Page 1

1


2 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

3


Together makes us better. And you, too.

4 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The new UAB Multispecialty Clinic at Baptist Medical Center South brings two names you trust together.

Together makes us happier, stronger, better. That’s why Baptist South has opened a brand new clinic that brings the best names in healthcare together. Nurses and staff from Baptist South will join specially trained doctors from UAB to offer advanced care in many specialties. It’s a partnership that’s going to make everyone better, including you. Call today and make an appointment at the new UAB clinic. Let’s get you better, together.

See a UAB doctor in one of these specialties UROLOGY GASTROENTEROLOGY ENDOCRINOLOGY RHEUMATOLOGY

MULTISPECIALTY CLINIC BAPTIST MEDICAL CENTER SOUTH

More specialties to come

Knowledge that will change your world

334.613.7070 UABmedicine-Baptist.com 2119 East South Blvd, east of the Emergency entrance at Baptist South The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

5


6 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


7


BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

August 2016 Volume 7 Issue 1

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 10 Publisher’s Letter 13 Healthy Hearing Casey Gonzalez 14 5 Biggest Mistakes 50 Plus New Exercisers Make Leigh Anne Richards 16 Can You Afford Early Retirement? Brandt McDonald

page 23

Features

19 Walk to End Alzheimer’s Heather Goggin’s Story 21 The Beatles: Eight Days a Week

34 Heart Attacks Described 38 Looking for a New Hobby? 44 Lake of the Ozarks

22 Vicarious Vacations

Departments

28 BOOM! Cover Profile:

20 This and That

Now You’re “In the Know”

The green, rolling hills of Ozark Mountain Country

Drones are “the next big thing” for hobbyists.

If you were having a heart attack you’d know it, right?

52 {12} Things

36 Can You Live Without a Living Will? Ask an Elder Law Attorney

48 Greg Budell

Solutions for Bored Boomers

26 Beauty Profile I Can’t Believe My Eyes…

NOW SHOWING...

40 Comparing 3 Types of Senior Living Communities

BOOM!

COVER PROFILE

41 You should know this about “hospice care” Ask Nancy

page 28

42 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Going Nuts! page 53

page 22

43 Dating Coach: 10 dating tips 50-plus, single women need to know 47 Elmore County Art Guild Sandi Aplin: Art & Soul 51 Dementia, Caregiving and Political Correctness

page 25

page 38

page 26

54 Outdoor Recreation for People with Disabilities

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 6398 Eastwood Glen Pl., Montgomery, AL 36117. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2016 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

9


Publisher’s Letter

Dogs, Dogs, Dogs The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Associate Editor Kelly Watson

kelly@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Bob Batz Jr.

In this month’s issue we have more dogs than ever before, because this month’s cover profile has a lot to do with dogs. Her name is Frances McGowin who is the Executive Director of Service Dogs Alabama. Her organization trains dogs to become Service Dogs for children and veterans with disabilities. She does what she loves, something we all aspire to achieve. Frances has done some cool things along her journey back to Montgomery so I hope you’ll take a few minutes and get to know her and her mission. There’s plenty more to enhance your reading experience this month and it begins with Leigh Anne Richards helping you avoid some of the most common mistakes of people over 50 when they begin a new exercise plan. She’s always trying to help you succeed in your fitness goals! Greg Budell does it again...he makes you laugh from one of his stories from his teenager days. Tracy Bhalla is going nuts and she thinks you should too! Raley Wiggins, our BOOM! expert in elder law, offers some advice about living wills. Of course if you’re looking at the dating scene, our dating coach has 10 tips to help you be successful. If you’re one of the many caregivers looking after an aging parent, Nancy Stein in her column discusses hospice care and what it may mean to you. Some other topics of interest include the description of heart attacks. I found this interesting because they can be very different and if your symptoms don’t feel like the “Hollywood Version” you may hesitate to call 911. It’s a simple read that could save your life. Speaking of saving lives, police officers risk their lives every day to make sure we are safe. Throughout the month of September, citizens have an opportunity to show their appreciation through a program called “Back the Blue”. HandsOn River Region has planned a month long initiative in honor of the anniversary of 9-11 to promote community appreciation of police officers actively working to keep Montgomery safe. Now is the time to organize your office, business or organization to show your appreciation to the valuable police officers in our community. On a fun note, If you’re looking for a new perspective on a hobby, one word, drones. Check it out, it’s the future.

Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

Lisa Copeland Casey Gonzalez Brandt McDonald Frances McGowin Rick Phelps Holly Reich Bruce Rosenblatt Leigh Anne Richards Nancy Stein Wina Sturgeon Raley L. Wiggins Kathy Witt

There’s plenty more to enjoy in this month’s issue so sit back, relax and get a very cold beverage and read BOOM! your way! We now have over 1,700 Digital & Interactive subscribers of BOOM! and we want everyone with an email address to join us, go to RiverRegionBoom.com and please sign up, it’s free. Thanks to our readers and advertisers, together, you’re the best part of BOOM! Enjoy the Dog Days of August…inside a cool room!

Cover Photography Kim Bethea Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472

Digital & Interactive

jim@riverregionboom.com

Design & Layout Lake House Graphics

Distribution

Network Delivery

Printing Publications Press, Montgomery, AL 334.244.0436 publicationspress.com Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community”

10 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

11


Alzheimer’s Association celebrates milestone for care and support services announced by CMS In a major milestone for the millions of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has made it easier for physicians to provide critical care and support services for persons living with Alzheimer’s disease. Following rapidly growing bipartisan support in Congress for the Health Outcomes, Planning, and Education (HOPE) for Alzheimer’s Act (S. 857, H.R. 1559), CMS has proposed to begin paying for cognitive and functional assessment and care planning for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive impairments. “Recognizing the fundamental importance of such a benefit, the Alzheimer’s Association and our advocates have worked for years to advance the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act as a top legislative priority. We are very encouraged that CMS has taken this important step, reflecting strong bipartisan congressional support,” said Harry Johns, Alzheimer’s Association president and CEO. “Now, those living with the disease will have access to muchneeded information on treatments, services and support that can positively affect quality

of life for the individual, their family and caregivers.” Today, only about half of those with Alzheimer’s disease have been diagnosed. And among those who have been diagnosed, only 45 percent of them or their caregivers are told of the diagnosis. One of the reasons physicians do not diagnose Alzheimer’s disease — or do not disclose a diagnosis once it is made — is because of the lack of time and resources to provide information and support to patients and caregivers. “I urge CMS to implement this much needed benefit, but not stop here. With over 5.4 million Americans suffering with this terrible disease and that number expected to climb as the baby boom populations ages, I will continue to work with the Alzheimer’s Association, a strong leader in advocating for care planning coverage, to ensure that all Alzheimer’s patients are able to receive optimal care going forward,” said Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), co-founder and co-chair of the House Alzheimer’s Caucus.

“Understanding that access to care planning services leads to better outcomes for individuals with Alzheimer’s as well as their caregivers, the Alzheimer’s Association and our advocates have been steadfast supporters of the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act since its inception,” said Robert Egge, chief public policy officer of the Alzheimer’s Association. “For too long there has been a critical gap in care planning for those with Alzheimer’s disease, often leading to worse health outcomes, unnecessary hospitalizations and a decreased quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s disease.” Alzheimer’s Association grassroots advocates and staff have held thousands of congressional meetings to secure support for the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act since the bill’s introduction and have worked tirelessly to secure support for the benefit at CMS. The Alzheimer’s Association will continue to be actively engaged in ensuring the success of this new service as it advances through the regulatory process and into implementation. Following a period of public comment, CMS will finalize the rule and implement the new service starting Jan. 1, 2017. For more information, visit alz.org.

The Side by Side Singers are dedicated to sharing music to keep our minds strong. Music can improve our mood and boost cognitive skills. We invite those living with Alzheimer’s or dementia and their care-partners to join us for 8-week sessions each Tuesday, 1:00-2:00 pm at First United Methodist Church in Montgomery. The music we sing ranges from Sinatra to Elvis. photo by Mickey Welsh/Montgomery Advertiser

SIDEbySIDE singers singers

Please contact Jack Horner at ivortickle@aol.com or Laura Selby at 834-8990 for more information. 12 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

NO FEE, PLEASE JOIN THE FELLOWSHIP!

First United METHODIST CHURCH

2416 W. Cloverdale Park Montgomery, AL 36106 334.834.8990 www.fumcmontgomery.org

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Hearing Health Wellness: Preserving Your Hearing

The first step in combatting hearing loss is to prevent avoidable damage from harmful environmental noises. The Dangers of Noise Most people are surprised to learn that noise, not age, is the leading cause of hearing loss. Noise-induced hearing loss is a major problem in the United States. While there are many laws to regulate noise in the workplace, there are few that monitor other environments. The average age of hearing loss is dropping, with one in eight children and teens reported to have permanent hearing loss due to high-volume sounds. How Loud is too Loud? Many audiologists agree that any sound louder than 85 decibels (dB)— the equivalent of busy city traffic— begins to pose a health risk. Sounds that exceed this level include a rock concert (115dB), a jet plane engine from 100 feet (135dB) and gun shots (145dB). Taking the example of a

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

• Watch the volume on handheld electronics.

concert, a person can only listen to music at that level, without hearing protection, for a little less than 30 seconds before damaging their hearing. Unfortunately, most concertgoers don’t wear hearing protection for a variety of reasons. Regardless of the

If hearing loss is suspected in oneself or a loved one, a hearing professional can provide a base-line hearing test to determine if hearing falls within normal range.

Healthy Hearing By Casey Gonzalez, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA Montgomery Hearing Services

reason, damage to the hearing system occurs every time. What Can Be Done? Fortunately, there are ways to protect hearing when faced with dangerous levels of noise: • Avoid situations where noise can cause damage • Use hearing protection, such as earplugs

Casey Gonzalez received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Disorders from Louisiana State University, and earned her Doctorate of Audiology degree from Louisiana State University Health Science Center. Casey holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech and Hearing Association and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology.

Free Hearing Screenings

Ready to take the next step toward improved hearing? Montgomery Hearing Services is offering free hearing screenings and demonstrations of hearing technology. For an appointment, call (334) 651-0500.

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

13


The 5 Biggest Mistakes 50 Plus New Exercisers Make All of us are now aware how important getting fit and staying fit are to our lifetime health. A recent study found that midlife fitness is a very strong predictor of avoiding 8 major chronic diseases after 65. Those diseases include the following: congestive heart failure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease, colon and lung cancer. Remaining fit through middle age helps us postpone and shrink the amount of time we might have to spend living with chronic illness. Many of us have exercised in our “earlier lives” and now feel the need to get back in the gym or embark on a new exercise program. We must realize our bodies have changed and we will need to change some old habits to avoid injury and to make our workouts as effective and efficient as possible. What we do in our 30’s doesn’t work in our 50’s and beyond. The following are some common mistakes 50 something folks tend to make;

1. You don’t warm up - As we age, it takes longer for our bodies to get warmed up and ready to perform. Warming up increases the body temperature, and stimulates blood flow to all the organs. We want to make sure all our muscles are warm so we do not tear or injure anything. A warm-up should last 5-10minutes and should include some cardio exercise to raise the core temperature such as light jogging or walking.

14 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

2. You skip stretching - After

Arkansas, says “resistance training has been shown to reduce rates age 40, stretching becomes crucial of certain chronic illnesses such as for preventing injury. Stretching is type 2 diabetes.” Gray says it also best after the muscle is warm and “helps increase functional fitnesspliable- at the end of the workout. the ability to perform everyday If you do not stretch all major activities.” You say you don’t have time to do both strength and cardio- alternate days between them. Remember by Leigh Anne Richards your strength training workout should start with a slow progression involving 8-10 exercises that condition the whole body, with 2 sets of 10-15 repetitions for each exercise. muscle groups regularly, you lose flexibility and run the risk of muscle tears and tendon strains. Stretching 4. Your workout is too easy benefits the range of motion in your Once your workout is feeling easy, joints. The more flexible we are, then it is time to up the intensity. the greater our ease of movement. Many people just go through Is stretching necessary before you the motions of performing easy workout? There is controversy on repetitions. The only way to see this subject. Stretching should not improvement is through effort and be done first thing when muscles overload. If you are doing resistance are cold but some light stretching is training you want those last few recommended once you warm the repetitions of every exercise to be a muscles. The time to really stretch bit of a struggle- but doable. If you and hold the stretch for 15-30 are doing cardiovascular exercise seconds is post workout. This is the you want to increase the distance, time you see the greater gains in speed, or the length of time. By flexibility. All stretches should be overloading, you will strengthen your performed smoothly and slowly. bones, increase the proper building hormones, increase lean mass, and negate the physiologic effects of 3. You focus just on cardio aging. It is very important to mix We are all aware of the benefits of things up in your workouts- Variety aerobic exercise and its benefit for is the spice of life. Don’t let your reducing cardiovascular disease. body just go through the motions of However, when your focus is just on doing the same thing every time you cardio and neglect strength training, exercise. you miss out on important benefits. After age 35, we began to lose about A recent study at University of 5% of our muscle mass each decade Alabama- Birmingham found that so it is imperative to strength train when three groups of adults age to help reduce this. Cardio does not 60-75 were assigned three different prevent the loss of lean mass the 30-week fitness regimens, the group way strength training does. Michelle doing the most intense workouts got Gray, assistant professor ofof

Fitness over Fifty

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


the most benefit with average gains of four and a half pounds of muscle mass, and no injuries. Don’t be afraid to push yourself.

5. You avoid power - Why in the world should a 50

+ exerciser need to focus on training for power? By power, I don’t mean bench pressing 250 pounds. The focus is on exercises that require our core muscles to move with speed and strength. Avoiding this time of training contributes to a decrease in muscle fibers in our core and that has ramifications in daily life. Walking quickly to beat a red light requires power, as does steeping off a curb and having to get back quickly. Walking on uneven surfaces and having to maneuver over obstacles is another of example of “functional power.” To add some power exercise to your workout, introduce a speed component to just traditional resistance exercise such as sitting in a chair and getting up quickly and then lifting dumbbells or filled water bottles over head. You can start with 2 set of 8-10 repetitions. Remember if you are new to exercise, please consult with a doctor before starting. Never let your age be your excuse.

**“The Fiftysomething Workout: Your 5 Biggest Mistakes” By Linda Melone. Huffington Post, 11/10/2012

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

15


Can You Afford Early Retirement? Thinking about early retirement? Here are some of the things you should look at closely. Early retirement is a phrase many Americans wish they could turn into a reality. While retiring in your 50s or early 60s sounds enticing, it typically requires years of planning to make sure you’ve accumulated enough retirement assets to last for 20 or 30 years or more. It’s important to factor in how an early retirement could affect your Social Security benefits, options for health insurance, and the nest egg you plan to rely on for ongoing living expenses. Social Security and Medicare Those who collect Social Security at age 62, the earliest age when most retirees are eligible, face a permanent reduction in benefits. For example, if your full retirement age is 66, collecting benefits at age 62 will result in a 25% reduction in the monthly benefit you would have received by retiring at 66.1 Those born in 1960 or later will experience a permanent 30% benefit cut if they choose to begin collecting benefits at age 62 instead of their full retirement age of 67. In contrast, delaying benefits past full retirement age results in a higher benefit, with a maximum delayed retirement credit of 8% annually for those who were born in 1943 or later and wait until age 70 to retire.

16 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

Regardless of your age when you retire, Social Security is not likely to pay all of your living expenses. Social Security currently comprises 35% of the aggregate income of Americans aged 65 and older, with remaining income coming from with employer-sponsored Brandt McDonald retirement plans, wages, and other sources.2

Financial Thoughts

Finding health insurance is equally important if you plan to retire early. Eligibility for Medicare begins at age 65, and those who retire earlier typically must obtain health insurance on their own or through a former employer, which can cost thousands of dollars annually in premiums.

to qualified retirement accounts, such as an IRA or an employer-sponsored retirement plan, can help you build this nest egg. Retiring early requires advance planning to make the situation work to your advantage. If you have the financial resources to do it, you may want to start the process at your earliest opportunity. Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager MBCapitalWealth.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com or 334.387.0094 1Source: Social Security Administration. 2Source: Social Security Administration, Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, September 2014. Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber’s or others’ use of the content. © 2015 Wealth Management Systems Inc. All rights reserved.

Saving and Budgeting Early retirement typically requires a larger nest egg to finance living expenses over a longer period of time. Contributing as much as you can afford

Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

17


Baptist Medical Center South Baptist Medical Center South has received the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®–Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award, as well as Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award from the American Heart Association The Get With The Guidelines®–Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award recognizes Baptist South’s commitment and success in implementing a higher standard of stroke care by ensuring that stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted standards and recommendations. Additionally, The Get With The Guidelines®- Heart Failure is a quality improvement program that helps hospital teams follow the most up-todate, research-based standards with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing hospital readmissions for heart failure patients. Launched in 2005, numerous published studies have demonstrated the program’s success in achieving patient outcome improvements, including reductions in 30-day readmissions. “This award is representative of Baptist South Medical Center’s continued commitment to aggressive quality stroke care. The Primary Stroke Center is truly a team effort dedicated to the best possible outcomes for our stroke patients,” said Stephen P. Suggs, M.D., F.A.H.A., neurologist and medical director of Neuro Hospitalist Services at Baptist Health.

18 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Walk to End Alzheimer’s M

Heather Goggin’s Story

ore Unfortunately, than Goggin’s contact five million with Alzheimer’s people are did not end affected by there. Later in Alzheimer’s Goggin’s life, each year. her paternal You may not grandfather, Jake be one of Jarvis Sr., started the affected, showing signs of but Heather Dementia. She Goggin is. writes, “I was Goggin is a an adult when Montgomery my Papa started resident showing signs of who is dementia, and Papa, Heather and Ricki participating fortunately, in in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s event on the years since we lost Pepaw, there Oct. 1, 2016. This disastrous disease has had been improvements in detection taken a toll on Goggin for most of her and treatment of dementia and life. It was at a young age that she first Alzheimer’s – thanks to funding and came in contact with the disease. Her support provided through events like maternal grandfather, H.L. Tyus, was the Walk to End Alzheimer’s.” She loved diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. being able to share more memories She remembers the special moments with her grandfather, but she was now with her grandfather, known to her as able to fully comprehend what the Pepaw, before he became bedridden. disease was capable of doing. One of On Goggin’s fundraising page she writes, “All of those memories are special, and some of them are really funny even (especially!) now, and while I’m so grateful to have them at all, it makes me sad that looking back, I realize that even some of those memories are colored with the impacts of dementia and Alzheimer’s.” Her grandmother, known as Memaw, was the primary caretaker of Tyus. Despite not being able to drive, she took care of him until the disease Papa, Heather, Daddy, Ricki, and Hayden took his life. Goggin describes the trials her grandmother went through as a primary caretaker as the memories Goggin cherishes of her unfathomable. She writes, “I will forever grandfather occurred on her wedding be in awe of her strength, perseverance, day. She chose to hold her wedding day faith, and love.” on the same day as her grandfather’s birthday. He was able to enjoy his

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

birthday cake at Goggin’s wedding rehearsal. “It’s heartbreaking to endure those earlier stages – which can sometimes last years – when you don’t know day to day if your loved one is going to remember you, or know where they are, or even who they are,” Goggin writes. When I spoke to Goggin, she placed an emphasis on how the disease weighs on the family members. She reflects on her supportive family system and often thinks about the people who do not have that kind of family support. Alzheimer’s is a hereditary disease, and Goggin fears for her life as well as her family’s life. She writes, “With that kind of history on both sides of my family, it’s more than possible that our family will go through it again – it’s actually probable.” She hopes that her efforts in raising awareness about Alzheimer’s will protect her nephew and niece, Hayden and Isabel, from going through what she and her family have had to endure. This is the third year Goggin will participate in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. She hopes to bring awareness and understanding to Alzheimer’s disease. Although there have been improvements, Goggin said, “The lack of understanding and awareness terrifies me.” She believes the Walk to End Alzheimer’s is an opportunity for people to realize they aren’t alone in their struggles. When I asked her what reasons she would give people to walk she said, “I have a million reasons.” Her most important reason was, “This is your chance to make a difference.”

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

19


i

This & tHAT Sky High Hot Air Balloon Festival

Labor day Weekend, September 2-4th soar into September at our 18th annual Sky High Hot Air Balloon Festival. The weekend kicks off with the extraordinary Friday Night Balloon Glow and continues all weekend long. Watch beautiful balloons in flight or hop in a basket for your own tethered balloon ride. Saturday is filled with family-friendly events, including live music, beach activities, a Kids Zone and much more. There’s something for everyone with a classic car show, disc dog demonstrations, a pyrotechnic skydiving demonstration, as well as a 5K Race and Triathlon event. If you’re a photography buff, you can sign up for our handson “Mastering Night Photography” course. Plus, you’ll find drink specials and sports on the televisions at the Beach Bar. Cap off the weekend with a final balloon glow Sunday night on Robin Lake Beach. With this exciting line-up of events, surrounded by the natural beauty of Callaway Gardens, there’s no better way to say “farewell” to Summer 2016. For details, call 1.800.852.3810 or visit www.callawaygardens.com/HAB

MACOA Annual Seniors of Achievement Awards Nominations MACOA is seeking nominations for the 29th Annual Seniors of Achievement Awards, which recognizes seniors who have made significant lifetime contributions to their community. Over the years, 300 River Region seniors have been selected to receive this outstanding award. These distinguished senior citizens have come from every walk of life. Our purpose is to recognize those who have truly blessed the lives of others through their community involvement, personal achievement, and professional achievement. The nomination form is available online at www.macoa.org/seniors-awards/ or by emailing jfdvorak@macoa.org. Applications are due by August 18th and the Awards Luncheon will be held October 19th at the Montgomery Country Club. Sieu Tang Wood, 2015 Mary Katherine Archibald Blount Special Friend of MACOA Award Recipient; photo L-R, Bill Wood with wife Sieu Tang Wood, , with her sister and brother-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Man Woo

Get Your Affairs in Order, FREE Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop Wednesday, August 31: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30 - 3:30 pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334.625.6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com.

20 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week Ron Howard’s Beatles documentary, The Beatles: Eight Days a Week — The Touring Years will hit theaters on September 15th and the streaming service Hulu on September 17th. Howard first announced that he was working on a Beatles documentary in 2014, telling Rolling Stone that he would be utilizing rare, silent Super 8 footage for much of the film and working closely with surviving member Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr as well as the widows of deceased members John Lennon and George Harrison, Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison. “We’ll not only be able to digitally repair [the Super 8 footage], but we’ve also been finding the original recordings,” Howard said in the same interview. “We can now sync it up and create a concert experience so immersive and so engaging, I believe you’re going to actually feel like you’re somewhere in the Sixties, seeing what it was like to be there, feeling it and hearing it. And as a film director, that’s a fantastic challenge.”

The Fab Four “The Ultimate Tribute” with Ed Sullivan Tickets now on sale for The Fab Four Tribute Concert, Thursday, November 10th at www.mpaconline.org The Fab Four is elevated far above every other Beatles Tribute due to their precise attention to detail. With uncanny, note-for-note live renditions of Beatles’ songs, the Fab Four will make you think you are watching the real thing. The Fab Four will take you back to a time when four lads from Liverpool ruled the world of music! This incredible stage show includes three costume changes representing every era of the Beatles ever-changing career. This loving tribute to the Beatles has amazed audiences around the world, including Japan, Australia, France, Hong Kong, The United Kingdom, Germany, Mexico and Brazil. Hear record-perfect live performances of such classics as: Can’t Buy Me Love, Yesterday, A Day In The Life, Twist And Shout, Here Comes The Sun, and Hey Jude. “The Fab Four were experts in audience interaction, and the audience responded by singing virtually every note to every song back to them. It was quite an amazing sight to see, and added to the feeling of actually being at a Beatles concert.” - Examiner.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

21


This & tHAT

i

More

Trekking through Wyoming’s Wilds...Vicarious Vacations Summer exploration is easy with Vicarious Vacations at Old Alabama Town, Saturday mornings in August! Experienced travelers will be here, transforming Hobbs Auditorium into new and different lands each week! Take a vacation without leaving Montgomery! Spend every Saturday of August traveling the world in the cool confines of the auditorium in Old Alabama Town. Defend yourself against the dreaded doldrums of DOG DAYS! Spend every Saturday of August traveling the world in the cool confines of the auditorium in Old Alabama Town. For the fifth year, Landmarks Foundation offers exciting seated trips led by seasoned travelers who will take us on four free VICARIOUS VACATIONS! August 6th - Uganda, John Schneider; August 13th - Amsterdam to Spain, Steve Brickley & Jim Hodgson; August 20th - France & the Caverns of Chaurat, Frances Durr; August 27th - Trekking through Wyoming’s Wilds, McDowell Crook. Vicarious Vacation Series, Saturdays in August, 11 am, Hobbs Auditorium, Loeb Reception Center, 301 Columbus St. Free to the public. More information on website: www.landmarksfoundation.com

Elvis is in The House! Hearts will flutter and hips will shake when Elvis Presley returns to ASF on August 13th at 7:30 pm for a one-night only concert. Scot Bruce’s authentic, high-octane portrayal of the King is guaranteed to have you ALL SHOOK UP! Elvis: The Early Years starring nationally renowned tribute artist Scot Bruce traditionally sells out at ASF! The performance features songs made famous by the king of rock ‘roll, Elvis Presley, including Hound Dog, Burnin’ Love, Jailhouse Rock, Lover Me Tender, Suspicious Minds and more. Scot is backed by a four-piece Nashvillebased band. Because of his uncanny resemblance to the young “King” (and his ability to sing, strum a guitar, and swivel his hips), Scot’s live show has taken him across the U.S. and all over the world. As Elvis, he has appeared in music videos with Faith Hill and Sheryl Crow, and has been heard as the “Resident Elvis” with his pals “Mark and Brian” on their highly rated Los Angeles morning radio show. Scot has also appeared in recurring roles on the hit soap operas Days of Our Lives and The Bold and the Beautiful, a Pizza Hut commercial, the California Lottery “Elvis” ad campaign, and in several successful productions of Idols of the King, including the historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, the Barter Theatre in Virginia and the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in Montgomery. He performs at Disneyland on a regular basis, and tours with the ‘Legends of Rock & Roll - Buddy, Roy & Elvis.’ Showtime: 7:30pm. Tickets range from $35-$60. For more information, call 334.271.5353 or visit asf.net

22 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


“HandsOn” Approach to Police Appreciation: Back the Blue

Police officers risk their lives every day to make sure we are safe. Throughout the month of September, citizens have an opportunity to show their appreciation through a program called “Back the Blue”. HandsOn River Region has planned a month long initiative in honor of the anniversary of 9-11 to promote community appreciation of police officers actively working to keep Montgomery safe. HandsOn Executive Director Jo Ann Johnson says, “Throughout the month of September, we encourage area residents to express their gratitude for the selfless public servants who wear the badge and put themselves in harm’s way to keep us safe and pay respect for those who have lost their lives in the line of duty.” Churches, organizations, schools, businesses or individuals can participate by visiting the police station to provide whatever possible to say thank you - perhaps a home cooked meal, cookies or even a case of water. Blue ribbons will be available free of charge at the HandsOn office for residents to pick up and display on their vehicle antenna or wear on their shirt to show their support as well. Other suggestions include:

* * * * * * * * *

Wear blue clothing in support of law enforcement. Send a card of support to your local police department or state agency. Share a story about a positive law enforcement experience on social media. Ask children in your community to write letters in support of law enforcement. Proudly display a blue light in support of law enforcement. Organize an event or a rally in support of your law enforcement officers. Advertise your support through local media outlets/billboards. Restaurants can offer a free cup of coffee or breakfast to police. Most importantly, if you see a police officer, thank a police officer.

In addition to Back the Blue, HandsOn will be joined by area police to present assembly programs at four local elementary schools to help the students understand the importance of honoring the police and appreciating the significance of 9/11. “We’re just trying to promote the sense of volunteerism and community,” Johnson says. For more information, call 334.264.3335 or visit http://volunteer.handsonriverregion.org. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

23


This & tHAT

i

More

Ageless Designs, New Hands As a child, Henry Frazer, a native Montgomerian, enjoyed building and repairing things around the house. His father purchased a jigsaw and belt sander, and Henry enrolled in manual arts classes at Baldwin Junior High School. It was not until after his formal education and marriage that he returned to his love of woodworking. While furnishing his first home, he and Mary, his wife, visited Colonial Williamsburg and decided that the early American Colonial style of furniture of such cabinetmakers as Duncan Phyfe, Chippendale, Hepplewhite and Townsend was what they were searching for. Eventually moving back to Montgomery, Henry established a home workshop and began to experiment constructing some of these early furniture forms he had researched. Through the decades, he and Mary continued to search antique shops, museums, and publications looking for cabinet forms that they liked and that Henry could reproduce. Henry uses a variety of woods in his work usually rescuing discarded wood from dumpsters. Today, Henry has produced over 50 pieces of furniture, sometimes copying a favorite piece for himself and one for each of his two children. These exhibit pieces represent his evolving woodworking skills and attention to detail. He does not sell his work and continues to seek examples of period pieces that he thinks are work being copied and come within his woodworking capabilities. For more information, call 240-4512. Ageless Designs, New Hands exhibit continues through August 19th at Old Alabama Town, 301 Columbus Street. Free to the public

Calera & Shelby Train Ride Take a trip back in time as you board vintage railroad coaches restored to their former glory! The Calera & Shelby Railroad runs on a portion of the former L&N Alabama Mineral Railroad, established in 1891. Ride behind a first generation dieselelectric locomotive as you travel through the scenic forests of Shelby County. Upgrade to a caboose or locomotive ticket for a memorable experience and get an up close look at railroad operations! The Calera & Shelby train ride lasts approximately 1 hour. Please arrive 1 hour prior to your departure time to pick up your tickets at the Calera Depot, use the restrooms at the Gift Shop and get in line at your boarding location. Make sure to visit the exhibits in the Depot Museum, the collection of railroad equipment in Clark Yard, working Signal Garden, and Gift Shop! Train Rides- Saturdays through September 24th, Departure Times: 11 am & 2 pm. For more info visit www.hodrrm.org

WVAS-FM’s Nat King Cole Society Jazz Festival The community is invited to attend WVAS-FM’s Nat King Cole Society Jazz Festival on Sunday, September 4th. This all-star music event will be held from 4 to 8 pm at the Riverfront Amphitheater in Downtown Montgomery. Bring your blankets, chairs and umbrellas, no coolers or pets allowed. Candy Capel, WVAS-FM station manager, said the station is proud to host a festival named after a legendary jazz icon. “WVAS is honored to present the Nat King Cole Society Jazz Festival in Montgomery, the birthplace of one of the most memorable voices in American music history. It is a fitting way to pay tribute to musical royalty, especially since his birth home now resides on the campus of Alabama State University,” Capel said. Tickets are $20 for adults and $1 for children 12 and under. Tickets can be purchased at Heritage Barber Shop, 334.834.8494 (Carter Hill Road), Filet & Vine, 334.262.8463 (Cloverdale Road), Another Chance Package Store, 334.220.6301 (Central Parkway) and Ted the Wine Guy, 334.395.9911 (Zelda Road). For more information, visit WVASFM.org or call 334.229.4708.

24 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Michael McDonald to Headline Benefit the Bard Fundraiser The Alabama Shakespeare Festival welcomes fivetime Grammy Award winner Michael McDonald to headline the 3rd annual Benefit the Bard fundraiser. McDonald was part of legendary rock bands the Doobie Brothers and Steely Dan. Smokey Robinson and Michael Bolton headlined the fundraiser in the past, which raises money for the theaters cultural and educational efforts. ASF officials say they’re looking forward to what this year’s fundraising can do in the future. “He helps us to build awareness for the Alabama Shakespeare Festival because he is such a big name,” says Laurie Weil, Chairman of the ASF Board of Directors. The Benefit the Bard concert will be Saturday, August 20th at 8pm. Ticket prices range from $99-$129, and can be purchased by going online to www.asf.net or by calling 1-(800) 841-4273.

Groovy! Alabama in the Age of Aquarius Symposium

Join us at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery on Friday, August 19 for a groovy symposium exploring the cultural, political, and social themes in the decade after 1965. Featuring expert speakers from across the South and fascinating panel discussions. Cost is $40 for the general public, $25 for Friends of the Archives members, and $10 for students. Admission includes lunch. Seating is very limited, register today! Come back on Saturday, August 20 dressed in your retro best for a 1970s Family Fun Day! Featuring crafts, games, and a dance party! At noon, enjoy a screening of the 2013 documentary, Muscle Shoals, followed by a discussion with Muscle Shoals Swampette, Judy Hood, and musician, Spooner Oldham. Saturday admission is FREE! No advance registration required. to register and learn more visit www.archives.alabama.gov/press_release/AgeOfAquarius

BOOM! Now Available at

Publix

Digital & Interactive When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community” The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

25


Client Spotlight from the Face MDs at RRFP

Beauty Profile I Can’t Believe My Eyes… I was in a state of shock. His side of the closet was empty and his car was gone. I found myself standing in the kitchen staring at a wedding band and a note. I just couldn’t bring myself to read it… but I had to.

32

years of marriage, three grown children, anxiously awaiting our opportunity to become grandparents, and there it was. The end of my marriage starkly spelled out in font size number 10, black and white, Times New Roman. I couldn’t breathe. I couldn’t move. All I could feel was my heart pounding. This could not be real; but it was real, and I had to move on. The next few months seemed like a shadowy eternity of despair. What was once a loving relationship was reduced to a business failure and an emotional fire sale. I became a shell of my former self. But life goes on. Even the deepest of wounds can begin to heal. He left me everything. The house, the cars, money; he just wanted out. Then, I realized something very interesting. I was free. I was alive, and I could be happy. I enjoyed every moment of my marriage. I was happy as a wife. Motherhood was challenging, yet exciting; however, that time had passed. Now, staring back at me in the mirror was a face etched with 32 “not about me” years. Even though I saw myself every day, the person in the reflection was not me. I decided it was time. Where to begin, right? I joined several social groups, adopted a dog from the humane shelter, hired a fitness coach and had a

facial consultation with Dr. Thomas Cawthon at River Region Facial Plastics.

Things really started shaping up for me, and I started to really feel happy - for me! I met with Dr. Cawthon, in his very comfortable and friendly office off of Chantilly Parkway. I was greeted with a warm welcome and felt Dr. Cawthon really took his time to embrace my concerns and give thoughtful consideration to help me figure out what I wanted most. He created what he called a

“beauty plan”

, and I left with several options and pricing. I sat in the parking lot and considered my options… staring back at me in that very same Times New Roman font. I felt so sure about what he had explained I got out of my car and went back inside! I realized 66 years of aging didn’t happen overnight, and it would take several injections, a new skin care regimen, and an upper and lower lid blepharoplasty to

the reversal of 66 years

begin

. I decided this would be a good jumping off point for me to get started and have never regretted it one single day. Every time I visit the office the girls are so happy to see me, they celebrate my progress right along with me and I have relied on them to give me an honest opinion. I always joke, “If you can’t take the truth, don’t ask the RRFP girls!” Dr. Cawthon and his team are always warm, respectful and professional. I wish it wouldn’t have taken a divorce for me to start caring for myself. Timing isn’t always on one’s side, but if you can

do something good for yourself, start ASAP. Call and schedule your free consultation with Dr. Cawthon at River Region Facial Plastics and adopt a companion from the humane shelter!

Please contact us via email at RiverRegionFacialPlastics@gmail.com with your questions or comments!

26 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

27


BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Frances McGowin, Follow Your Inspiration This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Frances McGowin. Frances is an animal lover with a distinct purpose, helping people with disabilities live a safer, healthier, and more fulfilled life with a professionally trained Service Dog. Her non-profit organization, Service Dogs Alabama, grew from using her dogs to provide therapy for patients to providing well trained service dogs to children and veterans with specific disabilities. Frances has always been led by her inspirations and they have led her through an interesting life. We recently asked Frances to share some of her journey with us, so hold on, we think you’ll enjoy getting to know Frances as much as we have! BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, etc.? Frances: I was raised in Greenville, Alabama. I have a wonderful family, my brothers and I and all of my first cousins have grown up together. We still remain close. I understand the value of this support system and am so grateful that I have a huge extended family that all loves each other. I attended St. Mary’s High School in Raleigh, NC, then went to the University of Georgia, and then finally at 40+ years old, received a Master’s Degree in counseling from Troy University.

28 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

Ashley, Gaige with his Service Dog Emma, and Frances

I lasted in New York for about five years until I could no longer see the trees for the traffic or hear the birds for the constant hum of the streets, then I had to go. Fortunately, I was offered a job in Atlanta with a magazine representative firm. I began a new career as a sales and marketing rep for national magazines including Mademoiselle, Bon Appetite, and Architectural Digest.

I lived in New York City after college and worked at Ralph Lauren when he Upon my re-entry into southern life, I was a start-up company. I laugh that we adopted two dogs, Rascal and Honey, had no computers and kept antiquated two cats, Spenser and Winston, and records, but one horse, everyone Rooster. was involved Aside from in Ralph’s trees, clean creative air, and process. space, I had I can seriously remember missed Ralph my animal Lauren companions. coming into I was so my office happy to and wanting have them to look at back in my the tags in Frances and her dogs, L-R-Indiana Jones, Tinker’s, Toy, Tory and Nike on the floor life. my simple shirt dress that I had worn to work that During my Georgia residency, I designed day. He was such a creative master mind clothes and appeared in Women’s and drew ideas for his collections from Wear Daily many times for my designs, the most unlikely places. I was a stunt double in a movie with Kevin Costner, I spent several winters

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


in Wellington, FL to compete in equestrian events, and I fox hunted as often as possible. I lived in the Atlanta area for 17 happy years.

world’s greatest riders from all over the world. It was the equivalent of meeting the Beatles for most people. It was the royalty of equestrian sports, and I was right in the middle of it all. Quite a memorable experience.

BOOM!: What made you decide to move to Montgomery?

Frances: I wanted to be closer to my family. I also had close friends in BOOM!: Since Montgomery. So childhood, you I packed up my have loved horses and dogs, training dogs The McGowin Family, L-R: Peter, me holding grand nephew, Kessler, Sumpter II, Alinda Guynes, Steadham, Carleton, my Dada, Sumpter, Lucy, Mints, Brooks Parrish with daughter, Justin Parrish, Jim holding grand daughter. and came back and rescuing after being away stray animals, I also painted and sold my work in a from Alabama for 25 years. how did this passion for dogs lead you Gallery in Florida. to start your first therapy dog program, BOOM!: What did you do when you Dogs on Call? BOOM!: One of your special moved back? Could you experiences was when you share one of served as the Director of the Frances: I had had something like a your most Georgia Equestrian Training catharsis after the 1996 Olympic Games meaningful Alliance prior to the 1996 ended. I had a burst of inspiration to experiences Olympic Games in Atlanta, write programs to teach people how with your would you share how that to be more self-aware. It was a whole therapy dogs. came about and what that course experience called Frances: Much was like? Creative to my parents Frances with Kevin at the movie wrap-up party dismay, I Life Frances: I Lessons. brought home created the I was every stray dog or cat that I ever found. Georgia Equestrian determined Training Alliance to test Some people are just born with an (GETA) in order its merits affinity for animals which can sometimes to organize horse since it was cloud their judgement. That was me. farms in Georgia based on Always in trouble and always grounded to accommodate inspiration for yet another animal rescue. international Olympic rather than committees who research. Even as a young child, I trained my dogs, wanted to send their Luke with Inmate Trainer: Tiffany especially to do tricks. My connection equestrian teams to Georgia the year I taught in Juvenile Detention and with animals, both horses and dogs, was prior to the 1996 Summer Olympics and other Youth Incarceration Facilities so strong that I modeled my whole life two months prior to the actual Olympic (Mt. Meigs), Tutwiler Prison, and Kilby around them. Games in order to acclimate their horses Prison. I wrote additional programs for and riders to the heat and humidity of the Dept. of Human Resources and the When I moved back to Montgomery, Georgia summers. I got to know the Dept. of Postsecondary Education and I was looking for some meaningful The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

29


volunteer work because that included my Conor was dogs. I had Lily, not waking up my Lab/Golden and they were Retriever, certified struggling with as a therapy dog. an uncertain I tried going to future. see a few nursing homes on my own, When we but there was no entered Conor’s organizing therapy hospital dog program, and I room, Mindy, felt a little lost. With Conor’s Mom, the help of other told me that Volunteers, this Conor loved desire to help others dogs and asked Bear in hospital bed with Conor with my dogs grew me to let Bear into an organization and a full- time get in the bed with Conor. I gently lifted commitment. my 85 lb. Lab into to Conor’s bed, took Conor’s lifeless hand, and manually Dogs On Call, a therapy dog program, stroked Bear’s head. was created around a kitchen table with Laura Harmon and Tracey Rives, As soon as Conor’s hand touched Bear, both animal lovers like me. We all saw Conor woke up! He sat up in the bed and the value in taking dogs to visit people was agitated. Nurses and doctors came in Hospitals, nursing homes, schools, into the room, and I had to get Bear out. etc., but what we did not realize in I was overwhelmed by what had just the infancy of Dogs On Call, was the happened. power that dogs have to create truly miraculous healing. In the beginning, I had two therapy dogs who were wonderful, Bear, a black Lab, and Lily, a Lab/ Golden Retriever mix. They both had a magical effect on people. My most profound experience with my therapy dogs was taking Bear to the hospital to visit Conor Kirke. Conor had been in a bus accident while traveling with his church youth group up to a retreat at Lake Martin. The bus hit a pothole on I65 and flipped several times. Most of the children sustained minor injuries; Conor sustained major brain trauma injury. When Bear and I visited Conor, he had just been moved out of the Intensive Care Unit where he had been in an induced coma for five days. Conor remained unconscious despite efforts to wake him out of the coma. We were asked to visit and comfort the family

30 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

awakening. As I took Conor’s hand again to stoke Bear’s head, I remember thinking, ‘yesterday was miraculous, it just can’t happen again’. And at that moment, Conor woke up again, sat up quietly in bed and began stroking Bear’s head on his own and answering questions. I already believed in the work I was doing with my dog, and yet, I was completely astounded and again overwhelmed. At this moment, I knew that it was not happenstance, but God’s hand using my dog to intervene. I knew then as I know now, dogs are truly conduits of healing grace… and I have never looked back nor doubted the miraculous work of trained therapy and service dogs. BOOM!: K-9’s for Kids and K-9’s for Heros Service Dog program evolved from your therapy dog program, eventually becoming what it is today, Service Dogs Alabama (SDA). As cofounder and executive director of Service Dogs Alabama, would you please share the special mission of Service Dogs Alabama?

Frances: Service Dogs Alabama is dedicated to providing medical and psychiatric assistance dogs to Governor signing a service dog protection bill (Piper, is diabetic alert dog that we trained) children and Veterans with debilitating or The next morning at 7:00 AM my phone life threatening disabilities and rang. It was Conor’s Grandmother asking School Service Dogs trained to assist me to bring Bear back to see Conor as educators and counselors with student soon as possible. He had slipped back interventions that create drama-free into the coma when we left and they classrooms. were unable to wake him up again. We went back to the hospital. I put Bear In the process of fulfilling the back in the bed with Connor, surrounded mission, SDA rescues 50+ dogs a year, by family and nurses this time. All rehabilitates 50+ inmates a year who were waiting for the same miraculous train our dogs in prison, changes the The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


course of the lives of children and Veterans with disabilities, and alters classroom dynamics.

How could we say no.

SDA program, and they have become excellent evaluators and trainers. There are no better Service Dog trainers, especially with specialty task training and cooperative training, than in Service Dogs Alabama.

We knew then as we know now, peopleparents, young adults, and Veterans come to us as a last resort. They have BOOM!: What is the School Service Dog SDA has such been through all of program about? a broad reach, the medications and that it is therapies and they Frances: Follow the Lead is the School impossible to are still losing the war Service Dog program. It entails training calculate all of with their educators and Frances performing tricks with her the lives that are disability. counselors to Labradoodle, Indiana Jones touched by its A trained use intervention mission. Service Dog is most often their methods that last hope. promote inclusion BOOM!: What made you start a Service and participation Dog program? BOOM!: Are you a dog over correction. whisperer? The methodology Frances: My co-founder, Ashley Taylor, aims to change a and I had a request for a Service Dog Frances: That would be Ashley child’s pattern of for a 13 year old girl with Epidermolysis Taylor in our organization. behavior by using Bilosa (EB). As we listened to the She is the most insightful dog deflectors to avert mother’s story describing the symptoms trainer I have ever known. I am any opportunity of EB, we knew we had to help. always amazed at her analysis for conflict while of dogs and their behaviors creating an EB is a genetic disorder characterized and finding training solutions atmosphere where by skin so fragile that a simple touch for them. inclusion and can cause third degree burns. The body participation thrive. is wrapped almost from head to toe in I do have a very special Frances with grand nephew, and her The trained School mummy style to prevent infection to connection with animals and Service Dog is a tool horses Beamer and Jubilee the open wounds. Feet and hands are I am a good amateur trainer, within this process. wrapped between each digit to slow the but Ashley is a true dog whisperer. welding of toes and fingers together. She guides all of the trainers in the

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

31


Follow the Lead BOOM!: What are projects to help others. So I really think creates real change. you most passionate a propensity to serve others can be Placing a dog in a about? genetic. classroom would be just that- a pet in a Frances: Being BOOM!: You have lived in other parts of classroom. We had inspired. Making life the U.S.; how would you rate the quality to give the trained better for others. of life in the River Region? intervention dog Making myself more substance than a better person. Frances: Alabama feels like home to me. that by backing him Enjoying what I I love it here. I love Montgomery. I up with a program have- my farm, my have loved watching the revitalization that eradicates animals, my family of downtown; I love all of the student disruptions and friends. entertainment options like the ballet, Gus Malzahn and Frances at Kiwanis lunch and defiance by the Biscuits, Shakespeare Festival, the promoting inclusion and participation. BOOM!: How do you like to relax and symphony… we have choices for fine We are just now measuring the results wind down? and casual dining. We have parks, the from this past year in Elmore County: Alabama River, a Riverboat, and a Zoo reading and math scores are up and no Frances: A glass of wine and a sunset that is one of the best that I have seen. office referrals last year from the classes followed by a good meal and interesting using Follow the Lead methods with a conversation. However, when I am in I love the churches here. They may vary School Service Dog. need of serious therapy, only a long in the details of their beliefs, but when horseback ride through the woods will it comes to serving our community, they BOOM!: We understand that you’re an help. are united and they are active. artist and a writer…many of our readers have aspirations to explore similar BOOM!: You obviously care about But it is the Southern culture, the interests…how would you describe your serving others, how would you describe people, and the history in the River unique talents? the importance of serving others in our Region that makes it so special to community? me. It is the small town attitude of Frances: Not so unique. I am an artist Montgomery with the amenities of because I paint. I am a writer because I Frances: I once read, “by serving others a large city and the generosity and write. I am not worried about where it we find dedication of leads me, who it impresses, or if it sells. ourselves.” its residents It is simply the art of self-expression. I For me who make highly recommend it at any age. this is true. Montgomery an I have extraordinary BOOM!: Favorite vacation spot? Any always place to live. travel dreams planned for the future? respected all paths BOOM!: As Frances: With a farm filled with animals to selfyou’ve aged, and a very demanding job, I rarely take awareness, how have time off. (It’s a good thing that I love and there your priorities my job!) However, when I do vacation, are many. changed? I want to spend that time with family Service and friends wherever that might be. to others Frances: Well, I Actually my last trip was on safari at the resonates just want to be Montgomery Zoo with my grand niece with me. happy, and I want and nephew; it was a great adventure! everybody else to My mother Brother Jim, my father Sumpter, and Brother Mints. At 91 years old, be happy too. my father still plays 18 holes of golf 3-4 times a week. I have always loved the beach. There dedicated He shot a hole in one last year! is something very soothing and much of BOOM!: Give us peaceful about its sounds, smells, and her life three words that sunsets. For me, the beach is filled with to helping others. For the last 20 years describe you? memories. We spent every summer of her life, she was an active volunteer there during my childhood. That is with Hospice care. My Aunt Frances, her Frances: Inspired, Driven, Fearless always my first choice of vacation spots. sister, has spent most of her life creating

32 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


BOOM!: Many people over 50 are experiencing a renewed sense of purpose, new goals, new careers…How would you describe this sense of renewal in your life? Any advice for the rest of us seeking renewal?

off our newly acquired debt. SDA is a non-profit organization; we provide Service Dogs free of charge to residents of Alabama. All donations are tax deductible.

Frances: Decide what it is that you would like Ashley, Catherine (with her poodle service dog, Doodle Bug) and Frances to create, experience, or explore, and do it. Be inspired and I imagine that every person who has follow your inspiration. Don’t let fear one of our Service Dogs will tell you that impede your journey. their dog saved their life, changed the lives of their family, and continues to Age gives us many freedoms that give them confidence and strength to our youth denies us like reinventing live a life that they never thought was ourselves, setting new goals, and attainable. realizing that “if not now, when?” Instead of thinking that the best is yet Although we rescue dogs, we are so to come, we start realizing that we have much more than a dog program. We are arrived and begin to appreciate all that working to make sustainable change in we have. It’s a difference in living for the the lives of children and Veterans with future and living in each moment. disabilities, prison inmates, and in our struggling educational system. BOOM!: How can the readers of BOOM! help you grow Service Dogs Alabama? SDA has recently purchased 43 Volunteers? Donations? acres with a home, apartments, and kennels (which are under Frances: Service Dogs Alabama is a construction now). We needed this medical assistance program. We train to be sustainable. Alabama needs dogs to do things that science has yet this for us to continue to provide the to invent a device for. Our diabetic alert services that only we can provide. dogs can smell and alert to a low blood sugar 10-30 minutes before a meter can We need monetary donations to read it- they are lifesaving dogs. keep us operational while paying

We also need Volunteers for puppy raisers. We need Volunteers with administrative and clerical skills. We occasionally need Volunteers to help with events. Everything is on the Service Dog Alabama website at ServiceDogsAlabama.com We want to thank Frances for sharing her story with us and the precious puppies who will be trained to serve. If you have questions or comments for Frances, you can email her at fmcgowin@servicedogsalabama.org or visit her website to learn more about her organization, servicedogsalabama.com As always, thanks to Kim Bethea, the award winning photographer from Total Image Portraits for her professional cover photo of Frances. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to jim@riverregionboom.com

Frances with some of our rescue puppies

Digital & Interactive

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an

advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community” The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

33


Heart Attacks Described... If you were having a heart attack you’d know it, right? While some people experience the “Hollywood” heart attack, picture clutching your chest in agony and dropping to the ground, others have different or more subtle symptoms that can be mistaken for something a lot less serious. But a heart attack is serious, and time is muscle: The sooner doctors can restore blood flow (and oxygen) to your heart the more likely you are to survive. For this reason, the American Heart Association advises calling 911 immediately if you have even an inkling that you might be having a heart attack. Still, many people are reluctant to do that, especially if they aren’t experiencing the classic crushing chest pain. To explain the variety possible symptoms, we asked 11 survivors to share what they felt when they had a heart attack. Understanding that there’s a wide range just might save your life. “I had a throbbing pain that started in my back, then traveled up to my neck. Then my jaw started throbbing. It was a like sharp pain that was moving through my body. I actually took Advil hoping it would go away. Then my breathing got labored, like when I was giving birth. I felt like the pain was making it hard for me to catch my breath. Even after the doctors told me it was a heart attack, I was really surprised. I didn’t have the classic heart pain.” _ Gloria, 49 “I had a bad stomachache, like cramps, but worse. Then I felt sharp shooting pains in my chest. I thought I ate something bad and this was food poisoning, since both my stomach and chest hurt. Then I started to feel off, disoriented and nauseous. When my left arm felt numb, I immediately thought, I’m having a heart attack.” _ Carole, 55 “I was doing the dishes and I suddenly had pain in both of my arms; it started

34 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

“It felt like something was squeezing my chest. It wasn’t pain, so much as discomfort, strong discomfort. It was like someone was squeezing tighter and tighter.” _ Lily, 82 “I thought it was acid reflux. I probably wouldn’t have even gone to the hospital, but then I passed out. My husband called 911.” _ Rachel, 63

in the right and then moved to the left and then both arms started to feel numb. I wanted to just lie down and see if it would go away, but my husband insisted in taking me to the hospital. He saved my life.” _ Cheryl, 63 “I felt like I couldn’t breathe. It was the worst feeling. I was suddenly gasping for breath. It was like my lungs just shut down. Then I collapsed.” _ Stan, 71 “I thought it was heartburn; I’ve had heartburn all my life and it didn’t feel any different, just more intense. I tried taking Tums and lying down, but it wouldn’t go away. Then it started getting more intense and moved from pain to more of a squeezing of my heart. My husband drove me to the hospital and I was surprised to learn it was a heart attack.” _ Doris, 57 “It’s crazy because I had no heart pain when I had my heart attack. Instead, I felt nausea, like I was going to throw up, and I broke out in a cold sweat. I could feel my face and back pouring with sweat. I started to feel dizzy, like I was going to pass out. My son took me to a walk-inclinic and they called an ambulance.” _ Marty, 67

“I felt exhausted for over a week. Just really tired and run down. I thought I was coming down with something. I was trying to get more sleep, but still not feeling better. What finally brought me to the hospital was the shortness of breath. I have stairs in my house that I’ve climbed every day for 40 years, and suddenly I couldn’t walk them without feeling winded.” _ Joanie, 67 “I woke up in the middle of the night feeling like I was going to throw up. I sat up and my left arm felt numb. Then I started to feel mild pain under my left breast. It wasn’t even the pain that got me scared; it was the numbness.” _ Rose, 55 “I had just dropped the kids off at school and felt a pain in my upper back between my shoulder blades. It was intense. Then I started to feel nauseous, so I sat in my car waiting for the pain to go way. Another mom saw me and she said I was sweating and looking out of sorts, not responding to her questions. She called an ambulance. I was shocked to discover it was a heart attack. I was only 46 and in good health.” _ Stephanie, 50 For more great health tips, pick up a copy of Prevention magazine, visit www.prevention.com, or follow us @PreventionMag. (c)2016 Prevention magazine Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

35


Ask an Elder Law Attorney By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Can You Live Without a Living Will? second category includes non-end-of-life A “Do Not Resuscitate Order” (commonly Even among lawyers, there is a lot of decisions, i.e. decisions that do not involve called a “DNR”) is also often confused with confusion regarding which documents withdrawing life sustaining treatment or a living will. In a hospital setting, a patient clients need when it comes to health care artificially provided food and water. will typically receive resuscitation efforts decision making. Adding to the confusion (such as CPR) unless a physician has given is the fact that the names of many of these a “no-code” or “do documents—Living Wills, Advance not resuscitate” Directives, Do Not Resuscitate Orders, order. But such an Healthcare Proxies, and Healthcare Powers of Attorney—are often Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop order is not effective if the patient is (incorrectly) used interchangeably. Wednesday, August 31: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 discharged back into pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This the community. So, I thought I would address each of educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins these documents in turn to try and covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living In that case, the clear up some of the confusion. patient must obtain wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, a special doctor’s Let’s start with a Power of Attorney. bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care order called a DNAR A power of attorney (“POA”) is any and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. (Do Not Attempt document in which a principal grants Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at Resuscitation) which an agent the authority to legally www.redoaklegalpc.com. must be issued by act on behalf of the principal. For the physician on example, Joe Q. Client (the principal) a special form obtained from the Health If you don’t appoint an agent pursuant to may give his wife, Jane T. Client (his agent), Department. Unless the patient has a your POA to make healthcare decisions power of attorney to handle business and DNAR and is wearing a DNAR bracelet, for you, then you may draft an Advance financial affairs on his behalf. The POA Joe an EMT is legally required to attempt Directive. This is a document that appoints gave to Jane in this case is probably drafted resuscitation. an agent, called a Health Care Proxy, to very broadly to give Jane a lot of authority. make decisions on your behalf. Unlike a There are a number of issues regarding POA, a Health Care Proxy appointed in On the other hand, you may have executed health care decision making which must be an Advance Directive is limited to making a very limited POA if you have ever traded considered. Most people should have an health care decisions only, and does in a car to a dealership. The dealership will Advance Directive and Living Will as part of not have any financial authority. Stated typically have you sign a POA that gives it their ordinary estate planning documents. differently, your agent under a POA may the limited authority to sign any paperwork We also recommend a separate POA to also qualify as a Health Care Proxy, but necessary to transfer title to your trade-in deal with financial decisions. Individuals your Health Care Proxy appointed by an when they sell it to the next buyer. faced with a terminal illness may also Advance Directive does not qualify as your consider speaking to their physician about financial Agent. But, POA’s aren’t just for financial a DNAR order as well, if appropriate. transactions. Depending upon how it is Finally, you may also have a Living drafted, your POA may include provisions Advance Directives and Living Wills do not Will, which deals only with end-of-life for making health care decisions as well. If decision making. Your Living Will may be typically expire by the passage of time. the POA document authorizes your agent a separate, stand-alone document, or it They may, however, get “stale.” This is not (sometimes called your “attorney-in-fact”) a legal concern, but a practical one. For may be incorporated into your Advance to make health care decisions, then your Directive. It states whether you want to example, health care providers may be agent may also have the authority to act receive life sustaining treatment and/or more hesitant to follow your wishes if they as your health care proxy as well. More on artificially provided nutrition and hydration are set forth in a 25 year old living will. As that below. a result, it’s wise to update them from time if you are faced with a terminal illness. to time to keep them “fresh.” Terminal illness is defined as a situation When it comes to granting an agent or in which the patient’s death is imminent, proxy authority to make health care Raley L. Wiggins or whose condition is hopeless unless the decisions, the law breaks down those Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC patient is artificially supported through the decisions into two basic categories. The 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com use of life-sustaining procedures, in the first category is end-of-life decision making, 445 Dexter Avenue, ste 9000, Mont, AL 36104 opinion of a qualified physician. namely the decision to provide, withhold www.redoaklegalpc.com or withdraw life sustaining treatment or artificially provided food and water. The

Attend Free Workshop

36 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


FREE EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP

Estate Planning, Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility

CALL US OR REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Join local attorney Raley L. Wiggins to discuss wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting your assets, bankruptcy, divorce & remarriage, nursing homes, long term care and Medicaid qualification.

Seats fill up quickly! Reserve your seat today:

(334) 625-6774 redoaklegalpc.com

“No representation is made that the quality of legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.�

37


by Holly Reich

Looking for a New Hobby? Drones are “the next big thing” for hobbyists, as they quite literally and figuratively take off. Once limited to professional use for tasks like military covert operations and firefighting, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are now being produced at prices that bring them into the reach of the everyday enthusiast, and are becoming increasingly popular for recreational use.

What Type of Drone Should You Purchase? Steve Cohen, an Educator at Bergen County, New Jersey Technical Schools, Applied Technology High School, advises novices to buy a Micro Drone first. That’s a drone that can essentially fit in your palm or pocket. You can test it inside your home and you can easily find models for less than 100 dollars.

The Consumer Technology Association expects “the U.S. market will approach 105-million-dollars in revenue in 2015 (increasing by more than 52 percent from 2014) with unit sales expected to approach 700,000, an increase of 63 percent,” says Laura Hubbard, Senior Manager of Industry Communications for the Association. And research forecasts from the group say the global market for drones could reach 300-million-dollars by the year 2018.

Cohen explains, “The micro-drones are not suitable for outdoor flight—they are purely intended for operators to become more proficient in operating drones. Once you get into the $600 price point and a weight range of 2-4 pounds (with safety features like geo-fencing and return to home), you can start taking your aircraft to higher altitudes.”

The controls for micro-drones are basically the same as larger drones, however you are likely not You can see why getting the drone sales are safety features exploding from the and other bells beautiful video by and whistles, O’Sullivan Studios which can (youtube.com/user/ include GPS osullivanstudios) and video which showcases downlinks to the power of drone The DJI Phantom 3 Standard flies for 25 minutes, tablets and aerial photography weighs 2.68 pounds and records HD video. smartphones. to transform the everyday into something special. “Learning to work with a smaller drone will help you man a larger, more However, the outlook for drones is not expensive and more fully featured entirely rosy. Recreational drones are complex model,” adds Cohen. making headlines for creating airport hazards, interfering with emergency services and endangering people’s lives. For example, you could start off And in order to keep better tabs on all of purchasing this inexpensive and tiny these new unmanned aircraft, the U.S. 0.53-ounce Cheerson CX-10c ($34.99 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on techlicious.com) with a flight time is now requiring owners register their of about 4 minutes and an SD (0.3MP) drones. onboard camera or the 0.53-ounce Hubsan H107C+ HD ($89.99 on So what should you know before buying techlicious.com) with a flight time of a drone? We talked to industry experts about 7 minutes and an onboard HD and pros that use drones to find out. camera. Neither of these drones require registration.

38 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The Cheerson CX-10c weighs just 0.53 ounces and takes 0.3MP pictures and SD video.

Once you’ve established your comfort level and worked on your flying ability, you may then want to consider options in larger sizes and price tags. For instance, the medium-sized 2.68-pound DJI Phantom 3 Standard ($499 on Amazon) has a flying time of up to 25 minutes and an on-board, stabilized camera that can stream HD video back to the operator and take 12MP stills. The 3.3-pound 3DR Solo Drone Quadcopter ($999 on Amazon) has a flying time of up to 25 minutes and advanced operational features like follow me, orbit (for circling an object), selfie (for keeping you in the picture as it flies) and safety net, which ensures your drone stays below the maximum height allowed by the FAA (400 feet). You’ll need to supply your own compatible GoPro HERO3+ ($227.15 on Amazon) or HERO4 (starting at $199.99 on Amazon) action camera. In general, the more expensive, larger drones are tooled with everything from 3-D mapping and videography to search and rescue maps. The good news is that while larger, heavier and more technical, they can be easier to operate. Recently, manufacturers, including DJI and 3DR, have started work on integrating maps into drones that can be updated in real time with no-fly zones, allowing for geo-fencing and the creation of virtual boundaries. So if there were an emergency, drone operators would know how to avoid temporary no-fly zones. Do You Need to Register Your Drone? As of December 21, 2015, owners of a

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


drone weighing more than 0.55 pounds and less than 55 pounds, including accessories like on-board cameras, must register their drone with the FAA. To register, you must be 13 years of age or older and a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident. It costs just $5. What You Need to Know Before You Fly While they may look easy to fly, even the smallest of drones are potentially much more than mere toys. While one can learn the techniques with an inexpensive micro-drone, experts suggest that you get trained and educated in the craft before taking one out in the field. “Go to a group like Drone User Group or the Academy of Model Aeronautics to seek out clubs and forums,” advises Cohen. The Consumer Technology Association ’s emphasizes the importance of the FAA and industry guidance and encourages users to review this check-list of tips for safe recreational use of drones before they start flying them including: I Operate the device under specific

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

safety guidelines established under federal, state, and local regulations. Check out KnowBeforeYouFly.com an educational campaign and website established to help you to learn drone specs, requirements and guidelines for your area by plugging your zip code into their locator. I If you’re flying a drone within five miles of an airport, be sure to notify the airport or control tower before you begin flying your drone. I To avoid other air traffic, your drone should fly no higher than 400 feet above the ground. Always keep your unmanned aircraft within eyesight, and use an observer to assist if needed. I Avoid intentionally flying over unprotected persons or moving vehicles, and keep your unmanned aircraft at least 25 feet away from individuals and vulnerable property. I Sensitive infrastructure or property such as airports, power stations, water treatment facilities, correctional facilities, heavily traveled roadways, government facilities, stadiums, etc. should be avoided as places to fly your drone. I Remain well clear of - and do not interfere with - manned aircraft

operations. You must observe and avoid other aircraft and obstacles at all times. I Adverse weather conditions such as high winds or reduced visibility will impact your ability to manage your aircraft. I Don’t conduct surveillance or take pictures of people in areas where there’s an expectation of privacy. Be respectful and considerate of privacy concerns in the areas where you fly. The FAA offers its latest guidance on its website at faa.gov What Happens If You Enter a No-Fly Zone While Using Your Drone? Visit KnowBeforeYouFly.com before launching your drone. Breaking the rules could result in a citation, community service and/or probation plus confiscation of your drone and all the accompanying equipment. If the offense is larger (such as hurting a pedestrian or destroying public property) the punishment could be much more serious. So respect the guidelines, play safe and have fun with your new hobby! Content first appeared at www.techlicious.com

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

39


by Bruce Rosenblatt

Comparing 3 Types of Senior Living Communities There are vast differences in the various types of senior housing communities. These differences apply to how fees are assessed, whether an occupant owns their residence and the levels of care that they offer on the premises. The following types of senior living are the three most common models. Rental Senior Communities These communities are the most popular option in the country and in most cases are the least expense of the three options. Rental senior communities require a lease and usually some type of security deposit or community fee. This community fee may or may not be refundable. Typically, a rental community will offer independent living and have an assisted living facility on the premises should someone need additional assistance. Some even offer memory care and skilled nursing care. These higher levels of care are provided at an extra cost in a rental retirement community. There is no contractual obligation for the community to provide to this care, so it might be necessary for a tenant to move out if they need a higher level of care that is not available in their complex. In addition, if someone has depleted their assets and can no longer afford their rental payments, they would need to move out. Since there is no large up-front fee or complex medical and financial eligibility criteria, many people are attracted to the rental option. This is especially true for those who have a preexisting condition or do not want to make a long-term obligation. Such flexibility is also beneficial if a spouse passes away and the widow or widower is interested in relocating to be closer to other family members. Rental communities usually provide a variety of services and amenities that are built into your monthly payments. These can include meals, housekeeping, maintenance, transportation and onsite events and activities. It is worth noting that residents’ rental rates can be increased at the renewal of your lease term. 40 BOOM! August 2016 RiverRegionBoom.com

Equity or Ownership Senior Communities An equity or ownership-style senior community is a fee-simple arrangement where the resident actually purchases their unit and enjoys full ownership privileges. As in a traditional real estate deal, pricing is usually negotiated with the previous owner. There are obviously pros and cons to owning real estate, but this type of community is attractive to those folks who want to own something and probably enjoy some level of equity appreciation upon resale. Residents pay a monthly maintenance fee as well as condominium association dues and are responsible for covering real estate taxes and assessments as well. Renovations to the condo are typically paid for by the new resident taking possession, however this could be negotiated in the purchase price. Should a resident require higher levels of care, there is typically assisted living available onsite for a per diem (daily) cost. Then again, if a higher level of care like aroundthe-clock skilled nursing care is needed, the resident would need to move out and sell their unit. However, upon move out or death of a resident, monthly fees still need to paid until the condo is resold, which can pose some challenges for sellers and surviving family members. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) A CCRC is a type of senior community that offers a full “continuum of care,” including independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and memory care all on the same campus or within the same building. There is an up-front entrance fee as well as an ongoing monthly charge. In most states, CCRCs are strictly regulated by the Office of Insurance Regulation. Unlike some other senior living options, there are financial and medical criteria that residents must meet in order to qualify to move in. This is because once you are accepted in a CCRC, the community is contractually obligated to care for you no matter how your medical condition or financial situation changes. CCRCs are not for everyone, but for the folks who do qualify, they enjoy the peace of mind of

knowing that they have a guaranteed care and all these components are located on the same campus. Typically, CCRCs attract a younger population and more couples than the rental option. CCRCs vary on how much care is included in your monthly costs and how much of the up-front entrance fee is refundable. CCRCs also differ in the timing of the return of the refundable portion of the entrance fee. Some of these communities will refund it within a specified time such as 60 to 90 days, and others will provide the refund upon resale of the apartment. The amount of the refund also varies significantly as well. It is important to understand that the entrance fee is not equity and there will not be any appreciation of your initial investment when you move out. Most CCRCs will offer one, if not all of the following types of contracts: Type A: Residents will pay the same monthly charge regardless of the level of care that is needed. Type B: Residents receive a discount on future health care charges, but their monthly payments will still rise as their needs increase. Type C: Residents pay a lower monthly rate, but will pay full per diem rates for higher levels of care. Which Type Is Right for Me? There are pros and cons of each of these options, therefore it is important to carefully assess your medical and financial situation before making a decision. Meeting with an experienced senior housing advisor can also be extremely beneficial in helping to determine which might be the best fit for you. This article first appeared on agingcare.com Bruce Rosenblatt is a senior housing expert with decades of experience in the elder care industry. Bruce developed Senior Housing Solutions in 2009 and now uses his expertise to educate clients on all available living options and assist them in finding the best fit for their needs and lifestyle. SeniorHousingSolutions.net

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Ask Nancy: Caring for Aging Relatives You should know this about “hospice care”

Q: My mother has been referred to hospice care for end-stage COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). I understand that prescription medications related to this condition are covered by hospice Medicare. But what about the other medications that she currently takes for conditions including high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure and low thyroid. Will these continue to be covered under her Medicare prescription plan? _ Allison W., Jacksonville, Fla. A: I receive a lot of questions about hospice so your question offers me an opportunity to provide a more detailed explanation about how hospice works. Hospice addresses the physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs of dying patients and their families. A team of interdisciplinary experts work together to provide palliative care, with the goal of making the patient as comfortable and pain-free as is possible during their remaining days, in their own home if possible. Hospice care is an option to anyone who has been determined by their physician to be terminally ill and who has six months or less to live. Many families mistakenly believe that it is only a resource to be used for the very last days or weeks of the patient’s life. That is unfortunate because they are not taking advantage of the many benefits it offers. If after six months, the patient requires continued hospice care, he or she may be “recertified” depending on the individual circumstances. Jenille Ball, Executive Director, Hospice of Montgomery, one of the original hospice care providers in the United States, explains: “Hospice focuses on managing a patient’s symptoms and providing

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

comfort and dignity during their final weeks or months of life.” There are many companies that provide hospice care but Ball advises choosing one that offers all levels of hospice care, gets high marks for preserving family relationships, and is approved by Medicare. That last point is important because under the Medicare hospice benefit, all expenses associated with hospice care, including a hospital bed if needed, medical equipment and other supplies are covered under the hospice benefit. The patient must sign a form that states that they are choosing hospice over other forms of Medicare-covered benefits to treat their terminal illness. However, when it comes to coverage of prescription drug expenses, as explained in Medicare’s latest policy statement the “Medicare hospice benefit covers only drugs and biologicals used primarily for the relief of pain and symptom control

for the terminal illness and related conditions.” It also states that “the Medicare hospice benefit does not pay for services that are curative in nature.” In your mother’s case, that means only those medications for alleviating COPD-related conditions are covered by hospice. As an example, if a blood clot medication prevents or alleviates symptoms related to her COPD, they would be paid for under the agreement between hospice and Medicare. But her medicine to control her blood pressure and cholesterol levels wouldn’t be covered because they would not be considered “necessary for the palliation and management of the terminal illness and related conditions. Nancy Stein, Ph.D., is the founder of Seniority Matters (senioritymatters.com), a caregiver advisory and referral service in South Florida for seniors and their families. You can contact her at nancy@senioritymatters.com. (c)2015, Seniority Matters, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

41


Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Going Nuts!

Nuts and seeds are incredibly good for you and an amazing source of many vitamins and minerals. Coming from a family (and marrying into another one!) that consumes nuts every evening as a suppertime snack, I was amazed to discover that apparently two thirds of Americans don’t eat nuts at all! So, assuming then that two out of every three people reading this do not eat nuts, I am going to try and persuade you why you need to start. So, why should you eat nuts? Research continues to show that nuts and seeds are good for our hearts, in addition to a plethora of other benefits ranging from cognitive function to managing blood sugars. You can break it down into three main reasons: fiber, healthy fats and disease prevention. Nuts benefit your health by providing a source of dietary fiber. Fiber is a specialized type of carbohydrate found in plant-based foods. It does not break down as it passes through your digestive tract, and the undigested fiber adds bulk to your stool to promote regular bowel movements. Fiber also helps slow the rate of digestion, which means that sugar from your meal enters your bloodstream more slowly, avoiding those unwanted spikes or sugar highs, inevitably followed by the dips or sugar lows, which just leave you craving more sugar. A never ending circle! Having a slow and steady release of sugar into the bloodstream is the ideal and helps you feel energized after you eat. An ounce of almonds boosts your fiber intake by a whopping 3.5 grams, while an equivalent serving of pistachios and pecans offers 2.9 and 2.7 grams, respectively. You need fat as part of your diet, (which we’ve already discussed) and eating nuts helps ensure that your fat intake comes from healthy unsaturated fats. Walnuts, in particular, boost your healthy fat intake because they contain alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid. This type of fat helps maintain brain function, nourishes

42 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

your red blood cells and helps fight excess inflammation. Each ounce of walnuts contains 2.6 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, more than the 1.1 grams required daily for women or 1.6 grams required daily for men. There are many studies that link a diet rich in nuts (and seeds) to preventing disease. People who regularly consume nuts tend to weigh less than those who rarely eat nuts, as well as face a lower risk for weight gain in the future. Nuts are shown to help reduce the levels of inflammation in your

body, which might reduce your risk of heart disease. Nut consumption also correlates with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. There is somewhat of a misconception that nuts are expensive, which when you consider that a serving of seeds or nuts costs just eighty-five cents on average then they are worth every penny, particularly when you consider the potential health benefits. Although often consumed as a snack, you can of course add them to salads, cereal, pasta dishes, use as an ice cream topping. I love to bake with them, adding them to muffins, brownies, sweetbreads, etc. You can even blend them into smoothies and of course make your own nut butters to spread on, well, almost anything! My husband loves almond butter spread on

apple slices; our son loves peanut butter spread on banana bread (which, if I’ve made it, already has walnuts or pecans in it). The reason I say make your own nut butters is that it’s just so easy to do – just pop the nuts in a blender and off you go! No added sugar, salt or any of the other nasties that you see on some commercial nut butter labels. You can of course buy nut butters that have only one ingredient on the label, (nuts!) but they are harder to find. Earthfare will have them and so will Wholefoods when they open. Buying nuts in bulk is by far the cheapest way to buy them. Earthfare has this option as does HealthWise. You fill your bag with the amount you want and pay for it by weight. No fancy packaging to pay for, just like back in the old days of grocers and butchers (yes, we still have those in Europe). You can also order nuts online in bulk too. These are just two of the many sites out there: www.nuts.com, www. nutsinbulk.com. Just make sure you check the shipping rates; lots offer free shipping if you buy a certain amount. If you do buy in bulk, storing them properly will make them last longer – if you don’t store them properly they will go rancid and if you eat them then you will make yourself ill. Store them in airtight containers and if you have bought them in portions of 2 or more pounds at a time, store them in the fridge, or you can even freeze some! Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/ tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


DATING Coach

10 dating tips 50-plus, single women need to know

Tip No. 1 - You want to put in writing both your short term and your long term dating goals. My short term goals were about meeting new and interesting men and I wanted to have fun dating. My long term goal was about being in a committed relationship. Both worked out well for me and they can for you too when you start your journey with this exercise.

open your heart than it is to find a man who is 6 feet tall. Tip No. 5 - Get out of your comfort zone and date men who are different than your usual type. Your usual type hasn’t made you happy in the past so why will he start making you happy now?

Tip No. 2 - Stop making excuses for not dating. I hear women say, “Now isn’t the right time (and I ask them if not now, when?); or they have to lose 10 pounds before they can even think about dating.” This type of thinking comes from fear. When you’re feeling this way, take a baby step and go on one dating site. Once you’ve taken one step and you’ve had some success, the next step will be a lot easier. The cool thing is ... you might find you’re having fun! Tip No. 3 - Not understanding the language men speak and hear may be keeping you from finding a great guy. (By the way, they are not women in men’s bodies!) Men don’t love talking about feelings although they are far more emotional than you think. They just don’t know how to express it thanks to feelings often being squelched by adults in their childhood. By learning the language men speak and hear, you’re going to find that you start getting your needs met more often without having to ask for what you want over and over again. Tip No. 4 - End the cycle of being overly perfectionistic about what men must have in order to date you. It’s far more important to look for someone who will make you laugh and

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Tip No. 6 - Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right! Henry Ford said this about developing cars. Turns out it’s true for just about every aspect of your life, including finding good men and dating. Tip No. 7 - Stop dating from your mind and start dating from your heart. Your heart doesn’t necessarily want what your mind does when it comes to a man. Remember your mind is always trying to keep you safe and in your comfort zone. Your heart wants you to feel loved, cherished and adored which are qualities you want in a man if one of your goals is to be in a long term relationship.

Men are visual and they want to see you and your beautiful smile not pictures of your cat, the scenery from your last vacation or your favorite outfit without you in it. Here’s the difference a great profile and awesome pictures can make. Laurie of New Jersey writes, “It’s only been about 24 hours since I put my new profile and pictures online. Forty-nine men want to meet me, 14 have written to me including two of my ‘top 10 prospects’ as have two other men I really would be interested in talking to. And the notes are so flattering and sweet. This is more activity than I’ve had in a year. You are a genius Lisa!”

exhausting.

Tip No. 9 - Dating can be both overwhelming and

It’s important to take a break whenever you need to. Get back in touch with what lights you up. Once you do, you’ll feel rejuvenated and ready to date again. Tip No. 10 - Have fun and enjoy yourself on a date meeting someone new and interesting. Everyone has a story ... your job is to find out what his is. Definitely makes a date a lot more fun! Lisa Copeland, “The Dating Coach Who Makes Dating Fun and Easier after 50!” Find out more at Findaqualityman.com (c)2016, Lisa Copeland, findaqualityman.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

Tip No. 8 - Go from invisibility to ‘Rock Star Visibility’ with great pictures and a warm inviting profile online! R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

43


Travel Trending with Kathy Witt

Lake of the Ozarks

There are the green, rolling hills of Ozark Mountain Country; cutaways layered thickly with sandstone and limestone; two superlative state parks; and that lake, the jewel of mid-Missouri: the massive, 54,000-acre Lake of the Ozarks, stretching out more than 90 miles from end to end in sun-shimmering splendor.

Sitting on the dock of the lake at Lake of the Ozarks State Park

Here is a laid-back, lake-front family vacation destination that checks all the boxes for a memorable, scenic and affordable getaway with more than enough to see and do. With 1,150 miles of meandering shoreline surrounded by a dozen pretty communities, the lake is the focal point, and area accommodations, from cottages, condos and camping sites to full-service hotels and full-on resorts, take full advantage to showcase the view. For example, Tan-Tar-A Resort Golf Club, Marina and Indoor Waterpark, an amenities-rich wilderness retreat, spreads over 400 acres on the banks of the Lake of the Ozarks. The comfy and more intimate mom-and-pop Holiday Shores Resort offers thoughtfullydesigned three-bedroom cottages tucked into the trees and lining the lakefront. A STORIED LAKE To get an idea of the sheer size and scope of the Lake of the Ozarks and learn how

44 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

one of the world’s largest manmade lakes came into being, stop by the sprawling circa 1930 Willmore Lodge, a visitor center and free-admission museum operated by the Lake Area Chamber of Commerce. You can read up on the area’s pre-lake history and towns submerged to make way for the construction of Bagnell Dam, which began in 1929, and follow the progression of the lake’s development. Stoll along the front deck for a lake views that bring photographers to their knees. Follow this up with a narrated lake cruise everyone in the family will love: Captain Omer Clark and Tropic Island Cruises offer 90-minute excursions aboard a 150-passenger motor yacht. Departing from the dock at Tan-Tar-a Resort, the new Tropic Island II glides past rugged bluffs and multimillion dollar homes as the captain shares lake history and highlights. Order a cocktail from the bar to enjoy on the sundeck or inside in the air conditioning.

Of course, with a lake the size of this one, there is opportunity aplenty to dip your toes into the water, swimming, fishing, boating and all sorts of watersports adventures. NATURAL BEAUTIES A full 85 miles of the lake’s shoreline is within ruggedly beautiful Lake of the Ozarks State Park, Missouri’s largest at a whopping 17,441 acres. Stretch out on two free sand beaches, swim, share a picnic, go hiking, mountain biking or horseback riding or take a boat out in this National Register of Historic Places marked by soaring bluffs, woodlands and ravines, historic log buildings, rustic bridges and stone ditch-dams built by the Civilian Conservation Corps of the Great Depression era. Head underground into Bridal Cave, one of four area show caves as well as one of the largest caves in Missouri. Sitting adjacent to the lake, Bridal Cave legendarily hosted a Native American The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


wedding ceremony in this pristine wonderland in the early 1800s. Today, more than 3,000 couples have been married or renewed their wedding vows in the same spot, now called Bridal Chapel.

crusty French baguette to dunk into a piquant blend of parmesan cracked black

Follow your tour guide over concrete pathways for a onehour journey into this national treasure, whose chambers are marked by mineral deposits, giant columns, delicate soda straws and massive draperies. The cave boasts more onyx formations than any other known cave or cavern and Mystery Lake, a purewater lake you can see on your tour that leads to the second, unseen Spirit Lake. Nearby is Ha Ha Tonka State Park, a magnet with its 70-foot wide natural bridge that stretches upwards more than 100 feet; steep-sided sinkhole called the Colosseum; and Counterfeiter’s Cave and Robber’s Cave, both used as hide-outs by 1830s bad guys. Native Americans explored the area, Daniel Boone fur trapped here and a wealthy Kansas businessman built a European-style stone castle on its grounds. Trek the trails and boardwalks to see the park’s caves, sinkholes and castle remains.

Tour castle ruins at Ha Ha Tonka State Park

Holiday Shores Resort has spacious three-level, three-bedroom cottages located right at water’s edge of Lake of the Ozarks

Seven Springs Winery and Vineyards, near Lake of the Ozarks, sits atop 160 acres of rolling Missouri foothills

With a sweeping garden-and-gazebo view against a forested backdrop, the Seven Springs Winery and Vineyards makes for a gorgeous afternoon interlude. Order The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Beloved by locals and visitors alike is Randy’s Frozen Custard, home of the famous Turtle Concrete, a gooey-delicious melange of hot fudge, caramel fudge and pecan halves over thick ice cream. And no one should miss the kitschy fun of Ozarkland with its countless souvenir tchotchkes and delicious fudge. (If you buy four squares, you get two squares free, and it’s worth every penny, and calorie.) PLANNING YOUR TRAVELS Lake of the Ozarks Convention & Visitors Bureau, www.FunLake.com

SUPERB STOP-BYS Let yourself be lured away from the lake, at least briefly, for these roadworthy stops. It’s easy to get caught up in the savings-and-specials frenzy at the Osage Beach Premium Outlets, but great bargains really can be found. This is one of the largest outlet shopping centers in the U.S., so everyone’s favorites are among the more than 110 top-name manufacturer outlets represented.

activities and an excellent mix of new and used books, the place is bright and clean, with none of the mustiness usually associated with used books. Trade in the book you finished lakeside and you’ll get a credit toward a used book.

pepper olive oil and sweet-cream butter, a perfect accompaniment to any of Seven Springs’ delicious wines. Osage Beach has the wonderful, independently-owned Stonecrest Book & Toy shop. Stocked with giant stuffed animals, puzzles, games, children’s

With some 200 restaurants in the Lake of the Ozarks area, families find plenty of palette-pleasing dining opportunities, many of them situated, where else?, on the lake. The casual Shorty Pants brings authentic Creole cuisine, served at the water’s edge, to the table. The more upscale Baxter’s offers lakeside views and a huge variety of entrees, including hand-cut premium steaks plus soups made in-house. Locals love Tonka Hills Restaurant for its comfy dive-vibe and true-to-its roots Ozark family dining menu. Holiday Shores Resort, www. HolidayShoresResort.com, 800-6394207. Roomy condos with furnished kitchens, private lake-view decks, WiFi, fireplaces; boat slips, game room, fire pit area, outdoor swimming pool; paddle boats and boat rentals. Tan-Tar-A Resort Golf Club, Marina and Indoor Waterpark, www.Tan-Tar-A.com, 800-826-8272. Variety of accommodations; onsite waterpark, marina, golf, dining; Windjammer Spa and Salon. Author, travel and lifestyle writer, and travel goods expert Kathy Witt feels you should never get to the end of your bucket list; there’s just too much to see and do in the world. She can be reached at KathyWitt24@gmail.com or KathyWitt.com. (c)2016 Kathy Witt Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

45


August Featured Artists

Landscape 11x12 oil on board by Barbara Gallagher

Dancer 30x15 oil on canvas, Anita Westerberg galleryonefineart.com/Anita-Westerberg

Signs of Spring I, 12x12 acrylic on canvas, Shirley Esco galleryonefineart.com/Shirley-Esco

Tripod Wood Sculpture, Ken Lever galleryonefineart.com/Kenneth-Lever

Still Standing 24x34 mixed media, Carol Barksdale galleryonefineart.com/Carol-Barksdale

Vision Quest II 12x12 acrylic on canvas, Jane Segrest galleryonefineart.com/Jane-Segrest

Abstract Nude 48x28 mixed media Craig Green Baldwin County @10,000 Feet 40x30 oil on canvas, John Wagnon galleryonefineart.com/John-Wagnon

Rouge 30x40 mixed media, Cecily Hulett galleryonefineart.com/Cecily-Hulett

Little Red Coupe, 14x18 oil on canvas board Pamela Wesley Copeland galleryonefineart.com/Pamela-Wesley-Copeland

Purple and Oranges 24x18 oil on canvas, Anne Hugghins galleryonefineart.com/Anne-Hugghins

Moon Series: Blue Moon Copper bowl 14x14x2 , Bradley Moon galleryonefineart.com/Bradley-Moon


By Sandi Aplin

Art & Soul

ELMORE COUNTY ART GUILD Presents 32nd Annual Guild Show Some of the following information was taken from the ECAG program provided by Mark Harris and given to me by Shirley Esco, President of ECAG at the awards presentation on July 10th. Gallery One Fine Art furnished a floral arrangement for the reception which was given as a door prize at the end of the award presentation.

Capital City Artists which was formed in 2009. Judie grew up in Troy, Alabama

First I want to share a little information about ECAG which is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit corporation founded in 1985. Their membership Best of Show winner, Margaret Sant, title of painting (pastel): “Ross” of approximately 80 and attended Troy University and Auburn individuals with varying backgrounds, University in Montgomery, majoring in interest and abilities participate in art with a minor in history. She earned regularly scheduled meetings which her B.S. and M.S. in Secondary Art include educational programs which Education. are held on a quarterly basis with the exception of June, July and August. The And now here are just a few of the primary objective of the Guild is to awards beginning with The BEST OF advance and promote the appreciation, enjoyment and exhibition of the visual arts, for the mutual improvement, cultural benefit and social enlightenment of Guild members and the public at large.

SHOW which was given to Peggy Sant for her pastel figurative painting titled” Ross”. The purchase awards were as follows: REGINA EDWARDS, PC “Summer’s Pick” by Judy Les Graves, JACKSON HOSPITAL FOUNDATION “Giverny Garden” by Sherry George, RIVER BANK & TRUST “Beautiful Roses” by Manjula Kumar, FIRST COMMUNITY BANK “Blooming Pink Dogwood by Manjula Kumar, HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS “Swayback Bridge” by Mitford Fontaine. For more information about the Guild visit the ECAG website at www.ElmoreCountyArtGuild. com If you are an artist or a patron who loves art, I suggest you join the ECAG and begin receiving the monthly newsletter and email alerts. Membership is open to anyone high-school age or older that is interested in supporting and promoting the arts. Sandi Aplin, Director of Gallery One Fine Art sandiaplin@aol.com or galleryonefineart.com

Judie Hooks, Artist and Educator was the 2016 Juror for this show. Judie taught art, history and yearbook publication in the Montgomery Public School System for 25 years, retiring in 2003. During that time, she taught private art classes to both children and adults in the afternoon and evenings. Judie currently has 26 students painting on a weekly basis in her studio. Her group is called the The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

47


The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

The title sounds like something you’d see at a drive-in theater on a hot August night, right?

NOW SHOWING

A few drive-in theaters remain, but at one time they were numerous. They showed mostly “B” flicks, but the film was a sideshow. Drive-ins were vast parking lots where over- sexed teens could park for a few hours on a Friday night, and use their car as an outdoor motel room.

By Greg Budell

Shoe buying has changed over the years. Today, with rare exception, it is an individual experience. Shoppers look at displayed footwear, find a corresponding box on a shelf and try the shoe on. We, according to our boss, Mr. Kantor (a dead ringer for ‘Fish’ in The Godfather) were to provide “service” to our Maling’s shoppers.

Was I really there to see “Soylent Green” on a screen 500 feet away? To enjoy the soundtrack crackling through a rusted box clinging to the inside passenger window? Of course not. The drive-in was the Final Destination, the concluding chapter to a plot that included scoring a bottle of strawberry Ripple wine. This required finding am adult willing to commit the crime of providing alcohol to someone underage. We all had that one friend. It was the art of the teen deal. And, for 98 cents, was there a better way to wash down the popcorn (along with her ability to say “NO”)? I can’t think of one- and Ripple left your breath with the kissable, sexy scent of over over-ripened fruitcake.

That was many Augusts ago. A movie about a teenage boy working as a salesman in a ladies-only shoe store has better plot potential than some of the dreck they’re serving up at the Cineplex these days. I was that teenage boy and for several months in my wonder years, I did work as a shoe salesman for Maling’s in Chicago, a store that catered to women. A buddy of mine was working there and offered to “get me in”. He did, and I’ll never forgive you, Mike Beran! I walked into Maling’s as clueless about women as a 16 year old kid could be and months later, walked out with my heterosexuality barely intact. It was the OMG job of a lifetime.

Most of the Maling’s staff were guys my age or a little older. We wore white shirts, ties and pants - no jeans. Considering the average 40ish female customer could require as much as a mile of “running” (going to the stock room to find a size you KNEW was not going to fit) - sneakers and track shorts would have been a more practical sales attire. At Maling’s we learned The Art of the Kneel. After retrieving the requested shoe in the requested size, we were taught to descend to one knee, and gently guide the ladies foot into the shoe. Often, it was akin to guiding a pre-inflated inner tube into a tire. We were prohibited from suggesting a larger size. She had to come to that realization and ask for the larger shoe. Remarks like “the sausage doesn’t appear to fit the casing” were verboten.

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management

48 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Thinking back, there was something twisted about this group of teenage boys being compelled to kneel before, and grant the whims of women who could run the gamut from curt to completely condescending. The average customer would take 30-40 minutes and Teenage Salesboy would be up and down more often in that time than a catcher in baseball. For this, we were paid the going minimum wage - $1.65 per hour, and an 8% commission if our sales exceeded $100. Today, $100 is equal to a half-pair of shoes, but then, with shoes running $8-12 a pair, you had to bust tail to make anything extra, and except for the more suave among us, it was a feat rarely accomplished.

The Business Mini Directory

A Business Mini is a little fatter than your old business card and for a limited time we’re offering a Business Mini to fit your budget. Fifty dollars will get your business message in front of thousands of people over 50 who have the money to buy stuff. Every business needs one more customer, where will yours come from? Call today and get your $50 Business Mini, 324.3472 or jim@riverregionboom.com

I learned enough about women’s feet to become an amateur podiatrist. Even the finest, most elegant of Maling’s customers had feet riddled with...uh, feet-things. One of our Maling’s regulars was nicknamed “Bunion B*tch”. No lie, she was a hefty gal and her right foot had a protrusion that stuck out at a 45 degree angle. Woe to the Teenage Salesboy who was “up” when she walked in! She came in to toy with us. When she did, the rest of us would guide our customers to seats close to BB for the ensuing entertainment. We chuckled, watching as her shoe-boy began endless torturous orbits to the stockroom and back, hoping something would miraculously accommodate her abnormality. In 30 minutes, there would be a twin tower of shoe boxes building around her location, containing the rejects. BB rarely bought anything but we all met the reality that some women could never be pleased. My second wife may very well have been Daughter of the Bunion B*tch - another good drive-in title, no? My most memorable customer was a nice-enough lady who’d asked to see several styles. I placed the stack of boxes on the floor and dropped to my Shoe Knee. I removed the shoe she wore in and I am not making this up - was greeted by a tootsie that looked like, and bore the color, of a baked potato. It was lumpy and oblong, and had ‘eyes’ growing on the side. Grossest feet I ever saw. She bought 8 pairs, teaching me the important life lesson to never judge a woman by her baked potato feet. Thanks to that sale, and Mike Beran’s car, I was able to take Judy (or whatever her name was) to see Soylent Green at the Sheridan Drive-In. Soylent Green was made out of people and Judy (or whatever her name was) was made of sugar and spice and nicely rippled. It was a hot August night, and I got an eyeful of everything but her feet. Happy Ending! Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, children and dogs. He’s a 25 year veteran of radio who hosts the Greg & Susan morning show 6-9 am and Happy Hour 3-6 pm on NEWSTALK 93.1, Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

49


Digital & Interactive When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community”

BOOM! Now Available At Publix

50 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Rick Phelps, Blogger, Diagnosed with Early-Onset Alzheimer’s

Dementia, Caregiving and Political Correctness I sometimes surf the web, reading what I can about Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Short stories or paragraphs are all I can handle nowadays, and only then can I hope to remember what I have read. I came upon a couple of stories that have been discussed in recent months by some people who are considered to be in the know when it comes to Alzheimer’s, or dementia in general. It never ceases to amaze me how someone sitting behind a desk somewhere can pull some of these things out of nowhere, yet vow that their ideas are in everyone’s best interest. The latest foolishness that I have seen is to refrain from calling people with AD, “Alzheimer patients.” It seems as though calling someone an Alzheimer’s patient is labeling the person, and labels, by definition, are limiting. Wait, what? When I read such nonsense, as an Alzheimer’s patient, I take real offense. I’m not offended by these clueless people, but the mere fact that others actually buy into this nonsense. “Don’t call an Alzheimer’s patient an Alzheimer’s patient.” Isn’t that in itself what they call a misnomer? And why is someone who doesn’t have Alzheimer’s or any form of dementia, always behind movements like this? How do they know what is best for people like me?

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Now, as if this wasn’t enough, some of the same organizations want to stop calling people suffering from AD “sufferers.” Instead of calling me a sufferer of dementia, I should be referred to a person who is “deeply forgetful.” I kid you not. This kind of stuff is actually written about in more than one magazine that goes out to doctor’s offices and can be found around the internet, so you know it has to be true! They also make another idiotic appeal, this time regarding caregivers. It seems as though one should refrain from using the term “caregiver” anymore. The article goes on to say, “To see yourself as one who is providing care to another establishes a hierarchy within that relationship; a hierarchy with you on top.” In essence, calling my wife my caregiver is demeaning to me because it establishes a hierarchy within our relationship. To avoid creating this uneven playing field, we should use terms like “care partner” instead. Well, here’s a shocker... Phyllis June is

number one in the chain of command. Good Lord. She knows what is best for me and has seen these things through for me over the years since my diagnosis. Does this make our relationship uneven or any less of a partnership? You have to be special to buy into this kind of nonsense. Yet, once again, there are organizations peddling this and they consider themselves to be credible. But let me tell you something. All this boils down to one thing, and one thing only: political correctness. Period. Somehow even the long arms of politics are trying to infringe on the world of dementia. Why? Because, as I have said for years, it’s big business. Use whatever terminology you and your loved one are comfortable with. After all, you know each other best and understand the true depth of and meaning behind your relationship. If one of you happens to find certain words hurtful or demeaning, be honest, talk through it and find a better alternative. There is no such thing as one-size-fits all advice or solutions for dementia.

Rick Phelps became an advocate for dementia awareness after being diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease in June of 2010, at the age of 57. He was forced into early retirement and created Memory People, an online dementia and memory impairment group which supports over 7,000 individuals, all touched in some way by dementia. Visit http://phelps2645.blogspot.com/

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

51


August 2016

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Harriott II: Blues Cruise The Harriott II Riverboat, Downtown Montgomery Sundays during August, boards at 5:30, cruise 6-8 pm Enjoy a Sunday Blues Cruise aboard the Harriott II Riverboat. Live entertainment, cash bar and concessions available. Ticket Prices: $20 per Adult, $15 per Child. To purchase tickets call 334.625.2100 or visit the Box Office at 200 Coosa St or visit www.funinmontgomery.com Harriott II Riverboat, 355 Commerce Street Montgomery, AL 36106

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

RESTAURANTS IN MONTGOMERY Montgomery Restaurant Week Restaurants throughout River Region August 12 to August 21, various locations

Restaurants around the River Region, including many featured in the popular “100 Dishes To Eat in Alabama Before You Die” brochure, invite diners to experience the wonderful culinary scene of Sweet Home Alabama in the River Region. Participating restaurants will offer specials throughout the week. There are no tickets or passes required for any restaurants. See individual restaurants for meal prices, to learn which restaurants are participating visit eatmgm.com and www.alabamarestaurantweek.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA The Charlie Daniels Band MPAC Downtown Montgomery Saturday, August 20th, 8-10pm

First Sundays @ One Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Sunday, August 7th, 1 pm Learn more about work in the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (traveling exhibitions as well as the Museum’s Permanent Collection) in these FREE docent led tours the FIRST Sunday of each month at 1 pm. Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, 1 Museum Drive. For more information, call 334.240.4333. More information visit mmfa.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Veg Out Montgomery EAT South Downtown Farm Tuesday, August 9th, 7-8 pm

Join EAT South for their monthly plant-based diet pot luck dinners on the second Tuesday of the month. March - September at 7pm and October - February 6pm. Located at the EAT South Downtown Farm. For more information, call 334.422.9331 or email info@eatsouth.org. More information visit www.facebook.com/vegOutMontgomery. Rear Parking lot of Advertiser, 485 Molton St, Montgomery, AL 36104

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Live Music by Live at Five The Tipping Point, Hampstead Friday, August 12, 7-11 pm

52 BOOM!

August 2016

Music for the folks who have lived long enough to appreciate Members: Doy Summers, guitar and vocals; John O’Connor, guitar and vocals; Steve Kohn, bass. For more info visit www. facebook.com/liveat5music/

RiverRegionBoom.com

The Charlie Daniels Band will perform live at the Montgomery Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, August 20th at 8:00 pm. Tickets are $38 and can be purchased online or at the MPAC Box Office. For more information, call 334.481.5100. For more info visit mpaconline.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Buckmasters Expo Montgomery Convention Center-201 Tallapoosa Street Friday-Sunday, August 19-21st

Shop for hunting bargains from more than 300 exhibitors and vendors who are all a part of the biggest hunting sale ever! Experts from top manufacturers such as Mathews, Yamaha, Nikon and Easton will be manning booths to answer all your questions. Watch the nation’s best archers compete in the Top Bow World championship, presented by Mathews Archery--It’s the nation’s highest-paying archery tournament. Bring your grandkids to the Young Bucks area for games, hunting-related activities, mascots Bucky and Droptine, Balloon Man and much more. Admittance to the expo is free with a donation of a canned good per person. The expo is open from 3 until 9 pm on Friday, 9 am until 7 pm on Saturday and 10 am until 5 pm on Sunday. For more info visit buckmasters.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The 18th annual Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival, a celebration of new independent cinema in downtown Birmingham, is set to take place August 26-28. Since its debut in 1999, filmmakers from across the country and around the world have come to Birmingham to screen their work at Sidewalk and have been thrilled to discover fresh, enthusiastic crowds eager to devour new independent cinema. With multiple venues located within Birmingham’s historic Theatre District (featuring the fully restored Alabama Theatre, (a 2,200 seat movie palace built by Paramount in 1927), spontaneity rules the schedule of Sidewalk attendees. Lowpriced weekend passes provide easy access to Sidewalk venues, encouraging attendees to seek out new films and sample programming they may not otherwise see. The result is a crowd rich in diversity and united in a hunger for new film. www.sidewalkfest.com

This August marks the 7th anniversary of the Montgomery Dragon Boat Race and Festival, and it promises to be an exciting one! On August 27th, almost 80 teams will converge downtown at the beautiful Riverfront Park to paddle and party on Race Day in the pursuit of the Grand Championship Trophy while supporting the missions of our two local beneficiaries, Bridge Builders Alabama and Rebuilding Together Central Alabama. The Riverfront Park will be alive with music, entertainment, and over 30 local vendors, artists, and exhibitors while teams compete on the water in view of over 8,000 spectators! For more information, call 334.625.9411 or montgomerydragonboat.org

Sidewalk Film Festival Downtown Birmingham Theatre District August 26-28, a variety of theatres, various times

BURKVILLE, ALABAMA Okra Festival Burkville, Lowndes County Saturday, August 27th, 12-6 pm

The Okra Festival started as a small community event celebrating the only crop that survived an unusually hot summer in 2000. More than a decade later, it is one of the highlights of the summer season, featuring local food, music and cultural arts. Craftspeople and artists from all over including Storm Cloud Hills handmade, hand forged copper and brass jewelry. Incredible Food: Famous gumbo, fish, barbecue, pig ears, okra dishes, preserves, local produce and italian ice cream, Annie Mae’s famous pickled okra! And OKRA PIES (whole). Location and directions: Lowndes County, off U.S. Hwy. 80 W. on Frederick Douglas Road. Follow signs. For more information visit: www.okrafestival.org

Dragon Boat Race & Festival Riverfront Park, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, August 27th, 8-4 pm

WETUMPKA, ALABAMA

The Priscilla Crommelin: Her Life and Work The Kelly Art Gallery, Wetumpka Monday-Friday 8-4:30 pm The Kelly Fitzpatrick Memorial Gallery in Wetumpka will open a new exhibition featuring a long-time Wetumpka resident’s artwork. The Priscilla Crommelin: Her Life and Work exhibition—composed of 69 works, 22 of which have never been exhibited before is now open through September 21, 2016. Her work includes vibrant landscapes, portraits, floral and still life paintings. The public is invited to an opening reception on June 28 from 5–7 pm. The Gallery is located on the second floor of the City of Wetumpka Administrative Building, 408 S. Main Street and is open Monday–Friday from 8 am to 4:30 pm. For more info vist thekelly.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Mannheim Steamroller Christmas MPAC, Downtown Montgomery Tuesday, November 22nd,

Tickets go fast for some of the best Christmas music to set your holiday mood. This will be a great Holiday Tradition to start this year with the grandkids. For tickets and info visit mpaconline.org

Digital & Interactive

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community” The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

53


by Bob Batz Jr.

Outdoor Recreation for People with Disabilities

Kayakers follow Joel Johnston as he wraps up his 440-mile journey to raise money to buy adaptive paddling equipment for people with disabilities. (Michael Henninger/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/TNS)

Joel Johnston made it, reaching his physical destinations if not his financial goal, on his sojourn to help the cause of outdoor recreation for people with disabilities. On June 3, the 60-year-old Regent Square man embarked on SoFAR, or his Sojourn Funding Adaptive Recreation, a monthlong trip of 440-plus miles crisscrossing Western Pennsylvania by kayak, hiking shoes and bicycle. Johnston, a substitute school teacher who volunteers as a trip leader with nonprofit Venture Outdoors, decided to do bucket-list adventure in his home state to raise money to buy adaptive paddling equipment and train people to help people with disabilities use it. Recently, he finished paddling down the Allegheny River from Freeport, the last of 10 water or land trails in his journey. He decided to stop at Venture Outdoors’ new kayak rental spot at Aspinwall Riverfront Park rather than go all the way to the Point to avoid the crowds and traffic from the Kenny Chesney concert. He raised more than $6,200, not quite half of the $15,000 he’d hoped to raise via GoFundMe.com. But the site will continue to accept donations throughout July at gofundme.com/sofar2016.

54 BOOM!

August 2016

RiverRegionBoom.com

He was lighter than he started, by about 20 pounds, and with more facial hair. But he was feeling pretty good. “I’m glad I did southwestern Pennsylvania,” he said. “There is some cool stuff here.” The trip had its literal ups and downs. At one downhill stretch there was a broken arm-that of his friend Bob Rock, who’d joined him to bike the West Penn Trail to Saltsburg. (Rock is doing fine, he says.) Blisters caused Johnston to wear a pair of Crocs sandals while traversing the difficult Slippery Rock Gorge Trail, and that caused him to put on knee braces for the steep climbs and descents on the Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail. He had to endure a good bit of rain. Ironically, one of the things the trip made him miss was water that he didn’t have to filter before drinking. He also missed having ice. “It was not a good time sometimes,” he says. But he also saw some beautiful scenery, lots of wildlife including bald eagles and red spotted newts, and met some beautiful people along the way. The “trail angels” who helped him included the

Beaver County couple who not only let him camp in their yard but also had him in for dinner, drinks and breakfast. He also got assists from his friend and “trusty Sherpa,” Geoff Suiters, who helped shuttle equipment. Perhaps his favorite part was hiking the North Country National Scenic Trail from Parker to Moraine State Park with his wife of 30 years, Alice, and spending a couple of nights with her in the Davis Hollow Cabin. As he noted on a photo of them together that he tweeted from the trail, “Doing it with someone you love (is) priceless.” Donna Bour, Venture Outdoors’ director of development and communications, said this was the first time someone took it upon himself or herself to do a fundraiser for the group like this. “We’re thrilled with the amount,” she said. While he didn’t raise as much money as he’d hoped, he said, “I think we did a lot better than some people thought we would do.” (c)2016 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

August 2016

BOOM!

55


BOOM! August 2016  
BOOM! August 2016  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine