility

CALL US OR REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Join local attorney Raley L. Wiggins to discuss wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting your assets, bankruptcy, divorce & remarriage, nursing homes, long term care and medicaid qualification.

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The Montgomery Bridge Club’s Heart of Dixie Tournament 2016 Written by Jessica Klinner Photos by Brooke Glassford, Colorbox Photographers

Bridge players from all over the name was changed to the Heart of Dixie Family Sunshine Center charity game. Southeast flocked to the Wynona Tournament, which it continues to go by With guests present from Little Rock, Wilson Building in historic downtown today. This year’s tournament benefitted Arkansas, Vancleave, Missouri, six cities Montgomery the Family in Georgia, five cities in sunny Florida, on April 28 Sunshine as well as 22 cities in Alabama from through Center of Huntsville all the way down to the gulf May 1 to Montgomery, coast of Mobile, the 2016 tournament participate an organization was a huge success. Many guests in the working to end commented on how the Heart of Dixie Montgomery family violence tournament is the best-kept secret of Bridge Club’s and sexual the Southeast’s sectional tournaments. Heart of Dixie assault by While the tournament was tons of fun Tournament. fostering hope for guests, the competition was stiff Benefitting and healing with five national championship winners the Family through crisis present. Sunshine intervention, Nell Mc Ginnish, left middle, of Montgomery shares a laugh with friends Center, the advocacy and However, the success of the tournament 56th annual tournament was a huge community education since 1978. The would not be possible without the success with the incredible support of Family Sunshine generous many local sponsors. Center is doing support wonderful work of the The Montgomery Bridge Club is a to educate the sponsors. non-profit bridge club sanctioned by community Last year the American Contract Bridge League. on domestic was the For more than 40 years, the club was violence and inaugural housed on Mulberry St. and just last year sexual abuse, year for relocated to a beautiful building at 1103 and the sponsors S. Perry St. across from the Governor’s Montgomery and mansion. On April 28, 2015, the building Bridge Club charities as was named the Wynona Wilson Building is pleased to a part of dedicated to and named after the support the the annual L-R: Nelda Frazier, Panama City, FL, Susan Chapman, Montgomery, fundraiser. devoted club member of the same name. charity through Beth McArthur, Panama City, FL the tournament This made The club has for the second it possible for guests to have fun while been hosting year in a row. supporting a great cause. This year’s tournaments Donations to tournament saw the return of all 11 for many, the charity can sponsors from last year plus some! The many years. still be made on sponsors included Jackson Hospital, From 1960 their website the James W. Wilson and Wynona to 1990, (familysunshine. W. Wilson Family Foundation, Jennie the annual org). Weller Catering and Events, Servisfirst tournament Bank, Sterling Bank, Pickwick Antiques, was called The Heart of Kwik KopyShop, Liger’s Bakery, Buffalo the Blue Dixie tournament Rock Pepsi, Zoe’s Kitchen, Thompson & Grey kicked off Insurance, Baptist Health, Renfroe’s Tournament. on Thursday Food Land, Chicken Salad Chick and L-R: Fran Hultquist, Auburn, Keith Henderson, Birmingham, Jane Clark, from Auburn and Joan Braender, from Newnan, GA morning with the In 1990, the Gigi’s Fabulous Foods.

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of pink larkspur, green and raspberry hydrangeas, tangerine and hot pink garden roses, was provided by Melissa Kendall and adorned the buffet table, and hanging above it was a wonderfully designed banner from Kwik KopyShop, highlighting the 56th anniversary of the tournament and all of the sponsors.

Audree Newman Fort Walton, FL and the Honorable Robert Teel Birmingham. Judge Teel is a National Championship winner. He and the other 4 national championship winners playing in our tournament made the competition fun but FIERCE‼️

Over the course of the four-day tournament, guests worked up quite an appetite, and were met with a wonderful selection of food from Jennie Weller Catering and Events and Liger’s Bakery and beverages from Buffalo Rock Pepsi. An elegant flower arrangement

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

The tournament is due in part to the sponsors, but also to the staff, who worked tirelessly to ensure the guests felt welcome and comfortable the entire weekend. From directors Joel Haygood and Clay Hall to chairman Linda Hendrix and beyond, the tournament would not have seen its great success without their hard work and dedication. The Montgomery Bridge Club cannot begin to thank their sponsors enough for the support. For more information about the Montgomery Bridge Club, call them at 334.416.8014. Those interested in sponsoring next year’s tournament may contact rising president Dorothy Norwood at dfnster@gmail.com.

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Ask Nancy: Caring for Aging Relatives

My mother doesn’t want long-term care insurance, but I disagree

Q: My mother is 75. She has a few ailments, but is totally independent, both physically and financially. My concern is that her money will run out if she should require a lot of assistance as she ages. I’d like for her to get long term care insurance but she refuses. I have read so much about it, and think it’s something she should have. Is this something I should be pushing? My husband and I don’t have enough money to help her should the need arise. _ Leslie S., Short Hills, N.J. A: Long-term care insurance makes sense for many people who can afford the monthly premiums. However, your mother’s age puts her at the top limit for purchasing a policy. In fact, few companies, if any, will sell a policy to someone in your mother’s age bracket. Most seniors who apply will be declined because of existing health conditions even though they are cognitively well. But if one cannot pass a memory test, now a routine part of many companies’ application process, there’s little to no chance of obtaining coverage. Then there is the cost to consider. If your mother is found to be eligible she will likely be paying a higher annual premium than if she had applied at a younger age. I put your question about your mother’s reluctance to purchase LTC insurance to Jesse Slome, Director of the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance (AALTCI) and a recognized expert in his field. He told me that if this is something you want to pursue, the time to do it is now! “A good LTC insurance professional will ask important health questions first to The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

see if your mother would qualify before searching for the best company and premium for her,” he explained.

to obtain a policy is between age 52 and 64 and he reminded me that it doesn’t have to be an all or nothing approach;

As for her reluctance to purchase a policy, Mr. Slome said it’s a familiar story;

“Find a policy that suits your budget. If it doesn’t allow for every possible contingency, think of it as a partial payment for future long term care needs.”

“There are two main reasons why individuals are reluctant to purchase LTC insurance, especially older people,” he said. “They’re afraid they will run out of money if they spend it on premiums and also that they won’t have money to leave to their children.” If your mother does qualify and she is able to afford the premiums, Slome has a suggestion for how to convince her to purchase a policy; “Tell her that LTC insurance allows loved ones to care about you, rather than having to become your full time caregivers and care for you.” Has recognizing the potential high cost of your mother’s care convinced you of the need for obtaining a LTC insurance policy for yourself? Slome told me the best age

For help in finding a Long Term Care insurance specialist, visit the website of the American Assoc. for Long-term Care Insurance (www.aaltci.org) where you can search by zip code. The association, which does not sell insurance directly, offers a wealth of information and links to many other resources that can help you. Nancy Stein, Ph.D., is the founder of Seniority Matters (senioritymatters.com), a caregiver advisory and referral service in South Florida for seniors and their families. You can contact her at nancy@senioritymatters.com. (c)2015, Seniority Matters, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Tried Seaweed Snacks Yet? If you’re a sushi fan, then you probably all ready know how nutritious and delicious seaweed is. Or indeed, if you’ve ever tried a crispy seaweed salad at a Cantonese restaurant. Do not fear if you haven’t though, as seaweed is the new super snack! Many brands are joining in the game, roasting and adding different subtle flavors to this complex superfood to meet the requirements of all palates. Try Seasnax Original, flavored with just olive oil and sea salt. Costco has its own brand, which of course you buy by the box, but they come packaged in smaller containers inside. (I do actually prefer the smaller pack sizes, like Seasnax, but it is a lot more cost effective to buy in bulk. Even Costco’s individual packs are much larger and I can never finish one in one go. You then have to put it in a securely sealed Ziploc or cling wrap it, otherwise the seaweed goes all soft.) There are others that add spice to give extra flavor, but do not get concerned that this is to hide any fishiness or salty sea taste. That is just not the case. Seaweed has a distinctive flavor all of its own, that’s hard to describe. A bit like olives, what else tastes like an olive? Nothing, it’s a very distinctive taste. So don’t make presumptions, just give it a go. As for why to try it - seaweeds are one of nature’s true wonder foods! They are one of the most nutritionally dense plants on the planet and also the most abundant source of minerals in the plant kingdom as they have access to all the nutrients in the ocean. Remember we haven’t even explored every single part of the ocean yet, so it is a huge source. With seaweed being such a concentrated superfood, a little goes a long way. One bag of Seasnax’s classic Olive Oil flavor has 16 percent of our daily recommended value of vitamin A and 8 percent of vitamin C, at just 50 calories a bag. And that’s for two servings. It is one of the only natural, non-animal sources of vitamin B-12, which is

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essential for many cognitive and bodily functions. In addition, all sea vegetables tout particularly high amounts of iodine, potassium, selenium, iron, and magnesium— unrivaled by land vegetables, as these minerals are especially concentrated in seawater. Other benefits of seaweed include: Blood Purifying: The chemical composition of seaweeds is so close to human blood plasma, that they are excellent at regulating and purifying our blood. High in Calcium: They can contain up to 10 times more calcium than milk and 8 times as much as beef. Alkalizing: They help to alkalize our blood, neutralizing the over-acidic effects of our modern diet. Powerful Chelating Properties: They offer protection from a wide array of environmental toxins, including heavy metals, pollutants and radiation byproducts, by converting them to harmless salts that the body can eliminate easily. Contain Anti-oxidants: Seaweeds contain lignans which have anti-cancer properties. Detoxifying: They are rich in chlorophyll which is a powerful, natural detoxifier that helps to draw out waste products. Boost Weight loss: Seaweeds play a role in boosting weight loss and deterring cellulite build-up. Their naturally high concentration of iodine helps to stimulate the thyroid gland, which is responsible for maintaining a healthy metabolism. The higher your metabolic rate, the more energy your body uses up per day. Seaweed names to look out for include Nori – made famous by its use in sushi, dark green in color; Kelp – one of the

most common to be seen along the shores, brown in color; Dulse – bought whole or flaked, can be used as a seasoning, red in color; Arame – black in color and stringy looking, doubles in size when cooked; Wakame – sold fresh or dehydrated, rehydrate before use, add to soups, stews, stir fries, deep green color; Kombu – Japanese flavor enhancer, add a strip when cooking beans to make them more digestible and reduce gas. Naturally, when buying seaweed, choose certified organic brands where possible. Seaweeds will absorb the properties of the water in which they are grown, so you want to ensure that they have been grown and harvested in unpolluted waters that are pure, and free from harmful chemicals. Also, seaweed is naturally high in sodium, so check the nutrition label to ensure that there is not too much added salt, particularly if you’re on a low sodium diet. Last but not least, always always always choose the brand with the least number of ingredients, like Seasnaxs above – seaweed, olive oil, sea salt. Avoid at all costs, ANY food with a long list of ingredients, half of which you inevitably don’t understand. You don’t understand them because they are chemically produced artificial foods, which should be avoided as much as possible. Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/ tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


10 Tips for Taking Better Videos with Your Smartphone We’ve all been forced to sit through someone else’s video of a trip they took or an event they attended. They’re usually boring, filled with shaky footage, blurry landscapes shot out of car windows and unending shots of static or slow-moving objects. Or, perhaps, does this describe your own fairly unwatchable footage? To avoid this fate, follow these 10 tips when shooting your own videos to get polished, professional results. 1. Don’t take vertical video You know those videos that have the huge ugly black bars flanking the small image in the center? Those videos have been shot vertically. Don’t do it. Remember to rotate your phone into the horizontal position before you hit the record button. 2. Use two hands This might sound like advice you’d give your child trying to catch a ball, but it’s the best way to avoid shaky footage – in addition to your smartphone’s image stabilization. By holding the camera in both hands, it and your footage will remain steadier, with less headacheinducing shakes. 3. Don’t be a jerk When the action shifts, or you’re shooting a wide scene, you’ll be tempted to jerk around to follow the action. Not only does this result in unwatchable blurry footage until your phone is able to refocus, but you add shakes to both ends of the blurry shot. If you need to follow the action, keep your hands and arms still and instead swivel or bend your hips to pan across, or up-and-down, to capture the scene. This will keep everything in focus and the shot steady. 4. Don’t move and zoom at the same time Simultaneously zooming and panning (moving the phone) results in too much

motion, and the resulting footage can make the viewer nauseous. Don’t zoom until you’re done moving your phone, and vice versa. 5. Linger Don’t start shooting something and stop two or three seconds later. Quick cuts are disconcerting and don’t reveal enough of what you want to capture. If you’re going to commit something to video, spend at least 10 seconds exploring it with your phone. 6. But, don’t linger too long Don’t spend an inordinate amount of time exploring one particular thing. Keep the action moving and your audience interested by limiting your shooting time to around 30 seconds on any one particular scene. 7. Mix up people and scenery No matter how spectacular the scene may seem to you at the moment, it will always lose a great deal when you play it back. So put someone in the shot if you can. This not only lends size perspective to the object of your video affection, but it also gives your viewer something familiar to look at. Then, like on reality shows, do a little 10 to 15-second closeup of someone talking about how they feel about what you just saw before moving on to the next bit of scenery. 8. Don’t shoot scenery ahead of you out a car window Aiming your phone ahead of you or perpendicular from a car window results in loud wind noise and blurry footage. Your phone’s camera simply cannot focus quickly enough to compensate for the constant changes in distance to whatever it is you’re shooting. Instead, point the phone behind you and hold it still, allowing it to focus on scenery that isn’t rushing by its lens. You’ll cut down on wind noise as well.

9. Don’t shoot “still video” of objects that don’t move Please don’t make anyone watch a 10 second video of a building, mountain, lake or anything else that doesn’t move. That’s why your phone can take pictures. If you are shooting stationary objects, make sure the camera moves. Start your shot with a zoomed-in close-up of some aspect of the object in question then “reveal” the object by pulling out from the zoom, then slowly pan across or up and down the object. 10. Use a mic and a tripod when interviewing If you plan to interview people as part of your video, clip a microphone to your subject. You can buy a discreet clip-on mic, like the Rod smartLav+Lavalier Microphone ($70.98 on Amazon). Plus, use a tripod, like the Joby GripTight GorillaPod stand ($21.20 on Amazon) to keep the phone still. Otherwise, your jittery talking head will sound hollow and far away, their voice disconnected from the hand-shaky footage of their face. If you don’t have a mic, keep your subject as close to the phone as possible, and conduct your interview in as quiet a room as possible. And make sure your subject is well-lit. If you don’t have enough light, have your subjects face a window with sunlight coming in, or outdoors with the sun behind you. Finally, if your movie includes multiple talking heads or multiple interviews with the same person, make sure they’re all looking one way, either into the phone, or at you standing either left or right of the phone. techlicious.com

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By Nancy D. O’Reilly, PsyD

Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life

In case you haven’t already gotten the memo, competing with others is out. However, connecting with others to share ideas, work together on projects, and offer support is most definitely in. The changes brought about by the global economy have made collaboration and innovation “must-have” skills, and according to clinical psychologist Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, taking your own connections to the next level doesn’t have to be as difficult as you may think. (In fact, it may even be fun!)

“The world is making a shift to what I call ‘Connecting 2.0,’” says O’Reilly, who along with 19 other women, co-wrote the new book Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life (Adams Media, 2015, ISBN: 978-1-440-58417-6, $16.99, www.drnancyoreilly.com). “It’s more meaningful than the ‘mile-wide and inch-deep’ type of connecting we associate with social media. It’s based on sharing and co-creating, not self-interest. It’s authentic, it feels good, and it works.” This deeper approach to connecting works so well, in fact, that individuals all over the country (and across the world!) are creating an ever-expanding network of resources offering expertise and support to people in business, government, education, philanthropy, and other fields. The idea is not just to advance our careers and make money, but to make life itself richer, more exciting, and more creative. “The Connecting 2.0 movement is nothing like the phony, self-serving, let’s-exchange-cards-and-move-on networking that most of us hate,” O’Reilly comments. “Sure, connecting with other people does pay off in amazing ways, but the rewards flow organically from a genuine desire to make a difference in the lives of others.”

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You may be wondering, where do I sign up? The answer is “everywhere.” This is not some exclusive club—it’s open to anyone with passion, enthusiasm, and a yearning to live a richer, more fulfilling life and maybe even change the world. But O’Reilly knows you may not be used to thinking this way. That’s why she offers the following tips: S First things first: Aim for a good mix of online and face-to-face connecting. It’s easy to send an email message, and it’s really easy to like, to share, to follow in the world of social media. That’s why so many people do it. (It’s easy to push a key or click a mouse after all.) And while there is nothing wrong with social media, it’s also no substitute for real-world human interaction. The Connecting 2.0 movement depends on both types of connecting: virtual and face-to-face. “If you’re burning up social media, consider taking an online contact offline,” O’Reilly advises. “Tell that person you’d love to meet up for lunch the next time he or she is in town. Conversely, if you’re proudly ‘old school’ and are neglecting your social media presence, dive in. You really need a foot in both worlds.” S Join a new group that interests you and really attend the meetings. Make them a priority. It doesn’t matter what activity it’s based on. This may be a book circle or a kayaking club or a community cause. What’s important is that you’re getting together with other people who share a common interest—and that you go to meetings and events often

enough to let these strong connections develop. “It’s the shared passion for the activity that generates the connections,” notes O’Reilly. “And those connections take on a life of their own. You may end up forging alliances, finding jobs, winning clients—even though that’s not the ‘purpose’ for the group.” S Get involved in a philanthropic cause that speaks to your heart. Women and men who care enough about others to volunteer their time, talents, and treasure are the kinds of people you want to meet. They tend to be “otheroriented” and want to make new connections, too. So whether your “cause” is homeless animals, kids with cancer, adult literacy, or clean oceans, get involved. “I actually met the 19 women who cowrote my book through my Women Connect4Good, Inc., foundation,” she adds. “In fact, the book is living proof of the kind of collaboration that happens when people make connections based on their desire to serve.” S Get on a different team at work. We tend to stick to our comfort zone. But shaking things up from time to time keeps you sharp and puts you in the path of exciting new people. When you work with people you don’t know on projects you’re unfamiliar with, you will learn, grow, and often discover vital new talents and interests. S Think about what you need to learn. Seek out mentors who can help you learn it. Let’s say you have a small catering company specializing in weddings, parties, and family reunions. You’d like to expand into the healthcare conference arena but know nothing about the field. You might reach out to someone who plans such conferences and offer to trade services—perhaps cater an upcoming event for free or for a greatly reduced

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


price—in exchange for the chance to learn and get a foot in the door. “You’re not asking for something for free,” notes O’Reilly. “You’re also bringing something to the table. Who knows: The other entrepreneur’s clients may love your fresh approach, and it could result in the two of you starting a whole new venture.” S Likewise, give back to men and women who need your expertise. In other words, don’t just seek out mentors. Be a mentor to people who can benefit from your knowledge and experience. It’s “good karma” and it can pay off in unexpected ways. S Take a class. (And don’t just sit there; talk to your neighbor.) Whether it’s continuing education for your job, a creative writing class at the local community college, or even a martial arts training session, actively pursue new knowledge and skills. This will bring new and interesting people into your life—women and men who, just by being there, show that they have a zest for life and learning. S Volunteer your speaking services. Yes, yes, you hate public speaking. Many of us do. But taking to the podium is a powerful way to get your voice heard, to build up your confidence, and of course to make new connections with those who hear you speak. And there are many civic and service organizations—like the Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club—that need speakers. S Handpick five to ten powerful individuals in your community and ask them to participate in an event. This might be a roundtable discussion that takes place at an industry conference or a community fundraiser, for example. And don’t think that busy, important men and women won’t have time for you, says O’Reilly. “Many successful people love sharing stories, best practices, and ideas,” she says. “You might be surprised by how many will say yes.” S If you’re invited, go. When someone invites you to an event or gathering— whether it’s an industry trade show, a party, or a hiking trip—go if you can. Yes, even if you’re tired, out-of-sorts, and feeling blah.

“Say yes if it’s remotely possible,” advises O’Reilly. “There are always reasons to say no and some of them are good reasons. But overall, life rewards action. Life rewards yes. The more times you say yes, the more connections you will make. The more connections you make, the richer and more creative your life will be.” S Set a goal to meet “X” new people per month. Insert your own number, depending on your circumstances and personality. Hold yourself to this number (it will help greatly to keep track in a journal or calendar). If you take this metric seriously, you’ll figure out how to make it happen. And while meeting isn’t the same as connecting, it’s the essential first step. “Let’s say your goal is to meet five new people this month, and it’s the last day of the month and you have two to go,” says O’Reilly. “You can always pop into the spin class at your gym, or maybe go to an open house or political rally. While you’re there, of course, strike up conversations with at least two individuals and introduce yourself.” Voilà! You’ve met your goal! While many people are naturally good at connecting, it still doesn’t happen automatically, notes O’Reilly. We all have to make an effort. “Most of us are so busy and overwhelmed that we just don’t make it a priority to connect with other people,” she says. “We really do have to be deliberately purposeful about it. The benefits of connecting with other women and men are incredible, so we owe it to ourselves—and each other—to make it happen.”

10 Easy Hints to Help You Move Beyond “Surface” Networking Make the mental shift from “What can I get from you?” to “What can we create together?” Simple as it sounds, this really is the first step and the key to successful connections. When we think of networking as a selfserving exercise, we really don’t want to do it. It feels bad. But when we infuse sharing and giving into the process, suddenly it feels good. And it works. Go to functions alone. This will force you to meet people rather than spending the whole time chatting with friends and colleagues. When you get over your initial anxiety, you will see how natural (and fun) it feels. Sit beside someone you don’t know. Like showing up alone (though perhaps a bit less scary), this will force you to get to know someone new. Be friendly: Introduce yourself, introduce your neighbor to others, and find something in common. Have three or four good “go-to” questions in the bag. This will be a huge help in case a conversation grinds to a halt. It doesn’t matter what the questions are, but you might consider thought-provokers like “What is the best part of your job?” “What is the hardest part of your job?” “What is one goal you’d like to accomplish before you die?” or “What have you done lately that was fun?” Practice being interested rather than interesting. When you’re talking to someone new, ask her about herself and really listen to her answers. Probe for people’s passions. Then stick to that topic for a while. You can tell when someone is excited about a subject. His eyes light up. His voice gets animated. When this happens, keep the conversation going along these lines. Passion is a powerful energy source for making connections. Read three relevant articles before the event. If you are at, say, a business convention, you might want to scour the trades for new trends, products, and processes. This gives you fodder for discussion. Gravitate toward people who are smarter than you. Don’t make the mistake of thinking you have to be the smartest, most interesting, most successful person in the group. Try not to feel threatened by other amazing individuals— instead, ask yourself what you can learn from them. Ask, “What can I do to help you?” (Then follow through.) This may catch people off guard. They probably expect you to ask for an interview or a chance to pitch your product. When you ask a person if you can, say, introduce him to an influential colleague or bring your therapy dog to the children’s hospital she runs, anyone would be delighted. Avoid phoniness at all costs. Be real. Don’t hide or downplay your true nature or your beliefs to fit in or to make sure the person you’re connecting with likes you. Healthy relationships are built on transparency, and people respect this...even if you don’t agree on everything.

Nancy D. O’Reilly, PsyD, is an author of Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life and urges women to connect to help each other create a better world.

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Restoring Your Youthful Energy By Wina Sturgeon

One of the wisest things anyone ever said to me was, “It takes energy to make energy.” In other words, if you spend most of your days sitting around with little physical activity, your body will adapt to that sedentary lifestyle. Your energy level will deteriorate. On the other hand, if you use a lot of energy being active, your body will adapt by making the energy you need for your activities. You’ll have more energy, just like you did when you were younger. Far too many folks age 55 and older simply accept a loss of youthful energy as part of the aging process. But that’s not true. Scientific studies have shown that people can build muscle and improve their fitness at any age. In an article on the ScienceDaily.com website, Mark Peterson, Ph.D., and research fellow in the University of Michigan Health System, says “Our analyses of current research show that the most important factor in somebody’s function is their strength capacity. No matter what age an individual is, they can experience significant strength improvement with progressive resistance exercise even into the eighth and ninth decades of life.” Having energy means the body will actually have the desire to get up and get going. But creating that energy after years of being mostly sedentary will take effort. There’s another wise and very true saying: “A body at rest tends to remain at rest; a body in motion tends to remain in motion.” Why should you do the hard work of making your body adapt to being in motion? There are many reasons other than being more youthful. Some that are listed by the National Institute on Aging include:

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help reduce feelings of depression, may improve mood and overall well-being, and may improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly between tasks, plan an activity, and ignore irrelevant information. The National Institute on Aging is a valuable resource for the middle-aged. Their website offers numerous online booklets that can be accessed for free. One of the best is “Exercise & Physical Activity: Your Everyday Guide from the National Institute on Aging,” (http://1. usa.gov/1pMEz1V). This booklet has seven chapters of useful information on how to become active again no matter what your age; and a great deal of other information on the aging process. But never make the mistake of starting off with a ‘gung ho’ attitude. Getting your energy and strength back will require a slow start. Connective tissue such as tendons and ligaments may have become stiff and more fragile over years of inactivity. You should rebuild those tissues slowly, so that they can handle your new level of activity. Start with simple body weight exercises before hitting the gym and lifting weights. Climbing stairs or sitting down

in a chair and standing up five or so times is a good way to begin the process. Repeating the process of taking a can down from a high shelf and putting it back five times will stretch your shoulder muscles and tendons while getting arm muscles ready for strengthening work. Do modified pushups: lie prone on the floor with hands slightly wider than shoulder width. Bend your knees and raise your upper body off the floor by extending your arms while keeping your body straight. Do two push ups from the knees; when these get easy, add two more pushups to the set. This restoral of strength and energy can not be done on an on-and-off basis. You have to work out every day if you are over 50, because the older you are, the more quickly your new-found vigor will atrophy if not constantly reinforced, and the slower it will return once you begin training once more. Aside from making your heart, muscles and brain more efficient, there’s another big benefit from building your energy and strength. According to the Centers for Disease Control, falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults. Having good balance can help prevent falls. But balance depends on strength, because it demands quick recruitment of various muscles to stay upright. Being energetic and physically capable can help you stay healthy for the rest of your life. (c)2015 Adventure Sports Weekly Visit Adventure Sports Weekly at www.adventuresportsweekly.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Travel Trending with Kathy Witt

Create Your Own Adventure A passbook, an app and several package enhancements help travelers this spring and summer design and customize their fun in such chart-topping destinations as San Antonio, Texas, Charleston, S.C. and South Walton, Fla.

hotels, shops and restaurants. Clusters of umbrella-topped patio tables add splashes of color to a river scene that charms with touring barges, arched bridges and bougainvillea.

PASSBOOK TO FREE STAYS In San Antonio, Texas, the supremely wellsituated Hotel Contessa just rolled out its San Antonio Passbook program. Thumb through the 20-page booklet on the hotel’s riverside patio to find suggestions for some of the city’s top attractions, many of them a stroll away. Rising dramatically from the banks of the San Antonio River on a quiet stretch of the famed River Walk, Hotel Contessa is the only four-diamond all-suite hotel located directly on San Antonio’s most popular attraction. Book an outdoor table at Las Ramblas for dinner and watch the barges float by. Stretch out on a chaise lounge beside the rooftop pool and take in some breathtaking city views. Head to the Alamo, where you can customize the experience with a guided after-hours, battlefield or VIP tour. Dip into the history of the American West through paintings, sculptures and artifacts (Pancho Villa’s saddle, Santa Anna’s sword) at the Biscoe Museum of Western Art. Take the glass-walled elevator to the top of the 750-foot Tower of the Americas, a legacy of the 1968 World’s Fair, for dinner at the revolving Chart House Restaurant. Book Hotel Contessa’s “Define Your Destination” package, available through Aug. 30, 2016, and you’ll get accommodations, breakfast for two at Las Ramblas Restaurant (home of the best

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The San Antonio River Walk

huevos rancheros you’ll ever eat), valet parking, noon check-out and the passbook, a fun souvenir to tuck into your scrapbook once home.

One way to explore the River Walk is on a foraging expedition with Chef Elizabeth Johnson. Follow the flow and foliage to learn about San Antonio’s unique culinary history. Afterward, join the chef in her restaurant, Pharm Table, where you’ll taste the fruits of your foraging labors while also enjoying healthy and tasty dishes made with locallysourced ingredients.

Get your Passbook stamped at the front desk before “Food is your embarking medicine on your chest,” says explorations; Johnson, noting part of the the restaurant’s fun of this name is a program is synonym tracking sites for culinary explored. medicine. With each Menu items, visit to Hotel including veggie Contessa, tacos and you earn quinoa tamales, additional are inventive Amenities at Hotel Contessa include a heated rooftop pool stamps. and hot tub with city views and mouthWith wateringly flavorful. five stamps, visitors receive 50 percent off their next stay; 10 stamps nets one CLICK YOUR WAY TO A PERFECT STAY complimentary overnight. Click into South Walton, Fla.’s “Find Your Perfect Beach” locator webpage or Of course, the place to be is the River Walk. download the app and you can click or It unfurls over 15 miles, from the museums swipe your way to the beach community north of downtown to the missions south, that most perfectly aligns with your and is pedestrian-friendly every step of getaway goals. Keeping in mind that the way. Lushly planted and punctuated this jewel of a town stretching out lazily with public artworks, including suspended along the Gulf of Mexico is made up of fish and a vaquero (Mexican cowboy) 16 individual beach communities, each driving Texas Longhorns, its centerpiece with its own vibe and verve, narrowing is the historic downtown area, lively with “perfect” down can be challenging. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Choose “tranquil,” “shopping and spa” and “foodie favorite” from among 14 choices and two perfect beaches emerge: Sandestin and Seagrove. Plug in “walkable,” “arts and culture” and “architecture” and you’ll find two other beach idylls. With “family,” “water activities” and “ecosploring,” you’ll get five. Continue drilling down to exactly the kind of experience you want with choices relating to accommodations and their activities. Sandestin-bound foodies who love to shop and seek spa tranquility will find the Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort & Spa a great match. Customize your stay by choosing one of several themed packages, including golf, wine, bed and breakfast, or a triple indulgence treat at the hotel’s Serenity by the Spa that lets you craft your own spa package. If strolling along architecturally beautiful streets that look like they belong in a Hollywood movie set while soaking up the area arts and culture, Rosemary Beach is a peerless pick. And The Pearl, a luxury boutique hotel and spa, will put you in the midst of this master and mindfully planned beach community. With breezy coastal decor and sophisticated styling, The Pearl cossets guests with upscale in-room amenities and spa products, rainfall showerheads, private balconies overlooking a very pretty town or pool, a different turndown treat each night and an interactive iPad-powered platform where you can swipe your way to dinner reservations, room service calls and concierge requests. Through June 29, The Pearl is offering a Choose Your Savings deal: Stay three nights/get 30 percent off standard rates; stay two nights/get 25 percent off; stay one night/get 20 percent off. This offer includes complimentary beach setups, valet parking and nightly turn-down with freshly baked treats.

that includes cottage accommodations, tickets to a Riverdogs baseball game, tours of Ft. Sumter and the USS Yorktown, a World War II aircraft carrier, plus All American treats for the family, like sparklers, small American flags and nostalgic candy (taffy, braided lollipops, string licorice, caramel corn).

The Pearl is all about luxury, elegance and comfort.

ENHANCEMENT ADD-ONS When you get away to the harbor-front haven declared by Southern Living as a “Best Place to Stay,” you’ll be able to add the enhancement of your choice to an already fun adventure. The Cottages on Charleston Harbor, located on historic Patriots Point in Mt. Pleasant, S.C., is a choice collection of cottages perched near water’s edge.

Depending on your interests, you can design your own adventure, choosing from three different experiences. Tee It Up & Hit the Links includes a round of golf on the Links Course at Patriots Point Links and a Course Survival Kit, a small cooler bag with visor, sunscreen and bottled water. Add the Harbor-Front Romantic enhancement and enjoy champagne, strawberries and chocolate truffles on arrival, breakfast delivered to your cottage each morning and the use of two plush cottage bathrobes during your stay (robes may be purchased for $75/each). Optional spa treatments, including massage, mani and pedi, are available.

The twobedroom, three bath cottages have private If you’re craving screeneda culinary in porches experience in with rocking a town known chairs, full for its inventive kitchens, and varied designer gastronomical furnishings, scene, you’ll pillow top The Cottages on Charleston Harbor offer fully equipped kitchens for want to add the mattresses, your cooking pleasure or bring in a private chef Foodie’s Delight luxury to your stay. You’ll get a $100 gift card for linens and more. Stretch out on the just $50 that can be used at one of these hammock. Curl up with a good book or sip Charleston faves: Victor’s Social Club, a glass of wine while taking in the views Vincent Chicco’s or Michael’s on the Alley. of Charleston’s harbor, downtown and historical Ft. Sumter. Author, travel and lifestyle writer, and travel goods expert Kathy The Cottages on Charleston Harbor have an All-American Vacation package

Witt feels you should never get to the end of your bucket list; there’s just too much to see and do in the world. She can be reached at KathyWitt24@gmail.com or KathyWitt.com. (c)2016 Kathy Witt Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

CREATE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau, CharlestonCVB.com, The Cottages on Charleston Harbor, TheCottagesonCharlestonHarbor.com The Cottages’ Stay Enhancements, TheCottagesonCharlestonHarbor.com/stay-enhancement.php San Antonio Convention & Visitors Bureau, VisitSanAntonio.com, Hotel Contessa, TheHotelContessa.com “Define Your Destination” package, theHotelContessa.com/san_antonio_hotel_deals, Pharm Table, PharmTable.com South Walton, VisitSouthWalton.com; beach locator webpage: VisitSouthWalton.com/Beaches; app: VisitSouthWalton.com/visit-south-walton-s-perfect-beach-app, Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort & Spa, HiltonSandestinBeach.com, The Pearl, ThePearlrb.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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June Exhibit “Beloved Southern Artists”

Landscape by John Wagnon 18x24 oil on canvas

Still Life by Nan Cunningham 30x40 on canvas

Two Women by Barbara Gallagher Figurative on canvas 40x30

Nude by Eve Perry 36x30 oil on canvas

Abstract by Barbara Gallagher 48x24 oil on canvas

Lavender fields by Frederic Payet 24x20 oil on canvas

Still Life by Marguerite W. Edwards Oil on canvas 30x30

Figurative by Julia Wallace 20x16 oil on canvas


By Sandi Aplin

Art & Soul

Cherishing Treasured Paintings of Beloved Southern Artists

Woman with Lilies by Barbara Gallagher 20x24 oil on board

As we Baby Boomers with empty nests begin to downsize, what do we do with many years of investing in local artist work? The first thing is to have it appraised. Many of our customer are pleasantly surprised when they learn how much their paintings have appreciated. Once the value has been established, there are several options; give to family members, donate to non-profit organizations for a tax deduction or bring them to Gallery One Fine Art. We are pleased to announce our new program to help sell these wonderful works of art. These special pieces will be listed on our website under my name as their Director along with a photo of the work with a small description, size, medium, subject, price and artist.

We are researching the artists and we try to give as much information as we can find. It is so exciting to see artwork again that I watched so many of these artist paint over the last 50+/years. This month we are sharing a small number of paintings (see photos on the adjoining page) and they will be hanging in the gallery. To name a few of the artists in addition to our members, Barbara Gallagher, Julia Wallace, Marguerite Whitehead Edwards, Frederic Payet, Eve Perry and Nan Cunningham; all will be hanging in our gallery for viewing and sale. Drop by Gallery One for a stroll down memory lane. I love hearing your stories about your art journey and seeing your treasures. Sandi Aplin, Director of Gallery One Fine Art A freelance writer living in Montgomery, AL sandiaplin@aol.com or galleryonefineart.com

Two Brothers on the Beach by Barbara Gallagher 62x31 oil on canvas Gallery One offers a wide selection of original art by gallery artist members. As an Alabama not-for-profit cooperative gallery, Gallery One is actively engaged in the community. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

FROZEN You never forget your first time. I was nervous. I’ll admit that. I didn’t know what to expect or how it would feel. I’d heard from others it would be great but that was them. Hearsay evidence at best.

Before I opened the door to depart, she said, with near urgency, “will you be coming back?”.

Dr. Darren Woodling, a hugely successful chiropractor based in Troy- opened Infusion Cryo and Laser in Montgomery this past April.

“Damn right”, I said without hesitation.

Cryo therapy as a remedy for pain, is a major advancement past ice packs applied to a tender area. From the Infusion web site- “While Whole Body Cryotherapy started out as a treatment for arthritis and other degenerative conditions, there are a multitude of ways it improves every facet of your life. This doesn’t just help with pain, it provides energy and enthusiasm to meet every day strong.”

You get that first one under your belt and you’re ready for more almost immediately!

I undressed to my shorts but felt more comfortable approaching the chamber of pleasure wearing a robe, easily slipped off when the moment was just right. It was over in three minutes - three incredible minutes - and my friends were indeed, right about everything. It felt amazing! Like so many others before me, I couldn’t wait to do it again. And again. And again. “How was it?”, she asked innocently. My mind was racing through a thousand reactions when I finally stammered, “awesome!”. My partner in this escapade was named Brittany, a married woman, exceptionally attractive and about 40 years my junior. She smiled at my reaction. Soon, I was re-dressed and on my way to work.

As I stepped outside, Rich Thomas, the River Region’s premiere weatherman, was on his way in. Driven by curiosity, he wanted what I had just had. Cryo Therapy. “You’ll love it, Rich”, I said affirmatively. “It was fantastic!”. Rich Thomas, too, has gone back for more. BOOMers- This is The Bomb! Cryo therapy- spending three minutes in a chamber with a temperature that at its coldest approaches minus 250 degrees- has been in use for some time.

Truer words were never written. Cryo is a true head to toe experience, though one’s head remains outside the cryo chamber’s top. It’s what happens inside when the bodyprotected by thermal footwear, a pair of shorts and optional gloves- is exposed to the cold that brings about the miracle. Dr. Woodling explains it in a way that makes sense. “The chamber tricks the body into thinking it is going into hypothermia, which sends the circulatory system into overdrive to protect the body’s core. It

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management

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makes your body shoot blood from your extremities to come and protect your core, [and] afterwards when you get out of it your core is relieved of the blood and regenerates fresh oxygen and nutrients. When it does that, it helps stimulate healing and rids the body of inflammation,” The caloric burn during this three minute process is estimated at 500-800 calories! It can help with weight loss. Meanwhile, your nitro-charged (literally, as nitrogen is used to chill the chamber) bloodstream is working at warp speed sending all the body’s natural healing agents where they need to go. Those agents, says Infusion Director Ryan Turner, include dopamine and endorphins that explain the mental benefit of cryo therapy.

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For me, it took 2 - just 2 sessions to relieve a severe pain on the top of my right knee that made stair climbing dreadful. Ryan has worked with several local athletes in helping them heal quickly from the aches and pains that come with playing hard. But there’s more to this than pain relief. I feel great when I exit the chamber. It is rejuvenating to the body and brain. I am no longer dreading the heat and humidity that slows us down in the summer because cryo therapy is incredibly energizing physically, and produces a real sensation of sharp mental acuity. My day long energy level hasn’t sustained like this in years. I sleep better, awaken faster. When WSFA stopped by Infusion to cover the cryo therapy phenomenon, I told them “3 minutes in this chamber is better than a month’s worth of any pill designed to fight depression or sluggishness”. Brittany, the young lady mentioned at the top of this story, has helped prepare patients for their first exposure to the super cold- and stands by the tank keeping the patient engaged to help the time pass quickly. Yes, the first exposure to the cold is a bit of a shock, but when you realize the benefit- you look forward to it- because you know how great it’s going to make you feel. Pain. Chronic fatigue. Depression. Low energy. Any of those conditions can be removed or improved by the new Big Chill. You’re probably wondering...AFTER that first time, how long did the sensation last? The energy, the stimulation, the awakening of the body, these feelings linger long after you exit the chamber. For me, the experience concluded in a most satisfying way just moments afterward. Sorry, I just had to have a cigarette. View the video www.wsfa.com/story/32046248/getting-cold-to-remove-the-paincryotherapy-comes-to-montgomery

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, children and dogs. He’s a 25 year veteran of radio who hosts the Greg & Susan morning show 6-9 am and Happy Hour 3-6 pm on NEWSTALK 93.1, Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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BOOM! Now Available At Publix

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DATING Coach

10 ways to spot whether you’re dating a good guy or a jerk 1. A jerk’s actions don’t match his words. A good guy will always follow through on what he tells you he’s going to do. When he can’t, he’ll let you know and won’t leave you trying to figure out what happened. If he’s not doing this, he’s not worthy of dating you.

leaves you at the door to fend for yourself. A good guy will introduce you to the people he knows in the

8. A jerk asks you for a date but doesn’t call to confirm whether it’s happening. You end up calling him and he holds your life up, telling you he’s not sure how long his meeting is going to be. A good guy will make sure you have the details for your date including the time, place and when he’ll pick you up or meet you. Then he shows up or else if he’s running late, he’ll call you.

2. A jerk disappears then comes back then disappears again. This is a man hunting for what I call Shiny Penny Syndrome. He’s looking for someone else he perceives might be a better fit than you. What makes him a jerk is when it doesn’t work out, he comes back to you until he finds his next conquest. 3. A jerk is a narcissist who wants his way in every situation. He’ll manipulate you into doing what he wants to do even when you say NO. When you give in, you end up feeling like you betrayed yourself. A good guy will honor you when you say, “no.” 4. A jerk treats service people poorly. If he takes you to his favorite restaurant and his meal shows up wrong, he’ll blast the poor waiter with his anger. This guy often displays road rage as well. A good guy knows things can go awry and gives someone a chance to correct it. 5. A jerk takes you to a party and The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

bad mouth your decision looking for confirmation from others that he’s right. A good guy will work issues out with you and even if he disagrees with the final decision, he will keep it to himself.

9. A jerk makes all the decisions for both of you, thinking he knows what’s best for you. No one knows you better than you and a good guy will make sure your feelings and thoughts are part of the decision process.

room and will make sure you’re taken care of with food, drinks and people to talk to. 6. A jerk only cares about having his needs met. Your needs fall far below his on the priority list. A good guy is into pleasing you and making you happy. If he’s not, let him go. 7. A jerk is usually passive aggressive. If you’re trying to work an issue out, he’ll act like everything is okay. Get with other people and he’ll

10. A jerk doesn’t make sure you feel emotionally, physically or spiritually safe. You may feel financially safe with him but that’s not enough. He’ll be the one criticizing what you wear or how you do things. A good guy may offer constructive criticism but does so in a loving way that encourages your personal growth. Lisa Copeland, “The Dating Coach Who Makes Dating Fun and Easier after 50!” Find out more at Findaqualityman.com (c)2014, Lisa Copeland, findaqualityman.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

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June 2016

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Sounds of Summer Concert Series on Thursdays The Shoppes at EastChase, near Gap Thursdays during June, 5-8 pm The Shoppes at EastChase is hosting the Sounds of Summer Concert Series on Thursdays during the month of June! Enjoy live music from acts like Federal Expression, Bulletproof Marshmallows, Blackbird Pickers and Rollin’ in the Hay. Sounds of Summer is a free family-friendly event. The concert will take place from 5pm - 8pm near Gap. Food and drink vendors will include Frios Gourmet Pops, Alabama Sweet Tea Co., Blackfinn Ameripub and That’s My Dawg. Schedule: June 2: Federal Expression, June 9: Bulletproof Marshmallows, June 16: Blackbird Pickers, June 30: Rollin’ in the Hay. For more information, call 33.279.6046.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Farmers Market The Shoppes at EastChase Saturdays, 7-Noon The Shoppes at EastChase 12th Annual Farmers Market opens this year with more vendors, cooking demonstrations and fitness options for adults and children throughout the summer and fall. Visit the Market every Saturday through October 22 rain or shine near Dillard’s for the freshest produce around. You will also find local art, pottery, bath products and more at this year’s Farmers Market! For more information about the The Shoppes at EastChase Farmers Market, contact Suzanna Wasserman, Marketing Manager at 334.279.6046. theshoppesateastchase.com

WETUMPKA, ALABAMA

The Priscilla Crommelin: Her Life and Work The Kelly Art Gallery, Wetumpka Monday-Friday 8-4:30 pm The Kelly Fitzpatrick Memorial Gallery in Wetumpka will open a new exhibition featuring a long-time Wetumpka resident’s artwork. The Priscilla Crommelin: Her Life and Work exhibition—composed of 69 works, 22 of which have never been exhibited before is now open through September 21, 2016. Her work includes vibrant landscapes, portraits, floral and still life paintings. The public is invited to an opening reception on June 28 from 5–7 pm. The Gallery is

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located on the second floor of the City of Wetumpka Administrative Building, 408 S. Main Street and is open Monday–Friday from 8 am to 4:30 pm. For more info vist thekelly.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Summer Movies for the Grandkids Carmike Cinemas-Chantilly & Capri Theatre June-August , 10 am and 1 pm Carmike Cinemas - Chantilly is hosting their Summer Kid Series JuneAugust. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. and the movie will start at 10 a.m. Seating is first come, first serve. Admissions is only $4.00 + tax (Includes - 16oz drink and 46 oz. popcorn with every ticket), Movie lineup for the summer is June 2: Alvin - Road Chip, June 7 & 9: The Croods, June 14 & 16: Epic, June 21 & 23: Home, June 28 & 30: How to Train Your Dragon 2, July 5 & 7: Kung Fun Panda 2, July 12 & 14: Monsters vs. Aliens, July 19 & 21: Rio 2, July 26 & July 28: The Peanuts Movie, August 2 & 4: Penguins of Madagascar. For more info call 344.386.8017. The Capri Theatre will be showing Children’s Matinees on Wednesdays, Thursdays & Fridays, June 8 thru July 29. Showtime’s will be at 10 am & 1pm, the movie lineup is June 8 – 10: The Peanuts Movie(G), June 15 – 17: Alvin & The Chipmunks: Road Chip(PG), June 22 – 24: Minions(PG), June 29 - July 1: The SpongeBob Movie: A Sponge Out Of Water(PG), July 6 – 8: Shaun The Sheep Movie(PG), July 13 – 15: Open Season 2(PG), July 20 – 22: Hotel Transylvania 2(PG), July 27 – 29: Home(PG). Tickets: ALL SEATS $1.00. For more information, call 334.262.4858.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Montgomery Film Festival Capri Theatre Saturday, June 4th, 6 pm

The Montgomery Film Festival will celebrate its seventh incarnation, as 12 short films and a feature film round out this year’s official selection. This is the first year that the Montgomery Film Festival has accepted featurelength entries, announcing Paul Sapiano’s dark comedy “Driving While Black” from Los Angeles as the inaugural feature exhibition. Among the dozen short film selections, five entries hail from the state of Alabama. The Montgomery Film Festival starts at 6PM on Saturday, June 4th at the newly renovated Capri Theatre in Montgomery, AL. General admission is $10, while Capri members receive the discounted $8 admission. On June 3rd, the festival will be throwing a “pre-party” concert featuring performances from Merge Records’ A Giant Dog and local bands Bad Cologne (Tuscaloosa, AL) and King Magnum (Birmingham, AL) at The Sanctuary. Presented by The Black Lodge. Admission is $10. This event is 18 and over. For more information, call the Capri Theatre at 334.262.4858

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Montgomery’s Capitol Sounds Concert Band Presents “A Summer Spectacular” Concert St, James United Methodist Church Tuesday, June 7th, 7 pm The Capitol Sounds Concert Band will perform H. Owen Reed’s “La Fiesta Mexicana” and also feature Dr. Bryan Reeves on trumpet as the band pays tribute to Big Band artist Harry James. In addition, the Capitol Sounds will feature music by John Williams, including “Olympic Fanfare and Theme” as well as “Superman March”. The event is free and open to the public, but donations are gladly accepted and will go towards performances for our 2016-17 season, including our Children’s Concert and the Young Artist Solo Competition. For more information about the Capitol Sounds Concert Band, please visit capitolsounds.org

Alabamians from farmers to artists, hip food trucks and even original Alabama musicians. We will be bringing some of Alabama’s most loved local musicians to the ASC’s Engel Plaza to kick off summer. LOCAL is the perfect event for families and anyone who loves to call this great state home. Free! For more info visit alysstephens.org/local-2016

ALEX CITY, ALABAMA

BREWTON, ALABAMA

Join us for Lake Martin ‘s biggest musical event of the year! The 25th Annual Alexander City Jazz Festival is scheduled for June 10-11, 2016. The free two-day event will be held at Strand Park downtown Alexander City on Friday night and Lake Martin Amphitheater on Saturday.For more info on the performers and time visit alexcityjazzfest.com

The 3th Alabama Blueberry Festival will be from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in historic downtown Brewton. The festival features arts and crafts, cookbooks, blueberry bushes, crates of fresh blueberries, blueberry ice cream, a food court, festival T-shirts, a children’s section, live entertainment all day and an antique car show. For more information, including directions to the festival, call the Greater Brewton Area Chamber of Commerce at 251.867.3224, or visit brewtonchamber.com or alabamablueberryfestival.com

Alex City Jazz Fest The Amp on Lake Martin Strand Park, Alexander City June 10 & 11, 6 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Temptations Review with Dennis Edwards MPAC, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, June 11th, 8 pm

The Temptations Review is the newest installation of the legendary Motown group The Temptations. The members are David Sea, Mike Pattillo, Chris Arnold, Paul Williams Jr. (son of founding Temptations member, Paul Williams), and Dennis Edwards, who replaced David Ruffin in the Temptations lineup in 1968. The only living member of the original Temptations is Otis Williams, who is 73 years old. Edwards, 72, is still going strong vocally, and sang lead on some of the group’s biggest hits: “Cloud Nine,” “I Can’t Get Next To You,” “Ball of Confusion,” “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” “Shakey Ground,” and others. In addition, The Temptations Review performs the numerous other hits that The Temptations had over the past 50+ years, including “My Girl,” “Get Ready,” and “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.” For more info visit mpaconline.org

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Local, It’s All About Alabama Alys Stephens Center-UAB Saturday, June 18th, 5 pm

The third annual celebration of everything local. Join us on June 18th to “Celebrate All Things Alabama”! Enjoy shopping with interesting

The 36th Annual Blueberry Festival Jennings Park, Brewton, AL Saturday, June 18th, 8 am - 3pm

PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA July 4th Star Spangled Beach Party Callaway Gardens

Saturday, July 2ndMonday July 4th

The celebration begins early and lasts well into the night at our annual July 4th Star Spangled Beach Party at Robin Lake Beach. Highlights include beach activities, Aqua Island, Paddle Boats, Flying Trapeze, Rock Climbing Wall, Spider Jump, Miniature Golf, Table Tennis, shuffleboard, Giant Checkers, Giant Chess, Xcelerator Water Slide, Roadster Pedal Karts, Chickadee Choo Choo Train; live music - headlined by the Swingin’ Medallions, the FSU Flying High Circus and our annual Fireworks Extravaganza. Be sure to pack plenty of red, white and blue for this All-American Weekend! For more details visit callawaygardens.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

4th of July Celebration Riverfront Downtown Montgomery Monday, July 4th, 5-10 pm Join the City of Montgomery & for a family picnic and 4th of July Celebration along the riverfront. Enjoy food vendors & kids inflatables. There will be activities for kids, a Rib Eating Competition with prizes, live music at the amphitheatre and fireworks!! Riverfront Park, 355 Commerce Street Montgomery, AL 36106. For more details, call 334.625.2100. More Information visit: funinmontgomery.com

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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A: I think that most grandmothers find instinctively that the mother _ their child or their daughter-in-law _ is holding a kind of a power card that they didn’t hold up until the moment that baby is born. If we’re smart, we’re going to hold our tongue. If we’re not smart we’re going to be punished for it.

Lesley Stahl has been a “60 Minutes” correspondent for 25 years. During her long journalism career, she has covered Watergate, traveled to Rwanda to see Dian Fossey’s mountain gorillas, and interviewed Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Now, at 74, she’s turned her attention to a subject newly dear to her: becoming a grandmother to two granddaughters, ages 5 and 2, who call her “Lolly.” The girls are the children of Stahl’s only child, daughter Taylor. Stahl’s new book, “Becoming Grandma: The Joys and Science of the New Grandparenting” (Blue Rider Press, $27) was recently released. Newsday caught Stahl by phone in between her assignments. Q: You say you felt a “staggering thunderbolt of joy” when your first granddaughter was born. How did that lead to a book? A: I did have a thunderbolt of emotion. Everybody always told me being a grandmother is the best thing that can ever happen, but no one really explained the depth of feelings that go on inside you. So I decided to write the book to find out, ‘Do all grandmothers have that, and if so, what is it?’ And then as I began to work on it, I realized there are all these other questions that branch off of it. Q: Such as? A: I was shocked, shocked, at how many grandmothers are denied access to their grandchildren. Not only did it surprise me, it hurt me. The grandmothers who spoke to me about it ... they don’t understand why. The cruelty, from my perspective as a grandmother, the cruelty to deny a grandmother the thing that most of us care most about in the world, it’s almost unconscionable to me. The only thing that would conceivably justify it is if, as a parent, you believe the grandparent would hurt your child, but short of that it’s outrageous to me. As I kept digging and digging, I was coming up with categories of grandmothers who I didn’t know anything about.

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Q: You say this is the “age of the grandmother.” Why? A: Probably because we’re so large in number, society is accepting us more and more in positions of authority. Look who is running for president. Q: You mention modern technology such as the obstetrician monitoring your daughter’s contractions from home on his iPhone, Skyping with your granddaughter while you were on assignment in Italy and playing with the Cookie Doodle app to “make cookies.” Which technology surprised you most? A: If you live in a different city the fact that you can still be in their lives, even if it’s virtual, it’s changed the way we relate to our grandchildren. This way you can talk to your grandchildren, if you want, every day. And not only talk to them, you can see them. They can see you while you’re talking to them. I think it’s enhanced our involvement with them. Q: You call any grandchild’s mother the gatekeeper to access and talk about how modern grandparents have to resist giving advice. Can you elaborate?

Q: In the chapter entailing the competition between maternal and paternal grandmothers to be the most liked, you bravely asked your daughter’s mother-in-law about your relationship with her. What was that like? A: She was so breathtakingly candid with me. Wow. First I asked her if she thought it was easier to be the mother of the mother, the maternal grandmother. She said, “Yes,” and I asked why. And then, boy, she was so open about it. And then I said, “Do you resent me?” There was this long, long pause, and then she said, “Yes.” That was the most difficult interview I did. As more than one psychologist said to me, it’s incumbent on the mother-in-law to make the accommodations. Q: Didn’t you feel that thunderbolt of emotion when your daughter was born? What is the difference between what you felt then versus when your first granddaughter was born? A: I think when you’re a parent the love is overwhelming, and it’s full and rich. But you also have responsibility, and you’re worried. I learned a lot about biochemistry, and there are all these hormones that new mothers have coursing through them, one of which makes them highly vigilant. We don’t have those worries. We have this ... complete total loving without worries. Q: Untempered joy? A: Untempered, unfettered, pure, complete, enormous, thunderbolt-y. And it lasts. At least it lasts for me. (c)2016 Newsday Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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BOOM! June 2016  
BOOM! June 2016  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine