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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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August 2015

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When John had a heart attack, he chose Jackson Hospital—the first and only hospital in Alabama to be certified by the Joint Commission for the treatment of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). This distinction means that heart attack patients like John are treated by a team of experts who are committed to providing the highest level of care in the River Region. When you’re having a heart attack, turn to the one hospital you can trust.

JOHN HILL

Heart Attack Patient

Gold seal of approval in heart attack care

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine jackson.org/heart


HealthNEWS

August 2015

for Boomers and Beyond

Alzheimer’s

Four Things to Know By some estimates, more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, a disease that steals memory and has no cure. And while there is still much to learn about Alzheimer’s, scientists are discovering more about it every day. Here’s a look at four things they know so far: 1. Aging raises risk. Most people with Alzheimer’s are 65 or older. And the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s doubles about every five years after 65. 2. It’s a brain disorder. What causes Alzheimer’s is still a mystery. But scientists do know that in those who have it, nerve cells in the brain lose their ability to function and communicate with each other, and eventually the cells die. Damage to the brain starts more than a decade before symptoms appear. Four different medicines are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people with Alzheimer’s. These drugs all work by regulating brain chemicals that transmit messages between nerve cells. It’s important to know that the medications help mask the symptoms of the disease, but they don’t treat the underlying cause. And they may only be effective for a limited time. 3. Genetics plays a role. In about 5 percent of people with Alzheimer’s, the disease develops early, between ages 30 and 60. In most cases, this early form of Alzheimer’s is caused by changes in one of three genes passed on by a

parent. And most experts believe that additional genes may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s later in life. 4. Healthy choices may protect against it. Some studies suggest that these safeguards may help reduce risk: • Exercising regularly, for example, walking daily. • Eating a diet rich in produce and whole grains and low in saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, such as white sugar. • Staying mentally sharp, for instance, by doing puzzles, reading newspapers and visiting museums and keeping strong social connections. • Lowering high blood pressure and high cholesterol and staying trim. There’s no definite proof yet that these steps can help head off Alzheimer’s. More research is needed. Still, they can boost your overall health, and are clearly in your best interest. If you or someone you love is showing early signs of Alzheimer’s, contact your primary care physician. If you don’t have a primary care physician, call The Jackson Clinic physician referral line at 334-293-8888.

Sources: Alzheimer’s Association; National Institutes of Health

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BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

August 2015

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Volume 6 Issue 2

Carl Bard

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” C.S. Lewis

3 Jackson Hospital’s Health News 8 Publisher’s Letter 10 STOP Sedentary Lifestyle Leigh Anne Richards 12 Lessons from the Past with Brandt McDonald 14 Smoke on the Mountain 16 How to Start a Golden Girls Home page 14

Features

26 Cancer Screenings? When and when not to to have them.

Departments 14 This and That

Now You’re “In the Know”

18 BOOM! Cover Profile 22 Extraordinary Musical Artistry in the River Region

30 BINGE Watching 34 Need to Work in Retirement? Looking for intelligent viewing on TV?

44 {12} Things

Solutions for Bored Boomers

More retirees than ever intend to keep working past traditional retirement age.

24 New Treatment for “Double Chin” Dr. Michael Bowman 28 Can You Live Without a Living Will? Ask an Elder Law Attorney 32 Will Insurance Cover my Hearing Aids?

38 Greg Budell BON BALAYAGE

35 Can Coconut Oil Save You from Alzheimer’s Disease?

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41 Ask Nancy: Who to Call When the Caregiver Needs Help

COVER PROFILE page 18

42 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Going Nuts! page 45

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46 Good Habits to Cultivate in Your Grandchildren

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BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 6398 Eastwood Glen Pl., Montgomery, AL 36117. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2015 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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Publisher’s Letter

Meals on Wheels The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com Jim Watson, Publisher

Associate Editor Kelly Watson kelly@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Sandi Aplin Tracy Bhalla Dottie Kenady Blair Dr. Michael Bowman Greg Budell

This month’s BOOM! profile is Dottie Kenady Blair. Dottie has made a contribution to the River Region in ways many of us will never know. One of her most important contributions is her service to the Montgomery Area Council On Aging (MACOA), where she resides as chairman of the board of directors. As a volunteer she encourages 100’s of other volunteers to serve 100’s of hot meals each week through Meals on Wheels which helps feed homebound seniors who are unable to prepare meals. This program provides much-needed nutrition, a warm welcome, daily contact with seniors in need, and serves as a means to regularly check up on their welfare. For seniors who are unable to prepare meals, the program is a blessing and it gives a sense of security because of its regular personal contact.

Dottie and many others simply provide hot meals and friendly faces to people who might not have either if not for the volunteers at MACOA. You can give something to this effort as well. This month is The Maine Event fundraiser, their 16th annual. All you have to do is go to the their website at macoa.org and order live lobsters for you and your friends and the proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels. Lobsters need to be ordered by the 14th for pickup on the 21st of August. I hope you’ll support Dottie and the hundred’s of volunteers who provide hot meals to our seniors through The Maine Event. More importantly, become one of the friendly faces who delivers Meals on Wheels! Dottie is involved with other organizations in the River Region and she is a good example of positive aging by giving to others. I hope you take a few minutes and get to know Dottie in this month’s Q and A. She’ll inspire you to serve others.

Allan Fallow Brandt McDonald Mark Miller Judy Peres Leigh Anne Richards Katie Slade Brittany Spahr Nancy Stein Raley L. Wiggins

There are many other good reads this month. One in particular is for those folks who may need to work in retirement, the advice is to think small. Another article of interest is a new product that will help with that “double chin”, I know, it’s about time! But one of my favorites is a feature to help me with my favorite pastime, “Binge Watching”. Of course, at my age there aren’t many things I can binge on so watching every episode of every season of a quality TV show in a week is my kind viewing pleasure these days. Anyway, we have a dozen suggestions for you to “Binge Watch”...Enjoy!

Cover Photography

There are plenty of insightful columns from our experts including doing something about your sedentary lifestyle, eating more nuts and thinking about your living will. As you have come to expect, there’s plenty more to enjoy in the River Region’s best reading experience for the 50+ community! Thanks again for being part of our BOOM! Community and allowing us to share stories with you.

Kim Bethea Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Jim jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Design & Layout Lake House Graphics

Distribution Network Delivery

Printing Publications Press, Montgomery, AL 334.244.0436

Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

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STOP the Sedentary Lifestyle We are all aware of the benefits of regular exercise and the importance of meeting The American College of Sports Medicine guidelines on physical activity. I have written numerous articles and spoken to many organizations about these guidelines. However, research is finding that even those who acquire 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity most days of the week may still be at risk for death and disease if they engage in excessive amounts of sedentary behavior for the remainder of the day. Prolonged sedentary behavior also may contribute to chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and Type 2 Diabetes. If we assume that we sleep about 8 hours a night, and then do the minimum of 30 minutes of the physical activity recommendations what do we do the rest of our 15-16 waking hours? What about the nearly 50% of the Americans that do not meet the 150 minutes or more of aerobic physical activity in the week? It is very alarming because current trends have shown a dramatic increase in sedentary behavior during the last 40 years. How is sedentary behavior defined? According to the Sedentary Behavior Research Network “any walking activity characterized by energy expenditure less than 1.5 metabolic equivalents (METS) and/or a sitting or reclining posture. Total sedentary behavior refers to the total accumulated time spent sedentary per day, whereas prolonged sedentary behavior refers to continuous bouts of sitting/reclining while watching television and/or working on the computer. A recent study found that children and adults spend more than 7.5 hours per day of total sedentary time. As one ages, that number alarmingly goes up. Historic trends indicate how lifestyles have changed over the past 60 years as a result of transportation, technology and jobs. We ride everywhere we go, we spend time watching TV and playing on the computer,

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and most jobs require little to no activity; hence, our lack of physical activity during the day. This sedentary behavior does not come without consequences. It is necessary we educate people on all the benefits of exercise but it may be even more beneficial to educate them on the

Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne Richards

negative consequences of prolonged sedentary behavior. Of course the risk of weight gain and obesity are linked to sedentary behavior but it is also associated with increased death from cardiovascular disease, and metabolic variable such as: Men and Women • Increase in waist circumference • Increase in blood pressure • Increase in plasma glucose Women • Increase in body mass index • Increase in fasting glucose • Increase in triglycerides • Increase in high density lipoproteins Interestingly, several studies have shown a dose response relationship such that the greater amounts of total time spent sitting resulted in increased risk of disease. For example, a group of women demonstrated that for each 2 hour per day increase in time spent watching TV, there was a 23% increase in risk of obesity and a 14% increase in risk for Type 2 Diabetes. It is imperative that we encourage various short bursts of movements into daily routine in addition to moderate to vigorous physical activity. Replacing prolonged sedentary time with multiple short breaks has contributed to improvements in blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides and glucose metabolism, even when the activities are

light intensity. One study even showed a 12% decrease in risk of Type 2 Diabetes for each two hour per day increase in spent time standing or walking around the home. These physical activity breaks are not designed to increase physical fitness but they will aid in the reduction of risk factors for many chronic diseases. Presently there are no documented specific guidelines in the US to reduce total sedentary behavior in adults but here are a few suggestions • Every 60 minutes get up from the seated position and walk around the house, yard, office, etc • If you are talking on the phone, stand up • Get up and march or do something during commercials • Choose active games to play like charades instead of sedentary games • Wash dishes by hand • Stand up and fold laundry • Do “active chores”- mow the yard, vacuum, mop, rake leaves, work in the garden • Use the stairs in your house as an exercise tool • Park farther away from the place you are going • Take the stairs rather than elevator • If you work within walking distance of restaurants, walk rather than order in for lunch • Take activity breaks- not coffee breaks. Bottom line- Reduce prolonged sedentary behavior to no more than 60 minutes at a time and break it up with bouts of any intensity activity. One of the best ways to monitor you physical activity is to invest in a physical activity tracking device, such as a pedometer or any of the new devices such as a Fit Bit. There are even a number of “apps” on the phone which you can log your activity. Let me give you an example of how the Fit Bit helped my husband. My husband has a very sedentary job. Yes, he exercises 4-5 days a week, but most of his total day is sedentary. Then his weekends have a lot of sitting because he is tired. I bought him a Fit Bit for his birthday and he got to see how much activity he was NOT doing. Now, he has a goal of the The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


number of steps a day that he wants to do and he does whatever he has to so he can get those steps in. There is less sitting time on the weekends now because he wants to get his steps in for that day and meet his goal. The Fit Bit has just made him aware of being more active throughout the day. Our goal is to get 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week. But we must remember how important that although we may reach that goal and beyond, we are not exempt from the poor health effects associated with sedentary behavior after we are finished with our daily “structured exercise.” Everyone will benefit from reducing sedentary time and incorporating physical activity breaks into the day. Sources: “Improving Health by Breaking up Continuous Bouts of Sedentary Behavior.” ACSM’s Health and Fitness Journal, Vol 19, # 2, Starkoss, B. Ph. D., Lenz, E, Ph.D., 14-19. Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General ManagerMetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

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Lessons from the Past Recently, I spent 10 days in England and had an opportunity to visit some extraordinary places that most people only get to read about. The castles and cathedrals all over England were truly breathtaking. One in particular, The Tower of London built by William the Conqueror in 1078 is full of history. But, I think the most significant piece of history for me centers on a man named Sir Thomas More. It was here that he was held captive for his faith and refused to acknowledge King Henry the VIII as the head of the Church of England. Keep in mind that Sir More was the Vice Chancellor of England (something like second in command). After his trial, he was sentenced to death by decapitation. Prior to his execution he said ““the king’s good servant, but God’s first.” As I research and study the economics of the U.S. economy on a daily basis, I am always cognizant of the fact that we are a country with freedoms like none other. And, yes that includes religious freedom. But it only exists because we, as a people continue to hold our leaders accountable in a unique system of checks and balances designed to preserve freedom. There’s no question in my mind that the beginning of every economics discussion must have at its heart a belief and a trust that we as a people will continue to play a vital role through collective individualism in order to preserve a perfect union without the threat of death under treason. God Bless America. And, in the spirit of religious freedom, I even lit a prayer candle in the Salisbury Chapel. What a gorgeous cathedral!! While I was away on my visit, I also had the privilege of watching the Greek negotiations from an English perspective. There’s no question that there isn’t much love lost for the Greeks in England. The Greek government made ridiculous promises over the past many decades that have now come home to haunt its citizenry. Without a deal with the European Union and the International

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Monetary Fund, it was highly likely that the Greece would have been the first country to exit the EU. They would have adopted a new currency (Drachma) and witnessed rampant inflation, while losing approximately 25% of their economy at the same time. The deal that was reached was the latest version of “kicking the can down the road.” I can assure you the problems in Greece have not gone away and I feel confident that we will hear all about Greece sometime again next with year. But, at least for Brandt McDonald now, one of my three

Financial Thoughts

big concerns is off the table. I suspect the European Central Bank will continue with their own version of QE by printing a 1T Euros per year in order to stimulate the region’s growth rate. Now we are left with watching China and U.S. corporate earnings.

As of this writing, China continues to muddle through a massive deceleration in its growth rate, while they grapple with a broken credit system and a historic real estate crash. The economic backdrop in China continues to put pressure on U.S. multinational companies as exhibited in the most recent earnings releases. So far, we have seen disappointing earnings reports from United Technologies, IBM, Microsoft, Caterpillar, and yes, even Apple Computer. In a fundamental environment of weak earnings like this, it will be hard for Janet Yellen to raise interest rates. However, she has indicated that most likely the US Federal Reserve will indeed move in September to raise interest rates for the first time in over 8 years. One has to expect a sizable shift in capital flows as a result. Now, more than ever, it is imperative for retirees to aggressively look over their

retirement plans and make the necessary adjustments to contemplate a rapidly changing investment landscape in the coming years. Timing of returns is critical when you factor in ongoing systematic withdrawals from retirement accounts. For example, a ten percent correction, combined with a 5% withdrawal means a 15% decrease in account value in one year!! That is hard to recover from. So, I strongly encourage vigilance. Of course, our team here at McDonald, Barranco, and Hagen has the talent and the processes to assist you with building a long-term plan, customized to your personal stage in life and unique circumstances. We may not be able to help you build a castle like the Tower of London!! But, we certainly want to help you build a lasting legacy like Sir Thomas More. Rest assured, we are committed to keeping you from getting your head chopped off!! Everything we have experienced to this point in life is a rehearsal for the life that begins tomorrow. The lessons of the past help us learn from mistakes and prepare us all for a better tomorrow. We look forward to an opportunity to help you along life’s journey. Until next time, remember to never run with the herd, always be thankful, and look to the future with anticipation of what’s yet to come.

Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager MBCapitalWealth.com Direct comments and questions to bailey.worrell@lpl.com or 334.387.0094

Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The opinions expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the views of LPL Financial.

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Beloved Musical Smoke on the Mountain Will Open to Sell Out Audiences The Wetumpka Depot Players are sending out smoke signals to River Region theatre patrons. The awardwinning, Off-Broadway musical is returning to the Depot stage in celebration of the Depot’s 35th Anniversary Season. Smoke on the Mountain, has become a worldwide hit, with its heartfelt gospel songs and down-toearth characters, this musical is a celebration of life, love and bluegrass gospel at its finest. Set in 1938, the delightful show introduces the singing Sanders family, who perform their traditional and bluegrass gospel songs for the members of the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Mount Pleasant, NC in their return to the gospel circuit. Pastor Oglethorpe welcomes the family to the church, where their individual stories and testimonies are shared during the concert. The audience serves as the members of the congregation. “The music in this show is recognizable to audience members who grew up in country churches around the South but certainly still enjoyable to those that didn’t,” said director, Hazel Jones. “ The cast brings to life over 30 gospel/ bluegrass hymns that range from the familiar ( I’ll Fly Away) to the not so familiar ( Christian Cowboy).” Many performances are sold out but tickets remain on the following dates: August 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20 and 21st all at 7:30 pm. Box office hours are 9-3pm Wednesday- Friday at 300 S Main Street, in Downtown Wetumpka. Reservations may be made by calling the box office at 334.868.1440 or wetumpkadepot.com.

Vicarious Vacations - Beat the heat with our exotic travel series Beat the sultry summer weather with Vicarious Vacations at Old Alabama Town! Enjoy themed refreshments and Learn about distant lands as our seasoned travelers take you all over the world, from the Maldives to Turks and Caicos. Take a vacation without leaving Montgomery! Sponsored by Landmarks Foundation, these adventures are free to the public. Join us Saturdays in August at 11 am in the Hobbs Auditorium at the Loeb Reception Center, 301 Columbus St. Aug 1 - Cruising from Santiago to Buenos Aires Aug 8 - Exploring Underground Alabama, Aug 15 - An Escape to the Maldives, Aug 22 Trekking El Camino de Santiago, Aug 29 - Finding Paradise in Turks and Caicos For more info call 334.240.4500 or visit oldalabamatown.com

ARMS Chair Concert featuring Chuck Mead After leading several popular ‘80s cult bands in and around his hometown of Lawrence, Kansas, Chuck Mead landed on Nashville’s Lower Broadway where he co-founded the famed ‘90s Alternative Country quintet BR549. The band’s seven albums, three Grammy nominations and the Country Music Association Award for Best Overseas Touring Act would build an indelible bridge between authentic American Roots music and millions of fans worldwide. In 2009, he released his acclaimed solo debut album, Journeyman’s Wager, and toured clubs, concert halls and international Rock, Country and Rockabilly festivals with his band The Grassy Knoll Boys. The concert is September 3rd at Kiwanis Park, at Old Alabama Town, For more information visit chuckmead.com or alabamarootsmusic.com

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Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School Celebrates Retirement of Lynn Downes Montgomery Catholic Preparatory School hosted a retirement party for Lynn Jehle Downes in the Middle/High School campus library. Attended by her family, collegues and long-time friends, Lynn says good-bye to Montgomery Catholic after 31 years of dedicated service to the school. She began her roll as an administrative assistant in the 1980’s to then high school principal Thomas Doyle. She stayed on with the school as it transitioned to a regional K-12 Catholic school and served under three school presidents, Thomas Doyle, Faustin Weber and current president Anne Ceasar in the Business Office. Ceasar said, “ Lynn epitomizes someone who has a life long love for this school, as a student, parent and employee. She has always supported and relished all that is good about Catholic education, and we wish her much happiness in her retirement.” She presented Lynn with a painting by Diddy Vucovich, “Madonna and Child” as a gift from the school.

Good friends and Montgomery Catholic Alumni helped Lynn celebrate her retirement. Suzanne Bell, Lynn, Deanie Allen, Kay Hassett and Lynne Irwin.

Lynn is a 1963 graduate of Montgomery Catholic, known as St. Mary of Loretto then. Her three sons, Jeff Downes of Vestavia Hills, Greg Downes of Cumming, Georgia and Scott Downes of Atlanta, Georgia are all Montgomery Catholic graduates as well. Montgomery Catholic has been a part of Lynn’s life since first grade. Lynn said, “for all the years I spent as a student at St. Mary’s of Loretto and the years spent as a student at Catholic High, I was blessed with many teachers who instilled in me knowledge, values, and special memories that will continue to be in my heart and life forever! I cherish those days! Church activities, extracurricular events and school events were my life! While attending Catholic High, I never dreamed that one day I would again be a part of the school which formed my foundation. God led me to Montgomery Catholic 31 years ago.”

FREE Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop August 26th Wednesday, August 26: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30 - 3:30 pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. Call 334.625.6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at www.redoaklegalpc.com.

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Book Review: How to Start a Golden Girls Home Join the movement! Golden Girls living is taking off nationwide! Sharing your home and life with others provides the opportunity for laughter, companionship, and financial and emotional support as you go down that crooked path called life. Have an extra room? Would you like to find another woman or man to live with? Want to try it? There is nothing to lose and a lot to gain. Curious yet? It’s a great idea for a group of mature adults to live together—men and women—and it’s called a “GOLDEN GIRLS HOME.” This book offers guidance on how to make your home attractive to roommates, questions to ask in an interview, how to handle pets, boyfriends, and other tricky situations, as well as hundreds of other tips about seniors sharing homes! Plus, it includes sample applications, leases, and other great resources. If you’re considering starting a Golden Girls home, but not sure where to start—or are thinking about shared housing but aren’t quite sure if it’s for you—you must read this book! This book draws on the experiences of shared housing expert Bonnie Moore—both in her own GOLDEN GIRLS HOME and those of the many members of Golden Girls Network. What others say: “Shared Living is an important new possibility for mature women. The Golden Girls Network book contains many practical ideas and is a must read.” — Marianne Kilkenny, author of Your Quest for Home: A Guidebook to Find the Ideal Community for Your Later Years; “Shared Living for mature adults is a critical addition to aging-in-place efforts. Golden Girls Network is making it happen.” — Dr. Patrick Roden, creator of AginginPlace.com; “If you are considering sharing your home with roommates, you simply must read this book. As someone who has lived with roommates successfully for nearly eight years, Moore is well equipped to guide other women on the ins and outs of sharing a home.”— Josephine Brown, Maryland homeowner and Golden Girls Network member. You can learn more at goldengirlsnetwork.com or purchase the book at amazon.com Chef Randy will introduce attendees to many of his favorite vendors, discuss tips and tricks to navigating the curb market and simple meals using fresh curb market fruits and vegetables. Attendees are asked to meet Chef Randy (look for the cowboy hat!) in the front of the Montgomery Curb Market at 10am. This class will take place every other Saturday on: August 8 and August 22 at 10am. Reservations are not required. For more information visit Central’s website at central129coosa.com or email info@central129coosa.com.

Synovus One of America’s Most Reputable Banks

Alan Worrell, Sterling Bank president and CEO

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Synovus Bank, which operates in Montgomery and the River Region as Sterling Bank, has been named one of America’s most reputable banks by the American Banker/Reputation Institute Survey of Bank Reputations. Of 32 banks included in the survey, Synovus was one of three ranked in the top 10 among both customers and noncustomers. “We are proud of the way the Sterling Bank team cares for customers throughout the Montgomery and River Region,” added Alan Worrell, Sterling Bank president and CEO. “We are also proud to be part of a company that places as much value and emphasis on serving people and giving back to our communities as we do the delivery of quality, competitive products and services.” Synovus ranked fifth with customers and 10th with non-customers for its positive reputation. In addition, Synovus is one of eight banks with numeric rankings in the “excellent” category among customers, meaning scores of 80 or greater. This is the first year the Reputation Institute has seen banks score in the 80s. For more info visit sterlingmontgomery.synovus.com

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Gee’s Bend Quilters Recipients of Nation’s Highest Award in the Folk and Traditional Arts

Loretta Pettway

Mary Lee Bendolph

Lucy Mingo

The community of Boykin, Alabama, known to many as Gee’s Bend due to its proximity to a bend in the Alabama River, is home to some of the most highly regarded quiltmakers in America. These include Mary Lee Bendolph, Lucy Mingo, and Loretta Pettway, three of the chief quilters from the oldest generation of quilters who represent this profound cultural legacy. Described by the New York Times as “some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced,” the quilts are known for their improvisational and inventive quality, often being compared to 20th-century abstract paintings. To learn more visit arts.gov/honors/heritage

Rescued Relics: Montgomery’s Salvage Warehouse While restoring and maintaining the 50 historic structures nestled at Old Alabama Town—an authentic 19th century village located in the heart of Montgomery, Alabama’s historic downtown—the Landmarks Foundation has initiated an innovative recycling project to complement its preservation efforts. Since taking on its first historic restoration project for the City of Montgomery in 1967, Landmarks has come across many interior and exterior later-added components that must be removed to accomplish an authentic restoration. Not wanting to pollute the public landfill with perfectly good items, Landmarks established Rescued Relics—a not-forprofit salvage warehouse offering many historic architectural elements and materials from a variety of building styles and time periods. Rescued Relics is ideal for those working on home renovation projects around central Alabama. From the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement, the capital The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

city of Montgomery is rich with historic homes and communities reflecting important eras of American history. Rescued Relics allows local homeowners to purchase fixtures and hardware native to their homes—while also offering those with more modern houses a unique and inexpensive home supply store. The inventory at Rescued Relics includes—but is definitely not limited to—sinks, doors, light fixtures, mantels, window sashes, balustrades and many other fun items that ignite the creativity of home renovators. For those who have just completed a restoration project on a historic home, Rescued Relics accepts pre-1960s building materials and elements from other home renovators, contractors and remodelers. Such donations are tax deductable, as all proceeds directly benefit Landmarks/ Old Alabama Town—a 501c3 non-profit organization. All funds raised are used

to restore and maintain the historic structures at Old Alabama Town. Rescued Relics is conveniently located in historic downtown Montgomery at 423 Madison Avenue, near Interstates 85 and 65. Parking is plentiful. Hours are Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers are needed to assist in organizing the revolving inventory and establishing regular business hours. For more information, please call 334.240.4512. R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

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BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Dottie Kenady Blair, Enthusiastically Serving This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Dottie Kenady Blair. Dottie has been a part of the Montgomery area for 38 years and her participation in our community as a business owner and volunteer have added something special to it’s quality of life. She has provided a vitality to three specific organizations that have significant impact on how we measure our community, AUM, Montgomery Area Council on Aging (MACOA) and Leadership Montgomery. It seems very clear that Dottie abides by the philosophical advice she shares with us in her Q and A, which is “The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you never expect to sit.” Dottie does this very thing enthusiastically and provides a model for any of us searching for purpose in our retirement years. We hope you enjoy getting to know Dottie as much as we have in this month’s Cover Profile, she may also inspire you to step up and serve! BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Dottie: I was born and raised in Alexander City, AL and attended Benjamin Russell High School. I attended what is now Central Alabama Community College for one year and moved to Montgomery in 1974. I worked as a secretary for the State of Alabama for a while and later worked at Maxwell AFB. I attended AUM in the evenings. In 1978 I moved to Nellis AFB in Las Vegas, NV and continued my studies at UNLV .I do not have children. I have two nieces and a nephew and their families in Alexander City. I am married to Glen Zorn, Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries for Alabama. Through that marriage I got three grandchildren, Jansen and Curt Zorn, and Foster Weeks. They live in Opp, AL. Glen got two cats, Sam and Stella. BOOM!: As a graduate of Auburn Montgomery, with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and your M.B.A., you have become a serious supporter of

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On a recent trip to Sea Island, Ga with friends Jimmy Martin, Cherie Martin, Susan Moore, me and Glen Zorn (my husband)

all things AUM, would you share some of this passion with our readers? Dottie: I am a proud two time graduate of AUM. The courses I took at UNLV were transferred back to AUM and I received my undergraduate degree in l981. I was a non-traditional college student, working during the day and attending school in the evenings. Many AUM students are non- traditional so I identify with them. I personally feel that if had not been for AUM and especially the assistance of Dean Clark at the School of Business working with me to assure I took the proper courses at UNLV that would transfer back to AUM I would not have completed my undergraduate degree. I feel a great allegiance to AUM and this is an exciting time at the university. I am so happy to be able to support the University. I have served on many search committees, the most recent one being for the new dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. I serve on the AUM National Cabinet for the AUM

Comprehensive Campaign and am an emeritus member of the Chancellor’s Advisory Board. I had the privilege of delivering the commencement address at the spring graduation this past May. I also serve on the Board of Directors of the Auburn University Foundation Board and the Auburn University Real Estate Foundation. This has given me the opportunity to learn the Auburn campus better and work with some inspiring and generous fellow board members. Working with Carolyn Golden, Vice Chancellor for Advancement at AUM and her team, and Jane DiFolco Parker, Vice President of the Auburn Office of Development and the development team at Auburn has been an awesome experience. These people, who can raise enormous amounts of dollars and LOVE doing it, amaze me every day. BOOM!: You are a retired businesswoman who operated a business in the healthcare industry, what types of challenges will aging Baby Boomers present to the healthcare field?

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Dottie: By 2030 the percentage of the U. time consuming if you do it right. You sense of renewal in your life? Any advice S. population over 65 will be almost 20%, won’t be fulfilled and the organization for the rest of us seeking renewal? up from 13% you are volunteering for won’t be served currently. The well if you do not have a passion for that Dottie: My good news is “cause”. advice is to that “65 isn’t open your what it used BOOM!: How do you like to relax and eyes and to be”. I’m wind down from a hard day’s work? look around only three long before years away Dottie: Even though I don’t have an eight you plan to and my body to five job anymore there are not many retire. Some and my brain days when I’m not busy. Glen and I enjoy people are still think I’m dining out with friends, and when weather defined by 35! There will permits, just sitting on our back porch their careers be challenges having a nice glass of wine, talking about but it is wise on our health our day and watching our cats, Sam and to give some care system Stella. thought into and community what you My nieces. Candi Britton, me, Blair Dunn, Kim Dunn organizations to BOOM!: Favorite vacation spot? Any are going provide enough travel dreams planned for the future? to do after doctors, nurses, caregivers, housing, food, that career ends. Second careers, etc. to take care of the “frail elderly” Dottie: I’ve been blessed to travel to many volunteering, travel. There are many (either physically or financially or both). places in this ways to live a It’s not like we didn’t know this was world but have busy and full life coming. Awareness is the key. Kym Klass many left to after our “work at the Montgomery Advertiser recently get to. The life” is over, but, did a week-long series, called “Project British Isles are as in most things 7: aiding our seniors”. I urge everyone my favorite so in life, it takes to read it. ASU recently hosted a Bridge far. I have been some thought and Builders breakfast educating the public there a few planning. on an ever increasing problem, elder times. As for abuse. We as a community need to make quick getaways, BOOM!: What educating ourselves on these issues a we love Destin. are you most priority. We are all most likely going to I have recently passionate about? be there one day, either an active senior completed or frail elderly, perhaps both at different renovation Dottie: I’m times in our life. Knowledge is power! on our condo passionate about My book club. Donna Robins, me, Barbara Anderson, Susan Beecham, Pam Stephan, Joan DiLaura, Pat Franklin. down there everything I do, On the flipand that is side, there are where you will find us anytime we can get whether it’s great career a few days away. We have a two week trip volunteering, opportunities to France with friends coming up soon. travelling, or and business hanging out opportunities BOOM!: You are a dedicated community with friends in meeting leader, giving back much of your time to and family. the needs of organizations that enhance the quality of If I’m not active seniors life in the River Region, such as MACOA passionate and the frail and Leadership Montgomery. Would about elderly. you help our readers better understand something what these organizations do for our I don’t do it BOOM!: Many community? How can they participate? (cooking and Boomers are gardening experiencing a Dottie: I did not attend the Leadership come to mind). renewed sense Montgomery class until I was 57 years Especially in My cats, Sam orange, Stella black of purpose, old. It was one of the most interesting board service. new goals, and rewarding experiences I have had Being an new careers…how would you describe this in Montgomery. I met many people I effective board member is hard work and

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would probably have never met had it years in my board term. MACOA is on the Dottie: Although I was not born and raised not been for LM. I had lived here 35 move. Under the direction of our amazing here I have lived here for 38 of the last years by the time I completed my class Executive Director, Donna Marietta, and 41 years. I have developed some deep and I learned so much about this city a hard working board we have developed roots in the community. Montgomery is that I didn’t know. I now serve on the a strategic plan to guide us through the a perfect size city, not to big, not to small, LM Board of Directors so I continue to next five years and we have some lofty and has many cultural, sports and civic learn from and work with leaders who are goals. Serving this organization is truly opportunities available. Also, location, dedicated to the betterment of our city a labor of love. We currently have over location, location. We are centrally and preparing young located so one can take short trips to lots professionals to step into of fun and interesting places. I don’t like leadership roles in the to be more than three hours from a beach future. We say that you so Montgomery is perfect for that. don’t graduate FROM Leadership Montgomery, BOOM!: As you’ve aged, how have your you graduate INTO ambitions changed? it. Graduates from the Torchbearers Class Dottie: My ambitions have not changed. (young professionals) I have always been motivated by serving, and the Legacy Class are whether it is in the coffee shop at my encouraged to take on church or as a chairman of a board. volunteer and leadership Through my business I served the frail roles in our community. elderly and/or homebound seniors by According to a recent providing them qualified, compassionate My fall hiking class at AUM Lifelong Learning Institute. I’m bottom right. Taken at Russell Crossroads near Kowaliga LM poll, approximately caregivers, allowing them to remain in 148 volunteers/alumni their homes, OR move into a beautiful members reported devoting over 3390 400 seniors on a waiting list for meals. assisted living facility if that better met hours of volunteer service in the river This list can be whittled down with more their needs. Of course, in my business region in one year alone. Over 60% of volunteers to deliver meals. We have over I had to provide excellent service AND the Torchbearers class members and 500 volunteers delivering meals and 30 make a profit. No profit, no business. I alumni participated as volunteers on corporate route partners. Any individual still work hard to serve others, only my civic and faith based boards, community or business interested in learning more compensation has changed. Rather than councils, committees or focus groups, about MACOA and how to volunteer being paid in dollars, I am paid in the pure representing hundreds of non-profits. should visit macoa.org. And don’t forget joy of serving and seeing the results. This equates to over $2 million in value to call 263-0532 and for the community. Our Executive place your lobster BOOM!: Director, Dr. Cheryl Carter, is an awardorder for our “Maine Give us winning ED of leadership organizations. Event” coming up three words Leadership Montgomery is the place August 21st. that describe to be! For more information go to you? Leadershipmontgomery.org. BOOM!: Is there any dream job out there Dottie: I Shortly after I graduated from LM I that you would come polled some was asked to serve on the board of the out of retirement for? friends and Montgomery Area Council on Aging the three (MACOA). We’re the “Meals on Wheels” Dottie: We never know words that people currently delivering 367 hot meals what the future holds came up the five days a week to homebound seniors but as of now I do not Dottie Blair-MACOA Board President, Karen Campbell-14th Annual most were in Montgomery. Last year we served a know of a job I would Swinging Fore Seniors Signature Event Sponsor, Donna Marietta-MACOA energetic, Executive Director, and Russ Dunman-MACOA Board Member total of 563 clients. We also administer take if it meant I had to caring, and the Retired Senior Volunteer Program give up my community FUN. (RSVP) in a five county area surrounding involvement. I WOULD like to serve the river region. The RSVP volunteers on for-profit or corporate boards. My BOOM!: Do you have any hobbies or other must volunteer in non-profits, schools, education, business experience and board activities that grab your attention? or medical facilities. Last year the RSVP experience have prepared me well if that volunteered over 191,000 hours to 144 opportunity should come my way. Dottie: I have always been a reader and organizations. We also operate two have been a member of the “Martinis senior centers where seniors can go to BOOM!: What is it about living in the and Manuscripts” book group for 14 socialize and have lunch. I will complete Montgomery River Region area that you years. The women in this group are a my second term as Chairman of the Board like? special part of my life. Under our fearless in September, but still have a few more

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leader, Barbara Anderson, we read and lead a hiking class in the fall and winter discuss some great (and sometimes not so semesters. We go up to Lake Martin or great) award-winning books, socialize and up past Wetumpka, hike for a couple usually solve at least one of the world’s of hours, get to know each other, and problems before the evening is over. Glen always stop for a late lunch on our way and I enjoy kayaking when the weather back to Montgomery. I have met some of is nice at the beach. I am an avid hiker in the most interesting people in my hiking the fall and winter. I have been a member class. The staff at AUM and the volunteer of Frazer UMC for 26 years. However, we leaders of OLLI at AUM (its new name) like have attended the Destin UMC “Beach Ken Fuhrman, Carol Alford and others do Worship” all the hard work. more this summer BOOM!: Technology is than we have rooted in almost every Frazer. We aspect of our lives and spend Auburn many folks over 50 are home game reluctant to embrace it… weekends in how’s your relationship Auburn and with technology? attend Auburn UMC, but Dottie: I absolutely Susanne Trest from Wynlakes cc and Greg Barnes from Frazer is my embrace it. I love Facebook Montgomery public schools. Orientation for Class XXXII of LM. I am board member. home church. because I have reconnected with classmates, long-lost cousins and BOOM!: Could you describe the Lifelong former acquaintances I had lost touch Learning Institute? What’s your role with. I really love to see everyone’s travel there? pics. I recently went on a virtual trip to Vietnam and Cambodia with one friend Dottie: The Lifelong Learning Institute at and Tasmania and Australia with another, AUM began five years ago. It is a great all free of charge, just by seeing their pics environment for people over 50 and on FB. Texting makes life so much more retirees to meet new friends and take efficient. It’s much better than playing courses on subjects ranging from finance telephone tag. In my life, FB and texting to religion to dancing to golf and many don’t replace social interaction with others, including hiking! It is learning friends and family, they just make it so just for the joy of learning, no tests, no much easier to arrange AND widen the homework. I only do the fun part. I people in my circle. Doodle Poll is great

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for setting up meetings. The Bluetooth technology in my car that allows me to make phone calls without touching my phone is wonderful. I can get a lot of work done going and coming from Destin. Sometimes Siri doesn’t understand my “southern” so my friends know if they get a crazy text from me I am dictating it. I must admit that I don’t get that whole # thing, though. BOOM!: Would you give some advice to those readers who are looking forward to retirement? Any lessons learned? Dottie: Two pieces of practical advice. 1) Don’t retire without an idea of what you want to do next to fill your days and fuel your life. 2) Unless you are wealthy enough to self-insure, please purchase good long-term care insurance that covers care in a facility AND in your own home. Medicare does NOT pay for long-term care. On a more philosophical level, I’ll share my favorite quote: “The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you never expect to sit.” Nelson Henderson (a second generation Manitoba farmer) We want to thank Dottie for sharing her story with us this month. Please share your comments with Dottie at dkblair1@gmail.com and as always, thanks to Kim Bethea from Total Image Portraits for her professional cover photo of Dottie. If you have questions, comments or suggestions about our cover profiles, including nominating someone, please send them to jim@riverregionboom.com

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Quarteto Casals

Extraordinary Musical Artistry in the River Region The Montgomery Chamber Music Organization (MCMO) anticipates an exciting 55th Anniversary Season. It is bringing to Montgomery and to the River Region some of the world’s greatest music performed by internationally acclaimed chamber ensembles. The extraordinarily talented artists on MCMO’s 2015-2016 series will perform music spanning four centuries. The music will range from the Baroque period to the 21st Century. A variety of exciting programming characterizes each of the concerts from the opening performance by the Spanish quartet, Cuarteto Casals to the closing concert by the Russian Hermitage Piano Trio. The other two ensembles highlight the variety of performance experience represented by each group. Returning for their eighth appearance on our series is the quintessential Juilliard String Quartet. It is celebrating 68 years of performances to world- wide audiences. The Dover String Quartet is in their tenth year of concertizing. However, all of these ensembles perform regularly on the great music stages across the world.

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From its beginning MCMO’s mission remains unchanged. In 1950 three ladies, all from Montgomery, dreamed of bringing to Montgomery the finest chamber music concerts from around the world. Their dream started large and even though experiencing a few difficult early years, they succeeded through their dedication and hard work. In 1960 the organization was incorporated and the name changed to Montgomery Chamber Music Organization. 55 years later we are still celebrating their success.

the beauty of this music in an intimate setting. The 2015-2016 Season for Montgomery Chamber Music Organization is as follows:

Chamber music is generally explained as music written for a small ensemble with no two parts doubled and no conductor. At the heart of chamber music is the spirit of collaboration emphasizing the role of the individual player. It is often described as a musical dialogue or musical conversation between instruments. Chamber music rests on the collaborative talent, knowledge and experience of the performers. They share equally the process of bringing the music to perfection in its performance.

A Reception follows the first three concerts where the audience may meet and talk with the artists. Preceding the last concert on Sunday afternoon, a Spring Luncheon is held in the Café M. Tickets for the luncheon must be purchased separately. All concerts are held at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts.

We invite you to come and experience

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 Quarteto Casals Thursday, November 19, 2015 Juilliard String Quartet Tuesday, February 23, 2016 Dover String Quartet Sunday, April 17, 2016 Hermitage Piano Trio

Please come and enjoy one or all four of the concerts this season. For more information on the concerts and to purchase tickets, please go to our website: montgomerychambermusic.org The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


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Exciting New Treatment for “Double Chin” Hello, This is Dr. Michael Bowman with River Region Facial Plastics. I want to use our column this month to discuss an exciting new product, Kybella™, that we will offer exclusively at River Region Facial Plastics when it is launched this fall. Kybella™ is a new injectable treatment approved by the FDA to reduce submental fullness or “double chin”.

takes less than half an hour and injectable treatment. It is the first doesn’t have too much of a recovery. and only approved injectable drug Your Kybella™ treatment plan (both for contouring moderate to severe dosing and submental number of fullness. treatments) Kybella™ will have is a nonwith the Face MD’s to be human and customized non-animal Dr. Michael Bowman River Region Facial Plastics to help formulation meet your of aesthetic deoxycholic What exactly is submental fullness? goals for acid, This is a clinical term for the excess your improved chin profile. which is a naturally occurring fat that contributes to one’s chin, molecule in the body that aids in often referred to as a “double chin”. Kybella™ has been well tolerated the breakdown and absorption of Submental fullness is a common, it its clinical studies. The most dietary fat. When injected into yet undertreated facial aesthetic common side effects are swelling, the excess subcutaneous fat under condition. It can detract from an bruising, pain, numbness, redness the chin, Kybella™ causes the otherwise balanced and harmonious and formation of areas of destruction of those unwanted fat facial appearance – leading to an hardness in the treatment area. In cells. Once destroyed, those cells are older and clinical trials, the worst side effects permanently heavier look. were noted at the first treatment, removed and For many and the incidence and severity of therefore people this most side effects decreased with they cannot is a stubborn subsequent Kybella™ treatments. store or problem area Kybella™ has been the focus of a accumulate that can be global clinical development program fat. This very resistant involving over twenty clinical studies. means that to all the you should appropriate We, at River Region Facial Plastics, retain long therapies like are excited to be the first facial term results a good healthy plastic surgeons in this area to bring even if your diet, exercise, this exciting treatment to you! If body weight etc. In the you are interested, I hope you will fluctuates in past, I have come in for your own personalized the future had to resort consultation. after your to traditional Kybella™ treatments treatments. Yours in good health, that involve The first and only FDA-approved injectable drug that contours and improves the appearance of “double chin” Michael Bowman MD some form of Although surgery like a it is not facelift and/ an instant We hope you will contact us via email at or liposuction to address this area treatment, many patients Doctors@RiverRegionFacialPlastics.com with depending on your age and anatomy. experience visible results in two to your questions or comments! four treatments. Each treatment I’m very excited about the new session is spaced at least one month option for treatment represented apart; up to six treatments may be by Kybella™. It is indeed a unique administered. Each session typically

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Cancer Screenings? By Judy Peres

What you need to know about when and when not to to have them

An online medical magazine recently invited physicians to test their knowledge of cancer screening tests. The respondents undoubtedly were grateful for their anonymity, because the vast majority flunked. In the first question, a 72-year-old man comes to a new doctor for a routine physical and asks if he should be screened for prostate cancer. He says he has no family history, but his golf partner was recently diagnosed with the disease. Which next step is most appropriate, the Medscape quiz asks. Only 29 percent of respondents got the right answer: Explain to him that prostatespecific antigen (PSA) screening is not recommended for men in his age group. The doctors did a little better on the next question: A 55-year-old healthy man, in for a pre-employment physical after a nine-month period of unemployment, says he has never been screened for colon cancer. He is reluctant to undergo a colonoscopy because his new job does not provide any paid time off. A full 47 percent got the right answer: Order a low-tech take-home test, in which the patient smears a bit of stool on a card in the privacy of his own bathroom. With doctors unlikely to get screening right, it’s no wonder laypeople are at sea. In an attempt to ease the confusion, the American College of Physicians

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them. On the other hand, the treatment for cancer comes with serious side effects, and no one wants to leave a cancer untreated once it’s been detected. The net effect of such a screening test would be harm, or “low value.”

recently issued advice for screening average-risk adults without symptoms for five common cancers: breast, colon, ovary, prostate and cervix. The advice was distilled from the sometimesconflicting guidelines of several eminent medical organizations, including the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Cancer Society. “Many people have a lack of understanding about the trade-offs of screening,” said Dr. Wayne Riley, president of the college, in announcing the new advice, published in May in the Annals of Internal Medicine. “Patients and many physicians overestimate the benefits and are unaware of...the potential harms of cancer screening.” Dr. Kenneth Lin, a family physician at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, agrees. “People think tests are perfect and pick up everything,” Lin said. “But even if we had one that did that, it wouldn’t necessarily be a good thing.” That’s because many of the cancers detected by such a test would never cause health problems, so there’s no benefit to finding

The college of physicians’ calculus for recommending a cancer screening strategy is that it yields “high value,” which it defines as offering benefits that outweigh its harms. Among the high-value tests it recommends are biennial mammograms for women ages 50 to 74 and any one of four colon cancer screening strategies for adults ages 50 to 75. It does not recommend screening average-risk women for ovarian cancer or screening men older than 69 for prostate cancer. Dr. Nortin Hadler of the University of North Carolina, who has written extensively about overtreatment, says people need to understand that screening is useful only if it can “find the cancers that cause us to lose time on this earth.” “If I remove a cancerous breast but the patient dies at the same time of heart disease, there’s no benefit,” Hadler said. “I want to find the cancer I’m going to die from, not with. That challenge turns out to be very difficult. ... Finding cancers that aren’t going to kill us has a very high price.” Breast cancer is not a single disease but a collection of different diseases with The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


different biologies, Hadler said: “Some metastasize before we find them. Some are never going to hurt you. In between are the ones that might be helpful if we found them. But our ability to distinguish is limited, and the likelihood we’ll find the one you want us to find is slim. A tremendous percentage of ‘survivors’ would have survived without a breast cancer diagnosis.”

screening test; it’s a diagnostic test. Dr. Richard Wender, chief of cancer control at the American Cancer Society, said his organization is “100 percent” committed to the concept of high-

If 80 percent of healthy Americans between the ages of 50 and 74 get screened for colon cancer, Wender said, “we will prevent 277,000 cases and 203,000 deaths” from the disease over the next 15 years. Currently, less than 60 percent of the population gets regular screening tests for colon cancer.

But Hadler adds that “high” and “low” value are subjective terms, which is why medical groups have different guidelines. Individuals also may differ on how much benefit they need to receive from a particular test to make its potential downside tolerable. “Every patient should feel empowered to probe the conclusions of various august bodies to arrive at their own definition of value,” he said. “And every physician should be pleased to engage with the patient in such an exercise.” Experts stress that the recommendations for screening apply only to people with no special risk factors and no symptoms of disease. A mammogram performed on a woman who finds a lump is not a The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

of physicians. (The cancer society recommends annual mammography for women starting at age 40, for example.) “The issue isn’t which guideline you follow,” Wender said. “The issue is whether or not you get regular screening. That’s what’s going to save lives.”

Likewise, Wender said, about a third of women have not had a mammogram to screen for breast cancer in the past two years.

value screening and played down the differences between the society’s guidelines and those of the college

On the flip side, the Annals paper points out that overly intensive, low-value screening is common. Some examples: S About one-third of women in their 30s, and 50 percent of those over 80, get mammograms. S Nearly 70 percent of women without a cervix get Pap tests. S Over 1 million U.S. women have ovarian cancer screening. S About 60 percent of adults have colonoscopies more frequently than guidelines recommend. S Half of men ages 75 to 79 had a recent PSA test. Judy Peres is a freelance reporter for the Chicago Tribune. (c)2015 Chicago Tribune, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Ask an Elder Law Attorney By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

Can You Live Without a Living Will? second category includes non-end-of-life A “Do Not Resuscitate Order” (commonly Even among lawyers, there is a lot of decisions, i.e. decisions that do not involve called a “DNR”) is also often confused with confusion regarding which documents withdrawing life sustaining treatment or a living will. In a hospital setting, a patient clients need when it comes to health care artificially provided food and water. will typically receive resuscitation efforts decision making. Adding to the confusion (such as CPR) unless a physician has given is the fact that the names of many of these a “no-code” or “do documents—Living Wills, Advance not resuscitate” Directives, Do Not Resuscitate Orders, order. But such an Healthcare Proxies, and Healthcare Powers of Attorney—are often Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop order is not effective if the patient is (incorrectly) used interchangeably. Wednesday, August 26: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 discharged back into pm at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This the community. So, I thought I would address each of educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins these documents in turn to try and covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living In that case, the clear up some of the confusion. patient must obtain wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, a special doctor’s Let’s start with a Power of Attorney. bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care order called a DNAR A power of attorney (“POA”) is any and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. (Do Not Attempt document in which a principal grants Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at Resuscitation) which an agent the authority to legally www.redoaklegalpc.com. must be issued by act on behalf of the principal. For the physician on example, Joe Q. Client (the principal) a special form obtained from the Health If you don’t appoint an agent pursuant to may give his wife, Jane T. Client (his agent), Department. Unless the patient has a your POA to make healthcare decisions power of attorney to handle business and DNAR and is wearing a DNAR bracelet, for you, then you may draft an Advance financial affairs on his behalf. The POA Joe an EMT is legally required to attempt Directive. This is a document that appoints gave to Jane in this case is probably drafted resuscitation. an agent, called a Health Care Proxy, to very broadly to give Jane a lot of authority. make decisions on your behalf. Unlike a There are a number of issues regarding POA, a Health Care Proxy appointed in On the other hand, you may have executed health care decision making which must be an Advance Directive is limited to making a very limited POA if you have ever traded considered. Most people should have an health care decisions only, and does in a car to a dealership. The dealership will Advance Directive and Living Will as part of not have any financial authority. Stated typically have you sign a POA that gives it their ordinary estate planning documents. differently, your agent under a POA may the limited authority to sign any paperwork We also recommend a separate POA to also qualify as a Health Care Proxy, but necessary to transfer title to your trade-in deal with financial decisions. Individuals your Health Care Proxy appointed by an when they sell it to the next buyer. faced with a terminal illness may also Advance Directive does not qualify as your consider speaking to their physician about financial Agent. But, POA’s aren’t just for financial a DNAR order as well, if appropriate. transactions. Depending upon how it is Finally, you may also have a Living drafted, your POA may include provisions Advance Directives and Living Wills do not Will, which deals only with end-of-life for making health care decisions as well. If decision making. Your Living Will may be typically expire by the passage of time. the POA document authorizes your agent a separate, stand-alone document, or it They may, however, get “stale.” This is not (sometimes called your “attorney-in-fact”) a legal concern, but a practical one. For may be incorporated into your Advance to make health care decisions, then your Directive. It states whether you want to example, health care providers may be agent may also have the authority to act receive life sustaining treatment and/or more hesitant to follow your wishes if they as your health care proxy as well. More on artificially provided nutrition and hydration are set forth in a 25 year old living will. As that below. a result, it’s wise to update them from time if you are faced with a terminal illness. to time to keep them “fresh.” Terminal illness is defined as a situation When it comes to granting an agent or in which the patient’s death is imminent, proxy authority to make health care Raley L. Wiggins or whose condition is hopeless unless the decisions, the law breaks down those Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC patient is artificially supported through the decisions into two basic categories. The 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com use of life-sustaining procedures, in the first category is end-of-life decision making, 445 Dexter Avenue, ste 9000, Mont, AL 36104 opinion of a qualified physician. namely the decision to provide, withhold www.redoaklegalpc.com or withdraw life sustaining treatment or artificially provided food and water. The

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FREE EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP

Estate Planning, Asset Protection & Medicaid Eligibility

CALL US OR REGISTER ONLINE TODAY!

Join local attorney Raley L. Wiggins to discuss wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living wills, probate administration, protecting your assets, bankruptcy, divorce & remarriage, nursing homes, long term care and Medicaid qualification.

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BINGE Watching For BOOMERS By Allan Fallow

Come for: Heady, sexy drama about birth of TV news in 1950s Britain Stay for: Period‘Outlander’ faithful set design, Ricky Gervais, left, stars in Netflix’s “Derek.” Watch: 8 episodes on Starz, Amazon Broadcast News-style Instant Video tension, languid Stars: Caitriona Balfe, Sam Heughan, ‘Getting On’ (American version) plumes of rising cigarette smoke Graham McTavish Watch: 18 episodes (2013-2015) on HBO, Don’t miss: Surprising subplot entwining Come for: Panoramic Scottish Highlands, Amazon Instant Video Anna Chancellor and Peter Capaldi (“Dr. men in kilts Stars: Laurie Metcalf, Alex Borstein, Niecy Who”) Stay for: Our reluctant time-traveling Nash, Mel Rodriguez Binge-breaker: Smashing your TV in heroine has two lovers: one in 1945, a Come for: Absurdly real but funny look at anger this UK answer to “Mad Men” was second in 1743 life in extended-care unit allowed to air for only two seasons. Don’t miss: Witches dancing at dawn Stay for: The magnificent cast; haven’t inside a charmed circle of stones _ we met them all somewhere? ‘The Tudors’ mystical! Don’t miss: Puffed-up Dr. Jenna James, Watch: 38 episodes (2007-2010) on Binge-breaker: Diana Gabaldon’s “My job is infinitely more important than Showtime overwritten “Outlander” novels can yours.” Stars: Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Natalie make for overlong episodes. Binge-breaker: Caregivers, binge in small Dormer, Peter O’Toole, Sam Neill, Henry doses only! Cavill ‘Bosch’ Come for: Jousting, pageantry, rutting Watch: 10 episodes on ‘Foyle’s War’ Amazon Prime Watch: 28 feature-length episodes Stars: Titus Welliver, Jamie (2002-2015) on Acorn TV Hector, Jason Gedrick, Stars: Michael Kitchen, Honeysuckle Veronica Cartwright, Amy Weeks, Anthony Howell Aquino Come for: Murder mysteries on England’s Come for: Gritty and home front in WWII. romantic shots of L.A.; tense Stay for: One wry grin from Detective precinct dynamics Chief Superintendent Christopher Foyle Stay for: Lifelong character tells you when a suspect is lying. actor Welliver, 53, breaks out Don’t miss: Foyle’s reveal to his female as Harry Bosch chauffeur that he knew how to drive all Don’t miss: Bosch, trying to along. explain what jazz is all about Binge-breaker: Fans reversed two to his teen daughter, Maddie, Allen Leech as Tom Branson, from left, Tom Cullen as Lord Gillingham cancellations, but we’re glad the war is and Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary in Season 5 of “Downton Abbey.” in Episode 10: “I’ll get you finally over. some vinyl and a turntable, and scheming in the court of Henry VIII best way to listen!” ‘Parks and Recreation’ Stay for: The ripping of bodices, the Binge-breaker: Your adrenal glands may Watch: 125 episodes (2009-2015) on chewing of scenery tolerate only one or two episodes at a NBC, Amazon, Netflix Don’t miss: Sam Neill’s nuanced time. Stars: Amy Poehler, Nick Offerman, Rob performance as Cardinal Thomas Wolsey Lowe, Aubrey Plaza Binge-breaker: Meyers can’t decide ‘The Hour’ Come for: “Treat yo’self,” as Retta would whether to channel Sir Laurence Olivier Watch: 6 episodes on BBC America say, to TV’s top comedy writing or Tony Soprano Stars: Dominic West, Romola Garai, Ben Stay for: The ensemble cast blooming as Whishaw individuals Looking for intelligent viewing? All of these series offer compelling “TV for Grownups.”

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Don’t miss: Leslie Knope and Ron Swanson getting locked in the office overnight to settle their differences Binge-breaker: Season 1 clumsily portrayed Knope as a dope, but stick with it.

‘Derek’

Don’t miss: period props (slide carousels, metal ice-cube trays) and multiple costume changes Binge-breaker: It’s easy to overdose on noir!

Watch: 14 episodes on Netflix (2012-2014) Stars: Ricky Gervais, Kerry Godliman, Brett Goldstein Come for: Acting mastery of Gervais as mentally challenged nursing-home staffer Stay for: Touching, tender moments hidden in a mockumentary Matthew Rhys as Philip Jennings and Keri Russell as Don’t miss: Derek, Elizabeth Jennings in “The Americans.” clipping a resident’s toenails: “I like old people; they’re kind.” Binge-breaker: Must every actor break ‘Downton Abbey’ the fourth wall? (We blame The Office.) Watch: 51 episodes (2010-2015) on PBS, Amazon, Netflix Stars: Hugh Bonneville, Elizabeth ‘The Americans’ McGovern, Maggie Smith Watch: 36 episodes (2013-2015) on F/X Come for: To learn what life’s like in an Stars: Keri Russell, Matthew Rhys, English castle. (Answer: cold.) Richard Thomas, Noah Emmerich Stay for: The conniving and striving, both Come for: Russian spies living next door upstairs and down in Reagan-era suburbia Don’t miss: Lord Grantham’s emergence Stay for: To decide which is twistier: as a human being. Took him only five family dynamics or international seasons! espionage? Binge-breaker: Once the cast feels like family, you may long to ditch them!

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‘Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries’ Watch: 34 episodes (2012-2015) on Acorn.tv, PBS, Netflix Stars: Essie Davis, Nathan Page, Miriam Margolyes Come for: Glam, sexually liberated P.I. solving murders in 1920s Melbourne Stay for: Miss Fisher’s slowly building romance with Detective Inspector Jack Robinson Don’t miss: Flapper fashion-palooza! (Chokers, tiaras, pearl-handled pistol) Binge-breaker: Sorry, can’t think of one. But like Phryne Fisher, we’ll keep noodling it!

‘Dancing on the Edge’

Watch: 6 episodes (2013) on Starz or DVD Stars: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Jacqueline Bisset, John Goodman, Matthew Goode, Anthony Head, Angel Coulby Come for: Swinging jazz in 1930s London (original numbers), spiffy period dress and sets Stay for: A murder whodunit that deals with overnight stardom, media scrutiny, class and race relations Don’t miss: The Prince of Wales, a Louis Lester Band groupie, getting jiggy with it (c)2015 AARP Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Will Insurance Cover my Hearing Aids? Have you or a loved one started to notice signs of hearing loss or know you already have communication difficulties and are trying to decide what to do next? If you decide to purchase hearing aids, will your insurance company help you cover the cost? Hearing aids are a medical device that can change the lives of millions of people, but isn’t generally covered by insurance. Let’s take a look at why? Some states require that health insurance cover the cost of hearing aids, but this usually only applies to children. There are three states that have mandated that insurance cover the cost of hearing aids for adults – Arkansas, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island. For most other states, the only thing private insurance may cover is the hearing examination. The reason most private insurance companies do not cover hearing aids is because they believe that hearing aids are elective and not medically necessary. For people who have hearing loss, hearing aids are their lifeline. Hearing loss that is not addressed can lead to social isolation, a decrease in quality of life, difficulty with relationships and employment, and can affect mental and physical health. Hearing loss is really an invisible disability. To insurance companies, hearing loss is a likely risk. Over 50 percent of people over the age of 75 have some degree of hearing loss. If insurance companies were to cover the cost of hearing aids, the odds are that you would eventually make a claim. This doesn’t sit well with insurance companies because that would result in too many claims and the high cost of hearing aids, along with the fact that hearing aids will need to be replaced every three to five years, wouldn’t allow insurance companies to make a profit. While most insurance companies follow

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Medicare guidelines, there are some If your insurance does not carry a hearing insurance companies and that will help aid benefit, it is still very important to the patient cover the cost of hearing visit your audiologist to determine what aids – some provide the patient with a other options are available to you, i.e., specific amount Veterans Affairs while others may (VA), charitable entirely cover organizations, or By Dr. Katie Slade and Dr. Brittany Spahr the cost of the state vocational hearing devices. rehabilitation The benefits programs. In addition may renew to other organizations after a specific that may help with number of years. hearing aids, the Most insurance audiologists at companies Doctors Hearing renew the Clinic can provide hearing aid you with educational benefit every three years. If the hearing information on hearing healthcare, aids are purchased through an incommunication tips for dealing with network/contracted provider, you may hearing loss, and options for help on get a specified allowance for one or both telephones, such as the amplified phones ears. Or you or the Caption Call phone. may get negotiated Those with hearing loss do not always discounts perceive that they have a problem or that with specific they need hearing aids because hearing providers, loss comes on gradually. This is why it is for example beneficial to take that important first step 20% off the of getting you or your loved one’s hearing retail price. evaluated to find out more information There is also a Federal Employee Health on what you can be done to help! Benefit Program through Blue Cross Blue Visit or call Doctors Hearing Clinic, a Shield (BC/BS) that will cover up to $2500 HEARINGLife company to get started with for hearing aids every three years. your complimentary hearing evaluation It is important to check with your and consultation. While the audiologist insurance company to determine if you evaluates your hearing, our patient have a plan that may help you cover the care coordinator can verify any hearing cost of hearing aids, but be sure to ask aid benefits you may have with your the following questions: insurance. 1. Do I have a health benefit toward the Content adapted from: Healthy Hearing Website, purchase of hearing aids? “Why Aren’t Hearing Aids Covered by Insurance?” 2. Is there a specific provider I need www.healthyhearing.com/help/hearing-aids/ to see? If so, can you give me a list of insurance-financial-assistance providers in my area? www.healthyhearing.com/report/52484-Why3. Are there any limitations to cost or aren-t-hearing-aids-covered-by-insurance what hearing aid model/technology you can get? Dr. Katie Slade is a Board Certified audiologist and 4. Some insurance plans may define a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology. Dr. certain degree of hearing loss that meets Brittany Spahr is a Doctor of Audiology and fellow a specific requirement to be eligible for of the American Academy of Audiology. coverage. Make sure to ask if there are any criteria for coverage?

Healthy Hearing

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Need to Work in Retirement? think small More retirees than ever intend to keep working past traditional retirement age. But age discrimination and job burnout pose major challenges to staying in the corporate workforce.

Williams says his clients often start up businesses for well under $5,000 and incur monthly overhead expenses of less than $500. The most successful ventures he’s witnessed share three common traits: deep knowledge about a specific topic, the ability to consult or share knowledge about the topic, and the ability to sell their services online.

Entrepreneurship can be a viable alternative work route for retirees, and it’s getting more commonplace. Entrepreneurs age 55-65 accounted for 26 percent of all startups last year, up from 15 percent in 1996, according to the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity. While an entrepreneurial startup may sound like a risky investment of capital, it doesn’t have to be. A “micro-enterprise” can help retirees generate supplemental income without putting much capital at risk perhaps enough to forestall filing for Social Security or ease the pressure for drawdowns from retirement portfolios. “Whenever I mention entrepreneurship as an option for working longer, people think it means draining your 401(k), spending capital, and taking an enormous risk,” says Chris Farrell, author of “Unretirement: How Baby Boomers Are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community and the Good Life” (Bloomsbury Press). “But microenterprises allow you to work from home, take advantage of technology, not touching your retirement savings and using just a little money to experiment.” Farrell adds that if you think you have a service to sell, a micro-enterprise approach allows you to test it out. “Find out if there really is a market, if there is, then you can commit more resources and perhaps round up more money,” he says. One way to do that: test out your idea while still working. Kimberly Palmer is nowhere near retirement, at age 35, she works full time as a senior editor for personal finance coverage at U.S. News & World Report. But in 2009, she started writing and publishing in her spare hours Palmer’s Planners, a series of personal financial planners that she sells on Etsy.com, the e-commerce website for handmade items. The business only generated $200 monthly at its peak, but it helped stimulate other freelance

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work and speaking events that brought her side income to about $10,000 annually. Side-gigging worked so well for Palmer that she wrote a book about it, “The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life” (AMACOM, 2014). Micro-enterprises often leverage the entrepreneur’s accumulated experience and knowledge, as Palmer has done via Etsy. Another platform offering that kind of opportunity is Guru.com, which helps businesses connect with freelance workers; although the site started with a focus on information technology, it has expanded to cover more than 160 fields of expertise. Other examples include Elance and Fiverr. “These marketplaces are valuing older workers in a way corporate America doesn’t,” says Jeff Williams, CEO of Bizstarters, a company that provides coaching and training to older entrepreneurs. “The customers don’t care how old you are so long as you can deliver the solution. In the corporate world, it’s still about your resume, how you look, or how much they will have to pay you.” The best time to start a micro-enterprise? While you’re still working. “If you get started before you retire or need the money, and can develop something that generates a couple thousand dollars a month, it can make an enormous difference once you do retire,” says Judith Rosenberg, founder of The SAGE Centers, a business incubator and resource center in Berkeley, California, for entrepreneurs 50 years and older. Most of the microenterprises Rosenberg sees are run by part-time entrepreneurs who put in around 10 hours a week.

Some older entrepreneurs are even tapping into new shared-economy platforms such as Airbnb and Uber. Nearly 25 percent of Uber’s drivers are older than 50, according to a study commissioned by the company recently. Farrell says he hears often from older entrepreneurs who have become de facto B&B operators via Airbnb. “I had thought it would be more of a young person’s game, but it makes sense, if you’re comfortable with it from a security standpoint and you have kids who are out of the house or you’re widowed, it’s a fairly easy way to make some money.” The two major challenges for newbie micro-entrepreneurs, Farrell says, are selling yourself and getting paid. “If you’ve always worked in the corporate world, it’s getting used to presenting yourself as having a product or service that can solve your problem, and the other is asking for money, because they’ve never had to do it before.” Rosenberg sees similar transitional problems. “I see a lot of people who are retired, or about to retire, who have good skills and think they’ll do consulting work but know nothing about how to run a business, or people who may have a business but don’t know how to grow it to the next level,” she says. One downside to micro-enterprise is that it rarely provides a route to building up equity in a business that can be sold when it’s finally time to fully retire. Farrell cautions that that’s the wrong way to think about it. “What a micro-enterprise allows you to do is buy a lifestyle, it’s not about creating a business with a five-year exit strategy.” Mark Miller is a journalist and author who focuses on retirement and aging. He is the author of “The Hard Times Guide to Retirement Security: Practical Strategies for Money, Work and Living.” Mark also edits and publishes RetirementRevised.com (c) 2015 50+ Digital LLC. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Can Coconut Oil Save You from Alzheimer’s Disease? At this point in time, modern science and doctors will tell you that, although they have medication to slow Alzheimer’s, there is nothing that can be done to prevent it, nor to stop it once it starts. Many different chemical and natural substances have been studied and found to have little or no effect, such as ginkgo, vitamin E, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories. Recent studies, however, have come to light showing that coconut oil might be the answer we have been looking for.

deteriorated very quickly until he could no longer read a book or tie his shoes. Existing medication was doing nothing for him so, being a researcher, Dr. Newport began studying the physiology of the brain and the changes that occur with dementia. She decided to try coconut oil. The starting dose was 4 teaspoons of coconut oil each day. It was not long before Dr. Newport began to see amazing results. Her husband stopped deteriorating, and after a while he could read and walk without any help.

In order to function normally, our brain requires glucose and fat. Research shows that diets that are low in fat or low in carbs, especially those that are low in the essential fatty acids, are detrimental to the brain. When your brain is starved for nutrients, it begins to slip into what we call Alzheimer’s disease.

The doctor wanted to quantify her findings and began looking for funding that would enable her to do research on coconut oil in relation to Alzheimer’s disease. The first clinical trial of its kind is currently being conducted at the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute. This study includes 65 subjects who have mild to moderate Alzheimer’s and results should be published sometime next year.

Alzheimer’s disease is referred to as Type 3 diabetes by some, as it involves insulin impairment. Our brain cells begin to have difficulty metabolizing glucose and need to find an alternative means of fuel. This is where coconut oil comes in. Coconut oil can be used by the brain for energy when there is a shortage of glucose. This is the problem with demonizing high fat diets. Luckily, coconut oil is becoming more and more popular and its health benefits are being discussed now more than ever before. These studies began with one doctor, Dr. Mary Newport, when she discovered that her husband had Alzheimer’s. He

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Currently, Dr. Newport is experimenting with about 2 tablespoons of coconut oil each day, which would supply a person with 20 grams of the medium chain triglycerides that are thought to produce therapeutic results. The current health and nutritional guidelines that most people are following have contributed to the current rise in obesity, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. The low fat craze, which is thought to prevent heart disease, not only encourages heart disease, but diseases of the brain as well, including Alzheimer’s. Another factor is the

development and increased consumption of GM foods, which are prevalent in almost all processed and prepackaged foods. There seems to be endless amounts of money to develop new strains of toxic GM foods, but no money for research into treatments. If you should decide to add coconut oil to your diet, for best results look for organic, cold pressed, non-hydrogenated, virgin coconut oil. Are you concerned about adding more “oil” to your diet? Don’t be. Coconut oil has no trans-fats or cholesterol and is healthy for your heart, unlike most other hydrogenated vegetable oils on the market today. Read more about coconut oil benefits. There will need to be more research after Dr. Newport’s study has concluded, but there is no reason why you can’t start a program of consuming coconut oil each day. This oil has so many profound health benefits; you simply can’t go wrong by adding some to your diet. Source: naturalon.com

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August EXHIBITION: Gallery One Featured Artists

Break of Day, 48x48 acrylic on canvas Shirley Esco galleryonefineart.com/Shirley-Esco

Peaceful, 14x11 oil on canvas Anita Westerberg galleryonefineart.com/Anita-Westerberg

Gateway, 49x30, mixed media, Cecily Hulett galleryonefineart.com/Cecily-Hulett

When the Moon Was Made of Cheese, 30x30 oil on canvas, Judith Ivy Hayden galleryonefineart.com/Judith-Ivy-Hayden

With Olive, 10x8 acrylic on board, Jane Segrest galleryonefineart.com/Jane-Segrest

Inner Music, 12 x 16 acrylic on canvas John Mazaheri galleryonefineart.com/John-Mazaheri

Hill Town, 8x12 water color John Wagnon galleryonefineart.com/John-Wagnon

Cherry Stand, 16x20 oil on canvas, Pamela Wesley Copeland galleryonefineart.com/Pamela-Wesley-Copeland

Team Work, 14x11 oil on canvas, Anne Hugghins galleryonefineart.com/Anne-Hugghins

Pharaoh Dream, 24x48 mixed media, Carol Barksdale galleryonefineart.com/Carol-Barksdale

Gallery One offers a wide selection of original art by gallery artist members. Style and price accommodate every taste and budget. As an Alabama not-for-profit cooperative gallery, Gallery One is actively engaged in the community. Gallery Director Sandi Aplin sandiaplin@aol.com, 334.269.1114, galleryonefineart.com

Tripod, 4 x 4, wood culpture, Ken Lever galleryonefineart.com/Ken-Lever


Art & Soul

By Sandi Aplin

Charlie Lucas, The Tinman Folk Artist, Charlie Lucas says, “ I made my first piece of art at four years old. My great grandfather was a blacksmith, he made wagon wheels. This is why I use all-kindof wheels in my art. These found objects educate me, they tell me the story of what they want to be and each piece makes the next better.” Lucas was born in 1951 with severe dyslexia and left school early in his life. He continued to create art through the years while working to support his family. In 1984 he fell from the back of his truck and hurt his back, he could not work. He said, “I prayed that night that God would give me a talent, something that no one else could do and in 1985, I was called the Tinman.” Charlie Lucas meets Kathryn Windham Lucas and Kathryn Windham had met at various events and then in 2000, the artist Nall invited them along with twelve other artists to go to France in collaboration on a book titled “Alabama Art,” this is when they became friends. In a blog post, The Front Porch Philosopher says, “Kathryn lives in what can kindly be described as a declining neighborhood. Her children wanted her to move out of the house that has been her home where she raised her family. Kathryn refused and found her own solution to the problem. Lucas was completing a messy divorce and needed a place to live, so he moved in next door in 2003. Lucas is really is a member of the Windham family, they all call him brother.”

her many journalism contributions, Lucas told their stories. Lucas said, “Mrs. Kathryn and I are next door neighbors and our kitchen windows mirror each other. So, our ritual is, when she wakes-up in the mornings, she pushes back the kitchen curtain to let me know the angels didn’t come for her in the night. I sit in my kitchen and watch her in hers; it’s like watching a butterfly in a field of wildflowers.” The angels did come for Kathryn, affectionately known to Lucas as Doll, on June 12, 2011. She was 93 years young.

were answered and he was recycled to slow down and create art following a debilitating back injury. The pieces Charlie Lucas makes have always told stories, both in form and in title. Although he says making art is like making toys and often refers to the process as play, his work brings sensitive, spiritual wisdom, looking at universal human connections. Lucas, who has achieved an international reputation, was initially recognized as a self-taught Charlie Lucas, Self Portrait or contemporary folk artist welded scrap metal Collection of Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and has been included in many exhibitions and publications about this defined art area.” Lucas exhibited at Troy University Rosa Parks Library and Georgine Clarke, who recently lost her battle Museum, the exhibition was with cancer, would have enjoyed seeing the titled, In the Belly of the Ship. exhibition in the Freedom Riders Museum Georgine Clarke, Visual Arts which opened this month and the photoProgram Manager, Alabama State Council on graph of Lucas peering through a window of the Arts wrote, “ Charlie Lucas, also known as Ghost Bus-Ancestors Coming Down, one of The Tinman, makes his art with things others the artworks in the exhibit, Road to Equality. have discarded: bicycle wheels, metal banding, used tin, and car parts. Using these cast Charlie Lucas is working toward an opening off materials gives them new life, symbolizing of his exhibition, In the Belly of the Ship at renewal of the object but recognizing the his studio in Selma in the near future. I have potential for renewal in each individual. “ seen the show and it is well worth the trip. Lucas says, “We throw away people, too. When bad things happen, I can still do my art, it helps me stay disciplined and helps me work through it.” He believes his prayers

Sandi Aplin, Director of Gallery One Fine Art A freelance writer living in Montgomery, AL sandiaplin@aol.com or galleryonefineart.com

Kathryn affectionately told stories about Lucas’s artwork. One in particular was her favorite piece of sculpture titled the Little Soldier. It went like this, the Little Soldier is going out into the world and he knows life is not going to be easy, so he carries along this windshield wiper to wipe away his tears. Lucas said, “Mrs. Kathryn would tell me, don’t cry over spilt milk, just keep going.” They also loved to go fishing and looking for future art pieces. When Kathryn Windham was honored by the Alabama State Council on the Arts for The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

BON BALAYAGE I suppose the day in life comes when we see surrender to Father Time. The wrinkles and gray hair reflect back from the mirror, along with an age spot or two, and tired of fighting the inevitable, we say, “Screw it. I’m officially a senior. I accept the consequences, and in the utmost moment of maturity of my life, I’ll live each day left to me as the blessing it is, to be enjoyed to the fullest. I’m old now, so I’m just going to go with it.” Maybe some of you reading this have had this Mature Moment and felt the great albatross of “fake youth” lifted from your slumping shoulders. I’d like to announce I AM NOT THERE YET! I have been wearing my hair long since the 70s. My Mother liked the look so much she nicknamed me “Pansy”. Eventually Mom accepted my long hair and by 1975 Pops was no longer referring to me as his oldest daughter. Today, there are two people in charge of my hair. First is Jim, my guy in South Florida. I connected with him 20 years ago. He does a great job as stylist and consigliore. He has seen me through my bleakest moments and cheered me on as I completed The Big Comeback.

How close are we? I have been to his house every Christmas Day for years, met his wife and family, and I still don’t know his last name. But, I love the guy and have yet to make a trip to Florida these last 10+ years that didn’t include a visit with him. In fact, it was about 10 years ago, my hair, which I had been wearing dark since the 50s, was turning up “blonde” (Jim couldn’t bring himself to tell me it was gray).

I have ended relationships and quit jobs with a fraction of the angst required to let my good buddy know I was going Polystylist, which the Supreme Court just said is now OK.

Greg’s original “Hair Guy”, Jim with daughter Jamie

I asked him to remove those offending hairs.

In 2008 my daughter, Janelle, graduated high school so my trips to Florida would become a lot less frequent. Clearly I needed to find someone here in Montgomery who could replicate Jim’s magic. It took me months to tell Jim there would be “someone else” because I just couldn’t get to Ft. Lauderdale often enough to have him do it.

him.

Jim, of course, understood. Finding someone here would be an arduous process of trial and error. There was one young hairstylist so heavily tattooed I spent the entire time reading her arms. The result was “meh” (Yiddish for “meh”). No one had “the magic”. Then, one day we had a studio guest whose hair looked awesome so I asked who did it for

That’s how I found Debra, from Elegant Styles right down the street from Newstalk 93.1 FM on Carmichael Road. First though, Debra would have to survive my pre-haircut Inquisition. I have taken less time asking questions when buying homes and cars, really. But Debra was so bright and confident there was no doubt she’d be “the one”.

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald, Barranco & Hagen Wealth Management

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And she has been great! Recently though, she announced the blonde hairs were beginning to vastly outnumber the dark ones. Ominous news, to say the least. I have been coloring my moustache for years because for some reason The Lord decided it should grow in dishwater blonde. When I die, I plan to ask why He chose this color scheme. I use Just For Men to keep a consistent look. Just For Men works fine except it makes your face smell like you just colored your moustache with Just For Men. Not even my dogs will kiss me for 24 hours. Debra was suggesting I do a little more- a lot more. “I want you to try Bayalage” she announced during a monthly trim. I thought it was a Creedence Clearwater Revival song but Debra said it was the latest coloring process that “touched up” the hair without making it look like I was auditioning for Turd Ferguson on Saturday Night Live (you know, the jet-black Burt Reynolds look worn so brilliantly by my favorite comedian, Norm MacDonald).

WWJD? What would Jim do? I called, and Jim said “go for it”. I submitted to the chair and cape and Debra went to work. She poked through my hair with an applicator stick. The only drawback was the 23 minute drying time, which I successfully killed in my car so I could practice on my new E-cigarette (another future column).

backward for the wash and rinse in salon sinks. Debra’s even good at that. Once the “Bayalage” was rinsed, she cut my hair. “Voila”! You’ll see the big reveal next month. In the meantime, here’s a selfie right from Debra’s mirror taken during my Bayalaging. I’ll tell you this - I will party like its 1995, because I am not ready to surrender - not ready for the Mature Moment. Not yet, anyway!

Greg getting a “Bayalage” from Debra

Usually I wash my hair at home because I worry about “Sink Stroke”. Don’t laugh. It’s the dizzy spell some experience after having their neck bent

Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, children and dogs. He’s a 25 year veteran of radio who hosts the Greg & Susan morning show 6-9 am and Happy Hour 3-6 pm on NEWSTALK 93.1, Greg can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

The Business Mini Directory

A Business Mini is a little fatter than your old business card and for a limited time we are offering a Business Mini to fit your budget. Fifty dollars will get your business message in front of thousands of people over 50 who have the money to buy stuff. Every business needs one more customer, where will yours come from? Call today and get your $50 Business Mini, 324.3472 or jim@riverregionboom.com

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Ask Nancy: Caring for Aging Relatives Who to Call When the Caregiver Needs Help

Q: My parents are in their late 80s and live nearby, I see them often. My father, though very active, requires a lot of daily assistance as he uses a walker and sometimes a wheelchair. Fortunately, my parents have a longtime male caregiver who is able to help my father maintain his active schedule by helping him get ready in the morning and driving him to wherever he needs to go. He’s a huge help and his presence allows my mother to maintain her own active social life. The amount of assistance required increases slowly but surely. My mother has called recently to complain that his aide is asking for more time off and a later start time in the day. She also said he is often curt to them. Thus, she has had to curtail her own social engagements to accommodate my father’s needs more. It’s not so much that she objects, but that I think it’s just too much for her to do, both physically and emotionally. Any suggestions? _ Lynn M., Miami, FL A: What you described sounds like a case of caregiver burnout, an all too familiar consequence of caring for someone who

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requires daily attentive care over a long period of time. And, as you’ve learned, it can happen to a professional, trained aide who is otherwise compassionate and dependable. “Burnout is a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion that can be accompanied by a change in attitude, from positive and caring to negative and unconcerned,” explains Alexis Abramson, Ph.D., an expert on aging and caregiving and the author of “The Caregiver’s Survival Handbook” (amazon. com). It usually occurs when caregivers don’t get the help they need, or when they attempt to do more than they are able, either emotionally or physically.” Cranky behavior, frequent complaining and requests for time off are all symptoms of burnout and a signal that it’s time to make some changes. I’m not suggesting that your parents

replace the aide. On the contrary, if this is a longtime and cherished caregiver, it would be wise for them to do what they can to make the relationship continue to work. I suggest introducing a home health agency that can provide your caregiver with some help. For example, maybe it is just the morning hours that are too demanding for him. Or, perhaps he would like more scheduled time off on weekends. Talk to your parents’ caregiver to see what specific concerns need to be addressed so that you can help create a new schedule that makes everyone happy. Adding an additional trained caregiver for certain hours may be just the solution for your family going forward. Nancy Stein, Ph.D., is the founder of Seniority Matters (senioritymatters.com), a caregiver advisory and referral service in South Florida for seniors and their families. You can contact her at nancy@senioritymatters.com. (c)2015, Seniority Matters Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Going Nuts!

Nuts and seeds are incredibly good for you and an amazing source of many vitamins and minerals. Coming from a family (and marrying into another one!) that consumes nuts every evening as a suppertime snack, I was amazed to discover that apparently two thirds of Americans don’t eat nuts at all! So, assuming then that two out of every three people reading this do not eat nuts, I am going to try and persuade you why you need to start. So, why should you eat nuts? Research continues to show that nuts and seeds are good for our hearts, in addition to a plethora of other benefits ranging from cognitive function to managing blood sugars. You can break it down into three main reasons: fiber, healthy fats and disease prevention. Nuts benefit your health by providing a source of dietary fiber. Fiber is a specialized type of carbohydrate found in plant-based foods. It does not break down as it passes through your digestive tract, and the undigested fiber adds bulk to your stool to promote regular bowel movements. Fiber also helps slow the rate of digestion, which means that sugar from your meal enters your bloodstream more slowly, avoiding those unwanted spikes or sugar highs, inevitably followed by the dips or sugar lows, which just leave you craving more sugar. A never ending circle! Having a slow and steady release of sugar into the bloodstream is the ideal and helps you feel energized after you eat. An ounce of almonds boosts your fiber intake by a whopping 3.5 grams, while an equivalent serving of pistachios and pecans offers 2.9 and 2.7 grams, respectively. You need fat as part of your diet, (which we’ve already discussed) and eating nuts helps ensure that your fat intake comes from healthy unsaturated fats. Walnuts, in particular, boost your healthy fat intake because they contain alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid. This type of fat helps maintain brain function, nourishes

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your red blood cells and helps fight excess inflammation. Each ounce of walnuts contains 2.6 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, more than the 1.1 grams required daily for women or 1.6 grams required daily for men. There are many studies that link a diet rich in nuts (and seeds) to preventing disease. People who regularly consume nuts tend to weigh less than those who rarely eat nuts, as well as face a lower risk for weight gain in the future. Nuts are shown to help reduce the levels of inflammation in your

body, which might reduce your risk of heart disease. Nut consumption also correlates with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. There is somewhat of a misconception that nuts are expensive, which when you consider that a serving of seeds or nuts costs just eighty-five cents on average then they are worth every penny, particularly when you consider the potential health benefits. Although often consumed as a snack, you can of course add them to salads, cereal, pasta dishes, use as an ice cream topping. I love to bake with them, adding them to muffins, brownies, sweetbreads, etc. You can even blend them into smoothies and of course make your own nut butters to spread on, well, almost anything! My husband loves almond butter spread on

apple slices; our son loves peanut butter spread on banana bread (which, if I’ve made it, already has walnuts or pecans in it). The reason I say make your own nut butters is that it’s just so easy to do – just pop the nuts in a blender and off you go! No added sugar, salt or any of the other nasties that you see on some commercial nut butter labels. You can of course buy nut butters that have only one ingredient on the label, (nuts!) but they are harder to find. Earthfare will have them and so will Wholefoods when they open. Buying nuts in bulk is by far the cheapest way to buy them. Earthfare has this option as does HealthWise. You fill your bag with the amount you want and pay for it by weight. No fancy packaging to pay for, just like back in the old days of grocers and butchers (yes, we still have those in Europe). You can also order nuts online in bulk too. These are just two of the many sites out there: www.nuts.com, www. nutsinbulk.com. Just make sure you check the shipping rates; lots offer free shipping if you buy a certain amount. If you do buy in bulk, storing them properly will make them last longer – if you don’t store them properly they will go rancid and if you eat them then you will make yourself ill. Store them in airtight containers and if you have bought them in portions of 2 or more pounds at a time, store them in the fridge, or you can even freeze some! Tracy Bhalla, Owner/ Manager of Cool Beans Restaurant, 115 Montgomery Street, P: 334.416.8447, coolbeans.mgm@gmail.com or facebook.com/coolbeans.mgm Trained as an architect! Worked as a teacher of product design and graphic design for 9 years in England and Bermuda. Always had a love of healthy, good-for-you food. Always cooking for friends and family. Married a cardiologist in 2007. We have a shared passion about eating healthily (and wine) and both love to cook, so when Cool Beans became available we jumped at it. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


They Called In Hospice… How many times have you been talking to a friend or a relative about someone who is dealing with a serious illness and hear them say “They called in hospice.” Do you ever ask “which one”? Is one hospice the same as any other? The answer is No. Hospice is not a place, like a hospital or a nursing home – it’s a service- a concept of care, and many different providers offer hospice services. Multiple for-profit and not-for-profits hospices exist in most communities. Not all hospices are the same, nor are they affiliated with one another. So whether you and your loved one are talking to your physician about hospice or you Google ‘hospice’ in your area, do know that you have a choice which hospice care provider you use. The hospice you choose really can make a difference. You should choose your hospice carefully. Discuss your options with your physician and family. As the American population ages and the hospice industry grows, those in need of hospice care should “shop” wisely. Hospice care is about managing pain and allowing people to die in the comfort of their home with dignity and respect. That is serious business.

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It is unfortunate, despite the tremendous growth and availability of hospice, that an awareness vacuum exists. Some people experiencing an emotional crisis after receiving a dire prognosis are unaware that hospice is available, let alone that they have a choice in the care they receive. It matters which hospice you choose, and yes, patients do have a choice. How then should YOU go about choosing a hospice? Fundamentally, you have to be a wellinformed consumer. You have to ask: How long have they been in business? Where is the closest licensed office —this will play a role in how responsive they will be. Do they have a volunteer program? Can they truly provide 24-hour, 7-day-a-week service? How many times does the nurse visits each week? What is the case load for their nurses?

Knowing your eligibility and deciding when to initiate hospice services is a personal decision and should be determined by you, your family, and your physician. As the only independent non-profit hospice care provider in the River Region, Hospice of Montgomery offers quality and compassionate care by a highly trained and experienced staff. Care is available to anyone with a life-limiting diagnosis and those who wish to focus on comfort and palliative care. When you are ready to pursue hospice care, contact your physician and ask for a referral to Hospice of Montgomery or call us to find out if hospice is right for you. We would love to talk to you. For more information designed specifically to help individuals facing a serious illness and their loved ones gain resources and information, visit www. hospiceofmontgomery.org or simply call us at 334-279-6677. Make a difference today, make it Hospice of Montgomery.

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August 2015

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Tales From Goat Hill Capital City Club, Downtown Montgomery Thursday, August 6th, 11:30-1 pm

The Capital City Club is hosting Tales From Goat Hill on Thursday, August 6 at 11:30 am. Former Attorney General and Lieutenant Governor Bill Baxley, and the Honorable Jere Beasley, will panel an honest conversation about Alabama politics past. Enjoy a 2-course lunch while moderator, Alva Lambert, guides the lively discussion that will surely intrigue and amuse. Cost: $20 Inclusive. For more information on this upcoming event, please contact Heather Logan at 334.834.8920 or heather.logan@clubcorp.com.

GADSDEN, ALABAMA

2015 World’s Longest Yard Sale Gadsden to Lookout Mountain Parkway Thursday-Sunday August 6-9 The World’s Longest Yard Sale takes place each first Thursday through Sunday in August. The sale begins in Gadsden, AL at Noccalula Falls Park and continues up the Lookout Mountain Parkway towards Chattanooga. The sale is free, takes place in all weather, and vendors set up in yards, churches, anywhere there is open space along the route. For more info visit discoverlookoutmountain.com/yardsale

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Buckmasters Expo Montgomery Convention Center-201 Tallapoosa Street Friday-Sunday, August 14-16th Shop for hunting bargains from more than 300 exhibitors and vendors who are all a part of the biggest hunting sale ever! Experts from top manufacturers such as Mathews, Yamaha, Nikon and Easton will be manning booths to answer all your questions. Watch the nation’s best archers compete in the Top Bow World championship, presented by Mathews Archery--It’s the nation’s highest-paying archery tournament. Bring your grandkids to the Young Bucks area for games, hunting-related activities, mascots Bucky and Droptine, Balloon Man and much more. Admittance to

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the expo is free with a donation of a canned good per person. The expo is open from 3 until 9 pm on Friday, 9 am until 7 pm on Saturday and 10 am until 5 pm on Sunday. For more info visit buckmasters.com

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Scott Bruce as Elvis Presley ASF Saturday, August 15th, 7:30-9:30 pm

Hearts will flutter and hips will shake when Elvis Presley returns to ASF on August 15th at 7:30 pm for a one-night only concert. Scot Bruce’s authentic, high-octane portrayal of the King is guaranteed to have you ALL SHOOK UP! Get ready for a blast from the past to, almost like the real thing! Tickets range from $35-$60. For more information, call 334.271.5353 or visit asf.net

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Play with Clay for Adults – Ceramics Workshop MMFA in Blount Cultural Park Saturdays, August 15 & 29th 1:30-4:30 pm

Join nationally recognized ceramic artist Christopher Greenman, Associate Professor of Art at ASU, for this unique workshop and create SALT AND PEPPER shakers utilizing various ceramic construction methods. Come with or without design ideas and with a head full of inspiration and imagination. The second workshop will involve decorating the artwork using ceramic paints or glazes, after the work has dried and been bisque fired. All supplies provided. Instructor: Dr. Christopher Greenman Dates & Times: Saturday, August 15: 1:30 to 4:30 P.M.; Saturday, August 29: 2 to 4 P.M. Cost: $85 members/$130 non-members for the series of two workshops. For more info visit mmfa.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA The Main Event- Claws for a Cause

MACOA and Meals on Wheels Fundraiser

Friday Pick-up, August 21st, 3-6 pm

Don’t miss the 16th Annual Live Maine Lobsters Claws for a Cause to support MACOA and Meals On Wheels. Order your Live Maine Lobster today for only $30.00 ($15 per lobster is tax deductible). Get your lobster live or freshly steamed wrapped to go via drive through service on August 21st at two convenient locations to serve you--Downtown at the MACOA Office on E. Jefferson Street and East Montgomery near the Y’s Up and Somerset on Atlanta Highway! For an additional fee, you may also have your lobster prepared at two of Montgomery’s fine restaurants Garrett’s Restaurant or the Capital City Club. All proceeds to benefit the Montgomery Area Council On Aging (MACOA) and Meals On Wheels. Deadline to order is August 14th. For more information and to reserve your lobster today, please contact Chacolby Burns-Johnson, Development Coordinator, at cjohnson@macoa. org, 334.263.0532, or you may order online at macoa.org.

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MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

EatMGM, Montgomery Restaurant Week All Over Montgomery Friday August 14th- Sunday August 23rd Ten Days of celebration and exploration of the bites, treats and meals that make MGM one of the best places in the South to eat! The food scene in MGM is heating up! There are more great places to eat and drink than ever and this is your opportunity to get out and about and try something new. Purpose: Deepen and strengthen the food community in Montgomery, between restaurants, diners, visitors and the media. Raise awareness locally and beyond of the variety and quality of restaurants and food experiences in MGM. Increase business for local restaurants in midAugust. What’s in it for diners? Great deals! Lunches at local restaurants for $5, $10 or $15 and dinners at $10, $20 and $30! The opportunity to discover new restaurants, dishes and drinks. Win meals and prizes through social media contests. Participate in special dining events. Follow EatMGM on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get the details on promotions. Check out our ever growing list of participating restaurants to find your next great MGM meal! EatMGM is organized by The Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce Convention & Visitor Bureau and the Gumptioneers, visit megprpr.wix.com/eatmgm

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

Rickie Lee Jones UAB’s Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center

Friday, August 21st, 8 pm

Rickie Lee Jones will be performing in Birmingham at the ASC. The ASC will present the Grammywinning singer-songwriter for an evening of musical reminiscing and exploration. Her latest album and first new music in over a decade, The Other Side of Desire was written, recorded, and rooted in New Orleans. “This work is inspired by many years of sitting with all the events of my life until I had something to paint with. I came to New Orleans to write and to live a different way than what I have known on the West Coast …. Here is another record then, made of my imagination, and whatever else that has no words, using the clay of this place and the shapes of my eyes to form some kind of picture of my life, or my heart, that I alone can understand, and hopefully that others can enjoy.” for more info visit alysstephens.uab.edu

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Michael Bolton ASF-Benefit the Bard Saturday, August 22, 8 pm

We’ll Be Rocking the Night Away! The Alabama Shakespeare Festival will be

rocking on Saturday evening, August 22, as Wind Creek Hospitality and ASF are presenting Michael Bolton and you will want to give some Time, Love and Tenderness to ASF that evening! All proceeds from this event will fortify the theatre and its remarkable artistic and educational programs. Please respond generously, ASF will well use your additional gift. For more info contact Lindsey Jinright. 334.271.5353 or ljinright@asf.net or visit asf.net

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Rally in the Alley The Alley, Downtown Montgomery Thursday, August 27th, 5-7 pm

The River Region United Way is once again getting ready to kick off its annual campaign in style with Rally in the Alley on August 27, 2015. Representatives from United Way affiliate agencies will be hand with information about their organizations and how the community can get involved. Attendees are invited to mingle and learn about volunteer opportunities through board or community service with our 40+ affiliate agencies. Alley establishments -- including Alley BAR, Aviator BAR, Central, Dreamland Bar-B-Que, Jalapeno’s,Railyard Brewing Company, Sa Za’s and Wasabi -- will offer food samples, and live music will be provided. You can help the River Region United Way kick off its annual campaign in style and learn more about volunteer opportunities in our River Region. This community event, organized by EMERGE Montgomery and the River Region United Way, is free and open to the public. For more information, call 334.323.2503.

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Dragon Boat Race & Festival Riverfront Park, Downtown Montgomery Saturday, August 29th, 8-4 pm This August marks the 6th anniversary of the Montgomery Dragon Boat Race and Festival, and it promises to be an exciting one! On August 29th, almost 80 teams will converge downtown at the beautiful Riverfront Park to paddle and party on Race Day in the pursuit of the Grand Championship Trophy while supporting the missions of our two local beneficiaries, Bridge Builders Alabama and Rebuilding Together Central Alabama. The Riverfront Park will be alive with music, entertainment, and over 30 local vendors, artists, and exhibitors while teams compete on the water in view of over 8,000 spectators! For more information, call 334.625.9411 or visit montgomerydragonboat.org

AUBURN, ALABAMA

Jazz! Food! Art! Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Auburn Thursdays in August, 5-8 pm The Museum Café is open every Thursday night from 5 to 8 pm with tapas, beer, wine, and specialty cocktail menus. Prices range from $7 to $10, and the portions are meant for sharing. From 5 to 8 pm, hear live jazz in the lobby by some of the best local and regional musicians. The house band is the Cullars Improvisational Rotation. Others will occasionally perform. For more info visit jcsm.auburn.edu/event

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Good Habits to Cultivate in Your Grandchildren Good habits are a valuable part of a happy life and you can share the value of good habits with your grandchildren by starting with these ten. They are simple and effective actions that will help your grandchild make a better life for themselves as they grow into adulthood. 1. Be on Time Woody Allen once said, “Eighty percent of success is showing up.” I’d take that a step further to say that eighty percent of success is showing up on time. If you are late, you start with one strike against you. In a competitive world, you simply cannot afford this kind of disadvantage right out of the gate. Plan to make sure that you are always on time. In your planning, you must allow for unforeseen delays. Showing up on time is a habit that will serve you well in all the areas of your life. 2. Take Action Those that cannot overcome procrastination will be doomed to a life of mediocrity. I know that we all put things off from time-to-time, but teaching yourself to be a person of action without delay is one of the most important habits that you can cultivate. Mark Twain said, “If you have to eat a frog, don’t look at it for too long.” The more you stall and put off difficult tasks, the more anxious you will become about it. The best thing is to get it behind you. Do your most important task first thing each morning. This will get you started on the right foot and help you to consistently move toward your goals. 3. Stay Positive and Optimistic There has been a lot said about having a positive attitude. So much so, that you may hate hearing about it again. However, the importance of making optimism a habit cannot be overstated. In large part, you get out of life what you expect. If you expect to be miserable and to fail, then you likely will. Your thoughts are the seeds from which everything else in your life grows. You can’t plant one thing and expect to harvest another. Life just doesn’t work that way. You may or may not believe this, but it is true. Those that enjoy the most success in life understand this clearly.

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4. Work Hard Zig Ziglar said, “A lot of people quit looking for work as soon as they find a job.” The best things in life, personal and professional, come to those that make hard work a habit. If you want great kids, then you have to work hard as a parent. If you want to be a great writer, then you have to work hard to learn to express yourself clearly. Those that actively look for the difficult tasks and tackle them with gusto are the ones that reap the rewards. Thomas Edison said it best, “Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” Make hard work one of your habits and you’ll discover all kinds of new opportunities. 5. Take Calculated Risks Risk is a part of life. The old adage “Nothing ventured, nothing gained” is absolutely true. Every time a football team steps onto the field, they risk losing. However, they know there is absolutely no chance of winning if they don’t get in the game. Therefore, they make it a habit to show up every week. Are you willing to risk showing up? Calculated risks are mandatory if you want a truly great life. I say, “calculated” because “A fool and his money are soon parted.” If you do stupid things that are too risky, then you will pay dearly. For a great life, take calculated risks regularly, but don’t be a fool. 6. Invest Wisely You can invest money, time and/or energy into what you value. If you invest wisely, then you will produce a return that is much more than what you put in. Habitually invest in the right things and you will produce a great life for yourself. Investing is all about buying into your own future. It is being willing to sacrifice now for greater returns later. Our culture seems to want it all now. This is certainly not wise investing. The law of the harvest prevails in life. Understand how to incorporate this as a habit in your life and you will be miles ahead.

7. Think Long-Term Most failures are a result of wanting and expecting too much, too soon. You just can’t rush life. If you try, you will likely end up on the short end of the stick. Researchers have known for decades that those with greater self-control or the ability to put off immediate gratification for a bigger reward are more likely to succeed (see this article for details). Make longterm thinking a habit in every area of your life and you will come out well ahead. 8. Get Along with Others Life is not a solo sport. That’s why clear back in Kindergarten you were evaluated on your ability to work well with others. If you want to enjoy the best life possible, then you need to learn to get along with a wide-range of people. Honing your skills in this area will certainly help you to improve your life. Not all of us can be exceptional connectors, communicators and collaborators, but even a modest improvement in our habits in this area can produce tremendous results. 9. Love Unashamedly We all need love. The thing is, we have to give love in order to receive it. If you want the very best life possible, then I’d tell you to love people unashamedly. What do I mean by this? I mean don’t worry about getting hurt or looking stupid. Love people with your whole heart and make sure it is no secret. Again, I don’t mean that you should be a complete fool, although you may feel like this makes you one from time to time. That’s okay, because loving people this way will make your life happier overall and that’s what counts. 10. Get Adequate Rest The CDC says that insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic. You simply cannot perform at your best if you are not getting adequate rest. Eventually, this bad habit will catch up with you. Your body will not let you get away with ignoring its demands forever. Your best bet is to develop better sleep habits before the crash. This will ensure you that have the capacity to always do your best.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

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The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM! August 2015  
BOOM! August 2015  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine