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Helpful Hints for Your Home Sponsored by Capital City Ace Hardware, The Helpful Place

Summer Chilling: Decks & Grills

DECKS You love to hang out on your deck. You love to have friends over. You love to BBQ. Between all that entertaining and the natural beating a deck takes from Mother Nature, you’re going to need to re-stain it every few years. First, you’ll need to check and replace any damaged or loose boards. Then you can start to remove the dirt, mildew and other contaminants that build up over time. Use water with a stiff brush or power washer or use a premium liquid deck cleaner which works in a matter of minutes. You just apply it at full strength with a sprayer and let it sit for five to 10 minutes, then rinse it off. Let your deck dry for at least 24 hours, and you’re ready to start staining. Deck stains come in transparent, semitransparent, solid and semisolid colors. And there are over a hundred colors to choose from. The main difference between transparent stains is the amount of pigment they contain. If you’re using transparent stains, only one coat can be applied. If the wood is really dry and is sucking up the stain, you can apply a second coat – as long as the first coat is still wet. Once dry, don’t apply another coat, because the first coat will prevent further coats from penetrating the wood. When this happens, it creates an uneven gloss, and your stain will start to flake off. This will not look good. Use a high-quality brush, roller, paint pad or sprayer to apply the stain, and while you’re applying it be sure to stir your stain often. Stains will normally

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dry in 24 hours when it’s between 50 and 85 degrees. Certain stains may take longer, and high humidity can also keep the stains from drying as quickly. Avoid staining in direct sunlight and don’t stain if the forecast calls for rain less than 24 hours before you apply. For application tips and advice on the right stain for your deck and style, visit Capital City Ace Hardware and ask one of our deck experts. We’re always here to help.

GRILLS When it comes to backyard entertaining, few things are as important as your grill or smoker. They can make or break a meal, which can make or break a party. Let us show you the different kinds of grills and smokers available. We’ll also tell you the advantages of each type. Is there anything better than grilling or smoking on a beautiful day? Not much. That’s for sure. But when it’s time to pick up a new grill or smoker, how do you make that decision? Let’s start with grills. Charcoal or gas? That’s the first question. Charcoal grills come in a wide variety of sizes and styles. Many of them are portable, too, which makes them easy to take anywhere. When it comes to cooking temperature, charcoal lets you vary the heat by giving you the option of red-hot coals or dying embers. But you’ll need to keep a close eye on them throughout the cooking process to maintain the heat you need. And they’re messier when it comes to clean-up.

Gas grills ignite with the touch of a button and can maintain consistent heat for hours at a time. They’re also ready faster than charcoal and there’s less chance of over- or undercooking. Of course, they aren’t as portable as charcoal grills and they require a propane tank or a direct connection to your home’s natural gas line. And that’s another decision you need to make with gas grills: Do you want it configured for propane or natural gas? Look at the various features available and decide which are most important to you. Do you want a side burner? Warming grates? Preparation space? Whatever you choose, check the grill to ensure it can accommodate the amount of food you normally cook. And when it comes to space, make sure your grill is the right size for your deck or patio. Like grills, smokers come in charcoal and gas options, but there are also wood pellet and electric smokers. Pellet smokers do all the work for you. Just fill the pellet hopper with any variety or flavor of wood pellets, set the desired temperature, and let it smoke away. With an electric smoker, you never have to worry about a fuel source. You just plug it in, add wood chips for flavor and wait a few hours for the unbeatable taste of smoked meat. At Capital City Ace, we carry a large variety of smokers and grills, so stop in and ask us about the differences between various models. We’re always here to help. We welcome our neighbors in Montgomery! Capital City Ace is a local family owned hardware store ready to meet all your needs in any area of improvement in your home or property. Come see us today, we are just a few miles from your Montgomery neighborhood. Our Hours are: Mon - Sat: 8 am - 7 pm and ​Sun: 11 am - 5 pm. Capital City Ace Hardware, 3215 Taylor Rd (1 block from Vaughn Rd.), Montgomery, AL. capitalcityace.com

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Come Worship with Us! Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m. Christian Education: 11:00 a.m. on Sundays and 6 p.m. on Wednesdays

Founded Upon God’s Word

Liturgically Joyful

At Christchurch, Holy Scripture serves as the final authority for our teaching and preaching. Indeed, over the course of three years, almost the entire Bible is read aloud and preached upon.

At Christchurch, worship involves the entire congregation, as we offer God praise, thanksgiving and adoration using worship traditions that can be traced back to the earliest days of the Church. Our worship is not designed to entertain us, but to honor the true “audience” of worship, the Lord!

Warm and Loving

Committed to Mission

By God’s grace and through His Spirit, the people of Christchurch enjoy the richness and joy of being a true family. We’d love for you to become a part of us! Regardless of who you are, you will always find a home at Christchurch.

The people of Christchurch respond to God’s Word by going out into the world proclaiming the good news of Jesus, and we joyfully serve as His hands and feet whether in places like Uganda and Guatemala or within Montgomery.

8800 Vaughn Road, Montgomery, AL 36117 www.christchurchmgm.net 334.387.0566


BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

June 2018 Volume 8 Issue 10

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

3 Summer Chilling: Decks & Grills 10 Publisher’s Letter

Happy Father's Day! Features

16 Communication Skills Building a Lasting Relationship

Departments 24 This and That

Getting You “In the Know”

12 OLLI at AUM Learning Opportunities for People 50 plus 14 Grandma’s Flowers Tom Randall

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18 Don’t Become Unhinged Leigh Anne Richards

22 Loneliness and Isolation Impact on Our Brains

40 The Cove

20 How to Analyze a Company’s Stock McDonald Hagen

A Place for Quiet Reflection

25 Montgomery Catholic

44 {12} Things

Special Events for Boomers

42 Greg Budell

26 Watercolor Society of Alabama: 77th Annual National Exhibition

Cover Boy

29 MACOA Recruiting Volunteers 30 Are you eligible to receive this VA benefit? Ask an Elder Law Attorney page 27

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32 BOOM! Cover Profile 36 Fearless Online Dating for Older Woman 39 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: The Mighty Blueberry

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46 Judith Durham looks back at The Seekers

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 3966 Atlanta Hwy, Box 266, Montgomery, AL 36109. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2018 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

Happy Father's Day This month's cover profile is Rick Peters. Rick is the local owner of Bluewater Broadcasting, which operates eight radio stations in the River Region, offering music and talk to fit almost anyone's taste in listening pleasure. Rick is passionate about his local radio group and he puts local personalities like Greg Budell and Rich Thomas on the air because he understands what you want your radio to sound like and that means personality. I know you'll enjoy reading Rick's story and appreciate his passion for local radio, not to mention his Frenchies!

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Jeff Barganier Austin Barranco Tracy Bhalla Kimberly Blaker Greg Budell

Jim Watson, Publisher

This month, Jeff Barganier shares his experience as a babysitting grandparent and an escape to The Cove. Let's all take a deep breath now.

When it comes to relationships, people over 50 have the same challenges as everyone else so we decided to offer some communication methods to help you build your relationship and possibly avoid divorce. How you communicate with your spouse truly matters most when it comes to growing something special. We also share some fearless online dating ideas for older women, you can do this.

Gail Karpus Rick Peters Tom Randall Leigh Anne Richards Nick Thomas Raley L. Wiggins

Cover Photography Jeri Hines Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

Loneliness and isolation is way of life for some people as they age and it's important to understand the negative impact this may have on our brains. We share some ideas on what happens to our brains and how we can overcome loneliness and isolation. Leigh Anne Richards shares how not to become unhinged, a simple but powerful message for those of you who may suffer back pain issues. Greg Budell shares a little something about our cover profile because Rick is the man who gave Greg another chance to reboot his career, again and again! I hope you enjoy this month's reading experience, it's designed for you. Please share your thoughts to my cell/text or email, I love to listen and learn. Also, if you haven't started getting BOOM! to your email inbox each month it's a fun way to read the latest issues, convenient too! Please sign up for your free subscription to the Digital BOOM! online at RiverRegionBoom.com. Thanks for being part of our BOOM! Community. Happy Father’s Day!

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom

Digital & Interactive

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an

advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community”

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OLLI at AUM

Diverse Learning Opportunities for People 50 plus OutReach at AUM’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) provides intellectually engaging and enriching learning opportunities for people age 50 years or older who want to age gracefully and remain lifelong learners. In the past seven years AUM OLLI has increased its membership from 22 members in 2010 to 230 in 2017. This remarkable growth creates a new demand for number and diversity of courses and an increased number of instructors. Since everyone who teaches for OLLI is a volunteer, the advisory committee must work to find individuals who have knowledge and expertise, passion for their subjects, and generosity of spirit. The number of courses offered in the first two terms of 2017 2018 reflects the success of the recruiting efforts. Diversity of subjects is essential for the varied interests of the OLLI audience; courses fall generally into categories of discussion, hands-on, or activity.

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Subjects of discussion classes are quite varied. Literature, history, film, and architecture are four popular areas of study. In the past few terms OLLI members have read and studied novels by Harper Lee, Truman Capote, Fredrick Backman, and Helen Keller, among others. Sometimes the discussion classes are multi-media, with the participants reading the book and watching a film version for comparisons. Or the film courses may be composed of viewing one or two films, followed by instructor-led analyses. A few of the discussion classes have also resulted in the participants’ writing their own works, whether Christmas memories or spiritual autobiographies. History courses often focus on studies of wars – World War I, World War II, Vietnam – through the lenses of historical texts, literary works, and film. Architecture studies cover from ancient and medieval to modern and contemporary.

Many OLLI members are pursuing artistic interests – painting, pine needle basket weaving, jewelry making, creation of popup books. The results of their work are on display at the Open House held prior to the beginning of each term. The Open House (and artist exhibition) for Fall Term September 6th, 2018 from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. at Auburn University Montgomery’s Center for Lifelong Learning. Not only can people tour the exhibition but they can also meet the instructors of classes in the up-coming term and discuss plans for the courses. Activity classes are becoming quite popular with OLLI members. Again there is variety, from ballroom dancing and line dancing. Join AUM OLLI and take a course, or recommend a course, or offer to teach one. For more information about AUM OLLI or to request a catalog, contact: Brittany at 244-3804.

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By Tom Randall

Grandma’s Flowers Experiences from drive through Dalraida and one’s childhood Capital Heights, I could not often enrich help noticing how beautiful a person’s life the Camellias were. The throughout the soil in these ensuing decades. neighborhoods I would not swap is more anything for conducive the memories I Gardenias to growing have of beautiful camellias than in other spring flowers in my grandma’s yard. areas of Montgomery Grandma lived down the dirt road about where clay soil does not a half mile from my childhood home in drain well causing plants to suffer Northeast Georgia. In those days, my from “wet feet.” An alternative way to siblings and I thought nothing about grow Camellias in clay soil would be to walking down that road to Grandma’s plant one’s Camellia house. As I reached my in amended soil on grandparent’s home I was higher ground or place first greeted by the lush the plant shrub in a green foliage of a Gardenia container. shrub strategically placed beside two stone steps Flowering which led into Grandma’s Quince is front yard – it would bloom later. As I made my way among the across the neatly swept earliest yard, along the left side of shrubs to the house, my senses were bloom in the Forsythia overcome with the beauty, spring. Quince fragrances, textures and sounds of is a deciduous shrub flowering Grandma’s spring flowering shrubs and on bare stems before leaves appear flowers. giving the shrub an oriental look. The Quince should be pruned after It was in blooming, cutting old cranes Grandma’s yard back to the base to control size that I was first and promote growth. introduced to Forsythia, Forsythia blooms early, Flowering Quince, sprouting yellow flowers on its Spirea, Gardenias, bare leggy branches. Forsythia Camellias, and is a good plant to bring inside Daffodils. These during its budding Flowering Quince flowering shrubs stage to undergo and the Daffodils are heirloom plants “forced” blooming making of another generation which are loved it an attractive floral not only for their beauty but for the arrangement. Forsythia memories one associates with them. For has an irregular spreading that reason all of the mentioned shrubs manner and grows 6 to 8 and bulbs, except the Camellia, have a feet tall. It is a deciduous place in my own garden. shrub with green foliage turning to a maroon color Among the first to announce that spring in the fall. It is often used in border will soon arrive is the Camellia, the state plantings, hedges, against walls or in a flower of Alabama. During a recent large colorful mass. Forsythia’s older

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canes should be pruned after blooming to control its graceful form and vigor. Among my favorite spring shrubs is Spirea. As a child we referred to Spirea as Bridal wreath or Baby-breath which are among the heirloom Daffodils spireas. Spirea is an arching, round-headed, 4 to 8 ft. tall deciduous shrub which blooms spectacularly loaded with tiny clusters of white flowers. It is often used as a lawn specimen, border plant or in mass plantings. Prune immediately after flowering to control size and enhance flowering in the next year. Although not a shrub, the Daffodil bulb is among the first signs of spring. Once started it Spirea usually spreads prolifically on its own. Years ago in passing a grove of large oak trees where an old home place once stood, I beheld a landscape studded with hundreds of daffodils which had propagated themselves. Grandma died more than sixty years ago, yet her spring garden inspires my own desire to grow Daffodils, Forsythia, Quince, Spirea and Camellias. Make your own memories through gardening. They might just last a lifetime and beyond. Tom Randall, an intern in the 2018 Master Gardener Camellias Class, lives in Pike Road. For more information on becoming a master gardener, visit www.capcitymga.org or email capcitymga@gmail.com. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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Communication Skills

By Kimberly Blaker

for Building a Lasting Relationship

So what can couples do to insulate against divorce? Several risk factors that occur in marriage increase the odds of divorce. Some circumstances are difficult or impossible to change after marriage, say Stanley and Howard Markman, coauthors of Fighting for Your Marriage: Positive Steps for Preventing Divorce and Preserving a Lasting Love. These include: a defensive or reactive personality, financial hardship, having stepchildren, different religious beliefs, marrying too young, and a short courtship before marriage. But often, breakups are the result of communication problems. In fact, learning to effectively talk through some of the seemingly irreconcilable differences just might prove those differences reconcilable. Many couples alienate each other throughout their relationships as they try to communicate their needs. As misunderstandings escalate, even minor issues turn into major ordeals. The reason for these serious disputes usually has more to do with the way couples communicate than what they are trying to say. Fortunately, some risk factors can be changed if couples put forth the effort, explain Stanley and Markman. Negative communication styles, poor communication skills for handling disagreements, and attitude differences regarding important issues can be overcome. Couples can also overcome unrealistic beliefs about marriage, low commitment levels, and difficulties working as a team. Communication Styles There are five communication styles, according to Ronald B. Adler and George Rodman in Understanding Human Communication. Many of these patterns are devastating to relationships. Non-assertive communicators have a tendency not to express their thoughts

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If you see yourself or your partner in any of the first four styles, you’ve probably experienced many of the problems these styles often create. Quarreling, escaping, and resentment often result. If these problems become too frequent, they can ultimately destroy your relationship.

or feelings when conflict arises. Instead, they avoid issues or accommodate their partner. While non-assertiveness can be used to protect oneself from greater harm or embarrassment, this style is often the result of low self-esteem. It can also be an inability to communicate one’s own needs. Two more ineffective styles of communication are direct and passive aggression. A person who uses direct aggression attacks the other through criticism and name-calling. So it's easy to recognize. Passive aggression is less visible, but equally troubling. A passive aggressive partner might agree to comply with a request with no intent to follow through. He may also use guilt, jokes, and withholding as weapons against his spouse. Another ineffective style is the indirect approach. A partner may offer subtle hints rather than discussing the issue directly. Sometimes this effectively gets the point across while preventing hurt feelings or a negative response. But it also leads to misunderstandings and the opportunity for the receiver to avoid or ignore the message. Assertive communicators, according to Adler and Rodman, are the most effective because they are direct and clear about their feelings. They don’t try to control or hurt the other person. Assertive partners may not look forward to some discussions. But they’re able to handle these in a manner that ends positively and leaves couples feeling good about each other.

A Better Approach Changing old patterns isn’t easy and requires work. But learning to communicate with your partner effectively can be achieved. One method of communication therapists teach their clients can make arguing, yelling, and avoidance a thing of the past. Not only do couples learn to communicate more effectively, they may develop deeper bonds and intimacy. This can have a lasting effect on your relationship. This technique, sometimes referred to as Intentional Dialogue, is used in Imago Relationship Therapy. Through this technique, couples learn how to talk to their partner, share feelings, and really hear and understand each other. Also referred to as Couple’s Dialogue, it uses a speaker-listener approach and consists of four steps. Imago Therapist Eleanor Payson A.C.S.W, shares this process in her handout, Making the IMAGO Conscious. But before getting started there are important “ground rules” couples must follow. First, explains Payson, the person who needs to have a discussion must initiate it by making a request for a specific time. Couples often jump into important discussions without making sure it’s convenient for their partner. If the time requested isn’t convenient, your partner should schedule a time better suited to both of you. The discussion should be held within twenty-four hours though. Also, when making your request for a

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dialogue, don’t disclose the details. Tell your partner only the topic to avoid undue worry. When the scheduled time arrives, the person making the request is responsible for reminding the other. During your dialogue, stick to the topic. If other issues arise save them for later. Finally, your dialog should consist of four steps: mirroring, summarizing, validating, and empathizing. When these steps are complete, switch roles so that each of you has the opportunity to share your thoughts and feelings.

he understood correctly. If he has, he then asks if there’s more. This exchange continues until the speaker has finished. Next, the receiver summarizes his partner’s discussion and what he believes she’s trying to say. He should then ask if he got it all. If not, the mirroring process continues until he has received all of the important details. Now the receiver needs to validate his partner by explaining that he understands her feelings and why. If the receiving partner doesn't yet understand his spouse’s feelings, the mirroring process continues.

Getting Started To begin your dialogue, sit close facing each other. The first speaker is the person who requested the dialog.

Once the mirroring spouse understands his partner’s feelings, it's time to empathize. This means to be able to experience the thoughts and feelings of his partner.

During the four-step process, as explained by Payson, the receiver should not interrupt, except to check his understanding of his partner. Furthermore, he should not discuss his feelings, perspective, or anything else until the roles are switched.

Learning to empathize is important to any relationship as it “allows both partners to transcend, perhaps for a moment, their separateness and to experience a genuine ‘meeting,’” says Payson. “Such an experience has remarkable healing power.”

The first step is to mirror. After the sender describes her concern, the receiver will mirror what his partner said and then ask if

Therefore during this step, your partner should indicate he empathizes with your specific feelings.

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Finally, switch roles and begin the process again. Keep in mind that for some couples, therapy may be required. In her book, The Wizard of Oz and other Narcissists, Payson describes the narcissistic personality. Individuals with this disorder may not be capable of empathy, a key element of these recommended forms of communication. If this may be a problem in your relationship, or you're unable to work through this process on your own, look for an Imago or similar type therapist. Finally, as Markman, Stanley, and Blumberg point out, “Good marriages take work. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not how much you love each other that can best predict the future of your relationship, but how conflicts and disagreements are handled.” So learn these techniques early in your relationship, or before misunderstandings escalate—and you’ll dramatically increase your chance for a successful marriage. Kimberly Blaker is a lifestyle and parenting freelance writer. She also writes a blog, The Young Gma's Guide to Parenting at www.theyounggma.com

Copyright © 2018 Kimberly Blaker, All rights reserved.

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Don’t Become Unhinged

The hip hinge movement is a term used in the fitness and the rehab settings to bend at the hips instead of rounding the low back. It is one of those movements taught in the gym as a precursor to exercises like deadlifts, squats, or any kind of kettle bell movements. However, the hip hinge does not just belong in the gym. It is a normal human movement that we all need to be mindful. Every time you bend forward, you should bend at the hips and avoid rounding or flattening your lower back. Movements, such as when you sit to stand, bend to pick something up, even spitting tooth paste in the sink should be a hip hinge movement rather than rounding the back. With all these movements and many more, the motion should always start at the hips. Studies have shown that the constant repetition of rounding or flattening the lumbar spine (low back) kills it. Our spines have natural curves and the bones in our spines called vertebra have disks made of fibrocartilage in between them. The disks help to prevent wear and tear on the bones. They also provide shock absorption.

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Disks are like jelly donuts (I had a vet tell me this one time because my dachshund

doing that right now!! Over time these ligaments become elongated and that “STOP” message becomes less effective. This means we are essentially hanging off our ligaments every time we lean forward and round our backs. Richards OUCH

Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne

constantly blew out her disk). In the center of the disk is the liquid that helps provide some of the shock absorption. The nucleus can be thought of as a bubble. When you round your back, the edge of the disk is squeezed and overtime this can cause the back wall of the disk to weaken and bulge. This bulge can end up pressing on the spinal cord and can lead to certain conditions like sciatica. All our joints have ligaments that connect the bones to each other to stabilize the joint. When a ligament becomes over stretched, a signal is sent to the nearby muscles to say- STOP> We are being torn apart. The muscles around the area then contract to prevent further movement. Most of us sit for long periods of time with our flexed rounded backs- I am

Hinging at the hips, helps us maintain a neutral spine during movement. This should happen naturally when we bend over- we should not even have to think about it. We should be able to feel when we round or flatten our lower backs and stop immediately. So how do I hip hinge may be the question because some people literally do not know how nor understand the concept. I will give one way to learn the hip hinge and for you to practice. You can take a broom stick or a dowel. Start with straight knees rather than bent because it is a simplified version. Not much weight should be used. Grab a light bar or broom stick and watch yourself in a mirror. Even better if you turn to the side so that you can keep your eye on your lumbar spine. Follow these instructions:

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• Stand with your feet hip width apart with your toes pointing straight ahead. Imagine trying to gently stretch the floor between your big toes by gently tightening your buttocks. • Take a diaphragmatic breath and hold it. Brace your abs then breathe out while keeping your belly tight. This helps protect your spine • Grip the bar with your hands just outside hip width. Twist your arms outwards and apply pressure to the bar with your little finger and thumb. You should feel your shoulders move back and down. Now you have tightened your upper back and set your shoulders in good position. • Tuck your chin toward your chest. Now ready to hinge • Keep knees straight and slowly push your legs backwards and bend at the hip. Keep the bar over the mid part of your feet. Weight should be in the forefoot. • You will feel a stretch down the back of your legs. These are your hamstrings

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• You should never feel pain anywhere.

telling you that you are approaching your range of motion and you should stop there before you round your back • Reverse the motion and return to upright posture. Things to Remember • Don’t over arch your back- keep abs tight

knees.

To learn or relearn this pattern takes practice. Try to hinge every time you bend forward. Some movements such as spitting the toothpaste out do not require a deep hinge. If you are lifting a child out of a car seat or a baby crib you will probably have to hinge further. Hinge as far as you need then bend your

The hip hinge is one of the most functional movements- lifting, gardening, getting up from a chair, picking up something off the floor and we could go on and on. It is not just in the fitness world but in everyday life!! Are you hip hinging or becoming unhinged

• Never allow the lumbar spine (low back) to round or flatten

Sources: “The Hip Hinge – a beginner’s guide to Preventing Back Injuries” Sort Your Posture Out, February 24, 2016.

• Your whole spine from hips to head need to move as one unit.

The Hip Hinge: The Key to Preventing Injury, Sara Butler, The Joint.com

• Don’t hold the bar out in front of you. The bar needs to stay over your center of gravity (the mid foot) • Never hold your breath.

Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General ManagerMetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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How to Analyze a Company’s Stock

Brandt McDonald introduces his guest columnist, Austin Barranco… From time to time, I will be introducing several of our advisors through this column. They will share personalized insights into financial markets, financial planning, and overall wealth management concepts. At McDonald & Hagen, we have a deep bench of talent that is eager to serve our firm’s clients and our local community. This month’s column is written by Austin Barranco. Austin entered the financial industry in 2014 after earning a degree in Finance from The University of Alabama, with a specialization in Insurance and Risk Management, he has also earned the distinction of a FINRA General Securities Principal held with LPL. Austin and his wife Maghen live in East Montgomery with their dog Chip. In his free time Austin enjoys college football, golf, and traveling the world.

What makes a company a good investment? Investment professionals consider several factors when selecting companies to include in a stock portfolio. Here are some of the criteria we are likely to use. A Company's Finances A strong financial position on the part of the issuing company can make a stock attractive to investors. Analysts typically look at the company's cash flow to evaluate how much money the company spends, how much it brings in, and how much "free" cash is left after the bills are paid. Reviewing revenues, net income, and earnings per share helps analysts assess the company's history of sales and earnings growth. Another gauge of financial health is the amount of debt the company has compared to equity. A Look at the Business Stocks of companies that are leaders in their industries generally are desirable choices for a portfolio. Analysts look for profitable companies with limited competition whose products or services are valuable to customers. Keeping an eye on earnings estimates helps analysts determine whether the company is likely to experience rising profits or unexpected slowdowns in the future. Valuing Stock Analysts use different calculations to assess a stock's relative value. Some of the most common include: Price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) shows the relationship between the current stock price and the company's projected earnings. The P/E is one of the most widely used ratios, and it is used to compare the financial performance of different companies, industries, and markets. The company's forecast P/E (its

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Financial Thoughts

with Austin Barranco

P/E for the upcoming year) is generally considered more important than its historical P/E. Price-to-book ratio (P/B) is a stock's current price divided by its book value (i.e., total assets minus total liabilities) per share. Both can help identify potentially undervalued stocks and also may be reliable indicators of investor sentiment. Like most ratios, it's best to compare P/B ratios within industries. For example, tech stocks often trade above book value, while financial stocks often trade below book value. Return on equity (ROE) is calculated by dividing a company's earnings per share by its book value per share. The ROE is a measure of how well the company is utilizing its assets to make money. Understanding the trend of ROE is important because it indicates whether the company is improving its financial position or not. Dividend payout ratio is calculated by dividing the dividends paid by a company by its earnings. The dividend payout ratio can also be calculated as dividends per share divided by earnings per share. A high dividend payout ratio indicates that the company is returning a large percentage of company profits back to the shareholders. A low dividend payout ratio indicates that the company is retaining most of its profits for internal growth.

The Personal Factor While metrics are critical to analyzing a company's stock and whether it may be a good addition to an investor's portfolio, personal circumstances -- e.g., an investor's other portfolio holdings, goals, time frame, and risk tolerance -- should always be considered when determining whether a stock is right for a particular portfolio. If you need a sound investment strategy, or would like an Investment Advisor to analyze your current strategy, give us a call. Our team of professionals is well equipped to handle a wide range of investments, and we would be happy to help you with your pursuit of financial freedom. Austin Barranco, Financial Advisor Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager www.mcdonaldhagen.com Direct comments and questions to Jennifer.Hunt@LPL.com or 334.387.0094 The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principle. The payment of dividends is not guaranteed. Companies may reduce or eliminate the payment of dividends at any given time. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized legal or tax advice. We suggest you discuss your specific legal or tax issues with a qualified legal or tax advisor. Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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The Impact Loneliness and Isolation Has on Our Brains In his hit “Only The Lonely (Know How I Feel),” legendary crooner Roy Orbison hits close to home regarding the heartache of being and feeling alone: “Only the lonely know the way I feel tonight… only the lonely know this feeling ain’t right.” Yes, it’s true — feeling alone is no fun. But the fact remains that many American seniors spend most their lives lonely and isolated from the outside world. Sure, everyone enjoys a little alone time. However, for too many seniors, remaining isolated does more than diminish joie de vivre. It can actually increase the risk of disease — and may even precipitate an early death. The Science Behind Excess Alone Time on Senior Brains A 2010 survey sponsored by AARP, referenced in the Harvard Health blog, revealed that 35% of American adults aged 45 and up felt lonely.¹ What’s more, their sense of isolation increased over time — 56% of the lonely respondents “had fewer friends at the time of the survey than five years earlier.” The evidence is mounting that loneliness and social isolation actually affect the way our brains function. In the same article, Christopher Bullock, MD writes that when it comes to loneliness, “we now know it is not just a feeling, but a condition that has a very real effect on the body.” A study conducted in the United Kingdom found “that hundreds of thousands of people had not spoken to a

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vulnerability to many types of disease I Increased depressive symptoms I Increased fearfulness of social situations (sometimes resulting in paranoia) I Increased severity of strokes (with shortened survival) I An overall decrease in the subjective sense of well-being

friend or a relative in a month — that’s a lot of silence in your life. “Humans are social creatures,” Bullock goes on. “Among ourselves we form all kinds of complex alliances, affiliations, attachments, loves, and hates. If those connections break down, an individual risks health impacts throughout the body.” A Clear Connection to Senior Health Issues According to Dr. Bullock, recent research demonstrates the potentially serious impact of isolation on health, including: I Increased risk of cardiovascular disease I Decreased cognitive and executive function (there is initial evidence of increased amyloid burden in the brains of the lonely) I A 26% increase in the risk of premature death from all causes I Decrease in the quality of sleep I Increased chronic inflammation and decreased inflammatory control (linked to the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia) I Decreased immune function leading to

The Loneliness, Disease Connection is Nothing New Studies began documenting the correlation between loneliness and illness some thirty years ago. Bullock reports that “social isolation was a major risk factor for mortality, illness, and injury, and in fact was as significant a risk factor as smoking, obesity, or high blood pressure.” Other studies link loneliness with inflammation and neurological changes. For instance, lonely people experience dementia more frequently and risk premature death.² And in a paper shared at the American Psychological Association meeting, Brigham Young University professor Julianne HoltLunstead suggested that “loneliness is a bigger health risk than obesity.” Conquering the Isolation Curse While loneliness is very common, treating it is often challenging. But seeing as how a recent University of Chicago study concludes that “loneliness can make you sick,” researchers are increasingly drawn to figuring out this “invisible epidemic.”³ Here are six ways to help lonely seniors (and their aging brains) cope: The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


1. Get moving. The longer someone has felt lonely the more difficult it can be to do something as simple as smiling and saying hello. But finding connections with other people is absolutely essential to alleviating a sense of isolation. 2. A common cure. Feeling disconnected with other people and telling ourselves we have nothing in common pretty much guarantees loneliness will continue. Taking a risk and reaching out “may lead you to a connection or commonality that will make you feel less alone.” 4 Strong relationships can help build your health. 3. Think outside your box. A major consequence of isolation is that we think too much about our personal plight. Switching our frame of reference to what others might be going through can help lighten our own loneliness. 4. Hunt down a new hobby. Those of us who feel cut off from the outside world can easily fall prey to inertia. So get up and get out there and just do

something. Whether it’s an exercise program or a pottery class, becoming engaged with a new pastime just might make you happier. Crafting can be one easy and engaging way to advance your cognitive skills and participate in a new activity. 5. Show up. People who spend extended periods of time on their own often shy away from social functions. Try accepting an invitation to meet for lunch or coffee. If not, even sitting in a public place and reading can be surprisingly stimulating. 6. Feed your brain. From crossword puzzles to jigsaw puzzles to enrolling in a course at a community college or even online, active brains are more likely to be happy, healthy brains. The People Prescription Dr. Bullock believes “that people are anxiety relievers.” He says that people are good for you and that finding ways to be around people is a smart way to go

through life. His final thought is that “it is only within the complex and gratifying and sometimes challenging ecology of human relationships that we can truly thrive.” All of which sounds like an intelligent way to use your brain. If you or a loved one are feeling lonely and isolated, learn how social programs can help both seniors and caregivers stay connected to their communities, by reading: https://homecareassistance. com/blog/social-programs-answerseniors-caregivers. Sources: www.health.harvard.edu/blog/im-so-lonesome-i-couldcry-2018032113512 www.washingtonpost.com/national/healthscience/loneliness-can-damage-health-triggeringinflammation-and-neurological-changes/2017/12/15/ e7211b84-df61-11e7-8679-a9728984779c_story. html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.8a606d57060c www.bustle.com/articles/126162-loneliness-can-makeyou-physically-sick-so-here-are-6-ways-to-fight-it www.bustle.com/articles/124823-9-feelings-you-arentalone-in-experiencing-according-to-the-therapists-ofreddit-even-if

This article is sponsored by Home Care Assistance, for more info visit www.homecareassistance.com

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Call Kristy today for your free in-home consultation!

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Child Protect New Spring Fundraiser, Barrel of Blues

Child Protect staff members Laurel Teel, Abraham White, L to R Delbert Madison, Board Treasurer; Les Massey, Tamara Martin, Tracy LaChance, and Kristin Byrd Board President; Carl Barker, President of ServisFirst Bank

Mayor Todd Strange blows out his birthday candle with Laurel Teel, Child Protect Development Director and Jannah Bailey, Child Protect Executive Director.

Child Protect, Children’s Advocacy Center debuted their new spring fundraising event, Barrel of Blues, at the home of Korie & Christian Lowry in Cottage Hill. Barrel of Blues replaces Child BlueProtect’s Yonder Chairs for Children in 2018, an event they have held for the past ten years. Barrel of Blues featured a bourbon tasting, music by blues artist Roger “Hurricane” Wilson & His Homeboys, a selection of cigars from Zelda Cigar Shop, food by Jennie Weller, and a silent auction with items contributed by local individuals and businesses. There was even a birthday celebration for Mayor Todd Strange! Barrel of Blues was sponsored by ServisFirst, Wind Creek Montgomery, Kam & Patrick Sidhu, Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama, Beasley Allen, Caddell Construction, Palomar Insurance, Jackson Thornton, Alabama Power, The Vance Law Firm, Jim Wilson & Associates, Whitfield Foods, Borden Morris Garner, Crosby Drinkard Group, United Heating and Air, Shaw Technology, Steve & Debbie Kranzusch, Patti & Whit Joyner, Railyard Brewing Company, and Warren Averett. The event raised over $26,000 in its first year! For more information about how you can get involved, visit their website, www.childprotect.org.

Senior Services the Focus of Ladies Who Lunch Ladies Who Lunch will welcome The Montgomery Area Council on Aging Thursday, June 7, 2018 from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m., at Martha’s Place, located at 7798 Atlanta Highway, Montgomery, Alabama. The power-packed luncheon will provide professional and business women a chance to connect, network and learn more about the services available for our senior citizens. Chacolby Burns-Johnson, Director of Development for The Montgomery Area Council on Aging will share information on how the business community can support their mission and help the organization continue to serve the area. Ladies Who Lunch is a service of Maximized Growth LLC, founded by Tasha M. Scott. She helps professional and business women achieve clarity, so they can improve productivity and profitability in life and in business. This year, Scott’s mission is to provide non-profit organizations a platform to connect with business women in the River Region over monthly lunch meetings. Each organization featured will receive a donation to help with their mission. “I felt compelled to not only to provide a platform but also help raise money for non-profit organizations and to help increase awareness about much needed services in our community. I was blown away by how little people knew about the organizations that serve our area.” Said Scott. Reservations are required to attend the Ladies Who Lunch event. Tickets are $14 and includes a buffet lunch, a beverage, dessert and gratuity. Local and surrounding professional and business women are encouraged to attend. For more information about upcoming Ladies Who Lunch events visit www.tashamscott.com/ladies-who-lunch/ or email tasha@tashamscott.com

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BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

Montgomery Catholic Announces Colonel Jack Lauer 2018 Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award Winner Col. Jack Lauer (Retired) was honored by Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School on May 7, as the 2018 Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award winner for his service to the school. The Charlie Harbin Distinguished Service Award was established by the Harbin family and is awarded by the school to recognize those selfless individuals who have significantly served Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School and exemplified its values in their lives. The 22nd recipient of the Harbin Award, Jack is a great supporter of Catholic education and well known for his dedicated service and integrity. Col. Lauer has served Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School in a variety of ways over the last ten years. A military father of two Catholic graduates, Kim Lauer ’84 Martin of Montgomery and Kevin Lauer ’88 of Virginia, Col. Lauer wanted to “give back” to the school that had given so much to his family, and he quickly found himself teaching religion AND acting as Dean of Students, filling a need for the school for a year. After his teaching job finished, Jack wanted to stay involved and asked the AD in Col. Jack Lauer(center) with son Kevin Lauer '88 2007, Jim Tolbert, if he could try announcing the basketball games, which led to announcing and daughter Kim L. '84 Martin. other sporting events, mounting up over 1200 service hours in announcements alone. Photo by Vicki Dickson Whether you call him Colonel, the Voice of Montgomery Catholic sports, the “unofficial” Ambassador of Montgomery Catholic or Grand Knight, we are grateful that he is a friend to Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School.

The Davis Theater is Pleased to Bring Heather Land to the River Region The Davis Theater is pleased to bring Heather Land to the River Region for a night of comedy to benefit Hope Inspired Ministries. Ms. Land has gained a large following through her hilarious "I Ain't Doin It" internet videos. The event will take place at Troy University's Davis Theatre on Tuesday, June 5th. There will be a limited VIP reception from 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m., with the program beginning at 7:00 p.m. Heather Land has a knack for finding the funny out of the frustrating. Leaving no stone (or people) left unturned, she hilariously unravels everyday events that cause us to laugh not only at each other, but more often than not, ourselves. From ex-husbands to failed diets, her ability to deliver consistent comedy in a self-deprecating style has made her adored by millions of people of all ages. General admission tickets are $35 and VIP tickets are $100. Call 334.241.9567 for more information. More Information on Website: www.facebook.com/events/562483364121808/ or visit www.hopeinspiredministries.org

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Watercolor Society of Alabama: 77th Annual National Exhibition Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University is pleased to host the Watercolor Society of Alabama’s 77th Annual National Exhibition through July 29th. The Watercolor Society of Alabama (WSA), organized in 1939, is one of the oldest major watercolor organization in America. The WSA is a continuing and vibrant influence in advancing the art of watercolor painting and has long contributed to the enrichment of the cultural environment of the citizens of Alabama. The society has been most fortunate to have continuing support from members, businesses, art galleries, and art organizations to enable WSA to offer more than $9,000 in awards each year for the national exhibition. This attracts the best artists nationwide, and the exhibitions represent the best in the field of watercolor painting. Explore other information regarding WSA exhibitions and view the galleries on the website, www.watercolorsocietyofal.org. For more info visit www.jcsm.auburn.edu

2018 Volunteer of the Year Awards Hundreds gathered at Montgomery's Trinity Presbyterian Church for the 2018 Volunteer of the Year Awards to honor volunteers for their incredible gifts of service and ongoing efforts to improve the lives of others. Co-sponsored by the Junior League of Montgomery, HandsOn River Region initiated the ceremony 44 years ago after its first year in operation to publicly recognize the outstanding service provided by community volunteers. ASU President Dr. Quinton Ross was keynote speaker, and WSFA's John O'Connor served as Master of Ceremonies. Laura and Barrie Harmon, III were the recipients of the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award in honor of their dedication, compassion and lifetime of philanthropy to our community. Susan Carmichael, former Director of the Montgomery Clean City Commission, L-R: Felicia Long, Junior League of received the Camilla W. Prince Community Partner in Service Award. HandsOn River Region mobilizes Montgomery President, Stefania volunteers and connects people, information and services to meet local needs and build a strong, caring Cumuze, President of HandsOn Board and Susan Carmichael. community. Others honored were: Adult – Joan Wood, Adult Group – Hamilton Lodge and the Blueheart Foundation, Arts – Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Docents, Senior – Dennis Charlesworth, Youth – Micah Cobb, Youth Group – Pink and Pearls for Girls. To learn more, visit www.handsonriverregion.org or call 334.264.3335.

Capital City Master Gardener Association Presents Free Lunch & Learn 2018 Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2018 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. We meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars, June 6 Butterfly Gardening in the South, Jane Mobley, Adv Master Gardener and July 11 Working with Ponds in the Landscape by Leonard Shannon, Master Gardener. For information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www.capcitymga.org. FREE GARDEN HELPLINE: Can’t find the answer to a home gardening question? Call our Free Help Line for the general public. 1-877-252-GROW (4769), Mon-Thurs 9am-1pm I March-August. The help line is operated by Master Gardener Volunteers who use research-based information to best answer your gardening questions.

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River Region Connects Needs Volunteers Thursday, July 12, 9 am - 1 pm at Montgomery Multiplex. What is River Region Connects? River Region Connects is a homeless resource fair which serves as a one-day, one-stop shop of services for the homeless. Representatives from government and community agencies bring their services under one roof to assist homeless individuals and families with finding shelter, employment, education, health care, legal assistance and other support. Most importantly, the event is outcome oriented; it is not just a day for people to wait in line but a day for people to make changes and have immediate access to essential services. We need volunteers to help us with this homeless resource fair. Volunteers...working on the front lines! * You will be matched with a homeless client to guide them through the event. * Treat clients with dignity - Try to talk with them, not at them. * Respect client privacy - When handling paperwork, do not review it unless necessary. * Ask for help if you need it. * Don't promise services as some of the services have limited availability and eligibility requirements. For further information, contact Breonna Walker at breonna@midalhomeless.org or 334.261.6182.

Memory Cafés at the Whole Foods Market in Montgomery Whole Foods and Dementia Friendly Alabama have partnered and are delighted to announce they will be hosting Memory Cafés at the Whole Foods Market in Montgomery. The next Memory café will be Friday, June 8th, 10-11 am. Memory Cafés are social engagement opportunities for people with dementia and their care partners to come together and just have some fun. We will provide an engaging sensory tour where they will experience tastes, touch and smells from all over the world. At any given café, organizers encourage attendees to not focus on the disease and have fun with the group. Please call 334.240.4680, ext 105 to let us know you’re coming. For more information visit www. facebook.com/events/183062925761705/

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Montgomery Botanical Gardens and Area Master Gardeners Planting Over 100 Plants

Amanda Borden, Membership Chair, Board of Directors for Montgomery Botanical Gardens.

The Montgomery Botanical Gardens at Oak Park (MBG) is excited to announce that over 100 plants were planted with the help of over 20 area master gardeners. Volunteers from the Alabama Master Gardeners Association, Capital City Master Gardeners and the Central Alabama Master Gardeners planted over 100 plants on Thursday, May 17th. The plants are Forsythia, Oakleaf Hydrangeas, and Limelight Hydrangeas. These plants will be planted along the Forest Avenue section of the Garden and around the terrace. The Capital City Master Gardeners have been strong financial and volunteer supporters of the Montgomery Botanical Gardens at Oak Park. Several members serve on the Board of Directors. “Botanical Gardens are a peaceful unifier for a community, it has been a long-time dream to have a Botanical Garden in Montgomery” said Cathy Maddox, President of the Alabama Master Gardeners Association and Treasurer of MBG. “We are beyond excited to get our hands dirty and be a part of the beginnings of what will be a beautiful garden for all of Montgomery.” MBG is planting over 1000 plants from 30 different species of Southern trees, shrubs and plants in this Southern Garden. A full list of plants needed to complete the gardens can be found at www.montgomerybotanicalgardens.com.

Maggie Stringer, MBG board member and Education Chair, Nellie Moore (right) a member of Capital City Master Gardeners.

2018’s Best & Worst States for Military Retirees

Retirement is typically viewed as the end of the line — a time for rest, relaxation and the pursuit of interests long ago put on the back burner. But the story is far different for military retirees who must deal with the trials of reassimilation into civilian life. For starters, the average officer is only 45 years old — 42 for nondisability enlisted personnel — upon retirement from service. Many of those who reenter the job market face tough challenges during the transition while others struggle with more difficult problems, such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, disability and homelessness. As such, military retirement can be a far more complicated issue than one might assume, given the extent to which state tax policies on military benefits vary, the relative friendliness of different job markets toward veterans, and other socioeconomic factors. This year, the military’s retirement system is also changing for new recruits and current personnel who opt in, going from a “defined benefit” to a “Blended Retirement System” that awards funds not just based on years served but also matches contributions to a “Thrift Savings Plan.” With that in mind, WalletHub sought to help ease the burden on our nation’s military community by comparing the 50 states and the District of Columbia based on their ability to provide a comfortable military retirement. Our analysis uses a data set of 27 key metrics, ranging from veterans per capita to number of VA health facilities to job opportunities for veterans. The findings were that Alabama ranked the 4th best state for military retirees to live in. The states who scored slightly better were #1 Florida, #2 Virginia and #3 New Hampshire. Also, Red States were far friendlier to military retirees than Blue States! To read the report visit www.wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-military-retirees/3915/

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MACOA Recruiting Volunteers to Help put The “Meals” in Meals on Wheels

Women of Hope

Breast Cancer Support Group Tuesday, June 12th, 5:30 p.m. Frazer UMC, Room 8114 6000 Atlanta Highway Enjoy fun and fellowship with your breast cancer “sisters” and friends!

The program will be: Family Medical History and Why It Matters

Presented by Tina Hodge, Previvor Manager, Breast Imaging for Baptist Health

Everyone is Welcome!

For information please call 334-220-4599 or email womenofhope@charter.net www.thewomenofhope.org

Retirees...

Help Wanted! Delivering BOOM! 2 days per month call/text 334.324.3472

The Montgomery Area Council on Aging (MACOA) announced a new volunteer opportunity known as MACOA Meal Makers that allows groups and individuals to contribute to Meals on Wheels even if they cannot drive a route. MACOA Meal Makers prepare the meals that Meals on Wheels drivers deliver to homebound seniors weekdays. Cooking skills are not required. Volunteers simply assist MACOA kitchen staff with packaging meals. Shifts are 7:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday through Friday and volunteers may choose to participate weekly, monthly, quarterly or annually based on their schedule. It is perfect for businesses, civic organizations, church groups, students and anyone looking for a service project or team-building experience. “It’s been fun watching our first groups work together. They’re clearly having a great time with each other, but you can also tell they love knowing they’re putting the ‘meals’ in Meals on Wheels,” said MACOA Executive Director Donna Marietta. “The service these volunteers provide is an important first step in the work we do to ensure no senior goes hungry.” The MACOA Meal Makers program not only helps the kitchen operate more efficiently, it also fills a volunteer need in the community. Groups and individuals who want to contribute to Meals on Wheels but are unable to commit to delivering a noontime meal can now be a vital part of the process. The launch of the MACOA Meal Makers program is possible through a generous grant provided by the Montgomery Lions Club Community Foundation, which helped purchase the aprons and supplies volunteers use in the kitchen. To learn more about the MACOA Meal Makers program go to www.macoa.org/macoa-meal-makers or call 334.263.0532.

Caring for the Caregiver, Alzheimer/Dementia Support Group Meeting the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 1-3 pm at ChristChurch, 8800 Vaughn Rd. Montgomery, AL. A place for RESPITE: a pause or rest, EXCHANGING: practical information on caregiving problems, possible solutions, and resources in our community, SHARING: needs and concerns, TALKING: through challenges and discovering new ways to cope. Often, we hear caregivers say they are looking for support from people who “really understand because we have been there too.” This group offers just that-a safe place for caregivers, family and friends of persons with dementia to meet and develop a mutual support system. We welcome caregivers. For more info call 334.462.2613.

Support Meetings for Cancer Patients and Caregivers

Support Meetings for Cancer Patients and Caregivers. Includes monthly education series, encouragement from cancer Survivors, caregiver support and sharing common experiences and solutions. June 19, July 10, August 14, September 11, October 9. All meetings held in Education Conference Room, Montgomery Cancer Center, 4145 Carmichael Road. Education series starts at 12N; Support meeting starts at 1pm. Call 334.273.2275 for more information.

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Are you eligible to receive this valuable VA benefit? One of the privileges of serving our country during a time of war is the potential eligibility for VA Pension benefits. These benefits are particularly valuable for veterans over age 65 who have large medical expenses, including prescription drugs, treatments, and even assisted living or in-home care. Recently, the VA has quietly taken action to attempt to reduce the number of Veterans who can qualify for these benefits by changing the rules.

While there is no specific formula to calculate what is excessive, the older the applicant is, the fewer assets they can have before they will be considered excessive. Many veterans are incorrectly informed that they cannot ever qualify for these benefits, but often that information is not entirely correct. Sometimes a veteran or surviving spouse may qualify after undertaking some estate planning with an attorney. While attorneys cannot charge veterans to prepare or submit a pension application, a VA Accredited attorney can assist veterans by evaluating their case and making recommendations regarding future qualification.

to be so under the proposed regulations. However, the proposed rules cap the “reasonable lot area” that the home sits on at 2 acres, a limit that does not exist under current law. Rural veterans will of course be treated unfairly under this rule. The VA also hopes to impose a Medicaidstyle penalty against veterans who have transferred property within 3 years before applying. Currently, no such penalty exists.

These VA Pension benefits are generally To illustrate: A married Veteran applies available to wartime Veterans (and their for VA Pension with an aid and attendance surviving spouses) who meet certain criteria. allowance. The monthly benefit he is trying Before 1980 the Veteran must have served to qualify for is $2,120. During the past 3 at least ninety (90) days of active duty, with years, the Veteran contributed $10,000 to at least one day being during a “wartime The Wounded Warriors Project, a nonprofit But as mentioned above, these rules may be period” (as set by Congress). After 1980, organization. He also gave his only child about to change. the Veteran must have generally served at $1,000 on each birthday the past 3 years. least twenty-four (24) months of active duty, with at least one day As a result of the being during a wartime period. In charitable contribution addition, the Veteran must not have the cash gifts to Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop and been dishonorably discharged. her child ($13,000 total Wednesday, July 25: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm in 3 years), this Veteran A Veteran must also be “disabled” would be penalized for at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This in order to receive this benefit, but 6.13 months when he educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins anyone over age 65 is automatically applies for VA Pension covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living deemed “disabled” for purposes of under the new rules. wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, determining eligibility. Of course, If this same Veteran bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care permanent and total disability at any was not married, the age also meets this requirement. penalty would be even and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. If the Veteran or surviving spouse longer—11.3 months. Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at has additional medical needs, then During the penalty www.redoaklegalpc.com. additional monetary allowances the Veteran would not may be awarded, like an “aid and receive his benefits. attendance” allowance. This penalty would apply to all transfers, The proposed VA rules changes include unless the Veteran could present evidence creating a one-size-fits-all number for The Veteran must also meet certain financial that a transfer was the result of fraud, determining the maximum amount of net requirements. The Veteran must not have misrepresentation or other bad act in the worth a veteran can have in order to qualify, income in excess of the current maximum marketing or sale of a financial product. currently $117,000 (adjusted annually for benefit amount. However, “income” for inflation). In addition, the proposed rules VA purposes is determined after deducting If you know a veteran or the surviving would include income in the applicant’s any unreimbursed out-of-pocket medical spouse of a veteran with substantial net worth calculation. In other words, if expenses. So, for example a veteran seeking unreimbursed healthcare costs, now is the a Veteran has assets worth $117,000 and a $1,700 monthly benefit, who receives time to investigate whether they may qualify receives an income of $2,000 per month, $2,500 in monthly income, but has $3,000 in for this valuable benefit. After all, it may the Veteran’s “net worth” is calculated at assisted living and prescription medication about to become much more difficult. $117,000 + $24,000, which is well over the expenses, would have an income for VA “net worth” limit allowed. Raley L. Wiggins purposes of zero. Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com A primary residence, whether or not the In addition to the income cap, the current 312 Catoma Street, Suite 150, Montgomery, AL 36104 claimant resides there, is an excluded asset law provides that a veteran or surviving www.redoaklegalpc.com for calculating “net worth” and will continue spouse cannot have “excessive” assets.

Attend Free Workshop

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Only 5% of potentially eligible Americans over 65 are receiving a valuable VA pension benefit . . . are you one of them? FREE EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP

Estate Planning, Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility

CALL US OR REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Join local attorney Raley L. Wiggins to discuss wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting your assets, bankruptcy, divorce & remarriage, nursing homes, long term care and medicaid qualification.

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Rick Peters, Bluewater Broadcasting's "Man Behind the Curtain"

This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Rick Peters. Rick is the owner of Bluewater Broadcasting, the largest locally owned radio broadcasting group in the River Region. Rick's group of stations includes, NewsTalk 93.1, Kiss FM 96.1, JAMZ 97.1, BamaCountry 98.9, Yo! Classic Jamz 100.5, THE GUMP 104.9, The Possum 103.9 and The Vault-Album Rock 107.1. Rick tells us that 48% of the adults in the River Region listen to his group of radio stations every day, so you have heard Rick's radio voice. Rick is passionate about locally owned radio and he'll share some of his ideas about what makes it valuable. For fans of Greg Budell, you can thank Rick for bringing him to Montgomery and giving him another chance to rebuild his career...Thanks Rick! Also, Rick was instrumental in helping Rich Thomas grow his weather broadcasting career through the Bluewater Weather Network. We recently spent some time getting to know Rick, his wife Jennifer and of course his "Frenchies", hope you enjoy the conversation!

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography… where you’re from, is Rick Peters a radio name, what brought you to the Montgomery area, school, married, family…? RP: I grew up in New Jersey about 30 miles from NYC. It was the best of both worlds. The #1 City in the nation but living in the country surrounded by apple orchards. Left NJ to attend the U of M in 1970. Started my radio career in Miami. They made me change my name to Peters because my real “Italian” name had too many syllables. Wouldn’t fit on a jingle. Rick with his wife, Jennifer The name just stuck for a whole career. Worked my way up from a DJ, that captured to Program Director, to VP, Consultant, your passion and finally CEO of a Company that was over forty years inventing consolidation in 1996. One of ago? Most my markets was Montgomery, so when rewarding I decided to go out on my own in 2004, aspect of your Montgomery was a natural for me. radio career? BOOM!: You are the CEO/Managing RP: Bluewater Partner for Bluewater Broadcasting, an is the best in independent group of 8 FM stations in the business the River Region, which was described because we as a tight knit group of radio crazies that have been able strive to be the best in the business, what to attract the makes Bluewater Broadcasting the best in the business? What is it about radio

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absolute best broadcasters in the market. We did that with a new approach to management which is to “hire the best”, and then get out of their way. Remember why you hired them and support them any way you can. What a concept. What I’ve found is most managers spend most of their time creating tasks that justify their own efforts. We’ve eliminated most of that. My passion for radio goes back to the confluence of music and technology. The idea that we could play the most impactful music to the most people was a very strong draw, especially back in the 70’s before computers, the internet and streaming. Radio was IT. Radio influenced generations

Rick sharing his radio gig with a very good friend, Cooper!

The most rewarding aspects of my career is being able to create brands, and curate music environments that appeal to people. Couple that with radios ability to positively support the community when there

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is a crisis or BOOM!: Many Boomers are experiencing listeners need emergency, a renewed sense of purpose, new us, especially and through goals, new careers, especially if they’ve in times of involvement in experienced the empty nest syndrome emergency charities and of their kids moving on. How would you and crisis. That organizations, describe this sense of renewal in your explains our and the ability life? Any advice for the rest of us seeking commitment to focus the renewal? to Rich conversation Thomas, our in the market RP: I am so fortunate. I found my passion Weather and you begin early and have been able to make a Network, and to understand our new News living doing what I love. I am a blessed the appeal of man. That being said, Jennifer and I are and Weather the #1 reach experiencing the “empty nest syndrome” relationship medium. right now. Our youngest is now at Troy, with WAKA Finally, but just and we have a lot of empty bedrooms. and WNCF as important, I think it’s harder on Jennifer, the mom, TV. In times radio, as an than me. Having a little more freedom of need, we advertising gives us the ability to cross some items intend to be Gulf Shores with Dawson, Shelby, Jennifer and Louie the Frenchie medium has off the “bucket list”. We are also looking there and the ability to forward to splitting some time between serve the positively affect the businesses of our here and the beach. A perfect scenario community when they need us the most. advertisers in our community. Healthy would have us at the beach 4 days a week business equals a healthy community. We and looking over the business 3. BOOM!: You’ve been referred to as the take that seriously. Radio works, and our “man behind the curtain” at Bluewater, clients know that. They are very loyal to please explain? us. RP: Sometimes I BOOM!: Radio innovation in Montgomery do feel like that is alive and well with Bluewater scene in the Broadcasting-stations like The GumpWizard of Oz Alternative (104.9) and The Vault-Album where Toto pulls Rock (107.1); and blending weatherman back the curtain. Rich Thomas into your stations…how There’s a lot of challenging is it to innovate in radio “lever pulling” today? and “sausage being made” to RP: There aren’t many “holes” left in make these 8 the market from a music standpoint. I radio stations could name a few, but don’t really want run. I have to give the The "Frenchies", Cooper, Huxley and Louie competition any ideas. But, that BOOM!: What are you most passionate always put our onbeing said, about…besides radio? air personalities, the real management, and innovation RP: I’m really into cars, boats, planes sales professionals comes from and motorcycles. Love burning those out front and in increasing hydrocarbons! As of late I’ve sold the the public eye. I’ve community plane, the boat and the motorcycle. Still been content to be involvement love cars. Small, fast cars. Currently in in the background and love with my Mercedes 550SL. Best car creating an outreach, I’ve ever owned. Little known fact - I’ve environment where along the never had a four-seat car as my “driver” we can all thrive ability to always 2 seaters. And then there’s the and serve the Rick with Shelby and Dawson in the Bahamas be there Frenchies... community. when the

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Rick loves to burn hydrocarbons riding with Jennifer

Rick loves to burn hydrocarbons flying, too

BOOM!: How do you like to relax and wind down from a hard day’s work at the radio station?

business owners that share that vision and want to be part of that effort. BOOM!: Describe your experience as a father, can you share any fatherly advice?

RP: With a Moscow Mule in a chair by the pool in the back yard. BOOM!: With your busy schedule, do you get to travel much? Favorite vacation spot? Any travel dreams for the future?

Rick and Jennifer enjoying their favorite team

RP: Jennifer and I are real big on 4-day weekends. We’d rather do that than a week or 10 days. We love New York City. We visit NYC once a year at a minimum. We also are big on the Caribbean and Mexico. I really want to go to Italy and see where the family is from. We often travel to Nashville, New Orleans and surrounding cities for concert weekends away.

BOOM!: Your wife, Jennifer is part of the Bluewater Team, please share some of your love story? what’s her role? What’s the secret to making it work?

BOOM!: Rick, you have lived and worked in major markets, what was it like transitioning to a smaller market like Montgomery? How would you describe the quality of life in the Montgomery/ River Region area? What do we need more of? RP: I love Montgomery. South Florida was hectic, rude and impossible to navigate. It has all the problems of a major market including a very high crime rate. Montgomery is a welcome change. There’s a slower pace to life here. People are polite. Everyone speaks English. You can get anywhere in under twenty minutes. Montgomery is conservative and rooted in Christian values. All very important to me. Montgomery will spoil you traffic wise. It takes me 18 minutes to drive to the radio stations from Millbrook. You couldn’t go five miles in 20 minutes in Miami. As far as what we need more of?

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RP: Being a father was the best and hardest thing I’ve ever done. It was definitely the most rewarding. You’ll never know how deeply you can love till you’ve had a child. One piece of advice - more positive reinforcement than negative. Discipline from Love not annoyance or anger. And, don’t sweat the small stuff. You want to win the war, not the skirmish. Know what is “expected behavior” vs “misbehavior” and act accordingly.

Graduation from U of A, 2016, Husband Blake, Rick, Shelby, Jennifer, Dawson

Arts & Entertainment...and a few more great restaurants. BOOM!: What is the future of local radio? RP: Local radio is alive and well, as long as you remember why you are here - to serve and entertain the local community. We fully believe that radio should be locally owned by members of the community who have a vested interest in the well-being of where they live. I’m currently looking for a select group of

RP: I met Jennifer right after buying the radio stations in 2004. We were both recently divorced, and she took me under her wing as I was flying back and forth from Florida and spent many nights alone here. It’s a great love story. We hit it off instantly. We’ve been married going on 11 years now and I cannot imagine a life here without her by my side. She’s my rock and sounding board. Jennifer is my business partner at the radio stations. We are both working there daily. It could have been a relationship disaster, but it has turned out wonderfully. Jennifer looks over Sales. I look over the Programming. She’s “upstairs", I’m "downstairs". It’s definitely a collaborative effort. The secret to making it work is respect for each other and each other’s areas of expertise, and to never let

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the business get in the way of your relationship. BOOM!: You've influenced hundreds of lives during your radio career- who were your influences? RP: My influences early on were the great broadcasters of the 60’s in New York City. That was some of the best radio ever done, and something to aspire to. Later on, I found my inspiration in some of the greatest broadcasting entrepreneurs of the 80’s and 90’s. They were always willing to teach and motivate and guide. I’ve tried to continue that approach in my career with the upcoming young generation of broadcasters. BOOM!: Would you share your love for “The Frenchies” with us?

special gift for any creature. Our lives revolve around our Frenchies. They come to the radio stations every day. We are a dog friendly company. Not sure who’s in charge here, us or the dogs. I think it’s the dogs.

about this on the air. It took him years to get his issues under control, but, there was no denying his talent. I kept taking chances on him, only to be disappointed. We go back over 40 years now. When I purchased Bluewater, Greg asked for a fresh start. I took a chance. I figured it was a 50/50 crash and burn proposition. In hindsight, it was the best decision I Rick with Greg Budell, his "Franchise" Player! could have made. Greg has taken this market by storm. He’s healthy, BOOM!: Give us three words that describe focused, well adjusted, sober, married, you? and an integral part of the company. He’s my “franchise” player. I couldn’t be more RP: Intense, proud of him on a personal or professional motivated, loyal to a level. Love Greg and his rebirth in fault. Montgomery.

RP: Jennifer and I are totally enamored BOOM!: Greg Budell with French Bulldogs. is one of your biggest They are a special on-air personalities, breed. We have two why did you hire (and (and a third grandfire) him 4 times? baby). Frenchies are like potato chips. RP: Greg is my best Can’t have just one. redemption story. They are loving and He is an outstanding clownish, cute, and broadcaster and well mannered. A entertainer who let Rick with the late Ben Hagler, a Bluewater favorite his demons control Frenchie will make you laugh out loud every day. That’s a his life. He’s been very honest and open

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We want to thank Rick for helping us put together this month’s BOOM! Cover Profile. If you want to reach out to Rick visit www.bluewaterbroadcasting.com. He believes in our local market! We want to thank the portrait team at Total Image Portraits for their quality work. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to Jim Watson at jim@riverregionboom.com Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at www.riverregionboom.com/archive/

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Fearless Online Dating for Older Woman Online dating is fun at any age. But if you are a woman in your sixties or seventies, it can be a bit of a challenge. You need to be armed with the right tools to be successful. It takes time and tenacity. (How about these senior men who are looking to date women who are ten or even 20 years younger than themselves. Do they want children at sixty? Good luck with that college fund….!) Just for fun, here is a possible online profile of a 70-year-old man with a search age for a 45-60-year-old women: “I’m a young 69 year old man. My family says I look 60 and I feel sixty most of

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I’m looking for a young woman who is extremely amorous with a nice income. It would be great if you were also a nurse.” Get Real

the time. I’m in pretty good shape for my age. I am balding with a paunch, shorter then I use to be, retired and on a limited income. But hey, I use to be a pilot with my own plane! Until night vision problems set in. Anyhow, I have a nice condo with a pool and I drive a red convertible.

OK, are you smiling yet? All too often we see men’s profiles online that make us shake our head or even feel intimidated by the search age they are looking for. We don’t bother to say hello because of their listed age range for woman. Many older men (with money, or good looks) feel they can and should date 1015 years down from their own age. I have spoken with a few older men who tell me they don’t “want to date their mother.” Yet they are looking to date a woman the

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age of their daughters! As you might guess, their conversation with these younger women would likely be limited and these guys will all need chiropractors from dancing all night! So, how does a woman in her sixties or seventies compete with the man who says he is searching for a younger woman? Well, for one thing, men really don’t know what they want…other than sex:) So what’s a woman to do when you’re not in the age range they have listed? Action Steps Write them anyway. Don’t be intimidated. The worst thing that would happen is they don’t write you back. But just think…If a guy sent you an email with the headline: “You’re so hot you melted my computer” you’d reply…and so would any man you sent that to. Even if they weren’t normally interested, their ego would get the best of them. Sometimes, you just have to be a little more creative and gutsy online. Which brings me to a point regarding the photos older women put online; A man has to be attracted, no matter what his age! Be sure it’s just you in the photo; no grandkids, girlfriends, cat or dog. The best photos show a carefree you. A photo with the wind blowing your hair around, you laying on the grass reading a book, you cooking in the kitchen with just an apron, chef’s hat and wooden spoon (and maybe nothing else, if you’re daring). Accept that online dating is here to stay and it takes work. If you really want to find romance or that special someone, online is the only way to go in today’s world and you need to step up. An hour a day is not too much to find the love of your life. Work at it daily and send as many flirts and emails as you can to as many men that you even think have potential. You also have to go and meet as many men as possible whether it’s for coffee or a glass of wine. This way you won’t build up just one person in your mind and then feel let down, you can just say: “next” and move on to another. Knowing what to do and how to do it is half the battle of successful online dating. Don’t give up or get disgusted. Go get’m! This article first appeared at www.seniorplanet.org Gail Karpus is the author of Fast Track to Romance, a complete online dating guide for today’s mature woman, especially those who have never dated online or has been unsuccessful at online dating.

Digital & Interactive

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

The Mighty Blueberry An eternal American favorite, the diminutive blueberry is a little powerhouse of goodness (no wonder those grizzlies love them so). Multiple scientific studies have been done around the world on the various benefits of eating blueberries and all have concluded that if you add these tiny, yet potent little berries to your weekly diet (2-3 cups a week) you will definitely improve your health and probably in more ways than one. Proven to improve vascular health, help prevent cancer, improve bone health, help control diabetes, improve mental health, protect your lungs from decline AND improve your eyesight. All in that one tiny little blue berry. As we’ve discussed before, the more colorful your range of food products (naturally colorful, that is) the greater variety of health benefits you will derive from your food. The deep blue/purple color of the blueberry is what tells you how potent it is. The color comes from a plant compound called anthocyanin (you’ll recognize the “cyan” bit from the blue color in your printer.) It is this anthocyanin that gives blueberries both their beautiful color and many of their health benefits. While it is always preferable to eat fresh, local produce where possible and, of course, to buy organic or wild, sometimes it just isn’t possible. Fortunately, there are plenty of other options for blueberries; you can get them frozen or dried and both options are almost as good as fresh off the plant. Though right now is the best time to get fresh, the shops are full of delicious berries from now till the end of summer. Wild blueberries are particularly potent. They are smaller than the cultivated versions most often found in your supermarket, with about twice the number of berries per pound. They also have less water and a higher skin-to-pulp ratio. That means the wild versions have more intense flavor and double the antioxidant content. It is the antioxidant content that makes them so good at cancer prevention and The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

vision improvement. My son and I did a 4-month experiment eating a minimum of two berry-based smoothies a day for 4 months, mainly to see if it showed any difference in our vision. After the 4-month period I had my eyes tested and for the first time in my adult life there was no change in my prescription – usually there has been some, if only a little, deterioration each time and indeed, you will be told to expect that. So, I for one will be continuing munching on as many berries as possible. My son has still to go for his eye test, but I am hoping he will show at least the same. That is just our little experiment though, there have been many official studies done: • Harvard researchers measured cognitive function in 16,010 participants 70 years and older. Based on dietary questionnaires, they concluded that eating more blueberries slowed cognitive decline by up to 2.5 years. It works for young people, too. In a study in The Journal of Nutrition, 14 children aged 8 to 10 years old consumed a blueberry drink or placebo. Two hours later they completed a battery of five cognitive tests. The blueberry drink significantly improved delayed recall of a list of words. • A double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical study in The Journal of Nutrition found that bioactive compounds found in blueberries improve insulin sensitivity. Twice a week researchers had 32 obese, non-diabetic, insulin-resistant patients drink smoothies with or without 22.5 grams of blueberry bioactives. After six weeks, the blueberry group improved their insulin sensitivity by a factor of four over the placebo group.

• A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition followed 839 participants from the VA (Veterans Affairs) Normative Aging Study. Over 16 years, it found that men who ate two or more servings of blueberries a week had up to 37.9 percent less decline in their lung function compared to those who ate no or very little blueberries. • And perhaps the largest study so far: Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of East Anglia reviewed the berry-eating habits of 93,600 women between the ages of 25 and 42 over 18 years. The women were part of the Nurses’ Health Study II. Researchers concluded that women who ate three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries per week reduced their risk of heart attack by as much as one-third. And it really had to be berries. Women who ate a diet rich in other fruits and vegetables did not enjoy the same reduced heart attack risk. So, if you don’t eat 2-3 cups a week of blueberries all ready (and personally I would recommend more, especially when mixed with other berries) then you really should consider it. They’re delicious, fat free, no added sugar, have all the benefits listed above and are so easy to eat – just eat them as they are or toss in a salad, on top of cereal or yogurt. If you bake, add them to your cakes or layer them on top, particularly good with cheesecake or pies. YUM! Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/ tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have. R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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Travel Experiences with Jeff Barganier

The Cove

A Place for Quiet Reflection Cindy and I recently kept our three grands and two grand-puppies. On day five of our tour of duty, I “texted” their parents the following update: This is your pre-arrival debriefing: Your garbage can now has about ½ gallon of puppy poop in it. After two sleepless nights of cleaning up after them, I decided to leave the screened-door propped open at night so they could come and go. Worked beautifully. Next morning, zero poop. I know you’ve had coyote sightings, but the puppies do not stray far at night. However, last night events got ugly. There was lots of gunfire in the woods beyond the barn. Went on for several minutes. The dogs went nuts. Olive tore the screen out of the panel by the back door, jumped off the deck onto the garbage can, then to the concrete and took off running from the gunfire. After catching Scout and locking him in the puppy cage, I launched a search for Olive but couldn’t find her. I even drove up and down the busy highway at great peril to myself calling her name, but to no avail. When I got back, Cindy joined me outside with the flashlight but we couldn’t find Olive on the property anywhere. With

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howling in the distance, we decided to pray. Cindy prayed that the Lord would send angels to find Olive and return her without harm. I prayed that another female golden-doodle puppy with a reddish coat could be found within driving distance. Then we headed back inside to call the authorities and put out a lost puppy report. But when Cindy opened the door, Olive was sitting in the living room smiling up at her. We have no idea how she got there, except that it was an answer to prayer. We had some other minor mishaps. I’ll spare you the details for now. Bottom line, mission accomplished. We are desperately seeking a calm place for quiet reflection.

you’ll see is a picture of Billy Graham sitting in a rocking chair quietly reflecting. Our family used to vacation in North Carolina. I met the late Mr. Graham there many years ago. He was standing amidst throngs of people waiting for an Annual 4th of July Parade to begin. It struck me as amazing that a man of such renown was standing there alone and easy to approach and talk with. What I recall about him from that brief meeting was how calm he seemed, like a man who possessed a peace that passes all understanding. That same peace is exactly what one experiences at “The Billy Graham Training Center at The Cove” near Asheville. When the Graham’s first visited this scenic mountain property, they dreamed of a place where people could escape the demands of daily life, connect with God through His word and learn to reach others for Jesus. The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association purchased the property in 1972. Today, programs are offered throughout the year and attract thousands of visitors from around the

Speaking of quiet reflection, visit www.thecove.org and the first thing The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


world. What one finds here is retreat, rest, relaxation and renewal. It’s like a mental and spiritual massage. The accommodations are simple, clean and comfortable and the food is awesome. There are hiking trails, a museum of Graham memorabilia, prayer gardens, a chapel, wide decks, nature trails, scenic mountain views, benches, streams, and more—all places for quiet reflection. What you won’t find are TV’s, boom boxes, green slime (with sparkles), gunfire, screaming children, frantic dogs, heavy traffic; you know, the customary trappings of the Pop and Gigi scene. In fact, no children or pets are allowed. It’s the perfect place to go and pray for your kids, grands, and grand-puppies! Hospitality is a ministry at The Cove. The staff people are gracious and helpful beyond their calling. The maids actually pray for guests as they clean rooms. But you don’t have to be “in ministry” to go there. Cindy and I have met the nicest ordinary folks from all over the

country. Well-known speakers like Anne Graham Lotz and Ron Hutchcraft are exceptional; and the entire 3-day, 2-night event, all meals included, was only about $550. The Cove also offers special retreats for active-duty military personnel who have been or are about to be deployed. These special programs are funded by donations and are all-expenses-paid for qualifying service men and women and spouses. The Cove is an enchanting mountain lodge with giant stone fire places and

comfortable seating in the common areas. Our room faced east and each morning sun filtered in through the tall oaks on the mountainside. I cranked

the casement windows open and sat in a rocker like Mr. Graham’s and listened to the singing of birds and the soporific babbling of a nearby brook. Everywhere, rhododendron exploded in pink against greeny-gray stone walls. The glistening of spring foliage contrasted with the brown forest floor; and a cool breeze made new leaves appear as tiny flapping flags. It’s all so wonderful that, once there, one doesn’t want to leave. Regardless of motivation, The Cove is an outstanding get-away in the majestic Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. From the River Region, it’s about six hours. Seven with stops. But the drive is worth the transforming ambience of tranquility; especially, if you’re seeking a place for quiet reflection and recovery from the most-of-the-timewonderful little stresses of life.

Jeff S. Barganier is a freelance writer and business manager of Cindy Barganier Interiors LLC. He travels far and wide upon the slightest excuse for something interesting to write about. Contact Jeff at Jeffbarganier@knology.net. Follow him on Instagram: #jeffbarganier.

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The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

By Greg Budell

Cover Boy

"A few words about BOOM!'s JUNE Cover Boy" cut the cord.

Let’s talk about the guy on this month’s cover of BOOM!

On the Day of Dismissal, I visited the only friend in Florida I’d made in 2 months, Kathleen- who said “you can’t go back to Chicago after 2 months and say ‘it didn’t work”. She opened the Yellow Pages to Radio Stations and Broadcasting Companies and said “start dialing”.

I’d just passed through Troy, Alabama driving northbound on Route 231 the night of April 28, 2005. Around the flashing yellow light that signals “Welcome to Ramer”, I reached for the radio to hear something I hadn’t heard in 25 yearsthe buttery voice of Rick Peters hosting the night shift on the late, vastly underappreciated Alice 96.1. An Eagles song reached its conclusion and there he was, “Rockin’ hits” Rick- sounding not a day older, the same casual, confident conversationalist, efficiently teasing the songs ahead and keeping company with his nighttime audience. I was miles from my new town of Montgomery but hearing Rick made me feel at home before I arrived. Big smiles for that moment. I owe my 25 year Miami radio legacy to Mr. Peters. Rick, whose managerial style runs the gamut from pit bull (always when you really need it) to puppy (the real Rick), is also known to be the King of Second Chances. When he believes in you, it’s for keeps.

I scanned the listings to the bottomWWWL-FM, Love 94, Miami Beach. I called. Rick Peters was the Program Director. I was somewhat surprised he took my call. Whatever I said inspired an invitation to bring him a tape for job consideration. I had one ‘aircheck’ cassette from my last Chicago days. He listened to ONE break. “We need some weekend people” he said. “You can do this Saturday and Sunday afternoon”.

Rick Peters with Greg and two of their favorite things!

My Miami days began decidedly disastrous. I’d just been canned from (take my word on this, please) the WORST radio station in America. Even the worst radio station in America will allow you to completely miss just so many morning shows from drinking yourself into a coma before they

Wow. In 24 hours I went from abject reject to optimal opportunity. On the Sunday shift, things were going well when the studio door blew open (Rick’s a big guy and makes startling entrances). My heart filled with horror.

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management

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What had I done that he’d drive to South Beach (in’79 it was a decaying mess) on a Sunday afternoon? “You’re good”, he said. “I’m going to fire my morning guy and put you in there”. That’s how it all got started. A year later, we’d both leave LOVE 94 for more money and greater opportunity, but in different directions. Rick shot up the radio food chain like a rocket. Boston. New York. By the time we sat across from each other at a Ft. Lauderdale restaurant on an April morning in 2005, we’d both had quite the adventure. Rick was born ONE DAY before me in (redacted) and I’ve never let him forget he’s the old man. At that breakfast in 2005, Rick could have been enjoying an early retirement, but us radio guys just can’t give it up. I owe that meeting and the Montgomery opportunity to my exwife Michele, and Richie, the lawn guy. You read that correctly. In ’05, Rick had a house next to Richie. When he learned Richie still did work for my ex, he sent Richie on a mission. “Ask her how Greg’s doing”. My ex would never lie. Truth was, I was doing fine and she sent that word back to Rick. She called me, saying “Rick wants you to call him”. See how life works?

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After a nice reunion breakfast, I followed Rick back to the house next to Richie’s, where he took me on an online tour of the radio group he owned in Montgomery. That tour introduced me to Don Markwell, Ben Hagler and a photo of a beautiful woman Rick said he was “getting serious” with - they were “looking at rings”. That was my introduction to Rick’s wife, Jennifer, and God, the old man really married UP! Good for him! I’ve digressed here. He had a full studio in that house, and offered me a chance to pre-record shows from that studio- to work from Fort Lauderdale. “I have a better idea, Rick”, I said. “I’m ready for something new. How about bringing me up there?”. “OK” he replied, “but it won’t pay much”. My reply was simple. “Give me a shot”, I said. “You did in ’79 and that worked out well. Maybe history will repeat?”.

humble check, I’ve built a great life here, and gave Rick the satisfaction of showing Greg "Deniers" their well-intended advice was wrong. (Cue “It’s A Small World here). Besides the separation at birth, The Rick-Greg coincidences don’t end here. We both had daughters, born weeks apart, both who graduated college to become Graphic Designers. The mother of Rick’s daughter? The last guy she dated before marrying Rick was- ME! A long sobriety has allowed me to fulfill potential that’s positioned me to somewhat pay back Rick’s priceless faith. His BOOM! cover is well deserved. My fervent hope is that the good people of the River Region appreciate what he has accomplished here- a group of radio stations at Bluewater that offer LOCAL programming, LOCAL hosts helping LOCAL businesses grow. It’s what radio should be. Rick has dedicated his career to making it so.

Two weeks later I’m driving up Hwy 231, hearing Rick as if only minutes had passed between 1979 and 2005.

You might call it the Peters Principle of great radio.

Oh- Rick was right about the money. My first check brought tears of poverty to my eyes. I also learned that every single person in Rick’s inner circle had advised AGAINST bringing me into Bluewater Broadcasting. The King of Second chances over ruled. From that first

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since 1970, and is marking 12 years in the River Region in 2017. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

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June 2018

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

Everest-Imax McWane Science Center 200 19th St N, Birmingham, AL 35203 Month of June, various times

“Everest” is the dramatic true story of a team of climbers who found hope, strength and triumph in the wake of tragedy. Their successful ascent of Mount Everest just days after fellow mountaineers and friends died there, is a compelling story about the human spirit and a mountain they love, respect and sometimes fear. For more info visit www.mcwane.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Shoppes at EastChase Farmers Market The Shoppes at EastChase Saturdays through September, 7 am-12 noon Since opening in 2004, The Shoppes at EastChase Farmers Market has grown every year and is now one of the top five largest markets in Alabama. Several popular farms are scheduled to make their return with locally grown products, including Aplin Farms, Oakview Farms, Penton Farms, and Leatherwood Nursery and many more! This year’s Farmers Market will run through September 29th. For more information about The Shoppes at EastChase Farmers Market, contact Suzanna Wasserman at 334.279.6046 or swasserman@ bayerproperties.com or www.theshoppesateastchase.com/ farmersMarket/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Sounds of Summer Music Concerts The Shoppes at EastChase Thursdays in June, 7-9 pm The sweet, sweet Sounds of Summer is back at The Shoppes at EastChase and is bigger than ever! The Shoppes at EastChase is partnering with Cumulus to bring you the best local + national live music near Gap on Thursdays throughout June with food, drinks and tons of fun! The best part? It's FREE to attend! The Talismen will be kicking off the summer starting at 7 PM. Some of our vendors include Alabama Sweet Tea Co., Little Donkey, Fire Meats Wood, Frios Gourmet Pops, Dothan Ice Cream, and many more! Free activities for the kids include inflatables, facepainting by Abrakadoodle and balloon artist, Kreative Moments. Schedule: June 7-The Talismen,

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June 14-The Sea of Cities, June 21-Colonial Revival, June 28- Federal Expression. For more information, call 334.279.6046 or visit www.theshoppesateastchase.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Séraphine MMFA-Wilson Auditorium Thursday, June 7, 5:30 – 8 pm

Séraphine (Not Rated) is the true story of Séraphine Louis, aka Séraphine de Senlis (played by Yolande Moreau), a simple and devout housekeeper who at age 41 began painting brilliantly colorful canvases. Films are presented by Curators with discussions following. Popcorn and refreshments are available. This event is free and no reservation is required. For more information, call 334.625.4333. More Information on Website: www.facebook.com/events/1241267539337353/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Capitol Sounds Concert Band will present its’ "Summer Spectacular” concert St. James UMC, Vaughn Rd Thursday, June 7th, 7 pm The Capitol Sounds Concert Band will present its’ "Summer Spectacular” concert Thursday, June 7, 7:00 pm at St. James UMC. The concert will feature Dvorak's "Carnival Overture", plus the "Light Calvary Overture" by Franz von Suppe. George Gershwin's "An American in Paris" will also be included, as well as a medley of songs by Louis Armstrong, titled “Satchmo”. Everyone is invited to come out for a great evening of music, with a little something for all ages! The event is free and open to the public, but donations are gladly accepted and will go towards our upcoming Children's Concert in February, as well as other future performances. For more information about Capitol Sounds Concert Band, please visit www.capitolsounds.org.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

OVER THERE / OVER HERE: ALABAMA IN WORLD WAR I Alabama Department of Archives and History Friday/Saturday, June 8-9, 9-3pm Join us at the Alabama Department of Archives and History for a two-day symposium exploring how the Great War changed daily life for Alabamians The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Digital & Interactive

f re e su bsc r i pt i on s at w w w.rive r re gio n b o o m.co m both during and after the conflict. Expert speakers from across the nation will explore topics including military participation at home & abroad, African American servicemen, war kitchens, post-war social change in Alabama, memorials, & more. 2 Days = $25 Public/$15 Friends & Students, 1 Day = $15 Public/$10 Friends & Students. Cost includes lunches and refreshments For more information, call 334.242.4435 or visit www.archives.state.al.us/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Food Truck Mash-Up Riverfront Park, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, June 9, 1-9 pm Food Truck Mash-Up featuring Rock the Park! Large outdoor community food truck festival featuring Rock the Park, battle of the bands, games for kids, and the best food trucks from the state of Alabama! FREE GENERAL ADMISSION! Featuring trucks from across Alabama: Kona Ice of Selma/Prattville, Country Cajun, Cantina on Wheels, Southern Smokeshack BBQ & Catering, Cheezin, JoZettie's Cupcakes, Urban Pops, & many more to come!

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA HAPPY TOGETHER TOUR 2018

MPAC, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, June 9, 7:30 – 9:30 pm Music fans have been enjoying the hits of the sixties and seventies since the Summer of Love and beyond. They get to relive those moments on the renowned Happy Together Tour 2018, which is going on its 9th consecutive year. This summer, the Happy Together Tour returns with six headline artists who delivered the biggest hits of the era: The Turtles, Chuck Negron, formerly of Three Dog Night, Gary Puckett & The Union Gap, The Association, Mark Lindsay, former Lead Singer of Paul Revere & The Raiders and The Cowsills. The Montgomery Performing Arts Centre at Renaissance Montgomery 201 Tallapoosa St, Montgomery, Alabama 36104. www.mpaconline.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Farmily Day Eat South Downtown Montgomery Saturday, June 9, 9-11 am

Come out to EAT South and enjoy Farmily Day featuring field games, a brief lesson about growing herbs and flowers and DIY herb/ flower pot tower construction for taking home. Don't forget to wear a hat, and shoes you do not mind getting dirty. Bring sunscreen and a snack! We will provide water and sprinklers! Please contact bethanne@eatsouth.org with further questions or visit www.facebook.com/ events/472370943196643/ The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

MILLBROOK, ALABAMA

Bees Are Buzzing at Lanark! Alabama Nature Center, Millbrook, AL Saturday, June 23, 10-2 pm Come join the Alabama Nature Center at 11:30 am for a program all about the world of bees and bee keeping! Learn about pollination, bee keeping, and the equipment used in bee keeping. Guests will get to taste some local honey as well! Come learn more about the makers of delicious honey! Honey jars will be for sale in the bear den gift shop. Daily admission is $5/person with a $20 maximum per family. Call 334.285.4550 for more information or visit www.alabamawildlife.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Grandparents Event

Annie ASF July 4, 2018 – August 5, 2018 “One of the best family musicals ever penned” – Chicago Tribune. The sun will come out tomorrow! No one can resist the optimism of Annie – a little orphan girl who refuses to give up hope. The delightful cast of this feel-good musical will get toes tapping with memorable song-and-dance numbers, such as “It’s the Hard Knock Life,” “Easy Street,” and “Tomorrow.” Recommended ages 4+ Runtime: approx. 2 1/2 hours with intermission. For more info and tickets visit www.asf.net/project/annie/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Wynonna & The Big Noise MPAC Friday, October 12, 8pm

Wynonna and her band The Big Noise, led by her husband/drummer/producer, Cactus Moser, released their debut full-length album in February 2016 via Curb Records to critical acclaim. Wynonna has described the new sound as “vintage yet modern” and a “return to the well.” It’s a rootsy work encompassing country, Americana, blues, soul and rock. The album features special guests Derek Trucks, Jason Isbell, Susan Tedeschi and Timothy B. Schmit. NPR’s Ann Powers noted that, “With her tight band behind her after touring together for several years, she just sounds like she’s home…You can just feel the grin on her face.” The Montgomery Performing Arts Centre at Renaissance Montgomery 201 Tallapoosa St, Montgomery, Alabama 36104. www.mpaconline.org

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Tinseltown Talks By Nick Thomas

Judith Durham looks back at The Seekers Fifty years ago, The Seekers were a pop music sensation. Featuring members Athol Guy, Keith Potger, Bruce Woodley and lead vocalist Judith Durham, the Aussie group’s pop-folk fusion proved popular in America and their hit, “Georgy Girl,” was a nominee at the 1967 Oscar ceremony for ‘Best Song’ for the film of the same name, although it lost to “Born Free.” The Seekers had burst onto the world music scene just 2 years earlier with their 1965 hit “I’ll Never Find Another You,” but Durham struggled with the sudden celebrity status. “I was suddenly thrust into the international spotlight and found myself inadvertently in competition with the glamorous UK stars of the period – Dusty Springfield, Sandie Shaw, Lulu, Twiggy,” said Durham from her home in Melbourne. “I was a 20-year-old girl who worked by day as a secretary, and I weighed more than 10 stone (140-lbs at 5’2”). Those girls were ‘real’ stars to me – slim, pretty, and wearing beautiful clothes. I sewed my own frocks for TV shows and performances! I didn’t feel I was glamorous enough to be the pop star I was being projected as. It caused a lot of anxiety for me for the first two or three years.”

lead vocalists, while Durham focused on her solo career. Enviably, however, the group’s enduring popularity led to several reunions of the original ensemble. Reuniting with The Seekers meant putting her 25-year solo career on hold, but Durham felt compelled. “I wanted to do it for the group’s fans, who had remained so loyal for so long, and who had never stopped pleading with us to come back. What I didn’t realize was that it would become an on-again, off-again situation for another 25 years!” Production still from The Seekers Down Under TV special in 1967

From 1965 to 1968, The Seekers’ sound enchanted the pop music world with a string of hits including “A World of Our Own,” “Someday, One Day,” and "The Carnival Is Over” (www. theseekers.com.au). But as the group’s popularity increased, the pressure on the lead singer continued to mount.

But four years ago, tragedy struck. “We were still performing by the time our 50th anniversary rolled around. During a sell-out Australian tour as part of our Golden Jubilee in 2013, I suffer a brain hemorrhage after the first of four nights in Melbourne.” Durham was in hospital and rehab for six months and her recovery still continues.

Judith Durham then and now

“That was a difficult time,” she admitted. “I had problems finding the words I needed in conversation, and still do to a certain extent. I effectively had to learn to write again. But my long-term memory wasn’t affected, so I had no problem remembering things like lyrics. And thankfully, my voice wasn’t affected in any way.” Looking back on the past 50 years, Durham – who turns 75 in July – has continued to forge ahead through the good times and the bad. “Even though age and illness have slowed me down some, I still crave creative stimulation,” she says. “I hope I can still absorb myself in those pursuits until it’s time to go.”

“We worked constantly for four years and when we weren’t doing seasons of tours, we were The Seekers onstage in the UK in 2014 during their sold-out Golden Jubilee tour. in the recording studio. It was exhausting.” So, in July 1968, Durham parted ways with The Seekers to With her departure, The Seekers Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at pursue her own career disbanded, although the group reformed Montgomery, Ala, and has written features, (www.judithdurham.com). over the years with various replacement columns, and interviews for over 650 newspapers and magazines.

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

June 2018

BOOM!

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BOOM June 2018  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM June 2018  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine