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Join us at Frazer for a year of preaching through this life-changing book that will show you exactly who Jesus Christ is. “Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.” –John 20:30-31 THROUGHOUT THE YEAR 2014, Pastors Tim Thompson and Patrick Quinn will be preaching verse by verse through the gospel of John in all of Frazer’s Sunday morning worship services. Jesus made the remarkable claim that He came to give you life—real, abundant, overflowing life right now, and eternal life in the world to come. This teaching series will lead you to the heart of who this Jesus is and what it means to believe in Him.

Frazer Church: find hope, Follow Jesus • Sunday worship 8, 9:30 & 11AM 6000 atlanta Hwy. Montgomery • frazerumc.org • 334.2728622 •


BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

September 2014

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Volume 5 Issue 3

Carl Bard

Humor Advice Health Community

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 6 Publisher’s Letter 10 Dating Advice Facial hair a deal breaker? 16 BOOM! Cover Profile 19 Cover Profile Nominations

page 15

Photo by Frank C. Williams

20 Who Would You Trust With Your Face? Dr. Michael Bowman 23 Meaningful Meditations 24 CAN THE NURSING HOME TAKE YOUR PARENTS’ HOUSE?

Ask an Elder Law Attorney

26 The Last Typewriter R+epairmen

Features 9 It’s In The “Kiss”

Don’t be afraid to put some oomph in your smooch

Departments 12 This and That

Now You’re “In the Know”

36 Wine Country

Busket List: Washington’s Woodinville Wine Country

28 Is Hearing Loss Affecting My Employee’s Performance?

40 Healing Broken Hearts

“Don’t worry. When you get home, I will take good care of you.”

29 Riverwalk Wine Festival Ticket Giveaway 30 Sixty is the New Forty! Leigh Anne Richards

44 {12} Things

Solutions for Bored Boomers

46 Greg Budell

32 Financial Thoughts with Brandt McDonald

Confessions of a “Golftitute”

35 ARTREK-You’re Invited Art & Soul

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39 The Gift of Hospice

COVER PROFILE

42 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

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page 45

page 40

page 13

page page 42 14

page 36

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 6398 Eastwood Glen Pl., Montgomery, AL 36117. The phone number for voice and fax is 334.523.9510. Copyright 2014 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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publisher’s letter

Try It...You’ll Like It The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.523.9510 jim@riverregionboom.com

Associate Editor Kelly Watson

kelly@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Tracy Bhalla Dr. Michael Bowman Greg Budell

Michael Castleman Lisa Copeland Erica Curless Gayle Kirby Erik Lacitis Brandt McDonald Mary Meehan Peggy Myrick Leigh Anne Richards Katie Slade Brittany Spahr Raley L. Wiggins Kathy Witt

Cover Photography Kim Bethea The Studio @ EastChase

thestudioateastchase@gmail.com

www.thestudioateastchase.com 334.239.3196

Try it you’ll like it...Some of us remember the cereal commercial where the older kids tell Mikey to try a new cereal that’s supposed to be good for them. To their surprise, Mikey does try it and he likes it! That’s what technology feels like to many of us older folks. In preparing this month’s issue I came across a blog that asked Are You More Tech Savvy Than a 14-Year Old? Of course I had to take it...I scored 114 and the average 14 year old scored 113! I’m not that tech savvy, more importantly, I’m not afraid to embrace the digital world and engage in new ways to live my life. In fact, most of us, after adopting new Jim Watson, Publisher technologies find life to be a little easier and better. It’s called learning and if you want to grow old fast...stop learning! Go online and take the test (link on pg 13) and then challenge yourself to become tech savvy, it’s a Brave New World. This month’s issue offers a couple of new contributors I think you’ll enjoy getting to know. First we have Brandt McDonald sharing his Financial Thoughts based on his research and understanding as the Managing Partner at McDonald Barranco and Hagen Wealth Management. We also have Tracy Bhalla writing about Eating Smart. Tracy is the owner of Cool Beans, Downtown Montgomery, and she is married to a cardiologist so she’ll bring an interesting food perspective each month. Our Cover Profile is the ever fabulous “Miss Kopy Kat”, a local blogger who has a passion for sharing her decorating ideas. She’s really Gayle Kirby and works as an NCIU nurse at Baptist South. I think you’ll enjoy reading some of her life’s journey...you may even be inspired to start your own blog! We have plenty of other good reads to stimulate your thinking; Greg Budell wants to be your Golftitute so give me a call! When was the last time you heard “Typewriter Repairman”, apparently they still exist. You can read about the wine country in Washington Sate, a Pediatric Cardiologist who’s 77 and rolls around in a wheel chair humming, a sixty something woman bodybuilder, the hospice experience and finally a chance to win tickets to the Riverwalk Wine Festival coming in October. There’s plenty more, so take a few minutes out of your busy day and sit back, relax and enjoy this month’s issue of BOOM! Thanks again for sharing your thoughts and sharing BOOM! with a friend. Don’t forget, you can read the digital and interactive BOOM! anytime at RiverRegionBoom.com. Reading the digital and interactive version gives you all the links to advertiser’s websites and bonus editorial content, which makes reading BOOM! more like exploring. Share your tech savvy score with me?

Jim

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.523.9510

jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text 334.523.9510 office

jim@riverregionboom.com

Design & Layout Lake House Graphics

Distribution

Network Delivery

DIGITAL and INTERACTIVE? When you read the Digital version of BOOM! at

Printing

RiverRegionBoom.com, you will be interactive with every

Publications Press, Montgomery, AL 334.244.0436

website and email in the magazine. You can click through to your favorite advertiser’s website or send them an email

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

requesting more info. You will also learn more from our articles because if there’s more information to learn you can click the link and go learn more! The BOOM! Reading Experience...Just Got Better.

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To be a better lover, put It’s been a long time since most older adults experienced their first romantic kisses. But while some elements of eroticism fade with age, kissing can remain just as vibrant and sensually satisfying at 96 as it felt at 16. And when couples take kissing more seriously, they can introduce new pleasure into even the longest-term relationships. Kissing is an often-overlooked element of sex. (Sexuality guides, for example, rarely mention it.) But the few scientific studies that have been done suggest that both men and women place a surprisingly high premium on smooching: U Oxford University researchers surveyed 308 men and 594 women aged 18 to 63. Many _ but especially the women _ considered the quality of first kisses a key signaler of the partner’s attractiveness and relationship potential. U University of Texas researcher Sheril Kirshenbaum, author of “The Science of Kissing: What Our Lips Are Telling Us,” reports that two-thirds of women and more than half of men recall terminating budding relationships

oomph in your smooch By Michael Castleman

because they disliked the way their partner kissed. Talk about your kiss-offs! U In long-term relationships, many people, particularly women, continue to use the quality and frequency of kissing before, during, and after sex as a gauge of relationship satisfaction.

The majority likewise prized soft, moist lips; deep breathing; mutual caresses; and assertiveness. That last item should liberate you to “lean in” and really put your heart into it, rather than remaining passive and simply receiving the other person’s kisses.

SIMPLE SECRETS FOR SUPER SNOGGING Remember the “Shoop Shoop Song (It’s in His Kiss),” the 1964 hit by soul singer Betty Everett? Many popular songs extol the virtues of kissing, but precious few tell you how to do it like a pro. Fortunately, results are just in on that front, too: In a recent survey of 1,041 adults, the vast majority cited fresh breath, clean teeth and good grooming as vital to a successful kiss.

Percy Bysshe Shelley defined kissing as “soul meeting soul on lovers’ lips.” (No wonder they called him a Romantic poet!) I suppose it’s possible to express deep love with lips-only kissing, but for soul to truly meet soul, most couples prefer open-mouth kissing with tongue contact. Most people consider the dance of tongues quite intimate; indeed, for some it’s almost as intimate as genital sex. Respondents to the survey mentioned above said the best kissing begins with mouths closed, and that the lips should part only as the two people become aroused. So who cares whether you met last year or last century? You may be able to “say it with flowers,” but the best way to seal the deal is with a kiss. Mmmwah! (c)2014, AARP Distributed by MCT Information Services

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DATING Advice

With Lisa Copeland

Facial hair a deal breaker?

Dear Lisa,

I found a nice man online but he has a beard and a mustache and facial hair is one of my deal breakers. We dated 4 times when I methis daughter who was not impressed with me as she still misses her mother I imagine. I did try. Also he only paid for me on the first date but was sporting a brand new car for the other dates. I am in a dilemma._Shirley

Shirley,

Let’s start with facial hair being a deal breaker. Usually deal breakers are qualities likecan’t smoke,must love kids and pets, or personality traits like must accept me for who I am. You could be missing quality men who’d be a good fit for you by keeping facial hair as a deal breaker, rather than a negotiable quality. Consider rethinking this one by asking yourself is this something you really can’t tolerate? If you believe you can’t ... then honor what you want. From my experience with clients and friends, children often have a tough time when it comes to accepting a new woman in their father’s life. For now, be yourself and don’t try and replace her mom. Be patient and give it a lot of time if your relationship continues. As for him paying, I usually suggest you let a man pay for the first three dates. After that you can offer to split or buy the popcorn at a movie or make him dinner. Talk with this man about how you are feeling using the phrase, “I feel uncertain about how we are handling who pays for dates.” Then ask, “What are you thinking?” If he’s willing to work with you, he’s got relationship potential. If not, let him go.

Dear Lisa,

I am finding it really hard to describe myself in a flirty way online. My girlfriends are all shocked I want to try online dating so I have given up asking their opinions. My daughter-in-law is a devout Catholic and does not approve of people my age even wanting to find

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someone. Her mother is also a widow but is content to be by herself. Don’t get me wrong, my daughter-in-law is a darling and very, very sweet to me, I love her dearly. But I don’t want to upset her. Help!_Ann

Ann,

First of all, your dating life is your business and no one else’s. Everyone always has an opinion of how others should live their lives. If you listen to them, you’ll end up turning yourself into a pretzel trying to please everyone but yourself. It’s okay to ask people for help but it’s ultimately up to you to decide what works best for you. As a single woman, it’s important to surround yourself with friends who understand what you are going through; that usually means other single women older than 50 who are divorced or widowed. Married friends can have the best intentions with their help but they’ve never been in your shoes so they have no idea what it’s like to be single again after 50. As for flirting in your profile, watch for exactly how to do this right here in my blog next month.

Dear Lisa,

First of all I have just finished reading your book,”The Winning Dating Formula for Women Over 50,”and thoroughly enjoyed it. I am 72. I lost my first husband to cancer in 1991, remarried in 2006 but picked a really wrong guy for me. He has temper/rage issues and after he took a swing at me I told him ‘do that again and I will walk.’ He did and I have walked. Unfortunately, this charming chap is entitled to half the proceeds of the sale of my home except the few bits and pieces I owned before we married. He is still in the home with another woman who is probably going through exactly what I and his other two wives have been through.Yes, there were red flags but I did not want to see them! In effect I have very little money now and live with my eldest son and his family. They are wonderful to me but I miss my own home

RiverRegionBoom.com

and feel I cannot date anyone because I do not have my own home and it sounds so much like a ton of baggage when I explain.What can I do?_SA

SA,

I want to congratulate you for recognizing you needed to leave when this man hit you. No man should ever abuse a woman and no woman should stay in an abusive relationship.There are other options. You said you saw red flags and ignored them.Often, we do this when the chemistry we experience with a new man is so intense or we are desperate to have a man in our lives. It’s worth taking some time to look at why you attracted a man like this in the first place, as well as why you flew past the red flags. You don’t want to repeat this pattern again. Everyone comes with a certain amount of baggage.And by the way, before you marry a man, it’s worth consulting a lawyer for advice on the, what if’s ... meaning what happens with my property if we get married? Back to your baggage ... since you’ve read my book, you know I’m a big advocate ofdating to date (and not to mate) especially on a first date.This means keeping the date light and fun as you get to know someone new and interesting. If you find a relationship developing over time, you can begin to share more about your personal life. It’s scary for a potential boyfriend to hear the intensity of your life upfront ... it will come off as drama on a first date.As he gets to know you, he’s likely to be more accepting of your circumstances. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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This & tHAT

Hands On River Region’s Volunteer Opportunities & 9/11 Day of Service and Remembrance Volunteer events will actually take place throughout the week of 9/11 and will include projects such as: Light construction and debris removal at multiple Rebuilding Together homes; Light construction and debris removal at multiple House to House homes; Trail cleanup at Lincoln and Remount cemeteries (Montgomery Clean City Commission); Trail cleanup along the Voting Rights Trail (Montgomery Clean City Commission). We will be adding more projects on our website and facebook page in honor of this National Day of Service. Whether an individual, group or corporation - HandsOn River Region is here to help you realize the benefit each and every person can be to their community. We coordinate and manage volunteer projects throughout the River Region for over 200 non-profits. And we’ve been doing this for over 40 years! Search for volunteer opportunies on our website or call us for assistance in locating the perfect volunteer opportunity for you! 334.264.3335. Current Listings for Volunteers include: Meals On WheelsMontgomery Area Council On Aging needs volunteers to prepare frozen meals which will be delivered to elderly shut-ins for their Meals On Wheels program. Meals On Wheels delivers meals to homebound seniors who are unable to prepare their own meals. This vital program is a source of much needed nutrition, provides a welcome, daily contact with senior clients, and serves as a means to regularly check recipients’ welfare. To older people who cannot prepare meals, the program is a blessing and gives a sense of security because of its regular personal contact. Family Guidance Center Walk/Run-Join the Family Guidance Center for the 5th Annual Walk/Run, Sept 14th, 7:30AM, at the Shoppes EastChase. Volunteers are needed for various race day tasks.Specific task instructions will be provided at the event. Dress is casual and T-shirt provided. EAT South Urban Farm-Volunteer Docents are needed at EAT South. Farm Docents host visitors and volunteers and lead educational tours of the farm. Docents have an opportunity to develop skills in farm education and volunteer management and work with a great team of staff and volunteers in a beautiful setting in downtown Montgomery. Get involved and Serve Today, visit handsonriverregion.org

Free Broadway Under The Stars Pops Concert The Montgomery Symphony will perform a free evening of Broadway showtunes on Thursday, September 11th, when the Orchestra presents its 28th annual Broadway Under The Stars Pops Concert. Picnic baskets, coolers, blankets, and lawn chairs are all welcome at this free, family-oriented event which is sponsored by Regions Bank. The concert will be held lakeside in the Blount Cultural Park in front of the Alabama Shakespeare Festival and will begin at 7:30 pm. Come early and pick a good spot to enjoy your family’s outing. The gates will open at 5:00 pm. For more information, or to order a Special VIP Dinner Package with reserved seating and parking, call 334.240.4004. For more info visit montgomerysymphony.org River City Church, a United Methodist congregation, invites the entire community to their 4th Saturday Outreach event on September 27 from 9-11am at the church, located at 301 Dexter Avenue. Admission is free. There will be blood pressure/glucose screenings, dental screenings, career services, free haircuts, hygiene items and canned goods. Participants can register for a drawing for a weekly bus pass. During the 2-hour period, attendees can speak with prayer partners, and purchase items in the River City Rummage Sale located on the lower level of the church. Nurses will screen for diabetes (glucose testing), blood pressure, and other vital signs. Volunteers will also provide homework help and a craft for children. For more information, please call 263-0549 or visit www.rivercityumc.com.

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BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

Bluegrass Festival The Titus Community Center will host its 14th annual bluegrass festival on Saturday, September 27, from 10 - 6 pm. Featured performers this year will be the Justice Family Band; Big Canoe Creek; Dixie Flavor, whose performers are between 13 to 16 years old; Laurie Harris Band; and Mike Ray, Sound Reinforcement. Held on the lawn at the Titus Community Center (bring lawn chairs for outside seating), children’s activities will be available and barbeque and beverages can be purchased. No alcohol or dogs are allowed. Tables are still available for arts and crafts sales. Call Ruth Bowden at 334-5678937 for more information. Admission is $5 for age 12 and over, and free to children. Proceeds will be used for the restoration and maintenance of the Community Center. The Titus Community Center is located approximately 10 miles north of Wetumpka on Highway 231, then six miles north on County Road 29. For more information, email titusbluegrassfestival@gmail.com.

Are You More Tech Savvy Than a 14-Year Old? Are you more tech savvy than a 14-year old? Find out how you rate. Everyone uses technology today—even 2-year-olds know how to navigate smartphones and tablets. So what does it take to be classified as tech savvy these days? Take the digital literacy quiz and find out! Is your score higher than a 14-year old with 113 points? How about the average 70-year old with 84 points? Take the quiz yourself and let us know how you score. techlicious.com/blog/ofcom-digital-quotient-tech-literacy-quiz/

Top Marriott and Renaissance Spas Found in Sweet Home Alabama While the resort spas in Aruba, Palm Beach, San Paulo and St. Croix certainly are first class, the best Marriott and Renaissance Hotel spas in 2014 are found in Sweet Home Alabama. Three of the top seven Renaissance Hotel spas and two of the top four Marriott spas are part of the Resort Collection along Alabama’s Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail. Spa Rankings out of 89 Renaissance Hotels in North America: 1st- Spa at Renaissance Montgomery 4th- Spa at the Battle House Hotel - Mobile 7th- Spa at Renaissance Ross Bridge – Birmingham. Spa Rankings out of 358 Marriott Hotels in North America 1st- Spa at the Marriott Shoals - Florence , 4th- Spa at the Grand Hotel – Pt. Clear

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Woman Makes Business Out of Giant Cookies After Losing Job of 30 Years Losing a job is almost never a good thing. But don’t tell that to Barbara Schechter. The New Jersey native was 57 when she lost her job as a marketing professional, which she had for about 30 years. Instead of panicking or sulking though, Schechter saw it as an opportunity to make a living doing what she loved. She launched Barbara’s Cookie Pies in 2011. The bakery sells what Schechter describes as a fusion between cookies and pies. She makes them in a variety of flavors, including chocolate chip, almond raspberry, and rocky road. It’s an old family recipe, so Schechter says she takes great pride in the product as well. But even though she enjoys baking, it wasn’t necessarily an easy path for her to take. She had to take money from her retirement fund to invest in the business. She also had to rent space in a commercial bakery and set up a home office where she could process and ship orders. She recently spoke with The Huffington Post about the challenges of starting her career over: “I think it’s key to understand that things may not work out initially the way you thought, but you can’t give up. You just have to keep your nose to the grindstone and keep plugging away understanding what worked and didn’t work. And soon, it all starts to happen and grow, building momentum with each passing day.” Schechter’s background is in marketing, not baking, so many of the business aspects that went along with starting Barbara’s Cookie Pies came easily to her. However, she said that things like manufacturing, production, and eCommerce were new to her. She also had to adapt to commercial baking since she was used to mainly baking as a hobby. So while it was definitely a challenge and a risk, Schechter said that it’s been worth it for her to continue learning and growing. When she was let go at 57, she wasn’t ready to retire. But instead of allowing a job loss to defeat her, she saw it as an opportunity. Now, she says the business is doubling in size annually. She fills orders for individuals and major retailers alike. That never would have happened if she hadn’t taken that initial risk and jumped into entrepreneurship. Visit barbarascookiepies.com. The post Woman Makes Business Out of Giant Cookies After Losing Job of 30 Years appeared first on Small Business Trends.

Living Well Alabama Central Alabama Aging Consortium is sponsoring a Living Well Alabama Chronic Disease Self-Management Workshop. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) consists of a six-week course designed to teach people with illnesses such as heart disease, hypertension, arthritis, COPD, fibromyalgia, diabetes, chronic pain and other chronic illnesses to manage their diseases, feel better, and lead more productive lives, living life to the fullest. The program is free and open to those with chronic health conditions as well as their families, friends, and caregivers. Classes are taught by two trained leaders for 2 ½ hours once a week. The workshop is interactive and participants learn skills and strategies for managing their symptoms such as pain and fatigue; they learn about healthy eating, relaxation techniques, overcoming depression, managing daily tasks, exercising safely, and attain skills in other areas. The workshop will be held at the Crump Senior Center, 1750 Congressman Dickinson Drive in Montgomery, beginning Thursday, September 18, 2014 and ending on October 23rd . The hours are from 12:30 to 3 pm Registration is required and enrollment is limited. There may be funding available for respite care. To register contact Jane Mitchel at Central Alabama Aging Consortium at (334) 240-4666.

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14th Annual Blue Jean Ball

Coach Pat Dye and his longtime girlfriend Nancy McDonald (Photo by Frank C. Williams)

The 14th annual Blue Jean Ball benefitting Auburn University and Auburn Montgomery’s Schools of Nursing will return to Coach Pat Dye’s Crooked Oaks Hunting Lodge in Notasulga on Sept. 26 at 5 p.m. Since 2001, the Blue Jean Ball has entertained hundreds of faculty, staff, students, alumni, friends and supporters of AU and AUM’s nursing programs. A silent auction, mascots, Pat Dye, Bruce Pearl and Jeno Jones. Live music and tours of Dye’s home. For more information or to order tickets, visit www.auburn. edu/academic/nursing/bluejeanball or contact Stephanie Wood at stephaniewood@auburn.edu or 334.844.7390

National Grandparents’ Day National Grandparents’ Day in the U.S. is the first Sunday after Labor Day, in September. September 7th this year. The holiday is expected to grow in significance over the next decade and beyond as the number of grandparents in the United States rises from 65 million in 2011 to 80 million in 2020 as a result of the baby boomers. Grandparents in America are also increasingly responsible for child care and support. In 2012, 30% of children under five with working mothers were cared for on a regular basis by a grandparent.

Attend Free Workshop

Wednesday, September 17, 2014: FREE estate planning and asset protection workshop hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 2-4 pm at Archibald Senior Center. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. Answering machine message, “I am not available right now, But thank you for caring enough to call. I am making some changes in my life. Please leave a message after the beep. If I do not return your call, you are one of the changes.” I just took a leaflet out of my mailbox, informing me that I can have sex at 73. I’m so happy, because I live at number 71. So it’s not too far to walk home afterwards. And it’s the same side of the street. I don’t even have to cross the road! My wife and I had words, but I didn’t get to use mine.

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Gayle Kirby, Miss Kopy Kat This month’s BOOM! profile is Gayle Kirby. Gayle was brought to our attention by her husband Robert, who expressed a lot of pride in his wife’s blog, Miss Kopy Kat. Thanks for the tip Robert and sharing your wife’s accomplishment. Not only does Gayle blog she also cares for newborn babies at Baptist South and her aging parents who are in their eighties. Like many of us in the 50+ community, we’re just too busy to grow old. As busy as Gayle and Robert are, they do plan to retire in few years and see the country and enjoy some new experiences together. Recently, we asked Gayle to share some of her story with us like starting a blog and her appreciation for life after a medical discovery a few years ago. We hope you enjoy getting to know Gayle as much as we have. BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Gayle: I was born in Birmingham, Alabama and spent most of my happy childhood in the suburb of Vestavia. After graduating from Berry High School, I attended Auburn University for two years. Being an airline stewardess sounded exciting to me so I left Auburn and worked for Southern Airways. I was based out of New Orleans. Eventually I wanted to go back to college and moved back to Birmingham and got a degree in nursing from Samford University. After becoming a nurse I met, fell in love with, and married David Penfield. He was working at a store in Birmingham called La-Z-Boy Showcase Shoppe. The opportunity arose for us to move to Montgomery and open our own store in a license agreement with the La-Z-Boy company. We worked hard to renovate the old S&H Green Stamp store on the Southern Bypass near Baptist Hospital, sometimes with our 6-month old boy in a baby backpack! The store grew and so did our family. We had another boy and then a girl in pretty quick succession. After a few years, we built a new building and moved the store to Atlanta Highway. Every year at Christmas we would do a family commercial with the children. That grew into me doing TV and radio commercials for the store yearround. Unfortunately, after twenty years

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Miss Kopy Kat

Martha Stewart. I had a desire to share my tips and tricks I had learned over the years for inexpensive ways to achieve a classy look so I thought that maybe I could achieve this by starting a blog too. Well, my husband BOOM!: You are a blogger and the name of Robert’s first marriage ended in part due to your blog is “Miss Kopy Kat”. Many of our the internet so he was reluctant for me to readers are probably curious about starting start a blog and be “out a blog so would there” on the internet. you share how you He agreed to it if I would started “Miss Kopy assume an alias and Kat”? Do you have not be known by my many visitors? Can real name. It is nerveyou make money wracking to pick a name blogging? for your blog but I chose “Miss Kopy Kat” almost Gayle: I have as a self-deprecating title, always enjoyed sort of modeled after trying to find a way Granddaughter Morgan Penfield @ 2 weeks “Miss Kitty” from the TV that I could try to show, Gunsmoke. Now, if make my home I ever mention Robert in the blog, he is “Tom look nice without spending a lot of money. Kat”. Although decorating/home magazines were primarily the way I got ideas, I was After choosing a name I went to Google to increasingly finding that going to the internet find out what was the easiest way to start a and “googling” how-to projects was my main blog, especially since I am not very tech savvy. way of discovering fun ways to accomplish The general consensus that I discovered was decorating. Many times my google searches that Blogger was the cheapest and easiest would land me on Do-It-Yourself-type blogs was to start a blog. Word Press has more written by just normal everyday people, not our marriage fell apart and David and I got a divorce. He kept the store and I went back into nursing.

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features but has start-up costs and requires more technical knowledge. I knew that if a blog was above my head computerwise, I would just give up so I went with Blogger. It was very easy (and free) to set up the blog using the Blogger templates. The hard part was pushing the button “publish” after I had composed my first blog post. Oh no! It is going to be out there for others to see and criticize! Oh well, everybody starts somewhere, I told myself. At first I didn’t have a lot of page-views but after I started joining blog “parties”, commenting on and following other blogger’s posts, the views on the blog started to increase.

creative outlet for me and a hobby. If you are starting a blog JUST to make money, I would say give it time to grow in readership before you quit your day job. BOOM!: We first learned about “Miss Kopy Kat” from your husband Robert, who is obviously very proud of your accomplishment…could you share a little bit of your love story with us?

step up your skills and the look or functions of your blog there are so many good sources by googling and YouTube to learn even more. There are some things that I have found that even if I could spend the time to figure them out, it is more cost and time effective for me to hire a more computer savvy person to do a few things for me. BOOM!: How many grandchildren do you have? What is your special experience of being a grandmother? What do your grandchildren call you? Gayle: I have two grandchildren, both little girls. Lilly is 5 years old. She lives in El Paso, Texas with my oldest son, David and his wife, Caroline. Morgan is four months old. She lives in Fort Collins, Colorado with my middle son, Taylor and his wife, Ali. Since they both live so far away, I mainly get to see the girls when we have Skype visits. They will all be coming to Montgomery in a few months for Thanksgiving! My grandmother name is G.G. which stands for Grandma Gayle.

Gayle: Robert and I met the old-fashioned way...a blind date! It was set up by his former neighbor and The biggest boost to my blog my friend, viewership has been the advent Martha of Pinterest. Now, when I look Aman. We at the “stats” page on my blog, were both Gayle @ Academy Awards the majority of people coming recently to the blog found it on Pinterest. divorced I have had the blog a little over three years. when we went out the first time. The first year I spent more time on it and After our divorces, we both felt would do about one blog post a week. The shattered and discarded so we last two years I needed to spend more time were good for each other in retaking care of my parents so I have fewer blog building confidences. We dated posts but because of the internet, I still get for a year before we broke up. about 2,000 After about three months views a day. of being apart, we both felt BOOM!: Favorite Over the life of that it had not been just a vacation spot? the blog that rebound relationship and Travel dreams? Gayle working at NCIU Baptist South comes to over we got back together. We 2.5 million got married about a year Gayle: My husband page views! later. and I are both in our sixties…we don’t know Some bloggers how much time we have left for travel so we have time to BOOM!: You must really love technology try not to go to the same place twice. We do regular to be a blogger, right? took an Alaskan cruise a few years ago and blog posts, plan to take a Hawaiian cruise this coming get sponsors, Gayle: I have had to learn technology to spring. The past six years we had four get on social have a blog. I am much more of a rightchildren’s weddings (only one of which was in media, grow brained person (creativity/artsy) but, Montgomery) so most of our travel resources their blogs and and I think this is good; I have had to and time were spent on planning and going get sponsors stretch the left side of my brain to teach to weddings. One year there was NOT a and ad myself computer/technical skills that wedding so we rented a big beach house in revenue. There are related to having a blog. I am able Santa Rosa Beach and invited family to come are at least to do things that I would never have down. Our big trip for this year was to go to two blogs “The thought possible when I first started Disney World in July with my oldest son and Gayle and Lilly @ Disney World Handmade blogging. If a person wants to start a his family. I had not been to Disney in over Home” and blog, certainly you can stay at the entry 25 years…we had a blast. When we retire (in “The Lettered Cottage” that are written level and not have many computer skills. You about three years) we hope to take long road by Montgomery-based women that are will enjoy your blog and interactions with trips to see more of the country and visit really popular. They have sponsors and other bloggers, sharing your ideas, recipes family along the way. big followings. My blog has been mainly a and thoughts. If, after a while, you want to

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BOOM!: What are you passionate about? Gayle: Treating each day as a gift and making the most of it. About 5 years ago an MRI revealed that I have a brain tumor. It shocked me into realizing how little time I may have to live. After more non-invasive tests, the doctors think it is a benign tumor since it is not growing or giving me any problems. So I won’t need surgery to remove it. I’m so grateful to have had the ensuing years since the tumor’s discovery to experience my children’s weddings and enjoy having grandchildren. Having a brain tumor also gives me a great excuse for my forgetfulness! BOOM!: How do you like to relax and wind down? Gayle: I enjoy reading lifestyle and shelter magazines, other blogs on the internet, and keeping up with my friends and family on Facebook. BOOM!: Do you have time to be involved in community, civic or other activities? Faith based organizations? Gayle: We are members at Young Meadows Presbyterian Church. I work every other weekend as a nurse so I’m not as actively involved as I would like to be. In the past I have been more involved in VBS and Women In the Church but not at this “season of life”. This past May I headed up a fund raiser for March of Dimes at Baptist South. They wanted to try something different so I suggested having a wreath raffle. Several of the nurses from my unit and I made wreaths

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for the raffle. I made some wreaths that had been popular on my blog. BOOM!: What is it about living in the Montgomery/River Region that you like? Gayle: I like that in Montgomery you can get almost anywhere in town in about 15 minutes. When I grew up in Birmingham, going across town could take an hour or more. BOOM!: As you’ve aged, how have your priorities changed?

also gotten interested in photography since I got a DSRL camera. I use it to capture photos for my blog…it makes a huge difference in the quality of photos I can post. I had read other blogger’s posts on how to do newborn photography before I went out to Colorado to meet my new grand-daughter last May. I had a great time getting memorable photos of our new grandbaby. BOOM!: What has your experience been like caring for your parents?

Gayle: Even though my parents are in their late Gayle: Earlier in my life eighties, up until about two my priorities were taking years ago they maintained care of my children and a home in Calera and were all that is involved in quite independent. When my that. I enjoyed every mother had to go to a rehab stage of their growing facility because a wound on up. Now my caretaking her leg would not heal, my role has shifted to the siblings and I would take other side of my family’s turns traveling to Calera to life cycle and one of my take care of my dad (he has main priorities is taking dementia) and help him get care of my parents. to the rehab facility to see my mother every day for months. BOOM!: Give three Eventually, mom got better Gayle’s parents, Pat & Erwin Collage words that describe you. and got to come home. My parents insisted that they Gayle: Creative, positive, pack-rat. (my wanted to stay at their house by themselves. husband prefers “hoarder”) A few months later my mom had a stroke that affected her right side and they could no BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies? longer take care of their daily needs on their own. They wanted to stay together and not Gayle: I don’t know if this is really a hobby go to a nursing home so I moved them to but I enjoy making things to decorate my Montgomery so I could keep my job and take house…sewing, painting, crafting, etc. I have care of them here. For about a year they have

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lived in an apartment near my house and we like oldgo over four times a day to move my mom in fashioned a Hoyer Lift and fix their meals, etc. We have pen pals) sitters that come three mornings a week so I through can sleep after working my night shifts. We blogging are trying to honor their wishes and think we too. My can probably maintain the current situation daughter for another year but we may need to go to calls them Plan B after that. BOOM!: Many Boomers are experiencing a renewed sense of purpose, new goals, even in retirement. Any advice for the rest of us seeking Daughter Leigh Anne Penfield, son Taylor Penfield with wife Ali, son David renewal?

Baptist Health gave me a really great orientation to get my nursing skills up and going again. The hardest thing about getting back into nursing was not the actual patient care but how much more computers are a part of health care now and learning to adapt to that. When I first went back to nursing I worked with Gayle and husband Robert adult patients but then my “imaginary transferred into working with babies, which friends” but I get was less demanding, physically. Now I work so much joy in in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Baptist communicating South. Most of the time I don’t work in the with other women part of the unit where the sickest or most that have similar premature babies are; that takes a certain “it interests to factor” that doesn’t come naturally to me. mine. Of course I work with more of the “feeder/grower” you have to use babies that have gotten through the most caution, but if you critical stages of their recovery and are trying Penfield. David is married to Caroline and they have a daughter, Lilly have an interest in to gain weight and learn how to breathe Gayle: I would give the advice to stay active cooking, gardening, sports, politics, or “you without supplemental oxygen so they can go and look for new opportunities to have new name it”, you can find a group of like-minded home. Even though I am a tiny part in the experiences and make new friends. My “old” folks to share your ideas with on the internet. babies’ recovery, it is rewarding for me to friends are really my closest and dearest I get such a thrill to see ordinary folks that I see the babies grow, get stronger, help the friends. A group of ladies that I went to “know” through following their blogs being parents and see the babies get to go be with church with when we attended Eastwood featured in national magazines and other their families where they will thrive even Presbyterian Church in its early years media outlets. more. recently got together to have a crochet club. If you have any questions for Gayle about starting Ummmm…most of us ended up not really BOOM!: You are currently an NICU nurse, a blog you can reach her at misskopykat@gmail. crocheting very much (I am still working on caring for the newest babies. Would you com or visit Gayle at her blog misskopykat. the same blanket I started two years ago) but describe your nursing career at Baptist blogspot.com. Thanks to Kim Bethea from I love and cherish the friendships from our biHealth? The Studio @ Eastchase for her professional weekly meetings. I also have a girl’s get-away cover photos. If you have questions, comments with college girl friends about once a year. Gayle: When I went back into nursing after or suggestions, please send them to jim@ riverregionboom.com I have also made so many new friends (more being out of that field for over twenty years,

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Who Would You Trust With Your Face? Presented by River Region Facial Plastics

Hello, this is Dr. Michael Bowman with River Region Facial Plastics. As many of you know, I maintain a medical practice at Montgomery Otolaryngology in our new offices on Olive Street behind Jackson Hospital. Dr. Tom Cawthon and I opened River Region Facial Plastics in 2012 to serve the facial rejuvenation and skin care needs of people in Montgomery and the River Region. A common comment from both my medical and cosmetic patients is: “I didn’t know ENT doctors did facial plastic surgery.” So in this month’s column I would like to discuss some things you should think about if you are contemplating facial rejuvenation. Before you trust your facial appearance to someone, here are a few important questions to ask: 1. What is your medical education background? After I graduated from Dartmouth College, I attended Duke University Medical School. From there, I completed my residency at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. 2. Are you board certified…and what field are you boarded in? I am dual board certified in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery as well as Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery. Many people do not realize that facial plastic and reconstructive surgery is an integral part of the ENT board certification process, which involves both oral and written examinations and covers both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. I sat for my ENT boards in 2008, and received my facial plastics board certification in 2011. Dr. Cawthon is also board certified in Otolaryngology and

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has been practicing facial plastic surgery the entirety of his career, and amongst others, trained under Dr. Jack Anderson, who is a well known pillar of medical education in our field. Board certified Dermatologists and Plastic Surgeons also have residency training and board examinations, which include facial cosmetic treatments. 3. Are you a member of any societies related to your field? Dr. Cawthon and I are both fellows of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery as well as the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery. We both regularly attend local and national conferences to make sure we keep abreast of our everchanging field. Most recently, I attended a Physician Summit hosted by SkinMedica® where I got to meet and learn about the latest research, technologies, and products in skin care. 4. Do you have any additional credentials? We are Platinum Plus level Allergan injectors at River Region Facial Plastics. This means that we are in the top 2% of all Allergan accounts in the United States. Allergan products include Botox® Cosmetic, Juvederm®, Voluma™, Latisse®, SkinMedica® and Natrelle® breast implants. We are the only Platinum Plus Allergan account in the River Region based solely on our volume of facial aesthetics products. This means we

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have more experience with cosmetic injectables than any other injectors in the area. I have also been nominated to become a Physician Trainer for Galderma Pharmaceuticals, makers of Restylane®, Sculptra®, Dysport® and Perlane®. This means I will be available to teach other physicians around the country my injectable techniques. 5. Can you show me before and after pictures of your patients who have had the procedure(s) I’m interested in? An established facial aesthetics expert should have plenty of photographs available for you to examine the quality of their work. I have an iPad slide show, which I use extensively in all my consultations to educate my patients about the results they can expect. I hope these basic questions will give you a framework to evaluate your choice of doctors for facial rejuvenation. As qualified experts in facial rejuvenation, all of our treatments at River Region Facial Plastics from skin care to the QuickLift® focus on beautiful, natural results. I sincerely hope we will see you soon so we can educate you about your choices for rejuvenation. After all, you only have one face; so don’t just trust it to anyone. Yours In Good Health, Dr. Michael Bowman 334.270.2003 Doctors@RiverRegionFacialPlastics.com

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Meaningful Meditations By Erica Curless

For an hour, the group sat in a circle, quiet and still. Not a yawn. Not a nose scratch. Not a twitch.

showed up for the afternoon class that was preceded in the day by pinochle and dominoes. The group ranges in size each week, but there are always a few faithful and a few newcomers. All say they benefit, whether it’s just slowing down for an hour or working on problems such as pain, anxiety or relationships.

The seniors were all in a state of meditation: practicing mindfulness and being in the now. The new air conditioner rumbled. Something fell against the wall of the thrift shop next door. Yet nobody opened an eye. They just sat and breathed while they listened to a CD by a well-known meditation instructor. Today’s focus was concentrating even with noise and distractions. After all, meditation experts agree, if people waited for silence, meditation would never happen. “It sure beats taking pills,” said Storma Edelbrock, the executive director of the Hayden Senior Center, who leads the weekly 4 p.m. meditation class on Wednesdays. Meditation is thought to reduce stress, anxiety, pain, loneliness and depression. “The hard part is getting them to try it,” she said. “It’s hard, especially for seniors, to try something new. But then they realize there’s nothing better.” Edelbrock started the class about a year ago, missing meditation groups she participated in while living in Southern California. After a divorce and anxiety she found meditation. The practice even got her past a 27-year fear of flying and other anticipatory fears. Now when anxious, she remembers her mantra: “In this moment I’m perfectly fine.” At first she thought the seniors at the center would think she was selling “California mumbo-jumbo.” That never happened. The members embraced the idea and the class started with a waiting list. “They realized it wasn’t some mysterious floating off,” Edelbrock said, laughing. Recently seven people, all older than 55, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

It was Mary Nickolson’s first class. She came at the urging of a friend after expressing concerns about getting frustrated with her husband who was in the hospital with heart problems. “I thought this might help me get through this,” said Nickolson, 77. “I don’t want to get edgy with him at all.” The group shared their experiences after they all had opened their eyes, rubbed their faces and stretched. It took some longer than others to fully return to the conversation. One woman dozed off, before waking with a start. Nickolson sat for a long time with her eyes closed before slowly looking around. “I had four tears come down my cheek,” she said, noting she has allergies. “I was able to just let it happen. It was a good feeling.” She said the experience was “very internally relaxing,” yet her mind wandered. “I was still thinking about going home and picking up the dog,” she said. Her classmates assured her that’s normal. Everyone’s mind wanders. They

said the key isn’t to concentrate or fuss over those thoughts but just to let them float through your mind. The most important advice: There is no right way or wrong way to meditate. Meditation comes in many forms and is an aspect of many religious beliefs and traditions, but it is not a belief system. Breathing, yoga and tai chi are types of meditation. In recent years, scientific studies suggest that meditation and mindfulness are beneficial, especially to the elderly, and can increase longevity and health, decrease loneliness, slow the progression of Alzheimer’s and reduce hospitalizations while improving moods. Yoga is a standard at most senior centers across the region, just like card games and bingo, but meditation classes are rare. Edelbrock hopes other centers take notice and add meditation to their services. To Edelbrock, meditation is about living in the moment and connecting with your conscious self. “It’s really a skill for some of us to get this,” said Kay Schneider. “For some it comes easy. I struggle. Some days I’m more receptive than others.” Tom Reul, 93, is a regular. He said meditation has helped him work on forgiveness, a topic that he doesn’t necessarily like. “You want a clean slate when you go out,” he said. “If you can, you need to forgive everybody for everything, including yourself.” www.haydengems.org (c)2014, The Spokesman-Review Distributed by MCT Information Services

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

CAN THE NURSING HOME TAKE YOUR PARENTS’ HOUSE? If you have parents who are 70 or older, listen up. This article is for you. Most of us have some experience with nursing homes, one way or another. Advances in medical science means that Americans are living longer than ever before. Unfortunately, it has become increasingly common for people to experience some period of disability late in life which requires long-term care. And the people most often tasked with coordinating a patient’s care are his or her adult children. Nursing home care, unsurprisingly, is expensive. In Alabama, it costs about $5,500 per month (or $183 per day). Most people can’t afford that kind of expense for long. When patients begin to run out of money, they have to look for help from other sources. This is the point in which a great deal of “beauty shop/coffee shop” advice begins to float around. Everyone has an opinion on what to do next, but most of what you hear on the street is just plain wrong. One of the most common misconceptions is that the nursing home will “take your house.” This is just not true. But that doesn’t mean that you should not do anything. To the contrary, the threat of losing a great deal of money to the cost of long-term care is very real. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at least 70% of Americans over 65 will require some long-term care services at some point. Over 40% of Americans over 65 will need long-term care in a nursing home, and the average length of stay is 2.8 years. Medically speaking, nursing homes provide care to patients who need assistance with their “Activities of Daily Living” (ADL’s) which include things like dressing, bathing, grooming, toileting and walking. The AARP reports that people over 65 have a 68% probability of either requiring assistance with two or more ADL’s, or of suffering from cognitive decline like dementia.

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Entering a nursing home is never anyone’s first choice. Many families try everything they can to keep a loved one in their home for as long as possible. According to a study conducted by Genworth Financial, 6 out of 10 potential caregivers responded that they were unprepared to handle the more difficult caregiving tasks, such as bathing, dressing and toileting.

The source of this misconception is the fact that you cannot have more than a limited amount of assets ($2,000) in order to qualify for Medicaid. Importantly, however, some assets are “exempt” and do not count against that $2,000 limit. For example, a patient’s primary residence will not be counted as long as they have an “intent to return home” in the future, or if they have a spouse When a loved one does enter a nursing or a blind or disabled child living in home, someone is going to have to the home. If none of those exceptions pay for the cost of their care. At first, apply, then the house may eventually be Medicare will counted, and pay for up Medicaid to 20 days (not the Learn More-Attend Free Workshop of nursing nursing Wednesday, September 17, 2014: FREE estate home care, home) may planning and asset protection workshop hosted but only for require a lien by Red Oak Legal, PC: 2-4 pm at Archibald Senior rehabilitation against the Center. This educational workshop presented by purposes. property as local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, After that, a condition powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, Medicare will of eligibility. probate administration, protecting assets from pay only a But even creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, small portion this lien nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid of the cost will not be qualification. Registration is required. Call 334of care for foreclosed 625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register another during the online at www.redoaklegalpc.com. 100 days, patient’s but only if lifetime. you (or your Instead, Medicare supplement policy, depending Medicaid has the right to recover money upon which one you have) pay a hefty from the sale of the property after the daily co-pay. patient’s death, and only up to the After that, you’re on your own. amount that Medicaid expended on the patient’s care. If you have a long-term care policy, it may cover some or all of the cost of care, Does this mean that you should “do depending on the policy. If you don’t nothing” to protect the house or other then you have to pay the monthly bill out assets? Of course not. Consider Medicaid of your own pocket. Planning as part of your overall estate plan. A qualified elder law attorney can Once you run out of money, the last help you (or your parents) create a plan resort is to turn to Medicaid, which is to protect the maximum amount of your a combined state and federal program assets from the cost of long-term care. which provides medical care for the very Raley L. Wiggins poor. While many nursing home patients Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC don’t start out as “very poor,” most 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com middle class people will run out of money 401 Madison Avenue, Montgomery AL 36104 sooner than later, and will have apply for www.redoaklegalpc.com Medicaid. This doesn’t mean that the nursing home will take your house to pay their bill.

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The area’s last typewriter repairman is 92 and he’ll tell you all kinds of stories. Bob Montgomery has the time for stories because he’s not that busy these days. Time passes slowly in his fifth-floor space at a downtown Bremerton office building. He was always a skinny guy. At his age, he looks frailer than he is.

At 92, one of the last typewriter

repairmen

But his mind is sharp, By Erik Lacitis remembering details about machines The Corona he’s repairing is a century-old and predates Corona Typewriter merging with L. C. Smith & Bros. in 1926. (Alan Berner/Seattle Times/MCT) manufactured a century ago. His Thousands and thousands of little typewriter parts are stored in eyesight is good, and he uses magnifying glasses to work with drawers and plastic boxes. Montgomery is the only one who knows tweezers on delicate parts. which specific model a little gizmo is for. Walk into his shop, and you’re transported to a different world. Sometimes, when he gets tired, Montgomery takes a nap on a couch in the office. “Then I’m good again for another two or three hours,” Outside, people are tethered to their smartphones, busy, busy, busy he says. tweeting 140 characters of random thoughts. Here, at the Bremerton Office Machine Company, the machines from a different era sit on shelves, relegated to collectors and those who never quite adjusted to staring at a screen. What matters here are not quad-core processors, but things like a little round metal escapement wheel, its teeth used to move type one space forward. A LIFETIME WITH TYPEWRITERS Montgomery was 7 or 8 when he began going to his dad’s shop in downtown Seattle, changing ribbons, learning to repair the machines. That’s 85-some years of typewriters.

REPAIRING THROUGH WWII Montgomery remembers repairing typewriters during World War II in Bushy Park in London, right where Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower was stationed as the Supreme Commander Allied Expeditionary Force. A few times, Montgomery saw Ike going to and fro. Wars generate not just casualties, but plenty of paperwork. Montgomery had been drafted and trained as an infantryman. Then his records showed he could repair typewriters. “I think every latrine orderly had a typewriter,” he remembers. When Montgomery returned from the war, he went back to the family business, which eventually moved to Bremerton.

To be accurate, he’s not the last, last typewriter repairman. But in the Puget Sound area, he’s the last one who could be found whose full-time business is repairing typewriters.

Besides the machines, Montgomery’s other big love has been the Bremerton Community Theatre. He has acted in or been part of the production of more than 145 shows, as recently as a few months ago.

“A lot of people see something on Craigslist and get some romantic notion to write the great American novel on this thing,” says Dave Armstrong, who also does a few repairs. “An awful lot of the machines are just not worth repairing.”

Montgomery tries to explain his 85 years of love for the typewriters. He says, “It’s the only machine I know of that you can put a piece of paper in it, start typing, and you see something appear on that paper.”

Every weekday, sometimes also on weekends, Montgomery takes the bus from the retirement community in which he lives to his shop. His rate is $48 an hour, and a punch time clock ticks away on the wall.

In the background, the punch time clock keeps marking the minutes. For a while, at least.

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Is Hearing Loss Affecting My Employee’s Performance? Addressing hearing loss in the workplace should be a wellness priority, says the Better Hearing Institute (BHI). Nearly 40 million Americans suffer from hearing loss, and the majority of them are still in the workforce. In today’s work environment, a knowledge-based economy, good communication skills and healthy employees are considered critical characteristics for business success for both the employer and the employee. Doctors Hearing Clinic and BHI are urging employers to include hearing screenings and hearing health awareness as part of their workplace wellness programs. Including hearing screenings and hearing health awareness as part of the wellness programs ensures that preventive measures can be taken to improve communication, job performance, and morale in the workplace. In order to facilitate hearing health awareness, Doctors Hearing Clinic is offering complimentary hearing screenings. If a more comprehensive hearing test is needed, our audiologists will discuss the results of the screening and help determine what additional testing and treatment may be needed. The sooner hearing loss is addressed the better. Hearing loss in the workplace is an element of concern, but leaving the hearing loss unaddressed is even more detrimental. Statistics indicate that when hearing loss is properly addressed job performance and productivity improve. Doctors Hearing Clinic and BHI believe that empowering employees with information on hearing health and options for addressing their hearing loss will result in more informed healthcare consumers and more productive and satisfied employees. In today’s economy, a demographic shift is occurring. Employees are staying in the work force longer, and an increase in the age of younger professionals entering the workplace is being seen. This demographic shift ultimately results in a more mature labor force in the workplace. The economic landscape is changing, and it has reached the point where hearing health must become a workplace wellness priority.

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Unaddressed hearing loss can limit the Addressing hearing loss is smart ability to communicate effectively and business practice. Hearing loss is largely can affect productivity, job performance, manageable, and the vast majority of and earnings. A national BHI study found people with hearing loss can benefit from that depending on the degree of hearing hearing aids in both the workplace and at loss, employees are losing $30,000 in home. Eighty percent of hearing aid users income annually. The reason for this loss were satisfied with the changes that have in income stems from employees with occurred in their lives due to purchasing unaddressed hearing loss becoming hearing aids. more fatigued and stressed at work. Employees with unaddressed hearing Currently, most employers have some loss are often more fatigued and stressed form of wellness program incorporated from constantly trying to understand and in their workplace. By including hearing interpret auditory information from other tests and hearing health information in employees, customers, and computers the wellness programs, along with hearing and machines. aids as an employee Statistics show benefit, employees that the extra are more willing concentration to seek diagnosis By Dr. Brittany Spahr and Dr. Katie Slade needed to and treatment for interpret their hearing loss the auditory rather than hiding it. information Incorporating these results in changes, creates a increased work environment sick time, where the employer disengagement and employee can from work, and work together to quality of life. ensure that a worker’s Additionally, employees with unaddressed hearing loss does not interfere with their hearing loss are at an increased safety risk job performance, productivity, morale, due to not being able to hear the warning opportunities, safety or success in the or hazardous sounds/alarms at work. workplace.

Healthy Hearing

Economically speaking, unaddressed hearing loss is costing employees more than just communication difficulty in the workplace. Research indicates that the cumulative annual loss in income due to underemployment for individuals with unaddressed hearing loss is approximately $176 billion. In addition, the fiscal cost to society in federal taxes is approximately $26 billion. EPIC’s “Listen Hear!” survey found that 95% of employees who suspect they have a hearing problem and have not sought treatment believe their untreated hearing loss impacts them on the job in at least one way. Sixty one percent of those employees believe that a major impact of hearing loss in the work place is having to ask employees and customers to repeat, and forty percent of those individuals pretend to hear what was said when they actually could not.

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Doctors Hearing Clinic can provide the assessment and treatment of hearing loss which enables both the employer and the employee to have a more productive, safe, and successful workplace environment. Doctors Hearing Clinic can also assist you in developing a wellness program for hearing health care in your workplace. Contact our audiologists today for more information! Content adapted from the Better Hearing Institute (BHI): Address Hearing Loss in the Workplace and Reap the Rewards, BHI Urges Employers and Employees for National Employee Wellness Month http://www.betterhearing.org/ news/address-hearing-loss-workplace-and-reap-rewards

Dr. Brittany Spahr is a licensed audiologist in Alabama and is a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology. Co-authored by Katie Slade, a Board Certified Audiologist in Alabama, and Amy Davis, Doctoral Extern, University of South Alabama.

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Sixty is the New Forty! Most of us think at 60 it is time to start slowing down a bit on our exercise program and we use the “age card” on why we can’t lift weights or why we can’t add muscle to our bodies. Peggy Myrick, a trainer at MetroFitness and the YMCA, is going to tell you her story. We might not all look like Peggy or even desire to look like her, but her story is encouraging to all of us that have aging bodies that we CAN build muscle and lose body fat. Peggy Myrick I was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, in December of 1953. At the age of 14, my father was transferred by Union Carbide Corporation in Indianapolis, Indiana, to San Diego, California. I attended high school in the San Diego Area, in a small town called Poway. I married my high school sweetheart in 1974 and by the time I was 30 years of age, I had given birth to 4 children, 2 boys, and 2 girls. At the age of 32 I was living in Montgomery, AL, and I went back to college (AUM) to earn a BS degree. In the Spring of 1993, I graduated Summa Cum Lauda at age 39 with a degree in Mathematics. I was hired by the VA Regional Office in Montgomery a few months later through AUM’s scholars program. I was 3 months short of my 40th birthday when I began working for VA. At that time, Golds Gym in Montgomery offered a discounted monthly membership rate to VA employees, so I took advantage of the discount and joined a gym for the first time in my life. I went to the gym regularly; my main motivation was to avoid what I called, “40 year old arms!” I discovered that I really enjoyed working out and bodybuilding, and have consistently worked out in a gym ever since. I retired from the Department of Veterans Affairs on my 60th birthday, after 20 years of service as a VA Claims Examiner. During the last two years with the VA, I started transitioning into becoming a Personal Trainer and a

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Fitness Instructor, which is what I had dreamed of doing after retirement. I began with getting certified to teach various classes, among them Indoor Cycle, Gravity, and Aqua. Before my official VA retirement, I began teaching a few fitness classes after work. Once retired, my teaching schedule picked up and I began teaching Gravity, Indoor Cycle, Aqua, and a Cardio/Sculpt type class called Sculptdown. I have since been certified to teach TRX and Insanity

in my hips, both feet, one thigh...But I finally had to accept the reality that I would not be able to run a marathon, because for whatever reason, by body was not built for that. Therefore, I decided to participate in some Sprint Triathlons (swim, run, bike) so that I would not be “on my feet” for the entire event. The sprint triathlons worked for me and proved to be fun, exhilarating, exciting, and challenging. I have participated in several over the past 12 years.

Tell us about your workout schedule and diet in order to compete. by Leigh Anne Richards Basically I lift weights 6 days a week. I do NOT do a total body workout on any one day, but rather divide the body into Back, Legs, Chest, Shoulders, Arms, and I have added a NETA Personal Glutes, Calves, Core/Abs. I rest a body Training Certification to my existing part for 48 to 72 hours before working W.I.T.S. Personal Training Certification. it again, and I sometimes combine body parts; for example, I usually work calves My husband, William, and I have 5 on my Shoulder day. wonderful, grown children between us and 12 grandchildren, and 1 greatMy cardio consists of swimming 1 to grandson. We are expecting our 2nd 1-1/2 miles once a week, indoor cycling, great grandchild in November 2014, and and the cardio I get from teaching our 13th grandchild is due in February Sculptdown or taking similar classes. 2015. My diet consists of 6 meals per day: How did your fitness journey begin? Meal #1: One Egg + egg whites, a As I mentioned above, I took advantage few strawberries, & one piece of dry of a VA offer and joined Gold’s Gym. I wheat toast. Meal #2: Protein powder, had never been a member of a gym almonds, and 1 or 2 rice cakes. The before, and I found that I truly enjoyed other 4 meals are usually chicken (or lifting weights. After several months of flank steak) with brown or jasmine rice working out, people would tell me that or sweet potatoes and 1 cup of veggies my arms and back looked great and (green beans, asparagus, Brussels wanted to know if I was getting ready sprouts, etc.). Additionally, I try to to compete. Those questions put the consume a gallon of water daily. Please “competing” idea in my head. I entered note that this is a “getting ready for 3 bodybuilding shows during 1999/2000. competition diet.” If I am not training for After I had been running for a while, I a competition, the diet is not as strict, decided I wanted to run in a marathon, but I try not to deviate too far from the but every time I would get to 5-6 miles diet. I confess that I am a sugar junkie in my training, I would suffer a stress and I do cheat from time to time--but fracture. I have literally had so many then I get back on track as quickly as I stress fractures in my lower body, that can and try not to beat myself up for I lost count. I know that I’ve had one falling off the wagon.

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Fitness over Fifty

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Why did you want to do a competition? across the country. I want to continue As I mention earlier, I competed in 1999 ballroom dancing with my husband, and and 2000. I was not married at the time, but my husband attended those competitions. In late 2013 he said to me, “Why don’t you compete one more time?” That question put the idea in my head, and I was not able to forget it. I started asking around, found a good trainer, and began training. My trainer Peggy Myrick Prepares for Bodybuilding Competition suggested a show for me to enter, and so I did. It was exciting to I hope to continue to do needlearts. I have a goal to work toward. absolutely love Needlearts and hope to pursue this interest with more vigor in Will you continue to compete? the coming decade. I am seriously considering a show on Obviously everyone over 50 will never November 8th, in Pensacola, FL, so I am have this much muscular development. gearing my training toward that date. I What is your advice to people that just would like to do at least one more show want to be fit and live a healthy life? after that as well, but I think that would I just happen to love bodybuilding, but be where I end the competitions. I realize not everyone will be drawn to lifting weights. But I believe people What do you see yourself doing during over 50 can find some kind of exercise your 60’s decade? that they like. Whether it be Zumba; I would dearly love to keep teaching Aqua; Low Impact Aerobics; Sculpt fitness classes and expand my personal classes; Low Impact Sculpt classes; training to reach more clients of all Pilates; Yoga; or whatever, and then ages. As far as fitness classes go, I am begin to exercise in one or more of currently looking into learning even more these areas and CONTINUE to do so. about teaching Aqua, including Aqua Consistency is the key component for Arthritis Classes, Low Impact Classes positive changes. Consistently follow and/or senior fitness classes, additional your exercise regiment with as little training in Gravity (Total Gym), additional interruption as possible and Challenge certifications in indoor cycle; and Pilates. your body systems in ways it has not I would love to teach fitness or train for been challenged before. Diet, of course, another 5 to 8 years. I have interests also plays a big part and the over 50 outside of fitness as well. I hope to travel crowd has to eliminate some or all and visit my family (California, Texas, of the foods that are working against Florida, Indiana, and Georgia) scattered them. Incremental changes (such as

changing from whole milk to skim milk) are important, don’t discount them. Continually raise the bar--your own bar. Please do not think that you can change overnight, most of us cannot do that. Be kind and forgiving to yourself, but Keep moving FORWARD in your efforts. Be sure to incorporate some strength training (weights) during your exercise week in conjunction with your aerobic exercises so that you can build some muscle tissue. Muscle tissue is metabolically active tissue. Muscle keeps your metabolism elevated. When you have more muscle tissue, your body burns more calories. Include Balance and Core work into your routine as well, because these components are SO important in maintaining your independence as you age! Strength training and body building are two completely different things. Most of us want to stay healthy and do what is needed to be “fit. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends for people over 50 the following: perform exercises 2-3 times a week that condition all the major muscle groups- arms, legs, shoulders and trunk. The goal is to lift a weight that is heavy enough to achieve 10-15 repetitions per session before the muscle becomes fatigued. Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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The Markets The last couple of years, I have had the honor and privilege of participating on Greg Budell’s “Happy Hour” show during the 5:00 hour where I take a deep dive into the current state of affairs of the ever-changing global financial markets. And, now I am taking up my pen to communicate my thoughts and opinions in a broader, more long-term view as it relates to macro-economic trends. I must admit that whether I am writing or speaking on these various topics, I proudly promote our processes and methodologies here at McDonald, Barranco, and Hagen, Wealth Management. But, more importantly, it is my sincere hope that our followers can learn something new that might help them avoid some of the more common mistakes when it comes to managing their financial affairs. As I always say on Greg’s show, whether you are working with us or someone else, take ownership of your financial future and make it a point to understand what you own and why you own it! Just like business entities, individuals have a balance sheet also. Proactive management of your balance sheet is imperative but also nearly impossible without a well-thought out, comprehensive financial plan. In my twenty five year career as a financial professional, I have never seen a period in time where the ebbs and flows of global financial markets have been more complex, uncertain, and fast-paced as it is today. Hence, my goal in writing this monthly column is to pull back the veil of the world’s financial markets and reveal to you our thoughts and insights on the three big items that impact our money: geo-political risks, global economics, and financial markets. Given that this is my first column, it is important that this month I provide you with a bit of a backdrop on my general feelings regarding the markets. It is my very strong opinion that U.S. financial markets (stocks, bonds, and housing) have benefitted greatly from an overly accommodative federal reserve. Three years ago, when the fed embarked upon their three rounds of quantitative easing,

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I proclaimed that we would all witness one of the greatest “reflation trades” in the history of this country. And, so far, that is what we have gotten. U.S. corporations have made a mad dash to Wall Street issuing record amounts of with corporate debt Brandt McDonald at historically low interest rates. Many of these companies have been using the proceeds of these bond sales to buy back their own stock – reducing the share count and inflating earnings per share. In reality it is nothing more than a colossal margin account. Individuals have refinanced their homes and increased discretionary spending with the interest savings. The Fed’s zero interest rate policy (ZIRP) and roughly $3 trillion in newly printed money has no doubt distorted the economic recovery over the last five years. My question is “what happens when the Federal Reserve changes course and goes the other way?” In addition, the fiscal policy initiatives set forth by the current administration has no doubt had an onerous impact on American Finance and capital formation. New regulations across multiple industries have slowed down the gears of progress and prohibited what should have been an otherwise healthier economic recovery after the credit crisis. In spite of the poor policy actions and extreme federal reserve intervention, I am in no way saying that there are not some great stories that we can highlight about America. The internet of all things, mobile devices, new technologies, processes, and innovation is the heartbeat of America. In the end, I believe this is what will lead the world once again. However, we need to return to free markets. When the Federal Reserve is actively participating in financial markets by suppressing yields and steering capital in a manipulative fashion, we do not have the invisible hand of laissez faire. When Washington

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Financial Thoughts

tries to micromanage every facet of our lives – determining winners and losers in society we are left with central planning and it’s got to stop. We have certainly had a recovery. It’s just that it’s been unnatural and will result in significant capital dislocations and unintended consequences. Currently, we face headwinds around the globe that must be considered in concert with one another. Every day at our firm, we are constantly monitoring the day’s events in an attempt to stay out in front of what we perceive to be happening. In other words, we want to “monitor the headlines on page 8” to see if they are quickly making their way to the front page. Next month, I look forward to spending time discussing some of these headwinds in more detail. But, for now, I remain somewhat defensively positioned across the board. Currently, there are several interesting developments that will bear a closer watch as we move through the second half of the year. China’s credit bubble is largely misunderstood and is NOT garnering the respect that it should. Europe is on the verge of deflation and a double dip recession. Will Mario Draghi throw in the towel and embark upon his own asset purchase program (QE) like the Americans and Japanese have done? We will find out soon enough. For now, never run with the herd, always be thankful, and look to the future with anticipation of what’s yet to come. Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager MBCapitalWealth.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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ARTREK EXHIBITION

Following Wagnon: Our Fearless Leader Featured Artists

Serving Girl 30 x 24 Oil on Canvas Pamela Wesley Copeland

Let the Games Begin, 24 x 48 Mixed Media, Carol Barksdale

Sugar Daddy 20 x 16 Oil on Canvas Anne Hugghins

Wild Heart 60 x 48 Mixed Media Cecily Hulett

Santa Rosa de Lima, 47 x 47 Oil on Canvas, John Wagnon

A Restful Moment 24 x 20 Oil on Canvas Anita Westerberg

Petty Flash #5 48 x 36 Mixed Media Richard Mills

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Seeking Harmony and Piece 60 x 36 Oil on Canvas John Mazaheri

Mystic Rythms Wood Sculpture, Kenneth Lever RiverRegionBoom.com

Endless Summer, 24 x 30 mixed media, Shirley Esco

Vision Land 24 x 18 Acrylic on Canvas Jane Segrest

Two Guests at a Beach Wedding 36 x 24 Oil on Canvas Ginnylu Greene The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Art & Soul

By Sandi Aplin

ARTREK

“You’re Invited” On Thursday evening, September 18th from 5 to 9pm will be the Kick Off for the 48th Montgomery Art Guild/ Regions Bank Show downtown Montgomery at the Regions Bank located in the RSA Tower. We are so excited that this year our event will be celebrated with the addition of the Trolley which will leave from the RSA Tower beginning at 6:15pm. The awards presentation will begin at 5pm and the galleries will open at 5:30pm. Gallery One Fine Art will feature our exhibition, “Following Wagnon: Our Fearless Leader.” This exhibition will include all of our artists members, we will have refreshments and will be welcoming guests until 9pm. Visit Gallery One Fine Art 423 Cloverdale Road, Montgomery, AL Gallery Director Sandi Aplin sandiaplin@aol.com 334.269.1114 www.galleryonefineart.com

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Bucket List Adventure

Washington’s Woodinville Wine Country By Kathy Witt

The best repurposing of a strip center surely has to be in Woodinville, Washington, where deserted malls have been repopulated with wineries, dozens and dozens of them. The proliferation of wineries has turned this once-sleepy community located 30 minutes east of Seattle into a veritable tasting room, with 107 of them in a city measuring 5.62 square miles.

them production facilities you can tour - and, a mere 2.8 miles away, the Hollywood Winery District where there are 35 tasting rooms as well as Washington’s founding winery, Chateau Ste. Michelle. In between are the West Valley Winery District and the Downtown Winery District.

WHERE WASHINGTON POURS To put that number in perspective, there are some 800 wineries in the entire state of Washington. Woodinville, a town founded in the 1880s on a logging homestead along the banks of what is now the Sammamish River, is considered by some to be the doorway to Washington wine. And while the vineyards remain east of the Cascade Mountains, the wineries and tasting rooms flourish in Woodinville, beckoning hundreds of thousands each year to taste the grape. Woodinville’s four wine districts are bookended by the Warehouse Winery District, home to 48 wineries - many of

Each winery has its own distinct vibe, from Patterson Cellars with its urban warehouse feel and jazzy Pondera with piano and art gallery to edgy Mark Ryan Winery, home of Washington’s “Red Wine of the Year 2014,” Lonely Heart and JM Cellars, which looks more like an arboretum with its treescape, ferns and mass plantings, to William Church Winery, an elegant holein-the-wall where you can have edibles from the Purple Cafe next door delivered to your table to enjoy along with your wine selections. Wine lovers can sip and sample wines from Washington’s 13 wine-producing areas without ever leaving Woodinville. No

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need to drive across the mountains seeking your favorite varietal; in fact, there’s no need to drive at all. Guests staying at Willows Lodge can book a guided Willows Wine Venture. Every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the lodge’s luxury van wends its way into Woodinville Wine Country while the history of the area is narrated, stopping for personalized tastings at three wineries. At tour’s conclusion, guests may opt to be dropped off near the Hollywood Wine District, armed with complimentary tasting vouchers to continue their adventure. AN OASIS SURROUNDED BY WINE Located on five lush acres adjacent to the Sammamish River Trail in the heart of Woodinville Wine Country, Willows Lodge is rustic elegance that pays tribute to the heritage of the Pacific Northwest through its design elements. These include the

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landscaped shell of a 30-foot-tall cedar holding court near the lodge’s front doors and repurposed Douglas fir timbers for floors and staircase. Within the lodge and amidst its gardens is the artwork of Haida Native Americans, the first inhabitants of the Pacific Northwest: bronze and glass sculptures and oil paintings. Onsite dining includes the Barking Frog, cozy and rustic and known for its American regional cuisine zinged with Pacific Northwest influences; Washington State’s only five-star restaurant, The Herbfarm; and Fireside, a cozy-casual eatery whose doors open into the garden. The lodge has a spa, library, outdoor garden gazebo and relaxation pool. Bicycles are available for exploring area trails, including one running along a historic railroad bed. The gardens are made for leisurely strolls where you may run into Basil and Borage, the resort’s resident potbellied pigs, who enjoy stepping out (on leashes) themselves. LODGE PACKAGES You simply cannot be within spittin’ distance of 100-plus wineries and tasting rooms and not offer a wine package. The Willows Lodge Winecation (starting at $440 per couple, through Sept. 13) includes overnight accommodations; a glass of Sommelier-select wine for two in Fireside; bicycles for cruising the trails; a pedi-cab ride to a local winery; and Le Picnic for two prepared by the Barking Frog restaurant and packaged in a souvenir backpack delicieux! Woodinville Lavender Farm is located about a minute from Willows Lodge so it makes sense the two would partner for an onlyhere experience. The Woodinville Lavender Harvest package includes overnight accommodations, a lavender gift, lavender drawn bath, transportation to Woodinville Lavender and two hours at the farm, which includes harvesting lavender with one of the farm’s owners. “People love the fragrance and know it’s relaxing and are sometimes surprised to learn there are so many other uses,” said Tom Frei, owner of Woodinville Lavender. Bundle, haul and hang lavender while learning about the care and maintenance of this fragrant, versatile herb. You will see an essential oil distillation demonstration, using the farm’s authentic, hand-formed

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Alembic still, from the loading of buds to the production of the essential oil from the still. MORE INFORMATION Willows Lodge, WillowsLodge.com. Opened in 2000, it has 84 Northwest-style guest rooms and suites, amenityladen and featuring stone fireplaces, soaking tubs designed for two and balconies overlooking the gardens. The Herbfarm, TheHerbfarm.com: Open for themed multi-course dinners Thursday through Sunday (one seating), with each day’s menu finalized only hours before the meal. Reservations: 425-485-5300. Chateau Ste. Michelle, Ste-Michelle.com: Summer Concerts at the Chateau Amphitheatre: Gipsy King’s 25th Anniversary Tour, Peter Frampton, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Tickets are available in the Chateau Wine Shop daily between the hours of 10 a.m.-5 p.m. or call 800-745-3000. ADVENTURE GUIDE TO DON’T-MISS MOMENTS ● Become a fly on sticky paper, at least that’s the way the esthetician at the Spa at Willows Lodge describes the lodge’s signature 60-minute Honey & Lavender Body Treatment that involves getting wrapped briefly in a cellophane-like cocoon. This delicious melange of potions - using local honey, salt and lavender exfoliates, heals and nourishes the skin. You’ll float back to your room, your skin feeling renewed and your mind at peace. ● Roll to nearby wineries by pedi-cab, the Willows’ covered two-person rickshaw drawn by a bicyclist who will drop you off at wineries within a mile of the lodge, including Chateau Ste. Michelle and the Hollywood Winery District. ● Revel in a nine-course dinner at The Herbfarm, an internationally renowned restaurant (and one of America’s 52 AAA 5-Diamond Award recipients) tucked into an enchanting cottage amidst the gardens of the Willows. Sup on seasonal, locally sourced dishes reflecting the gastronomic bounty of the Pacific Northwest and paired with six wines of the region.

● Tour Chateau Ste. Michelle, gorgeous and massive and spread over 100 acres. This is where all the company’s white wines are bottled (the reds are bottled in Washington’s Columbia Valley region). Daily tours and tastings, plus bustling gift shops, chef dinners, wine and food classes and an outdoor summer concert series keep things hopping here. ● Breath in the scent of lavender while standing in a field of the fragrant purple herb at the Woodinville Lavender Farm, WoodinvilleLavender.com. This is where Willows Lodge gets lavender for its spa treatments and where visitors shop for lavender oils, bath salts, soap, sachets, lotion, herbs and seasonings for cooking - even ice cream bars (the cardamom and lavender one will make you daydream about enjoying this treat again). ADVENTURE GEAR TO TAKE ALONG With more than 100 different wineries and tasting rooms in the very concentrated Woodinville Wine Country, chances are you’ll visit quite a few and will want to take pictures as you taste. For photographers relying on the camera in their phones, Kenu’s Highline for iPhone 5/5S, a clever case and leash system, will help you keep track of your phone. The clear snap-on case is made of tough polycarbonate and has a rugged rim for protection against drops, scratches and scuffs. An abrasion-resistant leash and loop system fastens to zippers, belt loops and purse handles; a Lightning Lock system plugs safely into the iPhone’s lightning port and locks to a tiny notch in the case. Viola! It’s a simple yet secure connection that will allow you to whip out your phone and snap away at each winery without losing it or leaving it behind. Author, travel and lifestyle writer, and travel goods expert Kathy Witt feels you should never get to the end of your bucket list; there’s just too much to see and do in the world. She can be reached at KathyWitt24@gmail.com or KathyWitt.com. Distributed by MCT Information Services

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The Gift of Hospice

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


A hospice nurse was recently asked, “How can you work in hospice--it’s important work, but it must be so sad!” She responded that, “I love providing highly-skilled, professional nursing care because I can truly make a difference in someone’s quality of life. I love that I can use my training as a nurse to bring comfort and dignity to my patients, and seeing the relief on their faces and on the faces of those who love them. I love being a part of a professional hospice team that works together to offer individualized, holistic care to families when it is critically needed. I love that I can offer practical solutions to some of life’s most difficult challenges, while also providing dignity and humanity.” Hospice is more than traditional healthcare. Hospice and palliative care programs provide pain management, symptom control, psychosocial support, and spiritual care to patients and their families when a cure is not possible. Hospice and palliative care combines the highest level of quality medical care with the emotional and spiritual support that families need most when facing the end of life. Hospice is a philosophy of care founded on the belief in the sacred dignity of human life. Hospice care affirms life and regards dying as a natural process. Hospice neither hastens nor postpones death. Hospice care adds life to one’s days, not days to one’s life. Hospice is not euthanasia. Hospice provides palliative (comfort) care to patients who are terminally ill so they can be as comfortable and alert as possible. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

When patients elect hospice care, they keep their own physician who approves medications and treatments that are consistent with national accepted standards of care and the patient’s wishes. In addition, patients are encouraged to participate in developing their own plan of care. Hospice does not withhold or force medications, nutrition or hydration on any patient. The decision on whether or not adult patients receive medications, food or fluid remains with them and their family. It is never the decision of hospice personnel. Unlike other forms of health care, hospice focuses on both the patient and the family. Because an approaching death is very stressful for a family, we encourage open and honest communication during this time. This helps minimize misunderstanding, conflict and/or disagreements. As one might imagine, watching a loved one die is never easy, but there can be immense satisfaction to families in knowing that they provided loving and caring support. The same holds true for hospice staff and volunteers. Most people who work for hospice do not consider it simply a job. Most feel called and consider it a ministry and are incredibly passionate about their labor. While often difficult, hospice is one of the most rewarding occupations one can have. At Hospice of Montgomery (HOM), we’ll help you live more fully because we know even the smallest of moments matter. Hospice of Montgomery is Alabama’s first hospice and has been providing services for patients and their

families in and around the River Region for over 30 years. As the ONLY independent, non-profit hospice in the River Region, HOM provides quality palliative care to meet the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of those in our community affected by terminal illness; maintains the highest ethical standards; and educates the community about the hospice concept and end-of-life issues. When we as a hospice team enter into the lives of patients and their families during these crucial transitional times, we become part of their stories and they become a part of our family. Hospice of Montgomery is available to anyone with a life limiting diagnosis and those who wish to focus on comfort or palliative care. Knowing your eligibility and deciding when to initiate hospice services is a personal decision and should be determined by you, your family, and your physician. When you are ready to pursue hospice care, reach out to your physician and ask for a referral to Hospice of Montgomery or simply call Hospice of Montgomery for more information: 334-279-6677. hospiceofmontgomery.org Alabama’s First Hospice. Still Local. Still Non-Profit Providing uplifting care to the River Region since 1976.

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By MaryByMeehan Mary Meehan

Helping Little Ones With Broken Hearts When Dr. Carol Cottrill approaches, you hear her faint, joyful hum before you see her. She’s singing, unwittingly, while she propels herself with her feet from exam room to exam room in the wheelchair she uses because of severe rheumatoid arthritis. “I don’t even know that I am doing it,” she said when her humming is brought to her attention. As a pediatric cardiologist with University of Kentucky (UK) HealthCare, Cottrill has been caring for babies with broken hearts for 43 years. Her patients, over the decades, have found a place in hers. “I just feel that if there are parents out there and kids out there that I can serve a need for it’s my responsibility as a physician,” said Cottrill, who is 77 and doesn’t have plans for retirement. “She is truly a pioneer in pediatric care, and her unwavering dedication to children and their families continues to have a tremendous impact on many, many lives,” said Dr. Bernard Boulanger, chief medical officer for UK HealthCare. Holli Hatmaker is just one example. “I don’t want to start crying,” said Hatmaker, looking at her son, Knox. The blue-eyed boy, just 4 months old, has a faint scar down the center of his chest as he waits in Cottrill’s office during a checkup in July. “She basically saved his life,” Hatmaker said. When Hatmaker was hospitalized with high blood pressure late in her pregnancy, an ultrasound showed a problem with Knox’s heart. Cottrill diagnosed his problem and sent the family to a hospital in Columbus, Ohio, so he could be operated on when he was born. Before the family left for Columbus, Cottrill told the anxious mother-to-be: “Don’t worry. When you get home, I will take good care of you.” “And she has, ever since,” said Hatmaker. Cottrill leans in close for an examination

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of Knox to determine if his development is on target. The infant is reaching for things, making sounds, doing what a newborn does.

going to fail I wanted it to be right up front.”

And Cottrill couldn’t be more pleased if he were her own grandson.

She eventually transferred to school during the day so she could take more courses at one time. She considered, briefly, dropping out when Crystal died after Cottrill’s sophomore year.

“That’s good,” she says, gently pushing on Knox’s tummy. “That’s really good.” Cottrill’s long career has its roots in personal pain. She was a housewife in Lexington in the late 1960s with no plans of going to college. She had four children and a house to run. But her youngest child and only daughter, Crystal, developed heart disease. As her daughter started treatment at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cottrill became interested in the work of the people trying to help her. “I started wondering if I might be able to learn something to help other children the way mine was being helped,” she said. She started taking evening classes in Cincinnati, switching child care responsibilities with a neighbor who worked second shift. She took the toughest classes first, she said. “I didn’t want my family to spend a lot of money for nothing,” she said. “If I was

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“Long-story short,” she said, “I didn’t fail.”

“I had to answer the question of whether I really wanted to go back,” she said. But, she said, “You don’t abandon your goals because things didn’t turn out for you personally.” She was one of five women in her medical school graduating class of 107 at the University of Cincinnati in 1971. Originally, she didn’t intend to take care of babies with bad hearts, but something about them captured her attention. She’d been practicing for about four years when she and her husband, Tom, took in their first of 30 foster children. That first boy, like most of the Cottrills’ foster children, had a medical condition. He suffered from primary pulmonary hypertension, which at that time was a death sentence, said Cottrill. The boy, whom Cottrill met when he was 5, did well when he took his medicine. But his mother, who had 11 children, often couldn’t monitor his medicine.

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The first time Cottrill met him he was blue from lack of oxygen and swollen from retaining fluid. Cottrill took him to UK where he soon improved; he then spent a few days recovering at her home. It was around Thanksgiving. He had never seen a Thanksgiving turkey, Cottrill said. He laughed and laughed at a book she gave him about Christmas because he thought it was crazy that people brought a tree into the house to decorate. He’d never seen such a thing.

Although she admits the story would play out differently today, Cottrill told the boy’s mother bluntly that her son was going to die. She also said, “he’s going to die sooner because you are not taking care of him.” “Will you do that for me?” the mother responded. “I want you to take care of him. I want him to live down there near the hospital.”

When Cottrill and her husband, Tom, took the boy to his home on a foggy evening, she worried she would never see him again.

“I was terrified,” Cottrill remembers. She talked to her priest and a child psychologist before making a decision. The priest told her she was agreeing to take care of the boy until he died and she would have to follow through until the end. The psychologist said her attitude about death would be the attitude adopted by her children.

So she hatched a plan. She told him, “If you ever swell up again you must find me.”

The boy lived with the Cottrill family until he was 11.

She also gave him money for a phone call and told him to keep it in his shoe so it wouldn’t be spent on anything else. And, a devout Catholic, Cottrill prayed the Rosary on her way home.

The day he died in 1981 he’d gone with Tom Cottrill to the family farm outside Lexington.

A month later, when the boy started to have trouble with swelling, the 5-year-old packed the Sesame Street jumpsuit Cottrill bought him in a paper bag and started hitchhiking on the Mountain Parkway. A trucker picked him up and took him to the local health department. The health department called Cottrill.

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Cottrill has been active for years with the Lexington-based nonprofit Children of the Americas, said Rosemary Vance, executive director of the group, which takes annual medical mission trips to Guatemala. “The word I would use for Carol Cottrill is inspirational. She has boundless energy and a commitment to the things that she believes in that is unprecedented,” Vance said. Vance has wondered when Cottrill will no longer be able to make trips to Guatemala where it is difficult for anyone to get around and an even bigger challenge for someone in a wheelchair. But, she said, Cottrill finds a way to make it work. She submitted her application to go on the 2015 mission last weekend. “She’s amazing,” Vance said.

“He’d had a really big day,” she said. “He got to ride in the big truck and go pick up some horses.” Cottrill insisted on an autopsy so the boy could help others like him. It might have offered clues to why that boy lived to be 11 while his brother, with the same disease, died as an infant, she said. Dozens of kids followed, from Eastern Kentucky and around the world. This year

Cottrill cared for a Guatemalan girl with severe facial deformities.

For her part, Cottrill plans to keep wheeling along. Each year she undergoes testing to make sure her memory is good. She has helped some patients who were not expected to survive into adulthood live into old age. And she wants to stay with them as long as she can do it safely. “I would feel like I am abandoning them at this point,” she said. “I don’t want to do that.” (c)2014 Lexington Herald-Leader Distributed by MCT Information Services

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HERBS: Grow & Store As well as tasting great, herbs have many medicinal qualities as well as adding delicious flavors to food dishes. Basil, for example, has anti-inflammatory properties and is reportedly good for digestive and respiratory issues. Oregano has antiviral and anti-fungal properties and is a natural insect repellant. Rosemary has been used for centuries to boost the immune system, improve memory and alleviate muscle pain. So, are there benefits in having fresh herbs over dried? In some cases, yes. Fresh herbs are definitely best when served uncooked – in a salad or suchlike. Dried herbs are best used when actually cooking them into a dish, as you can destroy the potency of fresh herbs by overcooking them – they should be added at the last moment (just like essential oils). Dried herbs do lose their potency over time though. Most chefs only recommend using dried herbs that are less than 6 months old. You do also need to remember that dried herbs are basically dehydrated, so the quantity you would use is much less than fresh herbs, and vice versa. Some dishes will specifically require the use of dried herbs, for instance, lasagna, as you are cooking the herbs for a long time. Others, such as pizza, you can add the fresh herbs after cooking the pizza itself. There are a lot of herbs that grow quite well in the River Region; many will survive with quite dry soil. They can also be grown either in pots indoors or outside. The easiest way to start is to buy a seedling from either a garden center or supermarket – look out for ones that have healthy looking leaves and are not flowering. If growing in pots indoors make sure you line the bottom inch with pebbles before adding good quality soil (potting soil or compost). Gently transfer the seedling to the pot and water gently at the root, pressing down the soil firmly to help the roots connect to the new soil. Place

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garlic, they are good for digestion and add great flavor to dishes whether used raw or cooked.

somewhere that has at least 5 hours of sunlight a day. Kitchen windows are the perfect place as they’re then so easily accessible when you need them. For outdoor planting, follow the same guidelines – 5 hours minimum of sunlight, decent topsoil, transplant gently and water at roots.

Oregano also likes full sun or a little shade and is great in a number of different sauces, particularly tomato based sauces. As well as its antiviral and anti-fungal properties, it also aids digestion and tastes great!

So, once you’ve got your herb garden growing and are harvesting away, In both how do you store cases, once them? Well there they’ve are at least two taken root tried and tested in their new methods. 1) drying home they them yourself – will become hang them upside pretty selfdown for at least sufficient. two weeks so the The trick important oils stay then is to in the leafy parts, harvest then once dry, the leaves store in an airtight regularly container for up to use to 6 months. 2) immediately wash, chop and Tracy with her son Ashton, the healthiest eating or store for 5 year old you’ll ever meet! freeze them in later. You ice cube trays. Fill can pick each cube with the chopped herbs then them with your fingers or with shears. top up with water and freeze. When you Never take all the leaves at one time, be need the herb for cooking just pop a selective and the plant will regrow new cube out and use. They should be good leaves. to use for at least 12 months with this method. 3) you can also keep them in oil. When the soil feels dry to the touch, Again wash and chop them first. Choose water gently, focusing on the root area. a suitable container, such as an old glass Do not overwater. Pull any weeds that jar, fill with the chopped fresh herbs appear near the plant as they will steal then top up with olive oil. Make sure the nutrients from the soil. the herbs are completely submersed in the oil. These will keep for 6-12 months. Three recommended starter herbs are Just spoon out and use with the oil in chives, oregano and thyme. They are all your cooking. Top up the jar with oil if perennial, so you don’t have to replant necessary. again, they will seed themselves. They are all pretty easy to grow, easy to find Tracy Bhalla, and can be used in a number of different Owner/ Manager of Cool Beans Restaurant 115 Montgomery Street dishes.

Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Chives are in the onion and garlic family and are actually a tiny bulb below ground, but you cook with the long leaves above ground. Once you get them going they will self-seed and spread. They like full sun or a little shade. Like

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coolbeans.mgm@gmail.com facebook.com/coolbeans.mgm Trained as an architect! Worked as a teacher of product design and graphic design for 9 years in England and Bermuda. Always had a love of healthy, good-for-you food. Always cooking for friends and family. Married a cardiologist in 2007. We have a shared passion about eating healthily (and wine) and both love to cook, so when Cool Beans became available we jumped at it.

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September 2014

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

CALERA, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Includes: Souvenir Wine Tasting, receive a keepsake glass and taste locally produced Whites, Specialty, Reds, and Dessert wines from the Ozan Vineyard overlook. Gourmet Box Lunch, lunch arrives after tasting. “Wow... there was a croissant sandwich, chips, fresh fruit, and three cookies! No skimping on anything!” Vineyard Tour and Train Excursion, gather under the trees for an educational vineyard tour and leisurely stroll prior to boarding The Heart of Dixie Railroad Train. A vintage museum train with all of the trimmings: Featuring air conditioned cars, open air seating, period dressed conductors, red caboose. Return to Ozan after a scenic and winding train excursion. The Vineyard Train departs from Ozan Winery. For tickets visit ozanwine.com

The Capitol City Corvette Club is hosting the 7th Annual Open Car and Truck show in Montgomery at the Shoppes at EastChase, September 13th. Registration $25 from 9-11, Awards at 1:30, Awards in multiple categories, Money tree, door prizes, silent auction, poker run, 50/50, oldies music, valve cover races and plenty of shops and restaurants for every taste, All proceeds to local charities such as Montgomery Area Food Bank, Autauga/Elmore/ Montgomery Humane Societies, Salvation Army, etc., Info: Larry Martin 334-201-8041 or capitolcitycorvetteclub.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Family Guidance Center Walk/Run The Shoppes at EastChase Saturday September 13, 7:30 am

Ozan Vineyard Train Ozan Winery, Calera, AL Saturdays in September

7th Annual Open Car and Truck show Shoppes at EastChase Saturday, September 13, 9 am

New exhibition: Rewind: Art of the 1960’s MMFA Through October 26th This exhibition of art from the Museum’s Permanent Collection explores the decade that set in motion the process leading to the art we know today. As the nation turbulently swirled with political and social events, artists began to experiment to keep pace with these social changes. Major movements that came to the forefront during this period include the second generation of Abstract Expressionism and Op Art, along with the Bay Area Figurative style of realism and Pop Art. For more info visit mmfa. org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

This event offers many different activities for individuals and families. In addition to the 5K and 10K courses designed by the River Region Runners, many of the stores at The Shoppes at EastChase open early and offer deep discounts to participants. Gap, Williams-Sonoma, and Bath & Body Works are some of the many participating stores. Refreshments, Color Guard flag presentation, and DJ-hosted music add to the festive spirit. Age-level awards encourage best times among competitive runners, and door prizes allows everyone a chance of going home with a prize. More info visit familyguidancecenter.org

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Paula Deen Live! Alabama Theatre, Birmingham Tuesday, September 16, 7:30 pm

Sunday Fundays are launching this Fall in Hampstead! Join us every first Sunday in September, October and November from 2 to 5 pm for live music and yard games on the Great Lawn at Hampstead Lake. Bring your picnics and blankets out for an afternoon of free family fun. Sunday, September 7 - Sunday, October 5 - Sunday, November 2 hampsteadliving.com

Paula Deen Live!” will be an entertaining and interactive ninety-minute show featuring Paula demonstrating how to make her favorite seasonal dishes, including new recipes featuring Springer Mountain Farms chicken. For the first time ever, fans will have the opportunity to get up close and personal with Paula on stage and taste her delicious Southern creations. Paula and her husband, Michael, will share personal stories and engage the audience in cooking and games. For more info call 205.252.2262 or visit alabamatheatre.com. Located at 1817 Third Avenue North, Birmingham, AL 35203

Sunday Fundays in Hampstead! Great Lawn Hampstead Lake First Sundays in Sept, Oct, Nov

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PRATTVILLE, ALABAMA

YOKOHAMA TIRE LPGA CLASSIC Senator Course at RTJ at Capitol Hill, Prattville, AL Thursday -Sunday, September 18-21 Come see the world’s best women golfers compete on the one the mopst demanding golf courses on the RTJ Trail. The top player in the world, Stacy Lewis, will be back as returning champion after the LPGA took a year off in Prattville. Lewis joins a field of 143 others to compete in the Yokohama Tire LPGA. Joining Stacy Lewis will be three other former LPGA champions who have won on the Senator Course at RTJ at Capitol Hill: Lexi Thompson (2011), Katherine Hull Kirk of Australia (2010) and Maria Hjorth McBride of Sweden (2008). Lorena Ochoa won in Prattville in 2008 and 2009 but has retired from professional golf. For more info visit lpga.com.

PENSACOLA BEACH, FLORIDA Taste of the Beach Pensacola Beach Friday-Sunday, September 19-21

Pensacola Beach Chamber invites you to Taste of the Beach. Entry is free. Enjoy two days full of delicious coastal cuisine presented by the beach’s finest chefs. Signature dishes are priced at $5 or less. With a variety chef presentations, live entertainment and kid fun activities, the family will have so much fun you’ll want to stay the whole day. Taste of the Beach is a primary off-season festival bringing thousands of locals and visitors to the Beach and was recently named one of the top 20 events in the Southeast for September by the Southeast Tourism Society. Visit tasteofpensacolabeach.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Loft Living Tour! Downtown Montgomery Sunday, September 21, 1:30-5:30

Find out why loft living is so popular! Tour ten different historic lofts & townhouses in downtown Montgomery. Sponsored by Landmarks Foundation and Foshee Management Company. Cost $15. Proceeds will benefit Landmarks Foundation. Want a free tour? Be a volunteer host at a loft! For more details call 334.240.4500 or email marketing@oldalabamatown.com

PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA

Blue Morpho Butterfly Month Callaway Gardens-Day Butterfly Center Month of September ART AND GARDENING WORKSHOPS Callaway Gardens September Pine Needle Basketry: Saturday, Sept. 13, 10 to 4 pm Make a basket using pine needles and coil basketry techniques. This beginner class covers the basic skills needed to The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

make the basket. Complete the class with a basket reflecting personal taste and design. Lunch is not included in the workshop. All supplies are included. Fall and Winter Vegetables: Grow Your Own in Containers Saturday, Sept. 27, 10 to Noon Learn which vegetables are best in the cool Fall and Winter seasons and how to grow them. Emphasis will be on those that can be grown in containers for easy harvest and care. Participants will take home a couple of containers to plant their favorites and perhaps some new ones to try. Choose from a variety of lettuces, Swiss chard, kohlrabi, beets, mustard greens and more. for more info call 1.800.225-5292 or visit callawaygardens.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Deck the Halls Trinity Presbyterian Church in Trinity Hall Saturday October 4th, 11:30 am The holidays will be here before you know it. Learn how to make your home merry and bright by attending Deck the Halls, featuring former White House decorator Jane Karotkin, on Oct. 4, 11:30 a.m., at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Trinity Hall. Admission is $30 and includes a boxed lunch from Jennie Weller Catering for those who register in advance. Organized by the Friends of the Alabama Governor’s Mansion, proceeds will support restoration projects at the mansion. Guest speaker Jane Karotkin is the administrator of the Friends of the Texas Governor’s Mansion, the most historic home in the Lone Star State. She has worked for the mansion since 1990 and during Georgia W. Bush’s eight-year presidential administration she was tapped to serve on the White House Christmas Decorating Committee. For more information, call 334-263-7914.

MONTGOMERY DOWNTOWN MPAC October Entertainment

Chicago The Broadway Musical Monday, October 13 and Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 7:30 pm Alice Cooper Friday, October 17, 2014 at 8:00 pm Bill Cosby Friday, October 24, 2014 at 8:00 pm ZZ Top Wednesday, October 29, 2014 at 7:30 pm For more info visit mpaconline.org

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

Confessions of a “Golftitute” They are the 5 seconds I’ll never forget! On a fine September morn, on the eve of my sophomore year in high school, I was the last of my foursome to tee off on the 9th hole at Marquette Park golf course in Chicago.

a Spalding Eagle, resting in the cup. When this amazing moment sunk in, we began jumping up and down and screaming because that’s what 14 year old boys do when golf “history” is made.

At 200 yards long, #9 was the shortest and final hole at Marquette. I teed the ball and turned to my 3 partners (and the 2 foursomes waiting behind them) and announced- “this will probably be my last drive of the year so I better make it a good one!”.

For the record, and at the advice of my Dad- also an avid golfer, I sent a letter to Spalding informing them of my achievement with their product. They sent back an affidavit to be signed by the witnesses and notarized. Weeks later I received what every 14 year old needs- a set of glass cocktail tumblers featuring the Spalding logo, certifying me as a member of the Hole-In-One Club. The glasses and accompanying certificate are pictured here as evidence.

It had been a pretty decent round to that point. An unlikely birdie would put me at 40 for the round. I planted my feet and swung. The ball took off high, soaring close to the tall willows lining the right side of the fairway. It began fading left and landed on the front of the green- bounced once, and rolled into the hole like it was on fire. A no-drama hole-in-one! I looked at my friends. They looked at me. Did that really just happen??? We ran down the fairway, leaving our bags behind at the tee box. We encircled the hole and “MIRACLE!”, there was the ball,

I love golf. Golf sucks. But I love it! I hate it. Only a marriage to an actual human being brings as many ups and downs as a long term relationship with golf. Like marriage, the game can humble you. If the game doesn’t humble you the people you play with, will.

In the prime of my “yute”, my nickname was “cannon ass”. I liked to hit the ball a long way, accuracy be damned. I.E (what does that stand for?) I was once playing Miami Lakes Country Club with some radio pals. Don Shula’s house backed up to the 13th fairway, and it was popular with athletes and celebrities in its time. The 18th hole was 320 yards long, with a green tucked in behind a small pond and it was there I made a shot that might have been better than the hole in one. I wound up and hammered a drive that landed on said green, 320 yards away. Everyone was suitably impressed but no one was more impressed with me, than me, and I guess I bragged a bit too much. The next week, at #18, one of my “pals” handed me a ball and said “let’s see how far you hit this one. It’s an illegal ball but with your power, we think you can hit it 400 yards”. “Sure”, I said confidently. “Why not”? I placed the ball on the tee and did all the appropriate pre-shot wiggling and hip shaking. I wound up like a medieval catapult and let fly! The ball was illegal all right. It was made of compacted sand. It exploded upon contact with my mighty swing. After

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management

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taking several minutes to spit the dust out of my mouth and clear my eyes and nostrils, I saw my 3 “pals” writhing around ON THE GROUND cramped by laughter. Very humbling. With memories like those, is it any wonder I have recently returned to the game I love-hate? I finally played again for the first time in years last month and had a great time. I was invited by my friend Steve German, a retired Air Force pilot and darned fine golfer. While I enjoyed getting reacquainted with the game I was a little stunned getting reacquainted with the high cost of golf. My generous pal Steve treated me, but if I am going to get serious and play frequently, I will need to make more money or resort to trolling for “invitations”.

spend several hundred dollars a month on golf! So, BOOMERS, take me with you! Along with my mediocre game, I can bring an array of name-dropping stories, radio station paraphernalia and anecdotes featuring Susan Woody, my Newstalk 93.1 FM morning chanteuse. I will give our foursome free publicity and willingly lie about your golf skills on the air. Just take me along. A Golftitute can’t be fussy. I’ll play anywhere with anyone as long as you pay. BOOM! Editor Jim Watson is my pim-, I mean, “manager”. Contact him to make arrangements. I’ve had all my shots. I just want to make some new ones! Golftitution is legal in the state of Alabama.

As long as the Golfer-In-Chief is president, making more money is going to be tough. I will troll.

For now.

So, I am resorting to what I call “Golftitution”. Look- I have 2 kids in school, 2 dogs and a wife. My money is spent. It would be irresponsible for me to

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, children and dogs. He’s a 25 year veteran of radio who hosts the Greg & Susan morning show 6-9 am and Happy Hour 3-6 pm on NEWSTALK 93.1, Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

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BOOM! September 2014  
BOOM! September 2014  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine