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November 2015

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

November 2015

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

November 2015

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.” Carl Bard

Volume 6 Issue 4

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 8 Publisher’s Letter 10 Fall Prevention - A New Way to Train Leigh Anne Richards 11 BOOM! Advertising 12 A Purse with Holes in It Brandt McDonald 14 Joy – An Irish Christmas page 30

Features

30 Dick Van Dyke

Pushing 90, Dick Van Dyke prescribes song and dance.

Departments 14 This and That

Now You’re “In the Know”

15 Callaway Gardens School of Needle Arts 18 BOOM! Cover Profile

32 Memoirs by Seniors Write down a little something every day.

34 Wildlife Safari

Jackson Hole, Wyoming in winter is like a magical scene inside a snow globe.

44 {12} Things

24 Beauty Buzz New Year with New Peepers 26 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Holiday Snacking

38 Greg Budell

Solutions for Bored Boomers

23 Healthy Hearing Casey Gonzalez

JERSEY GIRL & E.D. (MATURE CONTENT)

27 Dating Advice: Is he right for you?

BOOM!

28 Noticing Cognitive Decline Ask an Elder Law Attorney

COVER PROFILE page 18

37 AA Farm Creamery “Udderly Delicious” 40 7 Spectacular Ways Fall Boosts Your Health page 15

page 14

41 Ask Nancy: advice for an Alzheimer’s patient with sundowning 43 The Need is Growing for hospice

page 16

page 37

46 How to Find the Perfect Grandparent Name

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 6398 Eastwood Glen Pl., Montgomery, AL 36117. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2015 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

Thankfulness As I ease into the end of 2015 I find my heart full of thankfulness. I’m grateful for many things that touch my life. The opportunity to publish BOOM! and share stories of people over 50 each month. The joy in worship when I glorify God’s presence in the world. The many people who engage in service to others. My family who loves me unconditionally and looks forward to our next reunion. My friends, who are few, but loyal. And of course, my wife, who continues to light up my life with her fire. I guess we’re still newlyweds after just two years of marriage, Happy Anniversary Jackie!

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Associate Editor Kelly Watson

kelly@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Erin E. Arvedlund Jan Beale Tracy Bhalla Greg Budell

Lisa Copeland Casey Gonzalez William Hageman Brandt McDonald Leigh Anne Richards Diana Stanczak Nancy Stein Ana Weickert Raley L. Wiggins Kathy Witt

Cover Photography Kim Bethea Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

I also know that our Cover Profile this month is very thankful for her family and the team that helps her operate You Name It! Her name is Jan Beale and she is probably the best known embroiderer in the River Region. Her store, You Name It, will personalize anything and Jan means anything! I hope you take a few minutes and get to know Jan in this month’s Cover Profile, I know you’ll enjoy the read. Jim Watson, Publisher

We also have many other interesting features like the Kathy Witt Bucket List Adventure to Jackson Hole and a Wildlife Safari, It made me want to pack some bags! Dick Van Dyke has a new book out on his tips for aging well, he’ll turn 90 in December and his wife is 45 years younger...go figure. Brandt McDonald shares some financial wisdom that has something to do with how we treat our money, does your purse have a hole in it? Leigh Anne Richards is on to a new way to teach us older folks how to improve balance, something we need to maintain or we’ll fall down and can’t get back up! Our favorite funnyman, Greg Budell hits one out of the park this month as he takes on the ever present “blue pill”, you won’t want to miss it! We also have a new contributing writer for our Healthy Hearing column, her name is Casey Gonzalez and she is a Doctor of Audiology with Montgomery Hearing Services, welcome Casey! We have many more good reads this month and hope you continue to find BOOM! the best reading experience for the 50+ community. As always, thanks for being part of what we do. Your comments are the most valuable part of publishing BOOM! each month. Please continue sharing, I love to listen. If you’re not a Digital & Interactive subscriber to BOOM!, please sign up, it’s free. Go to www.RiverRegionBoom.com and fill in a few blanks and you’ll start receiving the full version to your email each month. Thanks for subscribing and thanks again for being part of our BOOM! Community. Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

Jim

Advertising

jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Design & Layout Lake House Graphics

Distribution

Network Delivery

Printing Publications Press, Montgomery, AL 334.244.0436 publicationspress.com

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

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Fall Prevention - A New Way to Train I made a new friend a few years ago that writes for the New York Times as well as writes for other publications. I “became friends” with John Hanc through our mutual friend, Dr. Hank Williford, lead exercise physiologist at AUM. Dr. Williford was gracious enough to put John in touch with me when he was writing articles about Senior Fitness because John needed input from a group exercise perspective. John and I have spoken on the phone and through e-mail but have never met personally. However, I have read many of his articles on different fitness topics. One particular article that John wrote in March 2015 was on “Training the Mind to Ward Off Falls.” I was very interested in this article and the new way to train balance so I called John and talked to him about this article. John visited Wichita, Kansas to see firsthand how exercise physiologist, Michael E. Rogers conducted a Stand Strong exercise class at the Linwood Senior Center. Most of the participants were in their 70’s and 80’s. The beginning of the class was a typical group exercise format with the warm-up with stretches and then some strengthening exercises. A graduate student led that part of the class and then Dr. Rogers stepped in to challenge the brain as well as the balance. Each participant stood with each foot on a three-inch-thick foam pad. Then, each one was given a yellow whiffle ball. He asked them to hold the ball in one hand and drop it into the other as the class followed his instructions and demonstration. He asked them to expand the distance by raising one arm to show how far the ball must fall. The next phase of this workout included Dr. Rogers asking them to read the words that had been projected onto the wall-red, green, yellow and blue. They are reading these words aloud in unison while standing on the unstable surface of the foam foot pads. That part appeared to be easy. Then the words appear again but now in different colors so that blue is in green type, red is in yellow, and so forth. They had to say the color of the word, but ignore the word. This time there is hesitation as participants have to really think.

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This brainteaser that Dr. Rogers was implementing is a part of the Stroop Test, typically used in laboratory setting to test a person’s capacity to direct attention. This is a mental exercise being incorporated into a physical fitness class. It is based on an idea cognitive distraction drills can help improve balance.

Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne Richards

Falls generally happen when we are not paying attention. Dr. Rogers explained that if he tells people to focus on their balance- like putting one foot in front of the other- they really concentrate on it and move very slowly and carefully. The idea in balance training is that it needs to become a more unconscious process- for example walking outside the house down stairs and being distracted by the dog. Falls are the leading cause of accidental deaths among older people, and physical activity is one of the primary ways to prevent them. However, exercise is often very challenging and intimidating for seniors. The Standing Strong program was developed in 2008 by Dr Rogers and his wife, a psychologist who is director of Wichita State’s Aging Studies Program. This program was developed to help seniors improve fitness and balance through basic exercise. The last few years have introduced the cognitive drills- the idea being that improving the participant’s dual taskingtheir ability to maintain balance on the foam pads while attending to other stimuli- can reduce falls. I decided to personally use this idea with one of my clients, Dr. Gene Brown. Gene is 81years old and is very fit for a man of his age. He works out at MetroFitness 3-4 times a week doing the recumbent bicycle for an hour and then doing a circuit of strength machines. After his knee replacement, his physical therapist, Mike Ellis, recommended he get with me and focus on balance. We have done all the traditional training with

walking forwards, backwards, laterally while changing eye and head position. He stands on balance objects with both feet and we also change the vision as well as moving his body in different planes. I decided to challenge him a few weeks ago by making him stand on one leg and then I would ask him different questions like the names of his grandchildren, their ages, the names of the University of Alabama coaches and players. I even got him to quote scripture while balancing. I call this functional balance training. This week I will try the colors written on different colors of paper and ask him to read as he balances on unstable objects, balances on one foot on a steady surface, and also incorporate it into just walking. The idea of being distracted and maintaining balance is what happens in our daily lives. Dr. David Thurman a fellow with the American Academy of Neurology who has worked with the C.D.C. and researched issues of balance in relation to senior’s falls, says that this idea with challenging balance with a cognitive task is something that needs more research and more study. He states he is not in a position to endorse this yet as a proven strategy. As for Dr. Mike Rogers, he continues his approach to training the brain with balance. He has presented the program to organizations of professionals focused on health, fitness, and aging around the world. In Japan, a class similar to Standing Strong is offered to older people in 12 cities. One of the regular participants in the Standing Strong program in Wichita says she could not use the balance pads at first but now she can stand on them while doing the cognitive drills. “My brain needed stimulating,” she said with a chuckle. The combination of physical and mental exercise seems to be a great way to train our balance. ** John Hanc, March 12, 2015, page F 5 of the New York Times edition retirement section with the headline “Training the Mind to Ward Off Falls. Hanc is a longtime columnist and contributor to Newsday in New York and a contributing editor to Runner’s World magazine. He is also a contributor to The New York Times, and a contributing writer to the digital edition of Smithsonian magazine. Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General Manager- MetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

We Love Women Over 50! If your Target Audience are Women with Money and Desire, BOOM! readers are your customers...70% of our readers are Mature Women, 75% of US wealth is owned by Mature Women age 50+, and Mature Women spend 2.5 times what the average person spends and they spend it on things like Beauty, Grand Kids, Pets, Fitness, Gifts, Restaurants, Healthcare, Financial Services, Caregiving, Classes, Fashion, Home & Garden, Concerts, Entertaining, Travel, and much more!

r WOMEN r MONEY r DESIRE Reasonable Ad Rates, Complimentary Ad Creation, 12,500 Readers*, Locally Focused Content, 250+ Locations, Digital & Interactive Subscriptions (1,600) *5,000 copies, 2.5 readers per issue

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A Purse with Holes in It In the book of Haggai there is a passage that I often lean on when I contemplate portfolio management, financial planning, and general advice about budgeting. Haggai chapter 1, verse 6 says “You have planted much, but harvested little. You eat, but never have enough. You drink, but never have your fill. You put on clothes, but are not warm. You earn wages, only to put them in a purse with holes in it.” Do you know anyone like this? Unfortunately, I meet people like this every day. We live in a feel good society with an attitude of “I want my _______ and I want it now!” You fill in the blank. It’s this kind of attitude that is at the root cause of financial stress in millions of homes across America. In this month’s column, let’s explore a few key points that can help you avoid saving money in a purse with holes in it. Are you content with what you have now? It’s OK to want more. However, the question to be asked is “why do you want it, when do you want it, and what do you have to do to get it?” To avoid impulse buying, or borrowing money for things you can’t afford, realize what you already have! If you look deep enough, what you already have is enough. Happiness is most often found in being content with the people and the things you already have in your life. Fulfilment rarely comes from getting things that you want on a short term basis. Turn your wants into long-term goals that are centered on a vision for you and your family. Make your vision something meaningful and lasting. Take what you have now, your wages, and current savings and develop a long-term financial plan that achieves the goals that are most important in your life. Stop the bad

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habits today that are robbing you of your future.

path and stick to it. A plowman never plows a field while looking back at his work. If he does, the line he cuts Managing your balance sheet (assets into the soil becomes crooked. And and liabilities) can be a daunting task. then that crooked line leads to a field But the key to it is to remove your planted in chaos; a field that yields emotions from the equation. I always less fruit from his labors. In the same like to think of it from a stewardship sense, if we constantly look back at perspective. what has been Pretend for a left behind, it moment that your will become a assets weren’t distraction or a yours. Rather, you bad habit that with have been hired causes your Brandt McDonald to take care of path to get off them for someone course. Plant else. Being placed your fields head in a position of up with your stewardship changes the character of eyes set forward. Work your field and the decisions plant the seeds of your future. being made. No longer are you November is the month of making decisions Thanksgiving. Let us all give thanks on emotional that we live in a country that is still needs and wants. free, that we can still pursue our But, instead own happiness, and that our life you now make can become what we make of it. decisions based Contentment, stewardship, and hard on long-term work will plug the holes in your purse. performance, Never stop looking up and take the fueled by a desire to do a good job time to smile and give thanks. and get hired again for the next year. Conversely, if you do a poor job, you From all of us at McDonald, Barranco, will be fired and lose the ability to and Hagen, Wealth Management, we manage that which was entrusted to wish you a Happy Thanksgiving. Try not you in the first place. Identify the longto eat too much and make sure you’re term objective and develop a plan that disciplined at the register on Black meets the objective. Making decisions Friday. As I always say, until next time, based on emotions is a sure fire way to remember to never run with the herd, failure. Learn to manage your balance always be thankful, and look to the sheet and make daily decisions based future with anticipation of what’s yet on a finite set of rules and discipline. to come.

Financial Thoughts

Learn to live with your eyes set forward and never look back. There’s a saying to never let past mistakes or failures cost you twice. Living in the past never does you any good. Mistakes and poor decisions should chisel us and prepare us for better decision making. Set your

Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager MBCapitalWealth.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com or 334.387.0094 Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The opinions expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the views of LPL Financial.

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i

This & tHAT

Keith and Kristyn Getty “Joy – An Irish Christmas” Presented by Baptist Health A special performance at Montgomery Performing Arts CenterMPAC, Thursday, December 3, at 7:00 pm Keith and Kristyn Getty occupy a unique space in the world of music today as preeminent modern hymn writers. In re-inventing the traditional hymn form, they have created a distinguished catalogue of songs teaching Christian doctrine and crossing genres by connecting the world of traditional and classical composition with contemporary and globally-accessible melodies. These modern hymns are rooted in the traditions of Celtic and English hymnody handed down to the Northern Ireland-born couple and long-time writing partner, Stuart Townend. “In Christ Alone” (penned by Keith and Stuart, and recorded by Keith and Kristyn) echoes this heritage, holding the #1 position of most-frequently-sung in UK churches for the past 8 consecutive years. For tickets visit mpaconline.org and to learn more visit gettymusic.com

MACOA’s 11th Annual International Tasting Sunday, November 15th, 2:30pm- 4:30pm at Southern Homes & Gardens, 8820 Vaughn Road. Take a trip around the world as you experience International cuisine, entertainment, and an afternoon of cultural surprises. This special “invitation only” charity benefit is reserved for those who provide monetary support to MACOA and Meals On Wheels. For more information on how you may be added to the guest list to attend this international event contact Chacolby Burns-Johnson, Development Coordinator, at 334.263.0532 or cjohnson@macoa.org. For more info visit macoa.org

Scarecrows in the Garden The Old Alabama Town Herb Society (OATHS) is offering up its 4th Annual Scarecrows in the Garden. This year’s theme is “Wonders of Nature,” and all scarecrows will be made with materials found in nature, as far as is possible. The scarecrows will be available for viewing through November 20th during Old Alabama Town hours. Scarecrows in the Garden included with admission

Free Hearing Seminar & Lunch

There will be a free hearing seminar and lunch at Red Lobster, Eastdale on Tuesday, November 10th. The seminar will begin at 11 am and is hosted by Montgomery Hearing Services, a Division of Montgomery Otolaryngology. Limited seating so RSVP today by calling 334.651.0500

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BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

Callaway Gardens School of Needle Arts The Callaway Gardens School of Needle Arts has been one of America’s premier needle arts events for more than four decades. The school is lauded for its world-class faculty and creative course offerings, as well as the long-lasting friendships it sparks among students who return year after year. The school includes a well-stocked boutique, a bookstore offering new and rare out-of-print titles, a juried needle arts exhibit sponsored by the Dogwood Chapter of The Embroiderers’ Guild of America, Inc., and two merchandise nights featuring the latest in needlework tools, beads, wearable art and more. Where else can you attend a needle arts school among beautiful Gardens in a moderate January climate? Callaway Gardens, Sunday, January 17, 2016 to Wednesday, January 27, 2016. To register, you can download and return the registration form at callawaygardens.com or call 1.800.7.NEEDLE (1.800.763.3353). For more information, email Pat Callihan, Callaway Gardens School of Needle Arts Coordinator, at needlearts@callawaygardens.com.

ASF Holiday Tree Lighting On Saturday, November 21st at 4:30PM, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival (ASF) will hold its second annual holiday tree lighting. Santa will parade through Blount Cultural Park and light a beautiful 40-foot Leland Cypress Christmas tree on display in front of the theatre. Bring the whole family out for this fun event and enjoy pictures with Santa, festive carols from the Montgomery Chorale, free carriage rides throughout beautiful Blount Cultural Park, free hot chocolate and Krispy Kreme donuts, and cast members of ASF’s a Christmas Carol. For more information, call 334.271.5354

Get Your Affairs in Order, FREE Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop

Wednesday, November 18: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30 - 3:30 pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334.625.6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com.

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More

Santa Claus is Coming to Town Santa’s Magical Arrival on Ice: Friday, November 13th at 7pm , Eastdale Mall. Santa Claus will arrive in his magical sleigh during a spectacular ice show at the Eastdale Mall Ice Palace. Ice Palace skaters will perform whimsical vignettes featuring traditional holiday tunes that will delight children of all ages. The Eastdale Express will be up and running, so make sure and catch a ride! For more info visit eastdale-mall.com Main Street Parade at The Shoppes at EastChase: Saturday, November 14th, 9am. Join us on Main Street for a parade celebrating Santa’s arrival at 9am followed by a festive performance and carriage rides. That night at 6pm watch as The Shoppes at EastChase light up with holiday spirit with a magical Christmas tree lighting and grand fireworks show! For more info visit theshoppesateastchase.com or 334.279.6046. Photos with Santa at The Shoppes at EastChase: Plan photos with Santa and your grandkids on these dates, Nov. 14-15, 21-22, 28-29, Dec. 5-6, 11-3, 19-24. Photos taken with Santa at his outdoor workshop in front of Blackfinn. 11am - 7pm on Saturday and 1- 6pm on Sunday. Photo package prices vary. Call 334.279.6046.

Alabama Dance Theatre Presents Mistletoe

Photo credit David Robertson, Jr.

The Holiday Classic, Mistletoe, will be presented November 13-15 at Troy University’s Davis Theatre. Featuring “Favorite Dances of Christmas”, a collage of dances set to beautiful Christmas carols and songs, favorites returning to the stage are “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Down To the River to Pray”. New “Favorite Dances” will include Janie Alford’s “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” and “Mary Did You Know?” choreographed by Sara Sanford. Also, one of ADT’s signature pieces “The Messiah”, choreographed by Amelie Hunter to George Frideric Handel’s famous score, returns by popular demand to the Davis Theatre Stage. It will be accompanied by the Montgomery Chorale Ensemble and a small orchestra under the new direction of Dr. James Seay. Call 334.241.2800 or visit alabamadancetheatre.com for tickets.

MACOA Welcomes New Development Director The newest addition to MACOA’s Leadership Team, Phyllis Fenn joined the Montgomery Area Council on Aging in October 2015. Her mission will encompass a strategic plan to expand their flagship Meals On Wheels program throughout both the city and county of Montgomery. “Any waiting list for seniors is too long”, Phyllis explains. “Our goal is to increase Volunteer recruitment and build our Corporate Route partnerships so no one has to spend a night hungry.” An Auburn graduate with a BA in Journalism, Phyllis’ professional career has its roots in the River Region. As Membership Director of the Capital City Club for the past 30 years Phyllis contributed to the continued success of Montgomery’s only private dining club meeting the needs of its Members on both a business and social level. Prior to this she spent eight years in the Advertising, Marketing and Promotion Department for Bass Anglers Sportsman Society coordinating the printing and publication of catalogs, direct mail and magazines. Fuller & Dees Marketing Group brought her to Montgomery originally as a copywriter and editor for a vast array of fundraising books. Phyllis is a proud graduate of Leadership Montgomery Class XXXI and a founding Member of Women of Hope supporting breast cancer survivors and their families. Active in Woodland United Methodist Church in the Pike Road community she donates her time and talents through multiple committees. “The Board of Directors and I are thrilled to have Phyllis on the MACOA staff. She is a proven professional and will work diligently to serve the mission of our organization” says Donna Marietta, Executive Director.

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A Community Celebration: 10th Annual Interfaith Nativity Exhibit

Come and attend the river region’s largest nativity exhibit sponsored for the last ten years by The Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints located at 3460 carter Hill Road in Montgomery. The goal of this event is simple: to bring the Christian community of the tricounty area together to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. By attending this display of nativities from all around the world and from different Christian churches the public can come together in Christian fellowship. Walking into an enormous hall where over four hundred table top nativities are beautifully and artistically displayed evokes feelings of reverence, joy, and peace that remind that Christ is the reason we celebrate Christmas. Each year a new theme, incorporating an uplifting Christ centered theme is displayed in the foyer which prepares attendees to leave behind the stress and chaos of the world and prepare for the tranquility and beauty of the Exhibit Hall. Local school choirs and musicians, church groups, community ensembles and soloist provide Christmas music throughout each night of the exhibit. The event is free of charge to the public who may attend as many times as they wish. The nativities are loaned by the public for the event and returned afterwards. For more info on how you can participate by loaning a nativity go to www.MontgomeryNativity.com. This event aids in promoting the interfaith of all Christians through their love of the nativities and how each in its own way represents the birth of our Savior. One nativity may be made of nuts and another of sterling silver, but all hold the same spirit of Christmas and evoke our dearest feelings for the season. A past visitor to the exhibit said, “Visiting the nativity display was a delightful experience. We were surprised to see there could be so many beautiful and unique scenes (or créches) in one place. It was a wonderful way to begin the Christmas season. It is truly one of Montgomery’s hidden holiday treasures!” Judge Lynn Bright, 2007. The event begins Wednesday Dec. 2 and ends Sunday Dec. 6, from 1-8 pm each day. A special Concert for Seniors and Veterans will be held Thursday, Dec. 3, from 9:30-10:30 am. Make this great event a part of your Christmas tradition this year and for years to come.

RiverWalk Wine Festival Winners they each won mutiple tickets, thanks for playing!

Lisa Beers + Donna Hughes + Dennis Cieszynski + Ed Nichols + Amy Daniel

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Jan Beale, You Name It, We Do It This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Jan Beale. Jan is the owner and doer of all things personalized at her unique store, You Name It, just across the street from Faulkner University. Jan is a hard working entrepreneur who is living and loving her dream as a member of the 50+ community in the River Region. Trained as an accountant at Auburn University, Jan soon realized she would have a whole lot more fun following her childhood passion of monogramming, a skill she learned from Mrs. Jones, Montgomery’s embroidery guru! We recently spent some time with Jan and asked her to share some of her experiences with our readers, we hope you enjoy getting to know Jan as much as we have...by the way, when it comes to personalization, Jan says, “you name it, we do it.” BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Jan: Born and raised in Montgomery… Graduated from Montgomery Catholic High School and attended Auburn University where I majored in accounting. Coming home as an Auburn graduate and an accounting major, I became involved in the family businesses: Alabama Bearings and

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greatest reward? Any lessons you can share with other aspiring entrepreneurs, especially, women?

Capital City Machine Works. After selling these family businesses, I began an accounting service for small businesses from home and working for my husband’s business as his bookkeeper at Welder’s Supply and Equipment Co. I am blissfully and happily married to my best friend, Cad Beale. We have 2 grown children, Lenzie and David, and 4 grandchildren ages 4-5-6-7…Stella, Eden, River and Knox. Also, my mom lives in Montgomery and is a vital part of my support group, and one of my greatest fans. My sister, Dr. Judi Jehle keeps me encouraged and confident. My family is an important part of me and my business, You Name It. BOOM!: You have been in the embroidery and gift business since 1992 and many of our readers have shopped with you at You Name It on Atlanta Highway, would you please share with us how you got started and some of the challenges of opening a specialty retail store? What has been the

Jan: My first involvement in monogramming was in the 1960’s watching an embroidery guru work! Mrs. Jones was her name and she was about the only person in this area that could monogram. I would visit her while having ALL of my things monogrammed and I mean everything! All of my clothes, towels, and sheets were monogrammed. Mrs. Jones had so much work to do. I always told her that one day when I was grown, I would learn how to do what she did and help her out. What an amazing lady! She inspired me to create and work hard. I was fascinated by Mrs. Jones, my embroidery guru! I got my first machine in 1990. At the time I was doing accounting and monogramming was just for fun. Crunching numbers and balancing books began to take a back seat to a favorite pastime that soon became a small business. The fun outgrew the home and You Name It was born. After several locations, we have landed here on Atlanta Highway, across from Faulkner University. Inside our 5200 square foot store we have many gift lines, almost all can be personalized via monogramming, engraving, vinyl monogramming and personalization, screen printing, printing The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


stationery and hot stamping; just to add Jan: I think for so long, You Name It You Name It has a remarkable staff and that personal touch to any gift. I started has been unique in what we do best the service initiated by my staff is simply with one and that is the best. It is obvious to everyone that machine, a monogramming the staff at You Name It is “family”, a little talent and home away from home. My ladies are and a lot of personalization beyond wonderful in so many ways! A drive. Along of any kind. We real blessing to me and to the customer. the way I have kept up added some with market BOOM!: Many Boomers are experiencing very talented trends while a renewed sense of purpose, new people to keeping the goals, new careers, especially if they’ve teach and “old Southern experienced the empty nest syndrome share the Charm” where of their kids moving on. How would you journey with. everything is describe this sense of renewal in your I have had a monogrammed life? Any advice for the rest of us seeking very helpful and renewal? The Captain Cad and his girl, Lenzie family and personalized. others, including a national network Also, we do very specialized items that Jan: Purpose? New goals? New careers? called Monograms America Inc., and my have become signature items for us. Well I do tend to reinvent myself every employees to work beside me all the You Name It creates so often…but the way. I could not have accomplished what and makes Bridal and main thing is to do I have in business without the support Baby books from scratch what you do best, and hard work from all of them. that very few people what you enjoy and anywhere create. The do it to the best of The greatest reward is in the books and our bridal your ability. Yes, my relationships…The greatest lesson is to linen cake runners have careers have changed make sure you have a strong support been created and sent all but the drive to group of helpmates to walk with you over the world. We have accomplish tasks and throughout the journey. People who been doing these items do them well, with will encourage you and be there for for 25 years! It is rare for pride has always you. People to speak blessings on you. me to ever say, “it can’t been my primary Life in this fast paced business can get be done” when a client focus. overwhelming wants at times and it something BOOM!: What are is the people special you most passionate around you that created…I about? make you smile will find Four generations: Peggy Jehle my mom, Jan, Lenzie Lane and believe in Jan: God, people and a way to (daughter) and Stella (grandaughter) yourself. do what relationships. These are the only things a client BOOM!: When that last for eternity. wants…whatever it we think of takes. We have made embroidery BOOM!: How do you like to relax and incredible, ornate banners in the River wind down from a hard day’s work? for sanctuaries, and many Region, we VERY unique items for think of You Jan: Enjoying my family, especially clients. Like we say… “You Name It, how spending time with my husband, my Name It and we do it.” I have you best friend, is so important to me. Also, will find a way to create become the being outside and around water is my what someone has a “go to” store happy place for sure. vision for! Now that is the for all things exciting part of You Name Krispy Kreme with the grands embroidery? BOOM!: Favorite vacation spot? Any It to me! What makes travel dreams planned for the future? your embroidery services different?

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Jan: Our favorite vacation spot has civic or other activities? company is a great venue for helping become a second home actually. It and encouraging people. I am enjoying is The British Virgin Islands. We lease Jan: I am active with my local church this very much but right now…but it’s boats there and and active with missionaries Christmas and my mind is set on You always keep plans and ministries in Montgomery Name It! for another trip and abroad. I am active with there whenever my sorority and the Greek BOOM!: What is it about living in the possible. We stay community, primarily Chi Montgomery/River Region area that you packed, ready Omega, both at Auburn like? to go and take University and Huntingdon those that can College. Jan: I have been here all my life…its stay barefooted family and and on the water BOOM!: If you home…Its along with us. weren’t operating friendly! But any place a unique specialty that has water store...what kind BOOM!: is a pleasure for of work would As you’ve us. My husband you be doing? Any aged, how and I are almost dream jobs? have your always on the ambitions Stella and Knox at Auburn game water when we’re Jan: I’m not sure… changed? not working. We have a home at Orange can’t go there just yet… Beach and the sign above our door there still have my focus on You Jan: Changed says “where your boat is, that is home”! Name It. I am actually ambitions? getting very involved in the No not We recently bought a home at Lake business end of Rodan and really…still Martin, again so we can get on the water Fields, a dermatological want to do and do what we love best, together. It’s mastermind company that what I like, also closer to our grandchildren and we is sweeping e-commerce do it well want to continue to teach them about and changing skin. It and have our love for water and boating. is a massive company fun doing it. Lenzie and husband, Clay in British Virgin Islands at our favorite spot “Cow Wreck” dedicated to renewed Be thankful BOOM!: As a busy entrepreneur, do you skin and new lives. I am a for the have time to be involved in community, true believer in their products and the journey, whatever that is and take it to completion.

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BOOM!: Give us three words that describe you?

of the business and each one is so kind and considerate. All of us have genuine love and respect for Jan: Energetic, Giving one another (my motivational gift for and we are all sure) and Workaholic (my husband says this) team players. Again, I will have to say, BOOM!: Do you have the entire any hobbies or other staff is the activities that grab your biggest asset attention? at You Name It. This team is Jan: Boating for sure, like no other sewing and having time that I have for nothing!!! My motto seen. Every in this intense busy employee world is “doing nothing has a special is doing something VERY “niche” and valuable! Take time to does that very relax and just enjoy your well. Put all blessings. (I will practice Knox and Stella at The Landing, Lake Martin those together this as time permits!) and you have an incredible team that is focused on one BOOM!: Most successful businesses another and the best for the business. require a team effort; how would you Maybe as their leader I have created an describe your leadership style in putting atmosphere for each of them to grow together a successful “You Name It” their own strengths and make valuable team? contributions to our success. Jan: I don’t know if I had much to do BOOM!: Technology is rooted in almost with putting together a team—the staff every aspect of our lives. How do you or at You Name It just molded together in a your team use technology to better serve fashion that is beyond wonderful. Every your customers? person at You Name It is a very vital part

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Jan: E-commerce is very important, and keeping up to date is probably even more important! But none of this compares to the personal touch at You Name It, something that cannot be replaced by technology. We still use pen and paper for orders and a personal touch with our customers. It’s just us. BOOM!: How do you balance your schedule between work and grand parenting? What do your grandkids call you? Jan: They call me JB as does most everyone now. Balance between the two—there is no balance—when Knox and Stella call…JB drops what she’s doing and is headed to Krispy Kreme and then off to the lake!

We want to thank Jan for sharing her story with us this month. If you need to put a name on something...Jan and her staff will find a way to do it, drop by You Name It and you’ll see what I mean! Also, a special thanks to Adrienne Asire for helping us coordinate Jan’s cover profile. As always, thanks to Kim Bethea from Total Image Portraits for her professional cover photo of Jan. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to jim@riverregionboom.com

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Hearing Health Significantly Impacts Overall Health

If you think living with hearing loss is not a big deal, or that only people with a serious hearing loss need help, you may want to take a closer look into the effects of hearing impairment. A recent study by the non-profit Better Hearing Institute (BHI) has linked untreated hearing loss to a myriad of other health issues. These include fatigue and stress, depression, avoidance or withdrawal from social situations, reduced alertness, increased risk to personal safety, impaired memory and ability to learn new tasks, diminished psychological and overall health, reduced job performance and earning power, and a greater risk of developing dementia.

Making matters worse, studies have shown that the effects of hearing loss compound without treatment. Just as muscles grow weak from lack of use, the brain loses its ability to process sounds and recognize speech without regular auditory stimulation. The longer people go without

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hearing optimally, the more difficult it is to recover a full appreciation of words, sounds and music.

Early treatment for your hearing loss can help you better manage various situations related to untreated hearing loss. A study by the non-profit National Council on Aging (NCOA) concluded that hearing loss treatment is shown to improve quality of life in several areas, including

Healthy Hearing By Casey Gonzalez, Au.D., CCC-A, FAAA Montgomery Hearing Services

The National Health Interview survey found that 27 percent of adults aged 65 and older reported a hearing problem. These studies, based on self-report, probably underestimate the prevalence of hearing loss, as people may be unaware of a hearing loss or unwilling to admit to having a problem (National Health Interview Survey, 1989 – National Center for Health Statistics). A survey performed by the Better Hearing Institute estimates that 31.5 million Americans report a hearing difficulty, which is around 10 percent of the U.S. population. Casey Gonzalez received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Disorders from Louisiana State University, and earned her Doctorate of Audiology degree from Louisiana State University Health Science Center. Casey holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech and Hearing Association.

physical health and mental stability, the sense of control over life, communication in relationships and intimacy and warmth in family relationships, ease in communication, and improved earning power.

Call Montgomery Hearing Services today for a complimentary hearing screening: (334) 651-0500.

Prevalence of Hearing Loss Among older adults, hearing loss is one of the most common self-reported conditions.

References: http://www.betterhearing.org/sites/default/files/quality_of_life.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9801018 http://www.betterhearing.org/hearingpedia/prevalence-hearing-loss http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09583.v1 http://www.betterhearing.org/sites/default/files/quality_of_life.pdf

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Beauty Buzz From our blog at RiverRegionFacialPlastics.com

Pop Off the New Year with New Peepers Communicating with the eyes is a very common way of connecting with others. Because of our constant eyeto-eye contact, the eyes are a great place to help make a noticeable improvement to your appearance. A blepharoplasty, or eyelid surgery, can be a simple inoffice procedure if you are pursuing a cosmetic desire to rejuvenate the eyes. Commonly in the 50+ age group, we find that due to volume loss of the face and loss of elasticity in the skin, eyelids can droop heavy enough to touch the eyelashes often inhibiting peripheral vision. If you are in pursuit of a cosmetic blepharoplasty, the upper eyelids and lower bags of the eyes can be addressed in the same surgery. We prefer that you have a current eye exam to state any issues concerning the eye or a letter stating you have generally good eye health. We administer a light cocktail of oral relaxing medications. Once you are comfortable and relaxed, we use lidocaine to numb the eyelids with a tiny needle. Once the surgery is complete, you leave our office with a driver of your choice to relax quietly with the head elevated. We supply you with Swiss eye therapy cooling gels to cover the eyes until bedtime. The following days are planned to be relaxing, and nothing strenuous, while you apply ointment 3 times a day to the healing tissues. You will return to our office in 1 week for a check up and suture removal. You can return to normal activities in 10 days – 2 weeks. Returning to reading and long hours of computer work is permissible in 7 days. Any swelling or bruising typically disappears in 10 days and can be covered with make up application. If you might be a candidate for insurance coverage, we can make that determination during your complimentary consultation. The fall months are the best time to consider a refreshing look for the holidays.

Tis the Season to Refresh your Look The two most popular times of the year to consider facial plastic surgery are the fall and early winter… just after the holidays. The QuickLift® is a great way to refresh your appearance before the holidays or wipe away the holiday stress after the season. We offer the QuickLift® at RRFP because this procedure gives a refreshed look to your mid face and neck without months of downtime recovering from surgery. While the QuickLift® is still a surgical procedure, by using a suture technique to lift the muscles of the face and neck, the recovery is minimal and the procedure is often referred to as a “mini lift.” The results are gratifying! We often hear that the clock has been turned back 10 years! Does it last? Yes, the lift is permanent; however, the face still continues to age over time. Simply stated, if you had the procedure and your twin did not, you would always look 10 years younger than your twin. While it is possible to have a general anesthetic, we find it quite comfortable to use a mixture of oral medications that relax you for the procedure. We use local injections of a lidocaine mixture to numb the tissues of the face making the QuickLift® a comfortable inoffice procedure, if you so choose. Many people are fearful of general anesthesia, and therefore do not pursue a traditional facelift. We have performed hundreds of lifts in our office setting with safety and comfort. Consider visiting with one of our physicians for a complimentary consultation to determine if the QuickLift® procedure is something you will ask Santa to put in your stocking!

Please contact us via email at Doctors@RiverRegionFacialPlastics.com with your questions or comments! 24 BOOM!

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Holiday Snacking Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

As the Holiday season fast approaches, all the stores are stocking their shelves with all kinds of chocolates and candies, fudges and caramel, cakes and treats. Now if we were a nation that abstained the rest of the year and only ate these delights at Christmas, then that would be ok, but we all know our weakness for chocolate and candy. Our sugar consumption as a nation is HUGE, 8 to 10 times the FDA recommended intake is the AVERAGE. So, we are only kidding ourselves if we use the pre-text “But it’s the Holidays!” However, there is some good news, but you do have to go back to Reading The Label! (My mantra!) Not all candy or chocolate is made of the same ingredients; in fact, some so-called chocolate is not chocolate at all! If you read the very small print it will say something like “chocolate flavored candy” somewhere on the wrapper, but you’ll probably have to look hard to find it.

Real chocolate should contain cacao, milk and sugar – simple and natural. The longer the list of ingredients, the worse for you it usually is. Great makes include Lindt, Milka, Ghiradelli, Green & Blacks (fabulous English line of organic chocolate, available in Earthfare). Of course, you can get flavored bars too, which with these makes would include real orange oil to add orange flavor, fruit and nuts of various types, real espresso bean chips for coffee flavor. Whenever you see “something” flavor on an ingredients list, it means it’s a chemically derived substitute for the real thing, so try and avoid it.

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Also the higher the cacao content of chocolate, the better it is for you, actually having some significant health benefits once you reach the 50% and higher range (70% and higher is known as Dark Chocolate.) Eight pieces of a Green & Blacks 70% chocolate bar will give you more iron than an 8-ounce steak. (I know which I’d rather eat.)

So, what I am trying to say is if you choose your chocolate wisely it does not have to be that bad for you and can in fact have added benefits such as anti inflammatory and anti-cancer elements. Do not, however, binge on it because of the benefits as it is still laden with milk and sugar too! Similarly, with candy; avoid the ones made from high fructose syrup (we’ve discussed the GMO issues with this earlier,) or other synthetically produced sugars and look for simple, natural ingredients like natural sugar, honey and maple syrup. Avoid all the terrible E-numbers and additives you quite commonly find on candy wrappers. Look for the “home made” varieties that do appear this time of year from the likes of Tuckers Pecans and Priesters Pecans and various fudge companies that use all-natural ingredients. Buy cakes from your local farmer’s market or Whole Foods and Earthfare’s own bakeries, ether than pre-packaged store bought cakes, which inevitably have some level of preservatives and food coloring in them.

Also, at home have bowls of dried and fresh fruit and nuts available to snack on instead of just chocolate and candy. You’ll be surprised how quickly they disappear if they’re actually readily available. Make your own baked apples at home instead of buying candy-coated apples. Simply core an apple, stuff the center with a mixture of dried fruit and a teaspoon of brown sugar, wrap in foil and bake at 350 for around 20-30 minutes, depending on the size of the apple. Deliciously sweet, naturally! Finally, one of my winter favorites – hot chocolate. Again, such a huge variety of ingredients in the different boxes you will see on the shelves. Green & Blacks make a good one, as do Cadburys (though there is more sugar in the latter). A good one should have similar ingredients to a good chocolate – cacao, milk and sugar. Sugar should NOT be the first (i.e. largest) ingredient, but unfortunately it too often is. You can of course mix your own by buying pure cacao powder which you would whisk into hot water or milk adding sugar to taste. Hershey’s actually make a cacao powder that they call Hershey’s Dark, that you can buy in the baking aisle at Publix. Otherwise you can buy it at any health food store or on ThriveMarket.com. Above all, enjoy the season, in moderation! SPECIAL NOTE: I wanted all of our customers and readers of BOOM! to be the first to know that we will be closing Cool Beans in December. It’s a bittersweet decision and I hope you can drop by for lunch and say goodbye. I will continue writing my “Eating Smart” column for BOOM!, so stay in touch. Thanks to all of our customers! Tracy Bhalla, Owner/ Manager of Cool Beans Restaurant, 115 Montgomery Street, P: 334.416.8447, coolbeans.mgm@gmail.com or facebook.com/coolbeans.mgm Trained as an architect! Worked as a teacher of product design and graphic design for 9 years in England and Bermuda. Always had a love of healthy, good-for-you food. Always cooking for friends and family. Married a cardiologist in 2007. We have a shared passion about eating healthily (and wine) and both love to cook. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


DATING Coach

Is he right for you? Here’s how to know for sure... When it comes to choosing men, especially online, are you looking for men who are “your type”? Do you wink at them or favor them, hoping they will notice you and write you back? Are you so disappointed if they don’t? Who does contact you? Is it the men you don’t want? Who really is that quality man you desire? Is he a good looking profile picture? Or is he a total package, a sum of everything he has to offer to your relationship? Have you ever thought about questions like these when considering a man to date? (This is a smart strategy anytime) Will he bring you soup when you’re sick? Will he stop at the store and get you what you need, even if it is a bit out of the way? Will he bring you flowers and say, “I love you,” even when it’s not your birthday? Will he rearrange his schedule to drive you to the airport so you don’t have to hoist that suitcase out of your car or worry about

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parking before your trip?

Yet it’s his kindness and the love he radiates from within that women of all ages adore about him once they get to know him.

When you’ve had a hard day, will he rub your back or bring you a glass of wine and give you a much-needed hug?

I can’t deny that looks are nice. They are. But next time you are reading those online profiles and you are thinking, “Hmm, not so cute,” dig a little deeper and pay attention to what that man is saying.

Will he take your trash out to the curb so you don’t have to? Will he get up and do the dishes after dinner?

If he writes that he’s kind, nice, loves his animals and his kids, he’s worth checking out, even if he’s not the most handsome guy on the page. He’s probably a man with a wonderful heart.

Most importantly, will he look in your eyes like you are the best thing that ever happened to him? As we age, we are going to want more in a partner than just his looks and we will more than likely need more, especially in our golden years. I watched my father take care of my mom as she was dying. He wiped her brow, took her to her chemo treatments, made her soup, and held her hand when she was scared.

More importantly, his looks could very well grow on you. After getting to know him, he may be like my father is...cute, adorable, loving and there for you through thick and thin.

My father is adorable, just ask my friends, but he would never have been the most handsome man on the block. If he had been single and dating in the digital age, he probably would have been passed over by lots of women on dating sites.

And that, my friend, is the true mark of a “Quality Man.” Lisa Copeland, “The Dating Coach Who Makes Dating Fun and Easier after 50!” Find out more at Findaqualityman.com (c)2014, Lisa Copeland, findaqualityman.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

THANKSGIVING

memory loss that disrupts daily life, or get something from the kitchen. My November is here, which means the holiday confusion with time or place. grandmother looked at us, with a puzzled season is in full swing. To me, Halloween look on her face, and said, “Steve? His is like a warm-up for the “real” end-ofIt was the third warning sign on their list name’s not Steve.” the year holidays. Gorging myself on my that caught my attention: “Difficulty with kids’ Halloween candy is just a preview We quickly figured of the upcoming battle against the out she wasn’t culinary temptations of Thanksgiving, joking. In fact, she Christmas, and countless holiday parties in between. Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop couldn’t name a single person in Wednesday, November 18: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 the room. What Of course, the holiday season is pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This was particularly ultimately about spending time with educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins strange is that the people you care about the most, she knew who we and people go to great lengths to covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living were—her daughter, do so. Thousands of Americans will wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, son-in-law, and her suffer through the monotony of a bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care grandchildren— just long drive, the mild humiliation of an and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. not what our names airport TSA security screening, or even Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at were. the unique odor emanating from a seat partner on a long-distance bus www.redoaklegalpc.com. A trip to the hospital trip, just to be home for the holidays. ultimately provided a diagnosis—vascular dementia, a condition completing familiar tasks at home, at work In my line of work, the holiday season is a with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms caused by or at leisure.” They provide examples as busy time. It’s the time of year when adult a series of small strokes. In the short-term having trouble driving to a familiar location, children take time off from the distractions she did improve and remembered all of our managing a budget, or remembering the of their everyday lives, and everyone is back names. However, over the course of the rules of a favorite game. It’s the last line in town to see Mom, Dad or Grandma. next ten years, her memory slowly slipped that really spoke to me. It states: “What’s away. typical? Occasionally needing help to use This is the time when many families begin the settings on a microwave or to record a to notice, to suspect, and even to discuss, This year, pay attention while you’re home television show.” the fact that a loved one may be showing for the holidays. Ask questions and talk signs of cognitive decline. with your family if you think a loved one In the mid-1990’s, no one on earth could may be experiencing diminishing capacity. operate a VCR as well as my grandmother, As a lawyer, I typically use the term If they are, the time to plan for their future who lived with my family during childhood. “cognitive decline” rather than “dementia” She had a true skill for deciphering VCR is now. Talk about who they would want or “Alzheimer’s.” These are closely related to care for them or manage their affairs if recording instructions clearly written by medical issues, of course, but I feel that they are no longer able to do those things someone with only the faintest grasp of cognitive decline more accurately addresses the English language. She always managed for themselves. Encourage them to have a the legal consequences of these conditions. to record all of “her shows,” as she called good power of attorney, advance directive, them, and has a vast library of reruns to living will, and last will and testament in It is rare for someone to suddenly become place. choose from. incompetent (to use the legal term) overnight. Instead, it is usually a gradual This can be a tough conversation for We didn’t know it then, but looking back process in which a person’s cognitive children to have with their parents. Just now it’s obvious. Gradually, she began to function slowly declines. The difficulty remember that you’ll be the one picking up struggle to operate the VCR the television. is distinguishing between ordinary, old In hindsight, this was a sign of things to the pieces, whether your parents do any age forgetfulness, from something more planning or not. The best time to get their come. serious. affairs in order is now, while they are still in A few years later, on Christmas morning, relatively good health and spirits. The Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org) we finally learned that her cognitive lists 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s on Raley L. Wiggins decline was neither minor nor attributable their website. The complete list is worth Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC to old age forgetfulness. I recall my reviewing if this is a topic that concerns 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com mother calling for my father, Steve, to you. The warning signs on their list include 445 Dexter Avenue, ste 9000, Mont, AL 36104

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By William Hageman

Pushing 90, Dick Van Dyke prescribes song and dance “If you get exercise, get moving, get the blood moving, you walk out of the gym feeling better,” he says. “Get that circulation going, and it changes you. I can go to the gym feeling pretty lousy, but I walk out of there with a bounce in my step and feeling pretty good. I know very few people who are inactive who have all their marbles.” Dick Van Dyke with wife, Arlene, originally his personal makeup artist. They are 45 years apart in age. But she’s not slowing him down. (Jim Udell/TNS)

It’s not even 9 a.m. in Malibu, Calif., yet Dick Van Dyke, soon-to-be 90 Dick Van Dyke, already is home from the gym, attacking his long to-do list for the day. “I just got back,” says Van Dyke, who has been entertaining audiences in some capacity for more than 65 years. “I’m up at 6 every morning. I wake up and have a cup of coffee and get over to the gym before I talk myself out of it.”

years (his birthday is Dec. 13). But mostly he wants to tell readers how to enjoy life as they get into their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond. The primary message of “Keep Moving” is just that _ keep moving as you get older. In the book, Van Dyke talks about breaking into a little soft-shoe when the spirit moves him, whether at home or at his favorite grocery market. He has no room, or time, for a sedentary lifestyle.

That leads to another factor in a healthy old age, one he mentions frequently in the book: the mental aspect. “There’s the biblical admonition about putting aside the things of your childhood. But I take that to mean self-centeredness, willfulness; not creativity and wonder. Walt Disney and I always said we were children looking for our inner adults.” Here are some of Van Dyke’s other lessons for living a full life:

His daily regimen includes the treadmill and weights _ he says he can still lift his age _ a stop at the market, errands, back home, a nap, dinner, then a nightly treat of ice cream. These days he’s also promoting his new book, “Keep Moving and Other Tips and Truths About Aging” (Weinstein Books). “I’ve got a couple of signings to do this week, phone interviews, some newspaper things,” he says. “I think it will sell well to my generation.” The book is full of stories from Van Dyke’s life and his reflections on what he has seen and learned over his 90

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Diet: “Good habits matter,” he writes. “Eating light and fresh. Staying away from fast and processed foods.” Van Dyke says he has never had a weight problem. “I come from a skinny family. I watch what I eat. I’m not much on meat, maybe once a week. I have blueberries every morning. I watch my sugar level. When I was a kid I said, ‘When I grow up I want to eat candy every night.’ I do eat ice cream every night.” For those keeping score at home, that’s two scoops of HaagenDazs vanilla with a generous topping of chocolate syrup. Bad habits: Van Dyke smoked and drank for decades but stopped on his own. His secret? “I tried for several years to quit smoking. It’s just the worst. Then a doctor showed me an X-ray. He said, ‘These are little emphysema scars on your lungs.’ I stopped right there. Drinking I had a problem with, but it went away. It started to taste funny. It didn’t do

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anything for me. I wasn’t interested anymore.” The mind: Find mental challenges. Van Dyke tries to memorize some Shakespeare every day. A lifelong artist, he also talks about getting involved with 3-D computer animation. “It’s so deep I’ll never master it,” he says with a laugh, “but it’s one of those hobbies you can lose yourself in. Everyone needs an engrossing hobby. Some of my older friends, there are still a few left, haven’t changed their minds about anything since they were kids. They can’t be open-minded. And I think that’s a factor in aging.” Thinking young: “You’ve got to stay social somehow,” he says. “I have a quartet I sing with (an a cappella group, Vantastix); we do benefits all over. The guys are all 40. My wife (Arlene) is 44. As my friends have disappeared, I have a circle of friends a lot younger. They say time appears

to pass more quickly as you age. I’ve had young people come to me and say, ‘Where is the time going?’ I think it’s the pace of life. Life goes faster. Belt it out: Van Dyke says that he has older friends who are bothered by weak voices. “I tell them, ‘For God’s sake, sing.’ They say, ‘I can’t sing.’ Oh, everybody can sing. Get those voices going.” It will not only strengthen your voice, but it will improve your attitude. “You can’t sing and be miserable at the same time.” One last nugget: “I think I repeat this to everybody. Never go down stairs sideways, no matter if it feels better on your hips or knees. I always tell everyone, go up and down forward, even if it hurts a little.” Copyright (c) 2015, Chicago Tribune Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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By Erin E. Arvedlund

Memoirs by Seniors Offer Lessons Worth Sharing prime farmland in Fayette County, Miss., in the heart of the cotton industry. He and Nero’s mother farmed it successfully for decades.

Before the advanced degrees, money, and accolades, he was just a kid growing up farming cotton with seven siblings, his mother, and his father, who was the son of an exslave in Mississippi. Benjamin Nero grew up just miles away in Mississippi from where teenager Emmett Till was beaten to death. Born in 1937, Nero was a high school football star who played in college and was recruited to play professionally. He remains close with childhood friend Morgan Freeman, the award-winning actor.

“My mother left college to marry my father and grow cotton. She stayed there 55 years,” he recalls. “Can you imagine? The daughter of a doctor and a city girl!”

(Michael Bryant/Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS)

Nero was also the first African American to graduate from Albert Einstein Hospital’s residency program in orthodontics. He built successful dental practices in greater Philadelphia and New Jersey and endowed a scholarship at his alma mater.

brother, David Nero Jr., in 2000. By 2002, David had died, prompting Nero to get serious.

Now he’s writing his memoirs, part of a trend from the baby boom and older who want to leave a record of their legacy. Some, like Nero, pay ghostwriters. Others take classes, do their own writing, and self-publish. There’s even a National Association of Memoir Writers, based in Berkeley, Calif., which began in 2008 and now has several hundred members and several thousand newsletter subscribers. For Nero, the spark was lit during the hours bent over at work, fixing crooked young teeth.

Nero’s mother was half-white, the daughter of an African American woman and a white physician. The white doctor’s wife had died, and he then fathered a daughter with the maid.

Clamping painful braces on his patients, Nero distracted and amused patients with tales of leaving the cotton farm, becoming a football star and a dentist. His parents were both educated and yearned for their children to leave farming and earn degrees. “I had so many stories that I was telling my patients, I realized I should just write my memoirs,” Nero recalls. The youngest of eight children, Nero started jotting down memories and snippets of conversation with his oldest

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NFL REALITY CHECK With his pal Freeman, Nero graduated high school. After playing quarterback for the Kentucky State College football team and graduating, Nero was drafted by Sid Gillman, coach of what was then the Los Angeles Chargers, in 1960.

Benjamin Nero, the first African American to graduate from Albert Einstein Hospital’s residency program in orthodontics, is writing his memoirs -- starting on a cotton farm in Mississippi.

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“I’d put it off, and his death pushed me to start. I was inspired to tell the story of my parents, too,” he said.

At training camp, the lifetime quarterback realized he wouldn’t be allowed to play this “brainy” position, due to an unwritten agreement in the NFL that restricted black players. So Nero walked away.

He was the first African American graduate of the University of Kentucky “Obviously, she College of Dentistry, had no choice in and then completed the matter, as this a three-year was during the late residency at Albert 1800s,” Nero recalls Einstein Hospital of his grandmother. Benjamin Nero and actor Morgan Freeman grew up as in Philadelphia. In childhood friends in Mississippi. (Shaun Ring/TNS) 1971, he took over a Nero’s mother was practice at a medical well-educated, arts building at 16th and Walnut Streets attending a boarding school for mulatto from Knowlton Atterbeary, the only children, and finally a historically black African American orthodontist in the city. college for women, leaving to get “I was the only black guy in my classes,” married. he said. Nero’s father, David Nero Sr., was the son But buying the practice almost didn’t of a freed slave who, with his brothers, happen, because Nero couldn’t get a bought up swampland in cotton country, bank loan. The late Eagles star Clarence drained and cleared it for farming. Peaks, running back and 1957 draft pick, cosigned a loan for Nero. Within a few Nero’s father inherited 50 acres of

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years, Nero opened a second practice, in the Germantown-Mount Airy area, and a third in Mount Laurel. Finally, Nero fulfilled a lifelong dream of building his parents a new house. Nero’s memoirs took a nontraditional turn; he was having trouble writing, so he turned to a neighbor, retired Inquirer columnist Claude Lewis, and a coauthor, John Timpane, a current reporter and editor. Lewis, who is blind, strikes up a conversation with Nero and records everything. Then Timpane transcribes the recordings and turns Nero’s personal history into a narrative.

Memoir consulting is “helping people who want to do the writing themselves. They need a professional to shape it. Sometimes someone wants something short and doesn’t want to do a full book.” The full package “can add a lot to the price. A lot of clients start the project for someone else, for their parents or grandparents or 50th wedding anniversary. And among boomers, the memoirs skew slightly more male.” For memoirists, the results can be priceless.

In reviewing his life, Nero says, he has learned to reflect more on the mistakes he made. “I flunked one course, and that was marriage.” Married three times, he blames his workaholic habits and drive to succeed. Recently, he said, he was able to make amends with his first wife. (c)2015 The Philadelphia Inquirer Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

A COTTAGE INDUSTRY Advice for memoirists? Write down a little something every day. Talk to siblings, cousins, and friends. In Nero’s case, “I’m not literary, so I hired someone.” Dixie Tabb Palmer of Harrisburg is writing her own memoir. Hers is a funny, poignant family history. “I’m writing a memoir about coming of age with a father who was my own ‘Don Draper’ of sorts,” she says, referring to the advertising hunk in the series Mad Men. She’s taking classes with Temple instructor Anne Hunter to complete her memoir. “The deadline really writes it for me,” says Palmer, who is looking for a publisher. The hardest part? A routine. Taking classes has helped, as does her work ethic. Classes generally run six to eight weeks and cost $150 to $200. “I feel if I stick to a routine, I can finish,” she says. Boomers can’t stop writing their life stories, says memoirist-for-hire Nell McShane Wulfhart. A native of Philadelphia, she lives in Uruguay and works as a freelance journalist and writer of memoirs for others, interviewing them by email and Skype and fashioning their memories into books. “It’s a baby boomer market,” says Wulfhart, 35. Her fees range from $130 an hour for memoir consulting to anywhere from $2,000 to $20,000 for a longer book with a professional designer and photographs. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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Bucket List Adventure by Kathy Witt

Wildlife Safari Jackson Hole, Wyoming in winter is like a magical scene inside a snow globe – snow-covered mountains sparkle in the sun; in the valley, lights wink from shop windows in a postcard-pretty Western ski town; elk and other wildlife gather on the range outside town.

Wyoming’s Jackson Hole

Winter is an exhilarating season for a wildlife safari. The area, tucked between the Teton Mountain Range and the Snake River along the border of Wyoming and Idaho, is home to over 60 species of mammals and 100 species of birds, plus a half dozen game fish. Bison, big horn sheep, moose, coyotes, fox, bald eagles, wolves and trumpeter swans are all here, having migrated in search of food, but crowds have thinned dramatically. As a bonus, the National Elk Refuge, home to some 8,000 wintering elk, is located here, just outside the town of Jackson. WHERE THE BISON ROAM With the National Park Service marking its 100th anniversary in 2016, there is no better time to follow the animal tracks and their scat while exploring the geologic marvels of Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone National Park, and no

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better outfit to tour with than Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris. The company was founded in 2007 by Jason Williams, a professional wildlife photographer, Wilderness First Responder and Leave No Trace Master Educator. All Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris’ guides are avid and accomplished outdoorsmen and women with keen interest in outdoor sports, photography, archaeology and wildlife conservation. Knowing they’re in such capable hands, visitors can relax and turn themselves fully over to the adventure of tracking and photographing bison, elk and other wildlife. “I love showing this to people,” said guide Kyle Williams, indicating the snowcovered landscape. “I get a kick out of being next to a bison, seeing a carcass.

And yes, I will take a stick and poke scat. You can tell the type of animal by scat droppings.”

Williams’ enthusiasm is contagious, and visitors touring with him have been known to grab their own stick and do likewise. Whether trekking across a frozen lake to capture a scene of two foxes flirting with each other or racing to a wolf kill site, Williams brings an edge-of-the-seat breathlessness to his tours. It feels like a scavenger hunt for wildlife, where some of the wildlife are scavengers. “We are a great PBS special that can turn into National Geographic real fast,” he said. WESTERN SKI TOWN Base yourself at Snow King Resort, the largest full-service year-round resort in Jackson Hole, just six blocks from town. Recently renovated to the tune of $16 million, it sits at the base of Snow King Mountain, which opened in 1939 as Wyoming’s first ski resort, and is mere minutes from Grand Teton National Park. Dining at the second-floor Hayden’s Post Restaurant, which overlooks skiers The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


schussing and tubing, is casual with a warm and bracing Wyoming-focused menu, bison chili, elk sausage, housemade jerky, and lots of Western-style hospitality. A favorite on the bar menu is Chile Verde poutine, a piquant mélange of braised pork, green chile, cheese curds, onions and cilantro.

thousands of wintering wild elk. S Tram to the top of Rendezvous Mountain for sweeping views of the Grand Tetons and waffles and wine at Corbet’s Cabin. Served in a warm foil packet, the waffles are gooey-delicious

A year-round activity center offers ski, snowboard, mountain bike and other rentals, plus information on nearby trails and all the outdoor activities found in Jackson Hole. The resort also has a fitness center, day spa and a pool with lots of comfy seating warmed by fire pits.

Qlipter swivels 360-degrees to open and folds open and closed. Its surfaceprotecting rubber end helps with gripping. In your hotel room, you can use Qlipter to hang your cosmetic kit from the back door of your bathroom; at a restaurant, Qlipter makes a handy purse hook to keep your bag off the floor.

In town, browse the shops clustered round Jackson Town Square. You can outfit yourself with a pair of custommade boots and a cowboy hat; pick up woodcarvings, antiques, leather goods, artisan-made jewelry; and find a book to take back to the hotel for reading by the lobby’s doublesided fireplace.

INFORMATION Snow King Resort, www.SnowKingResort. com, 800-522-5464, offers a winter ski package from $169/two people. Room rates are from $99 at the resort hotel, $199 at the adjacent Snow King Condominiums and Grand View Resort Lodges.

Plan to have dinner at the architecturally beautiful Kitchen, with bamboo bar and tables, softly illuminating light and a comfortably elegant ambience. Food focus is on natural ingredients and sleek presentation. The Lotus Cafe is another come-hither culinary gem with its organic, vegetarian and vegan dishes and delectables. Nightlife includes the Silver Dollar Bar with live music and the iconic Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, known for its authentic western memorabilia, live entertainment and string of country music greats that have performed here, including Waylon Jennings, Hank Williams, Jr. and Willie Nelson. ADVENTURE GUIDE TO DON’T-MISS MOMENTS S Bring camera, phone and selfie stick for a narrated horse-drawn sleigh ride through the National Elk Refuge, the largest established elk preserve in North America, where you’ll be surrounded by

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ADVENTURE GEAR TO TAKE ALONG The Qlipter ($19.95, www.Qlipter. com), a new gadget invented by Seattle entrepreneur Mina Yoo for her company, Lulabop, is a carabiner hook with a rotating clip. For winter trips and outdoor adventures like skiing, where you’re packing more luggage and equipment, this versatile device can bundle luggage or sporting equipment together.

with toppings including lemon curd, brown sugar butter, even peanut butter and bacon. S Explore the National Museum of Wildlife Art, home of one of the world’s premier collections of wildlife art, including one spanning three centuries and capturing the American West in all its former glory.

Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris, www.JacksonHoleWildlifeSafaris.com, 307-690-6402. Half-day wildlife safari tours and custom photography workshops are offered Nov. 1-April 30. Full-day Best of Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris are offered Dec. 15-April 1. New are Winter Wolf and Wildlife Safaris that start from both Jackson and Bozeman, Montana, and spend time in Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley and Jackson Hole. Pick-up offered at Snow King Resort. Check website for details and updates. Author, travel and lifestyle writer, and travel goods expert Kathy Witt feels you should never get to the end of your bucket list; there’s just too much to see and do in the world. She can be reached at KathyWitt24@gmail.com or KathyWitt.com. (c)2015 Kathy Witt Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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November EXHIBITION: Gallery One Featured Artists Gallery Director Sandi Aplin, sandiaplin@aol.com, 334.269.1114

Stone Bowl, 3x12 Marble Sculpture, Ken Lever galleryonefineart.com/Kenneth-Lever

West Edge 18x48 mixed media, Cecily Hulett galleryonefineart.com/Cecily-Hulett

Peaceful Forest 24x20 oil on canvas Anita Westerberg galleryonefineart.com/Anita-Westerberg

Pieces of a Dream 30x24 mixed media, Carol Barksdale galleryonefineart.com/Carol-Barksdale

Among the Woods and Waters 24x20 acrylic on canvas, John Mazaheri galleryonefineart.com/John-Mazaheri Show Me the Money, 20x16 oil on canvas John Wagnon galleryonefineart.com/John-Wagnon

Portrait of the Artist, 16x12 oil on canvas, Pamela Wesley Copeland galleryonefineart.com/Pamela-Wesley-Copeland

Haints in the Graveyard 6x6 mixed media, Judith Ivy Hayden galleryonefineart.com/Judith-Ivy-Hayden

After the Rain 16x20 acrylic on canvas Shirley Esco galleryonefineart.com/Shirley-Esco

Summer Song 20x16 oil on canvas Anne Hugghins galleryonefineart.com/Anne-Hugghins

Impre’ vue 42x24 Copper Sculpture Bradley Moon galleryonefineart.com/Bradley-Moon

Ambiguous, 20x16 acrylic on canvas, Jane Segrest galleryonefineart.com/Jane-Segrest


By Sandi Aplin

Art & Soul

AA Farm Creamery “Udderly Delicious”

done at the farm over wood harvested On a September Saturday morning, Cheddar (not too sharp but a bit drier on our property. The time and care I took a break from Gallery One and than the Timberbrook), Mozzarella each walked next (fresh smoked or flavored-definitely cheese door to Filet a crowd pleaser), El Cabra (a Spanish receives and Vine for a style hard cheese made with a blend does not cup of coffee. of goat and cow milk), Caciocavallo end once This is where (is between a dry mozzarella and a it comes I met Donna provolone) and several others from Adams. She which to choose. offered me They are a sample located at 590 of cheese, Hillcrest Drive Timberbrook, in Millbrook, Cookie and LuLu comparable to Alabama and out of the an Asiago with a creamy texture. We can be reached mold. We talked for a few minutes about their by telephone sincerely business, their Auburn connection and 334.730.3471 hope you Gallery One’s upcoming event, The Art or you can can taste of Philanthropy which took place this visit them on the love past October 6th. Donna accepted our Facebook. we put invitation to bring their assortment of com/AA-Farminto every delicious selections of their cheese and Creamery. They bite.” they were very well received. I asked if will be happy to I could share their story. send you a price For those list. of us who Just up the road near Millbrook, there A Selection of Ages Cheeses from AA Farm Creamery are 60+/is a small farm owned and operated here in the South, most will remember by Aric and Donna Adams. Aric makes raw butter, buttermilk and cheese delicious cheese. Donna says, “Aric sold in country stores. When I tasted believes that good cheese starts with Sandi Aplin, Director of Gallery One Fine Art their cheese, it brought wonderful healthy cows. He spends much of his A freelance writer living in Montgomery, AL memories of my childhood. They time and attention with each of our sandiaplin@aol.com or galleryonefineart.com make Timberbrook (their farm cheese), girls as well as each variety of cheese. Our seven dairy cows are Annie, Cookie, Fauna Belle, Ginger, Lulu, Mary and Princess. Annie, Cookie and Princess were purchased from E.V. Smith Research Center at Auburn University. While our farm is not certified organic, our girls have the most natural lifestyle we can offer.” Aric approaches cheese making as an art form. He shares his cheese experience this way, “Our girls love to rest in the cool natural springs on hot days and can often be seen grazing in our front yard in the afternoons. I hand craft each cheese, usually three days per week. My smoked cheeses are The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

JERSEY GIRL & E.D. (MATURE CONTENT)

I must admit she’s a fairly attractive woman. 40ish. She has a model’s narrow face, piercing eyes and is casually outfitted with a generic football jersey over her 99% fat-free body. Her eyes hint of a burgeoning lust, and she begins the Viagra commercial by telling us, the viewer, how nice it is to cuddle with her man after the big game is over. Let’s call her “Jersey Girl”. She looks like she just did one of those shampoo commercials, her long, dark hair, dancing lustrously about while she spins a football (Freudian moment?) in her lanky fingers. Jersey Girl is shown wandering about the house, eventually to the bedroom, where she is waiting for the darn game to end already! These TV ads for Viagra seem to run frequently during sports events, which in itself, for BOOMERs, creates a certain degree of self-consciousness. Most of us remember a time when TV ads that ran between innings or timeouts featured the Hamm’s Beer Bear or gorillas throwing luggage about for Samsonite. There were spots featuring pickup trucks scaling up a large mountain of rocks because they could. Manly stuff. Lots of flannel shirts and such.

If there was a sexy woman to be seen in a TV commercial during a game, she was mauling some dude’s freshly shaved face or wilting in the after-whiff of his Old Spice. We call that time The Good Old Days. Back to “Jersey Girl”. After she states her goal of seeking a post-game cuddle (or more!) she ruins everything by announcing- “BUT HERE’S THE THING! 40 PERCENT OF MEN OVER 40 HAVE SOME FORM OF ERECTYLE DYSFUNCTION!” Wow! Think we’ll score in the second half Bob? I have a message for Jersey Girl. Hey Toots! Guess what? The last thing any man- candidate for Viagra or notwants to know is that his potential mate is sitting there with statistics, studies and flow charts calculating his performance prospects! What do you think we are, light switches you can flick on and off at your whim? These E.D. spots never show the “lucky guy” who will catch (or fumble) the pass from Jersey Girlwho was selected for the commercial

because what guy wouldn’t want to be getting a handoff from her? A handoff containing a little blue, diamondshaped pill. A pill, by the way, that can turn his face into the same florid color as a cherry tomato- and pull the plug on his sinuses turning the nose into a non-stop snot dispenser. Never mind that his vision goes from 20-20 to legally blind or the pounding headache that comes on after taking the blue pill. THE THING IS, HE’S READY WHERE IT MATTERS! At least that’s what my friends who have used Viagra tell me. The side effects can be intense. Viagra runs these ads all day long! Families that gather around the TV for the big game are peppered with E.D. commercials. I’m not sure the World Series or Super Bowl needs to be interrupted with cures for these very personal conditions. Remember when games were interrupted by spots reminding us about the “colds and flu season”. The steamy joy of Campbell’s tomato soup on a cold day? Now little kids get to

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management

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sit in front of the family room TV and wonder what Jersey Girl means when she says “get and keep an erection”. Older and wiser kids wonder about if their 45 year old Dad is a “40 per center”. Now comes word that science has come up with a Viagra for women! I’d like to be the Creative Director for these TV spots, simply parodying the same Ad Men genius that produced Jersey Girl. We’ll show a man click off the TV at the end of the big game, rising from behind a battalion of emptied beer cans. He too is wearing a football jersey (with pizza stains on the front) and is ready for action with his wo-man! He’ll look into the camera and say “Win or lose, when the game is over the first thing I want is 5 or 10 minutes of fun time with that special gal of mine. BUT HERE’S THE THING! ABOUT 99% OF WOMEN CAN’T GET IT ON WITH A MAN WHO HAS BEER BREATH, A PAUNCH UNDER HIS MAN

BOOBS WHO THEN CUTS THE CHEESE WHEN HE BENDS OVER TO TAKE OFF HIS SOCKS!”

form called Wine, and the dosage can be adjusted to the circumstances she is facing.

I don’t know what the Lady Viagra pill does for the woman in this situation. Perhaps it distorts her vision to

I think women would prefer a pill for aging men that would inspire a sudden lust for vacuuming or other household chores she gets stuck doing. Then maybe she wouldn’t be too tired to, uh- you know, score after the big game. I’m not against science helping those who need it. BUT HERE’S THE THING- can we find a more appropriate time to advertise it? Or will they be playing next year’s World Series on a blue diamond?

overlook the decaying attributes of her middle aged animal seeking passion. Maybe it inspires a level of lust so powerful she just doesn’t care. Frankly this pill seems like a waste of time. Lady Viagra has been available in liquid

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, children and dogs. He’s a 25 year veteran of radio who hosts the Greg & Susan morning show 6-9 am and Happy Hour 3-6 pm on NEWSTALK 93.1, Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

The Business Mini Directory

A Business Mini is a little fatter than your old business card and for a limited time we are offering a Business Mini to fit your budget. Fifty dollars will get your business message in front of thousands of people over 50 who have the money to buy stuff. Every business needs one more customer, where will yours come from? Call today and get your $50 Business Mini, 324.3472 or jim@riverregionboom.com

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By Diana Stanczak

7 Spectacular Ways Fall Boosts Your Health Ah, autumn. Between the beautiful weather, colorful scenery, and pumpkin spice everything, there are a ton of reasons to enjoy the season. In fact, if we listed them all, we’d be here until winter. Instead, let’s focus on your health. Autumn makes it easy to eat well, feel great, and get back on the wellness train that summer may have derailed. Want proof? Keep reading. YOU CAN SLEEP MORE Setting your clock back is the perfect occasion to log more zzzs. And there’s a reason snoozing feels so good: It’s great for your health. Heart attack risk drops during the days following the end of daylight savings time, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. (It also increases in March when daylight savings time starts.) Researchers believe that additional sleep boosts cardiac health. ... AND YOU MAY SLEEP BETTER Studies have shown that the ideal temperature for sleeping is between 60 and 68° F. Temps above or below this range can lead to restlessness. Sure, you can control this factor with air conditioning or heating, but who can argue with the slumber-inducing effects of a cool breeze coming through the window? OXYTOCIN IS EASIER TO COME BY Yes, you can (and should) cozy up to

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your partner year round, but there’s something about a chill in the air that makes snuggling even more appealing. (It can be difficult to find sweat sexy.) It’s also good for your health. When you cuddle, hug, or have sex, your body releases oxytocin, the love hormone thought to reduce depression. SEASONAL SUPERFOODS ARE YOURS FOR THE EATING Autumn delicacies like pumpkin and squash get their fiery hues from betacarotene, a compound that aids in preventing certain cancers, heart disease, and high blood pressure, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. One cup of cooked, mashed pumpkin also contains more than 200 percent of vitamin A, which helps maintain healthy skin, teeth and vision. And don’t underestimate the satisfaction that comes from biting into a fresh and juicy apple straight from the tree (or store). Eating one apple a day has also been linked to reducing LDL, the “bad cholesterol” that hardens your arteries, according to a study published in the Journal of Functional Foods. IT’S THE PERFECT TIME TO SET GOALS It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been out of school; each fall still feels like a new beginning. A proven way to ensure you’ll meet your goals? Write them down, share them with a friend, and update that friend with weekly progress reports.

A recent study found that people who followed these steps were 33 percent more successful in reaching their goals than those who simply set intentions. THERE’S NO BETTER TIME FOR A BRAINBOOSTING SCENIC WALK Spending an hour in a wooded area, as opposed to an urban environment, improves memory and attention by 20 percent, according to a study published in Psychological Science. Lunch break strolls are great for a midday pick-meup, regardless of your surroundings, but supplement with a long weekend hike for full benefits, and scenic fall views. RUNNING OUTSIDE IS MORE INVITING Warm summer weather is wonderful, until you’re huffing and puffing 30 seconds into your run. Cooler temperatures let you enjoy your exercise without the excess sweat that balmy weather brings; enjoy it before snowy treadmill season strikes. (c)2015 Prevention magazine Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Ask Nancy: Caring for Aging Relatives A doctor’s advice for an Alzheimer’s patient with sundowning

Q: My father suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. He and my mother live in their home and have required little outside help and support. Recently, however, my father has stopped sleeping and he becomes very agitated at night. I’m very concerned, not only for him but for my mother. I’ve done a lot of research on “sundowning” as it’s called, and have spoken with professionals but none of their recommendations or the suggested remedies that I’ve read about have worked. We’ve hired a caregiver to help at night time. This enables my mother to sleep but it’s expensive and does little or nothing for him. Does this ever go away? If not, what can we do to make it more livable? _ Carla B., New York, New York. A: You’ve described a classic case of “sundowning,” a common problem in dementia patients, characterized by lack of sleep and high levels of anxiety and delirium. As you have observed, his behavior impacts the safety and wellbeing of your mother as well as family caregivers trying to help. You are smart to get additional help at night.

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How long will it last? According to Dr. Barry Baumel, Division of Cognitive Disorders at the University of Miami School of Medicine, “Sundowning usually occurs in the intermediate phase of the disease and will many times pass as the disease progresses. Just like there are many theories as to why sundowning occurs, there are many different approaches to effectively treat it.” Here are Dr. Baumel’s suggestions: ● Make sure that lighting during the day is bright and full. At night, leave at least a night light on so there is enough light to see if you awaken. ● As much as possible, keep your father active during the day since Alzheimer’s patients naturally tend to have less motor activity during the day.

● Make sure his Alzheimer’s medication, such as Aricept, Exelon or Razadyne is given in the evening. This may help improve the disturbed sleep-wake cycle know as sundowning. ● Adding a little melatonin may also help induce sleep at night. Dosage range should be determined by your father’s doctor. He should avoid napping during the daytime, if possible. ● Restful sleep is important for everyone. Reports of the frequent occurrence of sleep disturbances in patients with dementia make it important to exclude conditions that might interfere with sleep. This would include sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. For additional reading, Dr. Baumel recommends: “The Alzheimer’s Action Plan” by Dr. Murali Doraiswamy. It includes a chapter on the treatment of anxiety and sleeplessness. Nancy Stein, Ph.D., is the founder of Seniority Matters (senioritymatters.com), a caregiver advisory and referral service in South Florida for seniors and their families. You can contact her at nancy@senioritymatters.com. (c)2015, Seniority Matters, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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The Need is Growing November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month AND Family Caregivers Month. Hospice of Montgomery is reaching out to raise awareness about the highest quality care for all people coping with life-limiting illness.

Hospice helps everyone. Hospice care is for the patient whose illness is no longer responding to curative therapies. Hospice also deals with the emotional, social, and spiritual impact of the disease on the patient, the patient’s family, and significant other. It is care that helps the whole family, many of whom choose to enhance the life of their loved one by agreeing to be the primary caregiver. Each year more than 300,000 hospice caregivers in more than 3,000 communities across the country deliver care to 700,000 people with a serious illness. According to a National Alliance for Caregiving/ AARP National Caregiver Survey, at least 30 million adults provide ongoing care that is critical in helping friends and loved ones with debilitating illnesses remain in their homes and other community settings. It is estimated that at least 75% of all care received by older adults in the United States is provided by family members and friends. It is a sobering projection, however, as America is facing a nationwide caregiving crisis that is only going to worsen in the next 20 years. Roughly 78 million people will turn 65 between now and 2029. Because American society is aging, the number of people likely to face a terminal illness will grow. Alabama’s senior citizen population will grow by more than 80% over the next quartercentury, and every county will have more residents 65 and older than they do today. While these years may indeed by golden, many will need the help of caregivers. Most caregivers are middle-aged (3564) but many caregivers of older people The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

“We at Hospice of Montgomery, have the unique role in helping the community with difficult end-of-life issues,” said Jenille Ball, Executive Director. “The demands of caregiving along with the emotional challenges of end-of-life issues, increases the stress on the family unit. We help families with the duties of being a caregiver.” said Ball.

are themselves elderly. Of those caring for someone aged 65+, the average age of the caregiver is 63 years. The fastest growing age group in the River Region

Every day, 10,000 baby boomers celebrate their 65th birthdays, and many have chronic health conditions. At the same time that our population is aging and the need for care and support is increasing, declining birthrates means that the population of caregivers is shrinking. Family caregivers are an invaluable resource to our aging nation. Chances are that, sooner or later, we will all either be family caregivers or someone who needs one.

is 65 years and older. As our community ages, the need for hospice in our community will continue to increase. The Challenge In our fast-paced society, the most critical barrier to hospice care is the shortage of properly prepared family caregivers for patients. When a patient is not able to manage his or her own needs, a primary caregiver is required for safe, comfortable care. If the caregiver is elderly and frail, the needs of the patient are often beyond his or her capabilities. For those age 65 and over who don’t live alone, the typical caregiver is a spouse, often with compromised health, as well. The intense physical and emotional drain that accompanies care-giving can quickly exacerbate existing health limitations, leaving both patient and spouse in need of help. It is a difficult challenge. For most there is not an alternative. As a society, we simply do not have the resources to provide professional caregivers and support services to everyone who needs assistance.

As the community leader in providing end-of-life care, Hospice of Montgomery has been working alongside caregivers in patients’ homes for 40 years. Now, as the caregiver crisis worsens, Hospice of Montgomery is dedicated to providing the same uncompromising, compassionate care, making a lasting impact on our community. Hospice of Montgomery is not only committed to meeting this growing need in the River Region, but also to ensuring that the quality of hospice care improves along the way. For more information about hospice care, caregiver education, or how we can help, simply call us today to begin a conversation 334-279-6677. Hospice of Montgomery. It’s in our touch.

www.hospiceofmontgomery.org

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November 2015

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

ORANGE BEACH, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The festival provides an atmosphere to promote all writers, whether they had written hit songs which made people open their eyes and view the world in a different way or they are aspiring writers and musicians who knew they could do the same but needed a forum in order to get their music out to the world Most venues are free to attend, a few charge a modest cover at the door. For more info, call

The 6th Annual Montgomery River Region Veterans Day Parade will take place on November 11 beginning at 11 a.m. in front of the State Capitol and will proceed down Monroe/Lawrence. Following the parade, the Capitol Sounds Band will perform a Veterans Day Concert inside the City Hall Auditorium beginning at 12 noon - Rain or Shine. For more information, call 334.625.2100 or visit funinmontgomery.com

Frank Brown Songwriters Festival, 31st Annual Various venues throughout Orange Beach November 5-15th, various times and venues

850.492.7664 or visit fbisf.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Landmarks Foundation Fall 2015 Walking Tours Oakwood Cemetery and A Perry Street Trek Sundays, November 8th & 15th, 2 pm Oakwood Cemetery, Nov 8th: Join Jeff Benton as he launches the first tour of the Eastern Ridge. You will visit graves of Civil War heroes, a Union burial plot, the Jewish Eternal Rest area, the graves of Hank and Audrey Williams, and many more! Meet at the Hank Williams site, which is well marked from Lower Wetumpka Road (easternmost gate). (Rain Date December 5th) A Perry Street Trek, Nov. 15th: Robert Gamble and Mary Ann Neeley will lead the way from St. John’s Episcopal Church along historic Perry St. toward the I-85 bridge. Referred to in the 1850s as the “Fifth Avenue of Montgomery,” Perry Street’s houses date from the 1820s and include cottages, Greek Revival mansions and turn of the 20th Century revivals. Tour begins at St. Johns at the corner of Perry St. and Madison Ave. (Rain date TBD). $10 tour admission, free to Landmarks Foundation Members. Call 334.240.4517 or 240.4500 for more information. Landmarksfoundation.com

Veterans Day Parade and Concert Downtown Montgomery Wednesday, November 11th, 11 am-1 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Curator’s Tour Old Alabama Town-Ordeman House Second Thursday of the month, November 12th, 10 am Tour included with admission price All of our artifacts have a story—some of the stories we know, others are a mystery! But we continue to uncover information about our artifacts even decades later as they are exhibited in the Ordeman House. Come hear some of these stories by Carole King, Historic Properties Curator and tour the decorative arts collection housed in Old Alabama Town’s “crown jewel” house museum. Second Thursday of every month. Tour included with admission. Purchase tickets at 301 Columbus St., Old Alabama Town or visit Landmarksfoundation.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Join EAT South for their monthly plant-based diet pot luck dinners on the second Tuesday of the month. Located at EatSouth Downtown Farm behind the Montgomery Advertiser Building on Molton St. Bring a plant based dish to share and try some of everything. For more information, call 334.422.9331 or email info@eatsouth.org or visit Facebook.com/VegOutMontgomery

This monthly live music series is on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the Cloverdale Playhouse. Enjoy music from three or four regional songwriters as they perform original music on the Playhouse’s intimate stage. Tickets are $10 at the door. For more info call 334.262.1530 or visit cloverdaleplayhouse.org

Veg Out EatSouth Downtown Farm Behind Montgomery Advertiser Building Downtown Tuesday, November 10th, 6 pm

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Joe Thomas, Jr. 3rd Tuesday Guitar Pull Singer/Songwriters Night The Cloverdale Playhouse Thursday, November 17th, 7-9pm

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Juilliard String Quartet, widely known as the quintessential American string quartet celebrates the 2015-2016 season, the Quartet’s 70th, with concert tours in North America, Europe and Asia. Over its seven decades, the Quartet has made manifest the credo of its founders to “play new works as if they were established masterpieces and established masterpieces as if they were new.” The Quartet has won several Grammy Awards both for their recordings of contemporary composers and for recordings of the great composers of the past. For ticket info visit montgomerychambermusic.org or email mcmsing@aol.com or phone 334.277.3505

Join the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts for a FREE afternoon of relaxation and fun, featuring Jazz Jams, with some of best musicians in the area. Also, enjoy art making for the entire family. Relax with “Jazz Jams”, decorate a flower pot and plant a wildflower seed in the studio, and view the unusual glass still lifes by Beth Lipman in the Museum galleries. For more info, call 334.240.4333 or visit mmfa.org

The Juilliard String Quartet Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Wilson Auditorium Thursday, November 19, 7:30 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Montgomery Kennel Club Dog Show Garrett Coliseum Friday-Sunday, November 20-23rd, various times The Montgomery Kennel Club is hosting their AKC sanctioned all breed dog show at the Garrett Coliseum, November 20th23rd. The show offers both conformation & obedience competition. These shows are a wonderful opportunity to see the various levels of dog training and to enjoy the beauty of a sound, healthy, well-bred animal. The public can also learn about different breeds of dogs by visiting with the exhibitors and breeders at the show. For more information, email secretary@ montgomerykennelclub.org or visit montgomerykennelclub.org/ shows

Jazz Jams and Family Art Affair Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Sunday, November 22nd, 2-4 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

A Christmas Carol ASF November 22-December 24, various times Don’t miss A Christmas Carol at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival, November 22 - December 24. An ASF tradition begins with the return of this holiday hit featuring Charles Dickens himself who, with sleight of hand and sense of humor, brings his magical story to life. When miserly Ebenezer Scrooge receives an unwanted visit from the ghost of his former business partner, an overnight journey of epic proportions begins. With a gorgeous set, period costumes, beautifully sung carols and a spectacular new ending, you and your family will be left totally enthralled! For more information call 334.271.5353 or visit asf.net

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Moscow Ballet Montgomery Performing Arts Center-MPAC Tuesday, November 24, 2015 at 7 pm Bring the whole family for the sweetest Christmas celebration of the season! Experience the exquisite artistry of world class Russian dancers, playful puppets and the unmatched splendor of hand crafted sets and costumes. Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker is the Holiday tradition that brings the Christmas spirit to life! New York Times raves, “Real beauty!” and Los Angeles Times, “Bravura expertise!” Get your seats now for Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece at nutcracker.com or visit mpaconline.org

EUFAULA, ALABAMA

2015 Eufaula Christmas Tour Eufaula, Alabama Saturday, December 5, 1 - 6 pm Witness this enchanting tour of the South’s finest homes draped in holiday cheer! Stroll through history and experience how Southern halls are decked in the mansions of Christmastime! Ticket Information: 8 Homes: $30.00, Home: $6.00. Homes available from 1 pm - 6 pm Payable at door. For more info visit eufaulapilgrimage.com

Read Digital & Interactive BOOM! at RiverRegionBoom.com and click thru to every link :) The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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How to Find the Perfect Grandparent Name A New Name for a Grand New You! There aren’t many times in a life where you get to choose what your name will be. Becoming a grandparent is one of them. All of a sudden you get to figure out what the next generation of your family will call you for the rest of your life. It can be a pretty big deal. So, how do you go about picking your name? And who gets to pick the name in the first place? What’s in a Name? Often the grandparents pick their own grandparent name but that is not always the case. At times the parents of the child have a preference or claim veto powers over names that they don’t like. Keep in mind that the parents are caught between two sets of grandparents who may have competing interests. Having the parents involved in choosing a grandparent name can be helpful and prevent tension within their extended family. For those who are not good at choosing a name or do not have a preference, having the parent choose may be the best option. Dubbed by the Grandbaby Even better than parents at coming up with creative and unique grandparent names are the grandchildren. Especially in the tender years of imperfect pronunciation, your grandchildren may come up with the most cunning and adorable grandparent name you have ever heard. Some grandparents want to wait until the baby is born to decide on their name in hopes that the baby will name them. Of course, if this is route you choose, it is always good to have a base name until the baby can actually start pronouncing things. This both makes it less awkward for the parents when talking about you and gives you a name you can live with if not creative alternatives emerge. If you have a name chosen your perfect grandparent name, and in

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speaking it your grandchild transforms it into something not to your liking, you do not have to keep it. Gentle reminders of the correct pronunciation until may be needed until the grandbaby can grasp it. But who knows, the altered version of your perfect name may be even more perfect, especially spoken with glowing adoration by your new grandchild. Choosing Your Own Name If you want to take control of your own name, there are a few things to consider. The first thing to consider is your spouse. Working in collaboration with your spouse to come up with names that fit well together can be very important. It is easy for children and parents to get confused about which grandparent goes with which name, especially in modern day families with step-grandparents. Name pairings such as Grammy and Gramps, Lolli and Pop, and Cherry and Pip can help everyone in the family to keep the proper grouping of grandparents. Another consideration is the other grandparents. They too will have their preferences. Sometime adding an initial can keep clear two grandparents using the same grandparent name; Grandma G. and Grandma L. for example. Tradition Tradition is a big part of choosing a name. Begin by thinking about the names of your grandparents. You may want to choose Gramps as your name because your father was called Gramps by your children, you called your grandfather Gramps, and your father called his grandfather Gramps. On the other hand, you may decide that three Gramps was enough, and you would rather be called Bebop. There is nothing wrong with breaking tradition in favor of

a name that you feels better suits you. You may want to have the family practice the name so that it will sound natural. However, there is always the chance that in the excitement of a new baby, everyone, including yourself, will completely forget the well-practiced name and switch to the traditional name. If a grandmother wants to be called Nana as according to the tradition in her family, it would be bad form for the other grandmother to insist that she be called Nana (unless she goes for Nana B. or the like). There are plenty of names to go around, and an acceptable compromise should be easy enough to reach. Heritage There should be no cause for a grandparently scuffle over names. Tradition can take precedence, if applicable, but otherwise it is first-come, first-serve. There are hundreds of possible names already out there, not to mention all of the different variations you could get from your birth name or a nickname you already have. You may also want to consider honoring your heritage and your grandchild’s heritage by choosing a name from a different language. For example, if your family is very Irish, you could choose to be Daideó instead of Grandpa or Maimeó instead of Grandma. You may also choose a name from a different language just because you like the way it sounds. You don’t need to be German to want to be Oma and Opa. If you are asked about your name and you are not of that heritage, you can just say that you liked how it sounds. One Last Thing For grandfathers with secret long-term plans to scare young men who will eventually date their granddaughter, you may not want to be called Pop Pop or BooBoo. Remember that this new name will be with you for the rest of your life. Even with the trendiness of “unique” names, good old grandma and grandpa still top the charts as the most popular names. While name selection can be exciting and fun, it does not need to be a stress moment. Find a name that is comfortable and turn back to what is really exciting, being with your grandchild. What’s in a name compared to that? Ana Weickert www.grandparently.com The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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BOOM! November 2015  
BOOM! November 2015  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine