Page 1

1


3


BOOM!, The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Contents

April 2018 Volume 8 Issue 8

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.”

Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom C.S. Lewis

Thought Relationships Taste Inspiration

Humor Advice Health Community

“Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending.”

Carl Bard

6 Publisher’s Letter 8 Alabama Book Festival 9 "What the AUM - OLLI Program Has Meant to Me" 10 A LIFETIME OF SHARING Clyde Eller 12 Spring Fling

page 40

14 The Need to Train for Power Leigh Anne Richards

Features

18 The Art of Aging Well

32 Top 10 Items YOUR KIDS DON'T WANT!

36 Feeling Fairhope: Books, Food, Treasure & Art

16 401(k) Decisions, Decisions, Decisions, McDonald Hagen 20 Mint Juleps, Bourbon, Horses and Hats, Hats...

Departments 20 This and That

Getting You “In the Know”

44 {12} Things

Special Events for Boomers

42 Greg Budell

GREETINGS FROM LAKE GOOSE (The Wedding, part 1)

21 ZOO Serve Day 22 Israel Fest 70-Independence Celebration 26 What Should You Tell The Kids, Their Inheritance? Ask an Elder Law Attorney 28 BOOM! Cover Profile

page 5

page 18

page 42

34 A Day for Mom, Coming Soon... 39 Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla: Why Choose Organic 40 Teach Your Grandkids Critical Thinking Skills

page 34

page 28

page 20

page 21

46 Hayley Mills puts on her ‘Party Face’

BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine is published monthly by River Region Publications, 3966 Atlanta Hwy, Box 266, Montgomery, AL 36109. The phone number is 334.324.3472. Copyright 2018 by River Region Publications. No part of this publication can be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in BOOM! The River Regions 50+ Lifestage Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

5


Publisher’s Letter

An Unexamined Life is not Worth Much This month's Cover Profile is a special kind of doctor, a physician who specializes in pain management. Her name is Dr. Rachelle Janush, she has been practicing medicine in the River Region since 1996. For many of us pain is just something we try to live with to get by each day with a little less of it. That's why it's important to have a doctor like Rachelle who can help you better understand and provide an accurate diagnosis of your pain, so a solution can be created. It was a pleasure getting to know Dr. Janush in preparing for this month's interview, she is interesting, helpful and uses words I couldn't begin to spell...she's the expert in her field and we're glad she practices in the River Region!

The mission of BOOM! is to serve the folks of the River Region age 50 plus with information and ideas to inspire new experiences, better quality of life and new beginnings.

Publisher/Editor

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com

Contributing Writers Jeff Barganier Austin Barranco Tracy Bhalla Dottie Kenady Blair Kimberly Blaker Greg Budell

Clyde Eller Rachelle Janush Audrey Meinertzhagen Leigh Anne Richards Elizabeth Stewart Nick Thomas Raley L. Wiggins

Cover Photography Jeri Hines Total Image Portraits www.totalimage.com 334.261.2080

Advertising

Jim Watson, 334.324.3472 jim@riverregionboom.com Please Recycle This Magazine, Share with a Friend!

This month we share a feature article by Kimberly Blaker, who is becoming one of our regular writers, about how to teach your grandchildren "Critical Jim Watson, Publisher Thinking Skills". This is such an important concept, because too many young people have grown up without thinking and when they do share their thoughts they seem to be from another planet. Many times, they are without common sense and thoughtfulness. Maybe my skepticism and curiosity keep me engaged and interested in the world around me. Hopefully, the article will help you teach your grandchild to examine life, because as Socrates said, an unexamined life is probably not worth as much...or something like that. April will also bring some good reads from our friend Jeff Barganier who spent a recent weekend in Fairhope, AL for one of his book signings and since reading his article, I'm planning a trip that way soon, I may see some of you there too. Another interesting article is about the stuff we live with in our houses as we age. It's a common conversation with Sandy and myself about what to do with that or this and then realizing our kids don't want any of it. This month we offer the top ten items the kids don't want with a remedy on what to do with it...mostly give it away and move on! We've included some Mother's Day ideas to crank up your creativity to prepare for that special May Day. Finally, if you haven't started already, we're sharing some tips on The Art of Aging Well. Of course, many of us are so marinated in our habits and routines we're probably not going to change much, but some things may make a difference, so a little change may do you good down the road, enjoy the challenge. Greg Budell begins the journey of the "Father of the Bride" this month and his emotions are getting wetter by the day, I hope you'll join him on his wedding journey. Leigh Anne Richards helps us understand the importance of power as we age and how she is emphasizing it in her classes at Metro Fitness. How's your power? I hope you enjoy this month's reading experience, it's designed for you. Please support our advertisers because they support our aging process. Please sign up for your free subscription to the Digital & Interactive BOOM! online at RiverRegionBoom.com. Thanks for being part of our BOOM! Community.

Jim Facebook.com/RiverRegionBoom

jim@riverregionboom.com 334.324.3472 cell/text

Digital & Interactive

When you read the Digital & Interactive version of BOOM! on your digital device you will be interactive with every website and email link in the magazine. You can click through to a writer’s source, an

advertiser, send comments and suggestions, request more info and share your favorite reads on Facebook and Twitter. The Digital & Interactive version was built for the new you so go ahead and sign up for a free subscription at RiverRegionBoom.com “BOOM!, the best reading experience for the 50+ community”

6 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

7


Alabama Book Festival Announces 2018 Author Lineup for April 21 Event

A former Auburn football player, a death row exoneree, a coloring book designer and an award-winning food blogger are part of the diverse lineup for the 2018 Alabama Book Festival scheduled for April 21 in Montgomery. They join a long list of bestselling authors taking part in the annual event at Montgomery’s historic Old Alabama Town from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here are just a few authors scheduled to appear: Ace Atkins -- Ace Atkins is the New York Times bestselling author of 21 novels. A former newspaper reporter and SEC football player—he was a member of Auburn’s undefeated 1993 team—Ace also writes essays and investigative pieces for several national magazines. Atkins currently writes the “Spenser” detective novels, which he took over after the death of Robert B. Parker. Atkins is the 2018 recipient of

8 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

Troy University’s Hall-Waters Prize for his distinguished career in Southern writing.

Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row.”

Callie Chapman -- Elementary school student Callie Chapman has written three books about Glitter the Unicorn. The 8-year-old will kick off the festival in the children’s tent and read from her books during a special noon storytime session on the Old Alabama Town playground.

Linda Howard -- Howard is the awardwinning author of numerous New York Times bestsellers including “Up Close and Dangerous,” “Drop Dead Gorgeous,” “Dying to Please,” and her latest, “The Woman Left Behind.” She lives in Gadsden, Alabama.

Wayne Flynt -- Wayne Flynt is the author of 14 books, most recently “Mockingbird Songs: My Friendship with Harper Lee,” which recounts his relationship with the beloved Alabama author during her final years. Anthony Ray Hinton -- Hinton shares his story of wrongful conviction, survival on Alabama's death row, and his decades-long journey to exoneration and freedom in “The Sun Does

Laura Murray -- Author/illustrator Laura Murray was inspired to create “Amazing Alabama: A Coloring Book Journey Through Alabama's 67 Counties” after moving to Alabama from Georgia. To view the full festival schedule, sign up for a workshop or volunteer to help at the festival, visit the website at www. alabamabookfestival.org

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Written by Dottie Kenady Blair

"What the AUM - OLLI Program Has Meant to Me" I was one of the first members of OLLI at AUM when it began in 2010. My first class was “Great Decisions” where we read about and discussed world changing decisions. My cousin is Director of the OLLI program at Furman University and I was looking through their course catalog and saw that they offered several different hiking classes. Since I love day hiking I went to Rebecca Williams, the Program Director, and said if they ever had a hiking class I would love to participate in it. She said, “We can have a hiking class next term if you will lead it”. Thus, began my five years of leading hiking at OLLI. Over those five years we hiked rain or shine on the beautiful trails at Lake Martin and in Wetumpka. I got to know so many interesting and

energetic people through that class. Since I stopped leading the hiking class I have had time to take other classes. My favorite is line dancing. Laughter is good for the soul and learning dances is good for the brain and I get plenty of both in that class. I’ve taken classes about engineering projects around the world, World War I, religion, interesting book discussions and although I am not the creative type I even stretched my wings and tried a cake decorating class, although I must admit I flunked out of that one after the second class. There are also field trips to interesting places and bonus speakers at lunch. Learning keeps us interesting and

young. Who wants to be old and boring? Socialization and meeting new people keeps us mentally healthy and happy. With the variety of classes at OLLI there is something for everyone. If you have a passion for a subject, then you too can share that passion by teaching a class. Dottie Kenady Blair For more information about AUM OLLI or to request a catalog, contact: Brittany at 244-3804.

Come join us at OLLI, where the fun, interesting, healthy and happy people hang out.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

9


By Clyde Eller

A LIFETIME OF SHARING “It’s a rose begonia,” she said, as she handed me the small, potted plant. She was elderly and preparing to move from her familiar, clapboard home. I was newly married and beginning to establish a life in her neighborhood. We had never met before, but she was the first to give me a pass-along plant.

place and planted them in the fall. Every April since then, I look forward to their flowers. That sense of expectation has served me well, whatever the task and wherever I’ve lived: south, to north, then south again. My gardening and my pass-along plants are closely linked to friends and a lifetime of sharing. RESOURCES

Books and Articles The rose begonia would Adiantum capollus-veneris ‘Alabama be the first of many passLace retrieved on April 19, 2017 and along plants. From an available at www.plantdelights.com architect friend I received Barton, Gail. Twin Sisters (comments plants that reflected posted April 14, 2016) retrieved his impeccable taste: a April 17, 2017 and available at www. littleleaf lilac (Syringa An April landscape: Twin Sisters narcissus, as far as the eye can see; Magnolia Grove, yardflower.com Greensboro, Alabama. (Courtesy of Steven Cunningham, Montgomery) microphylla) and bulbs Bender, Steve. Daffodil Essential: Southern Plant retrieved on April 17, of Allium neapolitanum 2017 and available at white segmented petals and a small (an heirloom, known as Naples garlic). A www.southernliving.com/home-garden/gardens/ yellow cup. True to its common name, it colleague gave me a poor man’s orchid daffodil-bulbs. typically blooms with two flowers on each (Neomarica gracillis). It’s a trouble-free Note: Bender’s online article is from Southern Livings’ Complete Guide to Daffodils. Southern stem. Several other familiar names reflect house plant that produces fragrant, white Living is a subsidiary of Time Inc. New York, NY. this trait: Two Sisters, Loving Couples, flowers every spring. Lily of the Valley retrieved April 19, 2017 and Two-Flowered Narcissus, Cemetery available at www.monticallo.org Ladies, and Easter Lilies; but it is known Fortune smiled when I moved to Narcissus medioluteus ‘Twin Sisters” retrieved April 17, 2017 and available at www.plantlust.com also as April Beauty, April Narcissus, and Alabama. I worked with people whose Two-flower Narcissus, Twin Sisters retrieved April Pale Narcissus. It’s an heirloom, a hybrid goal was to save the best of Alabama, and 17, 2017 and available at www.davesgarden.com of Narcissus poeticus and Narcissus I travelled throughout the state. Friends Weisinger, Chris. Heirloom Bulbs for Today tazetta. Some researchers believe that kept in touch by sending me plants: lily(Houston: Bright Sky Press, 2010) 180 pp it was extant (still in existence, though of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis) from very old) in France prior to 1600. Its first Monticello; corms of Boone gladiola Interview: Katherine Parker, Thomaston, Alabama: by telephone, April 13, 2017 recorded name was Primrose Peerless. (Gladiolus dalenii) from Ohio; and from Georgia, the start of a maidenhair fern, a Further Sources: Plant Researchers can benefit Formally categorized Narcissus x southern version known as Alabama Lace from the following Alabama Plant Atlas (APA), medioluteus (and Narcissus x biflorius), (Adiantum capollus-veneris). I, in turn, Alabama Herbarium Consortium and the University of West Alabama, available at Twin Sisters graces Alabama roadsides, sent plants to them. www.flooraofalabama.org cemeteries, abandoned buildings, and DaffLibrary, American Daffodil Society, Inc., older home sites: places that offer sun Soon, however, Alabama plants became available at www.dafflibrary.org. See also or light shade and well-drained soil. It my priority. A well-established shrub www.daffseek.net spreads easily, and it is prolific. It’s a in Eufaula provided cuttings of KissVanBeck, Sara. Daffodils in American Gardens, 1733-1940 (Columbia: University of South Carolina narcissus that thrives in the south, but it Me-At-The-Garden-Gate (Lonicera Press: 2015) 360 pp Note: Sara VanBeck is an can be found in other regions and other fragantissima). It’s also known as winter author, co-author and organizer of many reliable countries. honeysuckle and by variations of the Kiss books, articles, and indexes. Me…. name. When, in 2014, I retired, my It was Katherine Parker, an experienced colleagues passed-along plants from all Clyde Eller, a 2017 Intern in the Master Master Gardner from West Alabama, over Alabama. Among them were several Gardener Association, has become a who dug up the Twin Sister bulbs after Master Gardener, lives in Montgomery. For narcissus bulbs. more information on becoming a master the foliage turned yellow. She dried them gardener, visit www.capcitymga.org or email and shook off the dirt. Following her Twin Sisters, a late blooming narcissus, capcitymga@gmail.com instructions, I stored them in a cool, dry has a sweetly-scented and delicate flower:

10 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

11


12 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


13


The Need to Train for Power for Older Adults Much is written about the benefits of strength training as we age. In fact, I have written several articles regarding the necessity of strength or resistance training for older adults. Another type of training that is now considered one of the health-related components we should be incorporating in our workout routines is power. It is just as important as strength training in maintaining or restoring function. As the name suggest, power training is aimed at increasing power which is where resistance meets speed. Optimal power reflects how quickly you can exert force to produce the desired movement. Here is an example I always give that represents power- You are walking across the street and the light turns green quickly while you are in the middle of the street- You have to have power to get across that street quickly before cars hit you. It is power not strength that helps you get across the road without being hit by on coming traffic. Power also prevents falls by helping you react quickly if you start to trip or lose your balance. Power is also the neuromuscular factor that shows the greatest decline with aging. For example, from ages 65-89, the decline in explosive knee extensor power

14 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

Fitness over Fifty by Leigh Anne Richards

is 3.5% per year, compared to the annual 1-2% drop in strength. Researchers have also hypothesized that the higher levels of disability in elderly women compared to elderly men is due to the women’s lower power to body weight ratios and less capacity to produce power. As early as 1992, a researcher, Bassey, reported that leg extensor power was significantly correlated with measures of daily activities such as chair rises, walking speed and stair climbing. Another researcher (Bean) in 2002 discovered that leg power is an important factor influencing the physical performance of mobility- limited older people. It has been also noted that although power is related to strength, it is a separate attribute that may exert a greater influence on physical performance. These studies have helped establish the link between power and the maintenance of independence in older adults. There is also a strong association between fall prevention and power.

Some power moves are strength training exercises done at a faster speed. Other exercises might add things like a weighted vest while performing certain exercises that are aimed at improving functions such as bending, lifting, reaching, and rising from a seated position.

So how do older clients train for development of power? Regarding neuromuscular training, the literature has established that high- speed explosive movements, or at least the attempt to perform high speed- movements. The following are some ideas presented in Strength and Power Training, a special health report from Harvard Medical School. These things can be done at home and requires no special equipment. Chair Stand • Exercises the muscles of the abdomen, hips, front of the thighs, and buttocks. • Position a chair against the wall. Sit at front of chair with your arms crossed and your hands on your shoulders. Once you have mastered getting up and down at a normal pace without using the hands add the power by getting up quickly from the chair and sitting down at the normal pace. Do 8-12 repetitions

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The Bridge • Exercises the muscles of the back, back of thighs and buttocks • Lie your back on a towel or a mat with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Put your hands next to your hips with palms flat on the floor. Keep your back straight as you lift your buttocks as high as you can off the mat, using hands for balance only. Lower buttocks without touching mat. To add the power component, lift the hips with more force and lower slowly. Do 8-12 repetitions. Triceps Dips • Exercises the muscles of the back of the upper arm, chest, and shoulders. • Put a chair up against a wall. Get your body to the edge of the chair with your shoulders back and straight, feet together flat on the floor. Bend your elbows and keep you hands in line with your torso. Bend the elbow. Drop the hips down toward the floor pressing down on the heel of the hand, bend the elbows and lower the hips a few inches and then lift hips and straighten the arms. Power move- Lower the hips toward floor slowly and then quickly lift your body back up as you straighten the elbows. Do 8-12 repetitions. To increase independence and reduce the probability of falls, power training needs to be implemented into a fitness program. No single workout or exercise device can address all the diverse physical factors associated with successful aging. There is no one size fits all either. I would suggest getting a personal trainer that understands the application of power training for aging individuals so that older individuals improve their functional status effectively but safely! “Power Training for Older Adults”, Joseph Signorile, PhD, Ideafit.com. Nov 1, 2007 “Power Training provides special benefits for muscles and function, Julie Silver, M.D. Harvard Health Publications, April 22, 2013 Leigh Anne Richards, MEd, Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, General ManagerMetroFitness. For any questions or comments, contact Leigh Anne at LAMetrofit@aol.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

15


401(k) Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Brandt McDonald introduces his guest columnist, Austin Barranco… From time to time, I will be introducing several of our advisors through this column. They will share personalized insights into financial markets, financial planning, and overall wealth management concepts. At McDonald & Hagen, we have a deep bench of talent that is eager to serve our firm’s clients and our local community. This month’s column is written by Austin Barranco. Austin entered the financial industry in 2014 after earning a degree in Finance from The University of Alabama, with a specialization in Insurance and Risk Management, he has also earned the distinction of a FINRA General Securities Principal held with LPL. Austin and his wife Maghen live in East Montgomery with their dog Chip. In his free time Austin enjoys college football, golf, and traveling the world.

If you are preparing to change jobs, do you know what your choices are for managing the money in your current employer's retirement plan? Although many people choose to take a cash distribution, there are other options that may benefit you more. Uncle Sam loves distributions, and Taking a lump-sum cash distribution may trigger an immediate 20% federal withholding tax. In addition, a 10% tax may be applied if you are younger than age 59½. Distributing your money as cash also means that you'll no longer enjoy the potential benefits of tax deferral that a qualified retirement plan offers. Depending on your circumstances, you may have several options that will allow you to maintain the tax-deferred status of your retirement plan assets. Here are three common 401(k) distribution strategies for people who have recently changed employers: 1) Leave the money in your former employer's plan. Your former employer must allow you to leave the money where it is as long as the balance exceeds $5,000. You will no longer be able to contribute to the account, but you will still get to decide how the existing assets are invested. Often times, this strategy requires the least amount of time and paperwork. 2) Roll over the money to your new

16 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

Financial Thoughts

with Austin Barranco

employer's plan. By "rolling" the money directly to your new plan, you'll avoid the taxes that could eat away at a cash distribution. You'll also only have one set of investments to monitor. Even if you're not immediately eligible to contribute to the plan at your new job, you may still be able to roll over the money right away.

account, known as a "conduit IRA," which may allow you to move the funds to a new employer's retirement plan at a later date. Research your options. If you plan to change jobs, don't just take the money and run. Rules vary from company to company, so find the time to explore all your alternative strategies. If you have specific questions about your retirement plan distribution options, or just want a second opinion from a professional, please do not hesitate to call us at McDonald and Hagen Wealth Management. Our team of experienced professionals are well equipped to help you make an informed decision about your financial future. Austin Barranco, Financial Advisor Brandt McDonald, Managing Partner McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management LPL Branch Manager www.mcdonaldhagen.com Direct comments and questions to Jennifer.Hunt@LPL.com or 334.387.0094

3) Roll over the money to an IRA. If your new employer doesn't offer a retirement plan or you aren't yet eligible to participate, you can roll over the money directly to a traditional IRA. Again, you'll avoid taxes that you would incur if you took a cash distribution, and still enjoy the potential benefits of tax deferral. Experts advise against commingling your retirement plan assets with other IRAs you may have set up. Instead, open a separate IRA

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. Stock investing involves risk including loss of principle. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized legal or tax advice. We suggest you discuss your specific legal or tax issues with a qualified legal or tax advisor.

Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA & SIPC. Investment advice offered through McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management, a Registered Investment Advisor, and separate entity from LPL Financial.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

17


by Audrey Meinertzhagen

The Art of Aging Well

Promote healthy longevity with these tips on creating an engaging and meaningful life direction of the future by living in a way that will have us in touch with our physical, emotional, and spiritual health right now. This is the path that Dr. Mark E. Williams lays before us in his book The Art and Science of Aging Well: A Physician’s Guide to a Healthy Body, Mind, and Spirit.

In 1900 if you lived to the age of 47 you were old. Today life expectancy has almost doubled to the age of 89. The probability that you will live to a ripe old age is better than ever before in human history. As life expectancy increases, there is much to consider to ensure that you age well and happily. More people than ever before have access to clean air and water, healthy food and housing, immediately increasing overall mortality rates substantially. In addition, personal awareness and knowledge about self-care has been gaining momentum and revolutionizing and empowering us to improve our health at any age. Add a sense of engagement, curiosity about life and people, activities, or practices that one finds fulfilling and you have the rough outlines of what it takes to attain healthy longevity. And yet, we don’t really discuss what is required to age well. We live in a society that embraces youth culture and ignores issues related to aging even though we live in a society that is aging. We ignore the prospect of aging until we are confronted with physical ailments. Aging is something that someone else does. That is until we begin to listen to the myths about being older and the limitations inherent in aging and find ourselves acting old and falling into habits that make us slow down. This scenario is not inevitable, and it doesn’t need to be this way. The need to be present and care for and balance the body, mind, and spirit throughout life is a lesson ideally learned when we are young. However, it is most commonly learned after life has taught us a lesson or two. After it has gotten our attention and convinced us of the fact that our time is limited on this earth and we learn, each in our own way, that we do, and will, run out of time. Some of us learn this earlier than others, some never do. To age well each of us needs to embark on a journey that requires full engagement and effort. The results we enjoy correlate directly to the effort that we expend. When it comes to aging, we can either mysteriously arrive one day at the doorstep of old age or we can gently point ourselves in the

18 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

It Is Never Too Late to Age Well Regardless of how you have lived your life or how old you are, you can impact how you age beginning today. Here are some useful tips for healthy longevity that you can use to elevate and expand your efforts. Appreciate where you are in body, mind, and spirit. Start where you are and do an inventory of how you feel physically and emotionally. What needs attention and care? Be realistic and create a list of ways that you can impact your overall wellbeing. Begin with the following: How healthy are you? What are you thinking about? What are your worries? Write them down, get them out of your head and onto paper, then look to see what can be done to begin to resolve one of them. The answer could be getting more sleep, exercising, giving up processed foods, having a difficult conversation with a family member, or dealing with sadness and depression. Start small. Simply attend to one thing. Write down what you are going to do the next day and then actually do it. Build on your success each day and in a week or two or three look back and see what you have gained by doing one or two things differently in your life. Learn how to age well by incorporating one of these lifestyle changes. Challenge, Stimulate, Manage and Nurture Yourself In the interest of developing a holistic and joyous life, challenge your body, stimulate your intellect, manage your emotions, and

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


nurture your spirit. Start with what is easy and expand. But also stick with the activities that you love. Hiking with friends, being socially or politically active, being creative, learning something new, and tending to and developing new friendships are all beneficial for aging well. Challenge Your Body Challenge yourself to eat healthy and nourishing foods every day. Concentrate on eating vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and healthy proteins. Go beyond what you are comfortable doing every now and again. Show yourself that you are capable of more physically than you think you are. Care for your body, tend to it and use it. If you don’t already, find an exercise that you enjoy that is encouraging, gentle and a bit of challenge. Keep moving.

Manage Your Emotions Being happy doesn’t mean that life is perfect. It means you’ve decided to see beyond the issues that are hanging around. It also doesn’t mean that you ignore them either. It means that you hold your problem lightly and with compassion. Be gentle with yourself and find support for what is difficult. Know that there are others who are navigating the same issues that you are and that you are not alone. Nurture your spirit What feeds your spirit? Do it. Is it a walk-in nature? Listening to beautiful music? Meditation? Prayer? Sitting with a dear friend or family member? Reading?

Stimulate Your Intellect

Spend some time each day tending to your spirit. It makes everything else easier.

Stay engaged and stimulated intellectually. Make your interests a priority. Many of us have interests that we have left behind and miss. Perhaps now is a wonderful time to revisit any pursuits that have fallen victim to a busy lifestyle. Learning something new and being curious is one of the simple ways to live a joyful and involved life.

Here is one final thought. While balance is important, engage in what is fun and easy for you. I don’t believe that any of this need be hard. It should be challenging and exciting but none of this will work if it becomes part of an overwhelming and difficult to-do list. Start where you are and try to incorporate one thing that you suspect might make your day happier and fuller.

This article is sponsored by Home Care Assistance, for more info visit www.homecareassistance.com

Live Well at Home with a Higher Class of Care We do home care differently • 24/7 Live-in and Hourly Care • Balanced Care Method™ to promote healthy longevity • Cognitive Therapeutics Method™ to boost brain health • Hospital to Home Care Call today!

334-593-3988 Changing the Way the World Ages The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

HomeCareAssistanceMontgomery.com

Call Kristy today for your free in-home consultation!

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

19


i

This & tHAT

Walk of Life 2018, Saturday, April 21st, Downtown Montgomery

The Joy to Life Foundation provides free mammograms and other breast cancer screenings, when necessary, to medically underserved women and men in Alabama, provides limited grants when needed, builds and supports breast cancer awareness among all Alabamians, and promotes over-all health, well being, and education throughout the state. We’re excited to celebrate our 17th annual Walk of Life this year! Thank you for supporting our mission. Because of your generous support/donations, we can continue to provide breast cancer screenings for women and men in every county in Alabama. Register today, and join us in the fight! Get your friends togeher and register at www.joytolife.org

Mint Juleps, Bourbon, Horses and Hats, Hats, Hats, Hats... Get ready for horses, hats, and bourbon! Join Hospice of Montgomery as they bring Millionaire’s Row with a casino twist to the River Region. The Kentucky Derby Annual Benefit will take place Saturday, May 5th from 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., at Montgomery Country Club. Dress in your “Derby” best, and take part in the post-position horse draw, exclusive silent auction, “funny money” casino tables, “best dressed couple” and “best hat” contests, and much more, all culminating with the viewing of the 144th Run for the Roses! Attendance at the annual benefit supports Hospice of Montgomery, which is the River Region’s ONLY independent, nonprofit hospice care provider. Funds raised through this event help provide medical care for the seriously ill, bereavement and grief counseling for families, as well as caregiver support. Be sure to reserve your tickets today for the most exciting two minutes in racing! $50 General Admission. Sponsorships are also available. Tickets can be purchased at Hospice of Montgomery, 1111 Holloway Park, Montgomery, and online at www.hospiceofmontgomery.networkforgood.com. For more information contact Hospice of Montgomery at 334.279.6677. The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports!

Caring for the Caregiver, Alzheimer/Dementia Support Group Meeting the 2nd Wednesday of each month, 1-3 pm at ChristChurch, 8800 Vaughn Rd. Montgomery, AL. A place for RESPITE: a pause or rest, EXCHANGING: practical information on caregiving problems, possible solutions, and resources in our community, SHARING: needs and concerns, TALKING: through challenges and discovering new ways to cope. Often, we hear caregivers say they are looking for support from people who “really understand because we have been there too.” This group offers just that-a safe place for caregivers, family and friends of persons with dementia to meet and develop a mutual support system. We welcome caregivers. For more info call 334.462.2613.

20 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


BOOMERS, share your stuff with BOOM! We Love to Bring BOOMERS Together, send info and pics to jim@riverregionboom.com

ZOO Serve Day ZOO Serve Day will be, Saturday, May 5, 9am – 5pm. A single day to gather volunteer groups to accomplish several tasks in preparing the Montgomery Zoo for the summer season. Volunteers are needed to help with landscaping, trimming bushes, planting flowers, raking leaves, painting, and overall prepping for the summer. It will be a great opportunity for those people that volunteer their time and energy to give back to the City of Montgomery Zoo and the River Region community. Volunteers can be adults, teens, civic groups, school groups, church groups, businesses, military squadrons, and families. Volunteers ages 12-16 years old must be accompanied by a parent / legal guardian or a designated group chaperone. For more information or to register for Volunteer Spring 2018 Serve Day, please contact the Zoo at (334) 625-4900 or register at the Zoo's volunteer page, www.montgomeryzoo.com

Boss of the Toss Corn Hole Tournament Who doesn’t love a game of Corn Hole? Whether at the beach, the lake or in your backyard, the game of corn hole is a game for all ages and that is what made this evening so much fun! The Cancer Wellness Foundation of Central Alabama in partnership with the Greater Homebuilders Association hosted the Boss of the Toss Corn Hole Tournament to Toss Out Cancer and help local cancer patients in the river region. Players enjoyed an friendly, albeit competitive, corn hole competition with over 50 teams participating as well as food, drinks and live music by Jilla Webb and Kurt McKinney. A drawdown event rounded out the Pat Mullen and Jeff Key evening with 10 lucky winners sharing the $10,000 winnings. For more info visit www.cancerwellnessfoundation.org

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Fido Fest

The Shoppes at EastChase Fido Fest is Montgomery’s furriest addition to the festival season and promises to be the Ulti-Mutt day out for people and their dogs! Saturday, April 21st, 11 – 2 pm. Fido Fest will include a wide array of vendors, doggy activities, great food from local food trucks, and live music! There is something for the whole family, two legged and four legged alike! This event is free. Bring your dog, kids, a chair and enjoy all of the fun at Fido Fest! For more info visit www.theshoppesateastchase. com or call 334.279.6046.

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

21


This & tHAT

i

More

Groundbreaking for Central Alabama Radiation Oncology's Prattville Cancer Center A new facility for Central Alabama Radiation Oncology (CARO) is being built in Prattville beginning in April. CARO is independently owned and operated by physicians whom have been offering radiation services in the River Region for more than 40 years. The new facility located Just off Highway 14 in Prattville, on the corner of Jasmine Trail and Nisbett Court behind the new Alabama Baptist State Board of Missions building, will provide a more convenient location for patients in Autauga, Elmore, Chilton and other central Alabama counties to receive the highest quality care and emerging radiation treatments for cancer closer to home. The Prattville Cancer Center will be Central Alabama Radiation Oncology’s third location, joining those in Montgomery and Selma. To learn more visit www.carollc.com

Israel Fest 70-Independence Celebration Jewish Federation of Central Alabama (JFCA) invites you to join them for ISRAELfest70, an annual community-wide celebration, which will showcase Israeli life, culture & spirit. The location is The Warehouse. 130 Commerce St., downtown Montgomery, Sunday, April 29th, 2-5 pm. All are invited: Whether you carry an Israeli passport, or you carry Israel in your heart and mind. Israeli Independence Day, known as Yom Ha’atzmaut in Hebrew, commemorates the public reading of the Israeli Declaration of Independence by the first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion, and its approval by Israeli leaders 70 years ago. In Central Alabama and communities across the United States, we celebrate Israel’s independence each year as a way to support one of our country’s strongest allies and to honor freedom and democracy throughout the world. The event will feature: a variety of traditional Israeli food catered by Eli's Jerusalem Grill, inspiring words from special guest speakers, a raffle, an 8-foot replica of Jerusalem’s Western Wall, bouncy house and dancing for the kids, merchandise, exciting door prizes, and much more! At the center of the celebration is live entertainment by Dahlia Road featuring Israeli and Jewish music and a special program by Jewish storyteller Noa Baum. Tickets for ISRAEfest70 are on sale now! Admission: Adults $18, Children (6-13) $7 and Tots (under 6) are Free. Pre-booking is essential as seating is limited. To order tickets visit www.jewishmontgomery.org

Inaugural Library Gala to Celebrate the Main Library's Upgrade Join the Montgomery City-County Public Library Board of Trustees Thursday, April 19, 6-8 pm in celebrating the culmination of three years of joyous endeavors to make Your Main Library a 21st Century Library! Be the first to see all of the library's new features including a brand-new computer lab, our new Montgomery Room for local history, the sound and video editing studio in our Young Adult Department, and exciting new technology and furnishings throughout the building. Enjoy musical performances by Booker T. Washington and Baldwin Magnet School students and mingle with old and new friends over drinks and delicious hors d'ouvres from Jennie Weller catering. Cocktail or business attire. Tickets are $50 and may be purchased through Eventbrite, www.eventbrite. com/e/inaugural-library-gala-tickets-43844736788 or call 334.240.2018

Prattville's Way Off Broadway Presents Crimes of the Heart This play will open on April 12 and will be presented for three consecutive weekends, ending April 29. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. This show is not recommended for children under 12. For more information, contact the Special Events Office at 334.595.0854 or visit cc.prattvilleal.gov.

22 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Capital City Master Gardener Annual Plant Sale

Capital City Master Gardener Annual Plant Sale Saturday, April 21st, 7:00 a.m. - noon Frazer United Methodist Church Corner of 6700 Atlanta Highway/Burbank Montgomery, Alabama. The Capital City Master Gardeners are having their annual spring plant sale with terrific plants at bargain prices. Plants for sale include: heirloom plants, vegetables, herbs, annuals, perennials, ground covers, trees, shrubs, succulents, shade plants and house plants. Garden items and potted container gardens also available for purchase. Bring the kids for fun children’s gardening activities.Our Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer your gardening questions. Beat the crowd and come early because the plants go quickly! For more information, go to our website: www.capcitymga.org

Capital City Master Gardener Association Presents Free Lunch & Learn 2018 Capital City Master Gardener Association presents Lunch & Learn 2018 the 1st Wednesday of Every Month from 12-1 pm. We meet at the Armory Learning Arts Center, 1018 Madison Avenue, Downtown Montgomery. Mark your calendars April 4th Tomatoes, Tomatoes, Tomatoes! Mallory Kelley, Horticulturist and May 2nd, Dabbling with Daylillies Terese Goodson, Master Gardener. For information, please contact the Montgomery County Extension Office 334.270.4133. Also visit www.capcitymga.org FREE GARDEN HELPLINE: Can’t find the answer to a home gardening question? Call our Free Help Line for the general public. 1-877-252-GROW (4769), Mon-Thurs 9am-1pm I March-August. The help line is operated by Master Gardener Volunteers who use research-based information to best answer your gardening questions.

Digital & Interactive

f re e su bsc r i pt i on s at w w w.r ive rre gio n bR iveoroRe gio m.co m n Bo o m . co m April 2018

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM!

23


This & tHAT

i

More

MMFA: Natural Wonders, The Art of Jacqueline Bishop and Douglas Bourgeois The artists Jacqueline Bishop (born 1955) and Douglas Bourgeois (born 1951) reside in Louisiana, a state that is a place of profound mystery embodied in its history, culture, and the distinctive landscape. Like their predecessor artist from the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Walter Anderson (1903–1965), Bishop and Bourgeois are in a sense “artist-activists.” Their work calls the viewers’ attention to various threats to our natural world and our cultural traditions. Bishop has traveled the world, focusing on the loss of habitat and destruction of natural environments in developing countries, as well as close to her New Orleans home. Like Bishop, Douglas Bourgeois also tracks a landscape, this one the cultural melting pot that has characterized Louisiana and its society since settlement. His compositions meld imagery from popular culture with portraits of the colorful characters native to this state, which retains its distinctive sense of the various ethnicities that have built it over time. The exhibit will be at MMFA through June 10th. For more info visit www.mmfa.org

5th Annual Ranch Roundup Join us for the 5th annual Family Sunshine Center, Ranch Roundup benefit dinner on Thursday, April 12th from 6:30-9:00 PM as we raise dollars to end domestic violence and sexual assault. Ranch Roundup is hosted by lead sponsors Serquest and the JK Lowder Family Foundation. This will be an evening of southern fun including a steak dinner at the cantina, live music, and a $10,000 drawdown. Event tickets are $125 and include a drawdown entry. Can’t attend, but want to support Family Sunshine Center, DRAWDOWN ONLY tickets available for $50 each. For tickets call 334.206.2121. More Information on at www.familysunshine.org/give/special_events

Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, Garden Benefit Performance “Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, men were deceivers ever…” The delightfully antagonistic relationship of Beatrice and Benedick is at the heart of this Shakespearean comedy. They skewer each other with witty repartee until they must join forces to save innocent young lovers threatened by a common enemy. Garden Benefit Performance, Wednesday, April 25 @ 7:30pm in the Shakespeare Garden Amphitheatre. General Admission. Recommended ages 11+. Other performance in the theatre April 28 – May 6. For tickets visit www.asf.net

Memory Cafés at the Whole Foods Market in Montgomery

Whole Foods and Dementia Friendly Alabama have partnered and are delighted to announce they will be hosting Memory Cafés at the Whole Foods Market in Montgomery. The next Memory café will be Friday, April 13th, 10-11 am. Memory Cafés are social engagement opportunities for people with dementia and their care partners to come together and just have some fun. Dementia is a socially isolating disease so it's important for people to participate in social engagement opportunities like this. People need to come together to make sure they're feeling heard and understood. At any given café, organizers encourage attendees to not focus on the disease and have fun with the group. For more information call Stephanie Holmes @ 240.4680 or visit www.facebook.com/events/183062925761705/

24 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Marcia Ball at Capital Oyster Bar

Women of Hope

Breast Cancer Support Group Tuesday, April 10th, 5:30 p.m. Frazer UMC, Room 8114 6000 Atlanta Highway Enjoy fun and fellowship with your breast cancer “sisters” and friends!

The program will be: Breast Imaging Presented by Dr. Krystal Smith, Breast Imaging Specialist Montgomery Radiology Associates

Everyone is Welcome!

For information please call 334-220-4599 or email womenofhope@charter.net www.thewomenofhope.org

Great Strides for Cystic Fibrosis at Hampstead Tipping Point

Someone’s Grandchild Needs Your Support Great Strides is the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s largest national fundraising event. Each year, more than 125,000 people participate in hundreds of walks across the country to raise funds for cystic fibrosis research and drug development. Great Strides continues to gain momentum, as do our research efforts and the progress we’ve made in the search for a cure. The CF Foundation has raised and invested hundreds of millions of dollars to support the development of new CF drugs and therapies. But the lives of people with this disease are still cut far too short. This year’s Great Strides Event will be held at Hampstead Tipping Point on Saturday, April 28th beginning at 9 am. Form a team, join a team, and serve those in the fight for the cure of Cystic Fibrosis. Get involved at www.fightcf.cff.org The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Sunday April 8th, 5-8 pm, Texas-born, Louisiana-raised pianist/vocalist/songwriter Marcia Ball will be appearing in Montgomery to support her new release, THE TATTOOED LADY AND THE ALLIGATOR MAN. The New York Times says, “Marcia Ball plays two-fisted New Orleans barrelhouse piano and sings in a husky, knowing voice about all the trouble men and women can get into on the way to a good time.” Tickets are $25 and may be purchased at Capital Oyster Bar. Call 334.239.8958 for more information or visit www.capitoloysterbar.com/entertainment-schedule/

Leading Ladies Award Brunch

The Leading Ladies Awards Brunch Tuesday, April 17, 10-2 pm, serves as a forum for recognizing outstanding women and organizations in southern Alabama and is an important fundraising event and promotion for Girl Scouting in the southern Alabama service area. The Leading Ladies Award celebrates individuals who are making a positive impact in their professional lives and in their communities, especially when they are directing those efforts to support the advancement of girls and women. The Leading Workplace for Women Award recognizes an organization that supports girl and women's leadership and success. Equal opportunity in the workplace helps women reach their potential and allows the community to fully benefit. Tickets are $45. Call 800.239.6636 for more information or visit

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

25


Ask an Elder Law Attorney

By: Raley L. Wiggins | Attorney at Law | Red Oak Legal, PC

What Should You Tell The Kids About Their Inheritance? Money is still a taboo topic in polite society. We don’t engage in small talk with someone we’ve just met by asking them “So, how much did you pull down last year?” Instead, we stick towards mundane and unoffensive topics like the weather.

parents—as much as $12 trillion overall. That amount will be eclipsed when boomers leave it to their children. Now, I don’t recommend that you report every penny of your financial situation to your adult children on a regular basis. But, I do think it’s a good idea to inform them, at least generally, about the nature of your assets, your investment and savings goals, and your ultimate estate planning goals.

members can squander a $15,000 inheritance just as foolishly as they do a $1.5 Million.

So prepare your heirs by educating them about what they may or may not stand to receive at your death. Help them to understand that their inheritance is not a sure thing, nor is it a But, this social taboo may extend to our panacea for a lifetime of poor financial families as well. At one time or another, decisions. Help them understand that parents with inquisitive school-aged a “fair” division of children will have to address your estate among the inevitable questions your heirs doesn’t from their young ones about whether their family is “rich” Estate Planning and Asset Protection Workshop necessarily mean that it is a mathematically or “poor.” Parents generally Wednesday, May 30: Hosted by Red Oak Legal, PC: 1:30-3:30 pm “equal” division. find a way to dance around the at the Archibald Senior Center (MACOA) in Montgomery. This topic while landing somewhere educational workshop presented by local attorney Raley L. Wiggins Talking about your in the “middle class” covers wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance directives, living financial situation with neighborhood. wills, probate administration, protecting assets from creditors, your adult children is bankruptcy, divorce and remarriage, nursing homes, long-term care just as uncomfortable Even after children are grown as it was to answer and have families of their and Medicaid qualification. Registration is required. the questions of your own, many parents don’t want Call 334-625-6774 today to reserve your seat or register online at young and curious to discuss their finances or www.redoaklegalpc.com. children all those years property with the kids—even ago. I realize that. if those kids are now in their If you intend to leave your kids some, But, a lot of things that are good for us 50’s. I think this is unfortunate. The but not all, of your estate, then it’s a are uncomfortable (I’m looking at you, fact is that most people want to leave good idea to tell them why you reached dentists). their property to their children one that decision. Billionaire Warren Buffet, day. If the kids are going to own it, who has famously decided to give Take some time, update your estate why shouldn’t they know more about it away most of his fortune rather than planning and financial documents, and now? leaving it to his children, thinks that the then have one nice long uncomfortable “correct” amount of money to leave conversation with your kids about it. Communication can go a long way the kids is “enough money so that they to smooth a transition from one would feel they could do anything, Once it’s done, you’ll be relieved to generation to the next. Consider but not so much that they could do know you’ve finally gotten everything the adult child who has to take over nothing.” And Buffet, who updates his in order. managing a parent’s finances when the estate plan fairly regularly, allows his parent can no longer manage on their children to read the latest version each own due to dementia. Clients often Raley L. Wiggins time a change is made. tell me that they don’t know where to Attorney at Law, Red Oak Legal, PC begin to look for their elderly parent’s 334-239-3625 | info@redoaklegalpc.com 312 Catoma Street, Suite 150, Montgomery, AL Most of us don’t have the kind of key financial information. 36104, www.redoaklegalpc.com “billionaire problems” that Warren Buffet has. Most of us hope that we As has been widely reported, the baby are in a position to leave our kids boomer generation have begun to anything at all. But, it is not the size of inherit the greatest inter-generational the inheritance that matters. Family transfer of wealth in history from their

Attend Free Workshop

26 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


27


BOOM! COVER PROFILE

Rachelle Janush, A Physician Fighting Pain This month’s BOOM! Cover Profile is Dr. Rachelle Janush. Dr. Janush is a physician who specializes in Physical Medicine and Pain Management. If you or someone you know suffers from chronic pain then you can understand the importance of having a doctor who can make a quality diagnosis and begin to lesson your discomfort, Dr Janush has been doing that in the River Region since 1996. Rachelle and her husband Henry have two daughters attending St. James. Henry is sharing his love of photography with Rachelle and they recently traveled to China to share their photographic interests. We recently spent some time getting to know Rachelle and we hope you enjoy getting to know her as much as we have.

BOOM!: Please give us a brief biography, i.e. where you’re from, education, what brought you to the Montgomery area, did you raise your family here, schools, married, family, etc? Rachelle: I am originally from Detroit, Michigan by way of Kansas City, Missouri and San Antonio, Texas. I was recruited over 20 years ago to this area from The University of Texas for my expertise as a neuro muscle skeletal pain multi-disciplinary specialist. My Husband, Henry Hernandez, and I have two teenage girls, Gabriella and Izabella. Like many of the aged 50 we are at the tail end of the baby boom generation. Our group is either facing child rearing challenges later in life or those of their grandchildren. BOOM!: Dr. Janush, your medical practice is called the Center for Physical Medicine and Pain Management and you have been serving the River Region since 1996. Please explain what your practice is all about? You are a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), can you explain the difference between a MD and DO for our readers? As a specialist do you require referrals from and from what types of doctors? Rachelle: I evaluate diagnosis and treat nerve, muscle, bone and

28 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

Rachelle and husband, Henry

my M.D., training in physical medicine unknown problems for pain. At our from The University of Texas Health Center, we look for the root cause Science Center of the pain, at San Antonio, including Texas. deficiencies in vitamins. Insurance We also carriers may focus on require their return to well clients to obtain being and a referral from functionality. their primary This wholecare provider body (PCP) to see me. approach is considered BOOM!: osteopathic. Dr. Janush, I trained both your practice as a D.O. at Dr. Rachelle Janush, D.O. of Physical Kansas City Medicine & University of Rehabilitation is unique in the River Medicine and Biosciences College of Region, can you share why you Osteopathic Medicine and received

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


decided to practice this type of medicine? Rachelle: I thrive diagnosing and treating patients with challenging puzzles that have plagued them. Pain can be chronically debilitating Rachelle and Henry's daughters: Izabella 14 and Gabriella 16 to anyone. As an intern, I found BOOM!: Fibromyalgia is a real disease that I was fascinated by the physical that affects many women over 50, examination to locate the patient’s what treatment solutions do you offer pain. Now my patients question for this disease? me how I know where to zero in to palpate or to touch their pain. Your Rachelle: Fibromyalgia is the over “evil thumbs” they say. That curiosity sensitization of the central nervous has only grown thru the years.

specific problems as they are. I am not a “lumper”. More good can come to individualize the treatment for each ailment. Re: vitamin deficiencies are the body’s main co-enzymes by which all pathways work. Medications, modalities, procedures – all hands-on approach is taken to prevent a magical or unrealistic which is not supported. BOOM!: What are some of your favorite travel destinations and why? Any travel dreams planned? Rachelle: My parents instilled a love of travel from a young age. I recall dressing up for an aeroplane flight to the British Honduras and being with my sisters as the only young people on the Cunard Liners travelling to Nassau.

Henry introduced me to landscape photography. Our last trip was a 2-week trip to very rural China to photograph the water terraces and canola fields. These people had not seen a tall blonde curly haired BOOM!: Many people as they age Caucasian experience pain and just accept it as woman part of aging, how do you help these before. I people with what seems to be a was quite chronic level of pain? the unique attraction to Pain at any age is an indication of them like the something not being right. One must Paparazzi. be mindful that a certain degree of I do not pain or its location may be a red flag. understand For women jaw pain, even mild, which what they radiates might be an indication of a will do with heart attack. Pain radiating from the all those low back into the toes accompanying pictures of motor loss or leg weakness and loss me. Perhaps of bowel and urine control can be an app will be a herniated disc and a neurological Dr. Janush with The Center for Physical Pain & Pain Management staff, left to right in circle, created with emergency. Chronicity is resisting Colleen, Marvetta, Cedric, Dr. Janush, Cassandra, Sandrekia, Audrey. (not pictured: Gary and Glenda) my hair and no mediocrity with the challenge of the face to put their own in! correct diagnosis, strengthening, system in general at any age. It is stretching, treatment, and to increase a real disease syndrome, however The snowy beaches of L.A. lower functionality. I still see many patients wrongly Alabama are an always welcome diagnosed. In diagnosis, I call

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m March

2018

BOOM!

29


weekend getaway with the family. Rest and historical information can be achieved anywhere your feet take you. BOOM!: What are you most passionate about?

Snow Day 2018, Izabella and LaLa

Rachelle: I am passionate about my work. Chronic pain patients deserve treatment. The federal government is treating chronic pain as if it does not exist, it should not be combined with addiction. The two are distinct and completely separate disease process. Write to your elected officials and let them know. BOOM!: How do you like to relax and wind down from a hard day’s work? Rachelle: I enjoy reading after a long day while on a stationary bike in order to stay fit. It is also important to me to listen to my daughters and husband

30 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

summarize their days.

for the life it has provided: family, profession, church.

BOOM!: Do you have time to be involved in community, civic or other activities? Faith-based activities?

BOOM!: As you’ve aged, how have your priorities changed?

Rachelle: Yes, occasionally I visit hospice patients and the home bound elderly. Weekly and dedicated church attendance is a requirement in our Catholic family. I have served in various roles at St. Peter Catholic Church.

Rachelle: Physically I emphasize new endurance activities as in 8-mile hikes on weekends, along with stretching and strengthening workouts. Also, I focus learning new activities or renewing older ones: ballroom dancing, genealogy. Cognitively in my work I have always stayed up to date or on the cutting edge of medical breakthroughs thus I am engaged in

BOOM!: What is it about living in the Montgomery/ River Region area that you like? Photo from recent trip to the YuanYang Rice Terraces in the Rachelle: After living in subYuan Province in South China zero weather for the majority mental stimulation. Some priorities as of my life I appreciate sunshine and in new fashion that works for me…will warm weather. I am a Southerner never change! by choice and cherish Montgomery

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Rachelle: My life is directly and am still surrounded by digital technology. fulfilled in My husband, Henry, is a computer my work. I guru and my daughters have grown love treating up in the digital era thus much patients has rubbed off on me. Though and would Rachelle: my family may tease me that I not dream Charismatic, am digitally challenged, I perform of stopping Intelligent and quite proficiently on my computer anytime persistent processing electronic medical records soon. The (EMR’s), medical research as well earlier you BOOM!: Do as on my smart phone for everyday concentrate you have Rachelle, Henry, Izabella, Gabriella, with Rachelle's mom digital use in my medical practice and on wellness any hobbies private life. in eating and exercise the more you or other activities that grab your will enjoy your later years. Move attention? We want to thank Rachelle for helping us put together this month’s BOOM! Cover Profile. If more! The more vigorous you are the you want to learn more or share a thought visit longer you are vigorous! Rachelle: My husband introduced me Dr. Janush's website at www.cpmpm.net. We to photography which has sparked my want to thank the portrait team BOOM!: attention, it is a shared hobby. I value at Total Image Technology the artistic composition of framing the Portraits for their is rooted in view in landscapes and the glory of quality work. If you have questions, almost every the beauty. comments or aspect of suggestions our lives. BOOM!: Many people over 50 are about our cover profiles, including What’s your experiencing a renewed sense of nominating relationship purpose, new goals, or thoughts of someone, please with the retirement. How would you describe send them to jim@ riverregionboom. digital world? this sense of renewal in your life? com How does Any advice for the rest of us seeking technology help renewal? Rachelle visiting family in Las Vegas in your medical practice? Rachelle: At this time, I am at the Read all of the BOOM! Cover Profiles at www.riverregionboom.com/archive/ pinnacle of my professional career BOOM!: Give us three words that describe you?

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

31


The Top 10 Items You Have...THAT YOUR KIDS DON'T WANT! The following is excerpted from No Thanks Mom: The Top Ten Objects Your Kids Do NOT Want (and what to do with them). By Elizabeth Stewart

Your house, and what it contains, is a minefield in the eyes of your grown children. They can see from your example that collections of stuff are a curse; such objects are superfluous to a life well lived. They want a clean, clear field in which to live their lives. Your grown children will not agree to be the recipients of your downsizing if it means their upsizing. In the following list of the Top Ten Objects Your Kids Do Not Want — inspired by conversations (or lack thereof) about my keepsakes with my 30-year-old son, Lock, and his wife, as well as by similar conversations I’ve had with hundreds of boomer clients and their millennial heirs — I will help you find a remedy for dealing with each: No. 10: Books Unless your grown kids are professors, they don’t want your books. There are a couple common mistakes my clients make in valuing books: The 17th-century books are likely to be theological or grammar-based, and are not rare. The 19th-century books are probably not in good condition, and since most came in a series or set, it’s unlikely you’ll have a full (valuable) set. Remedy: If you think the book is relatively common plug the title, author, year of publication, and publisher into a search engine. A favorite book site of mine is Biblio.com. Once you have background information, call a book antiquarian.

32 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

No. 8: Steamer Trunks, Sewing Machines and Film Projectors Trust me, every family has at least three steamer trunks from the 19th century. They are so abundant that they are not valuable, unless the maker is Louis Vuitton, Asprey, Goyard or some other famous luggage house.

No. 9: Paper Ephemera Things like family snapshots, old greeting cards and postcards are called paper ephemera. Old photos are not worth anything unless the sitter is a celebrity or linked with an important historical event or the subject is extremely macabre, like a death memorial image. Old greeting cards are not valuable unless handmade by a famous artist or sent by Jackie O. Postcards are valued mainly for the stamps. Remedy: Take all your family snapshots and have them made into digital files. The other option is to sell those old snapshots to greeting card publishers who use them on funny cards or give family photos to image archive businesses like Getty. If the archive is a not-for-profit, take the donation write-off.

Likewise, every family has an old sewing machine. I have never found ONE that was rare enough to be valuable. And every family has a projector for home movies. Thrift stores are full of these items, so, unless your family member was a professional and the item is top-notch, yours can go there as well. Remedy: Donate this category and don’t look back.

No. 7: Porcelain Figurine Collections and Bradford Exchange “Cabinet” Plates

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


These collections of frogs, chickens, bells, shoes, flowers, bees, trolls, ladies in big gowns, pirates, monks, figures on steins, dogs, horses, pigs, cars, babies, Hummel’s, and Precious Moments are not desired by your grown children, grandchildren or any other relation. Even though they are filled with memories of those who gave them to your mom, they have no market value. And they do not fit into the Zenlike tranquil aesthetic of a 20- or 30-something’s home. Remedy: Find a retirement home that does a gift exchange at Christmas and donate the figurines. If you want to hold on to a memory of your mom’s collection, have a professional photographer set them up, light them well and make a framed photo for your wall. Collector’s plates will not sell anywhere to anyone. Donate these to a retirement village as well or to anyone who will take them. No. 6: Silver-Plated Objects Your grown children will not polish silverplate, this I can guarantee. If you give them covered casserole dishes, meat platters, candy dishes, serving bowls, tea services, gravy boats, butter dishes and candelabra, you will be persona-nongrata. They might polish sterling silver flatware and objects, but they won’t polish the silver-plated items your mom entertained with. The exception may be silver-plated items from Cristofle, Tiffany, Cartier, Asprey, and other manufacturers of note. Remedy: None. Give it away to any place or person who will take it. No. 5: Heavy, Dark, Antique Furniture There is still a market for this sort of furniture, and that market, in the fashionable areas of the U.S., is most often the secondhand shop. You’ll receive less than a quarter of purchase price if you sell on consignment in one. Unless your furniture is mid-century modern, there’s a good chance you will have to pay someone to take it off your hands. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Remedy: Donate it and take a non-cash charitable contribution using fair market valuation. Use reporting services such as P4A.com to find where this class of furniture sells. No. 4: Persian Rugs The modern tranquility aimed for in the décor of the 20- to 30-somethings does not lend itself to a collection of multicolored (and sometimes threadbare) Persian rugs. Remedy: The high-end market is still collecting in certain parts of the U.S. (think Martha’s Vineyard), but unless the rug is rare, it is one of the hardest things to sell these days. If you think the value of the rug is below $2,000, it will be a hard sell. Like antique furniture, it may be best to donate. No. 3: Linens Go ahead, offer to send your daughter five boxes of hand-embroidered pillowcases, guest towels, napkins, and table linens. She might not even own an iron or ironing board, and she definitely doesn’t set that kind of table. Remedy: Source those needlewomen who make handmade Christening clothes, wedding dresses, and quinceañera gowns. Also, often you can donate linens to costume shops of theaters and deduct the donation. A site like P4a.com has auction results to establish the fair market value of such objects. No. 2: Sterling Silver Flatware and Crystal Wine Services Unless the scrap value for silver is high enough for a meltdown, matching sets of sterling flatware are hard to sell because they rarely go for “antique” value. Formal entertaining is not a priority these days. And of course, sterling must be handwashed and dried. Can you see your kids choosing to use the silver? Same goes

for crystal: The sets you have are too precious, and the wine they hold is too small a portion. Period. Remedy: Sites like Replacements.com offer matching services for folks who DO enjoy silver flatware and have recognized patterns. Because they sell per piece, and therefore buy per piece, sellers get a rather good price. Sell your whole silver service; it will be “pieced out.” Unless your crystal is Lalique, Moser, Steuben, Baccara, or another great name, you will not be able to sell your “nice set.” Give “unknown maker” sets away, fast. No. 1: Fine Porcelain Dinnerware Your grown children may not want to store four sets of fancy porcelain dinnerware, and frankly don’t see the glory in unpacking it once a year for a holiday or event. This is the saddest story I have to tell my clients: your grown kids and grown grandkids DO NOT want and will NEVER want five or more fine china services. They don’t even want one. They do not see the logic. They don’t want porcelain tea sets or dessert, fish, or fruit services either. Ask yourself, when was the last time you witnessed your grown son using a saucer? Remedy: Like silverware, china is something to consider for sale to a replacement matching service like Replacements.com. Know your pattern to get a quote from one. Because such replacement companies buy per piece, the aggregate of the selling price is always more than a bulk sale at a consignment store, which might be your only other option. This article first appeard at www.nextavenue.com

Elizabeth Stewart is the author of No Thanks Mom: The Top 10 Objects Your Kids Do Not Want (and what to do with them). She is a certified member of the Appraiser's Association of America and collects "no thanks" stories from her three decades of experience. To learn more about what you own, visit www.ElizabethAppraisals.com.

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

33


by Kimberly Blaker

A Day for Mom, Coming Soon... Mother's Day Celebrations and Gifts She’ll Treasure

“I realized when you look at your mother, you are looking at the purest love you will ever know.” —Mitch Albom The role of mothers in shaping their daughters' and sons' lives is unsurpassed. Mothers teach us to love, be strong, be confident, persist, live life to its fullest and be the best we can be. Mother’s Day is just around the corner, Sunday May 13th. So, this year give her the gift of your heart and time, and make it a special day she'll treasure. Mother’s Day Brunch – Serve your mother a scrumptious breakfast or take her out for Mother’s Day brunch. If you prepare it yourself, the following menu will be sure to please: fruit salad, juice, waffles or pancakes with her favorite blueberry or strawberry topping, Canadian bacon and fresh sausage, omelets or eggs benedict, homemade hash browns, and coffee cake or Danishes. Also, don’t forget the fresh cut flowers for the table centerpiece. Spring Blooms - What better way to spend a spring day than together in your mother’s garden? Pick up her favorite annuals and perennials: begonias, petunias, violets, morning glories, poppies, marigolds, snapdragons, or mums. Then enjoy a relaxing day

34 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

together planting and sprucing up her flower garden and catching up on old times. Mother/Daughter Memories – Give your mother a keepsake that’ll be dear to her heart. Purchase Mothers & Daughters: A Record Book About Us to fill out and share with her. Or create your own memory book with a scrapbook or journal. Include photos and memories about special times the two of you have had together; the most important things you remember about your mother from your childhood; how she has inspired you; and the times you look forward to in the future.

The Main Event – Surprise your mother with tickets to an event she's been dying to see: the ballet, a concert, play or musical, the opera, a favorite sporting event, a comedy show, or dinner theater. Be sure to tell her you have something special planned (but not what), so she'll be all yours for the day. A Train Excursion – Spring is the perfect time to tour the countryside. Take a train ride with your mother, and enjoy the vivid colors of spring, blue skies, beautiful blossoms, and other scenic sights. Family Portrait – If your family is like most, you're well overdue for an updated family portrait. What better time to have

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


it done than on Mother's Day? Schedule to have your family's picture taken at a studio, or hire a photographer for a photo shoot in the park. Coordinate with family members in advance on the formality and color scheme, so outfits don't clash. Inform your mother how to dress for her special day, but keep it a surprise, and don't disclose your plans. The Power of Poetry – You don’t need to be a poet to write a special verse for your mother. In your poem, share what it was like growing up with her, how she influenced your life, or tell her just what she means to you. Then print it on stationary, and matte and frame it. A Little Pampering – Mothers spend many years pampering their children giving bubble baths, washing hair, and caring for them when they're ill. Give your mother a special treat, a gift certificate for pampering at the spa where she can enjoy a Swedish massage, hair design, a sea spa manicure and pedicure, or a soothing facial. Weekend Getaway – Put together a weekend package designed especially for your mother. Choose a city that offers great shopping, art museums and culture centers, or even a quaint historic town with neat shops, cafes, and parks. Leave the dates for the getaway open so she can make the trip at her convenience, or so the two of you can make plans together. Keep it Simple – Plan a relaxing day together enjoying the outdoors, and head to a nearby park where you can meander along nature trails, take a scenic bike ride, and reminisce. Especially for Mothers - Select from one of many poetry books for and about mothers that expresses what you’d like her to know. Try one of the following: Mother: A Cradle to Hold Me by Maya Angelou Mothersongs: Poems For, By, and About Mothers by Sandra M. Gilbert et al. You Are One Amazing Lady: Special Thoughts to Share With a Truly Wonderful Woman by Douglas Pagels Kimberly Blaker is a lifestyle and parenting freelance writer. She also writes a blog, The Young Gma's Guide to Parenting at www.theyounggma.com Copyright © 2017 Kimberly Blaker, All rights reserved.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

35


Travel Experiences with Jeff Barganier

Feeling Fairhope Books, Food, Treasure & Art

dining at its best and the food is fresh, once, I thought a A book signing is a affordable and delicious. Its patrons, I chat had ended great opportunity might add, are completely courteous and only to have a newto get away, meet honest. I know this to be a fact, because found friend return new people and the full hour we were inside relaxing again and again to visit venues we’ve and enjoying dinner, our 2016 Honda pursue our budding known about but Odyssey sat in the parking lot unlocked, relationship. I never experienced. engine running, and full of our various observed local Cindy and I recently possessions! I had forgotten to push friends engaging took advantage of the button that shuts off the engine! one another as if such an occasion, I prefer regular old keys—that’s how family. And they signing my books at old-fashioned I am. As we walked away treated me like the famous Page and from the van, I clicked my “fob” several family, too. Page Palette Bookstore in times, thinking I was locking the doors. and Palette Books Fairhope. My signing But because the engine was still running, provides the perfect coincided with the the doors didn’t lock. And there it idled, setting for meeting city’s 66th Annual untouched, until our return. How many others. It’s not just Arts and Crafts times a day should we thank the Good a bookstore. The Festival to which Jeff with Book Buyer Mary Dora Younce at Lord that we live in such a blessed region space includes a 230 exhibitors from Page and Palette Books of the country where people respect the spacious bar in the all over the country property of others? back where one may enjoy live jazz and brought their best works. This sprawling a favorite brew; and an adjacent coffee extravaganza features live entertainment The next day, we drove about 45 shop with yummy scones – ask Cindy. and delicious cuisine on the streets minutes to Charles Phillips Antiques and of beautiful Downtown Fairhope Architecturals After a day throughout the three-day event. The on the of making festival has grown tremendously since Western Shore friends and 1953 and visitors now number in the at Theodore, signing hundreds of thousands. While signing Alabama books, books, I enjoyed conversations with where we we drove folks from Chicago, Columbus, Ohio, strolled among to the California, Florida, Peru and, of course, the 8 barns outskirts Fairhope. It’s not surprising that, in 2017, and 75,000 of the city Sunshine Artists Magazine recognized square feet – the only the Festival as #9 of their Top 200 Best. of amazing place we architectural could find a Typically, large gatherings repel me. salvage from hotel room But the kind hospitality of friendly all over the during the locals eased the stress I would have felt Mediterranean festival. We amidst the mad throngs of humanity. The Book Cellar at Page and Palette Books and the world. stopped Indeed, Fairhope has a spirit unique This extensive for a “pick among cities, a tension-free spirit of collection of architectural antiques is three” seafood basket at Kravers Seafood love and camaraderie that is, at once, tucked away in the country down a Family Restaurant on Highway 181 in vintage-Alabama marinated in Eastern scenic lane shaded by spreading oaks. Daphne. Although Kravers was slammed Shore seasoning, and a vibe difficult to For architects, builders and interior on a Friday evening, a mere table for miss. It’s a spirit of openness one can designers, these grounds represent two was not a long wait at this familyfeel. Conversations are easy in Fairhope resources that “age” new homes and add friendly establishment. Kravers is casual where outsiders fit in quickly. More than

36 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


the culinary crumbles of trenches sweet-potato and brings chips. Then we his personal savored some cuisine style of the best crab to life! The soup I have food here is ever tasted! not good. It’s For dessert? sensational! Excellent This is the baklava place to sprinkled with go when fresh berries. If you want dining out gets something any better than extraordinarily this, please tell The Bay House Bistro mouthme where. watering. And the quaint setting directly across from shimmering Mobile Bay Later, we headed straight for Bay House If you’re into art, Fairhope is to art makes Bay House Bistro the scenic, if Bistro on South Mobile Street back in as Fort Knox is to money. Fairhope is not romantic, Fairhope. home to the Eastern Shore Art Center, choice for a Due to heavy connecting people of all ages with the special dining festival arts through education, exhibitions and experience. traffic, we outreach activities. The Art Center is free Bay House also arrived a to the public and offers free guided tours has outside few minutes through its five galleries. Plus, artists seating under after their (and writers) are literally everywhere. spectacular designated I’m hooked. There’s nothing like feeling oaks, making lunch hours. Fairhope. You go get the feeling, too! it the perfect But, in typical place to enjoy Fairhope For more information visit: Sunday brunch fashion, they www.fairhopeartsandcraftsfestival.com on a pretty day. seated us www.pageandpalette.com Charles Phillips Antiques We enjoyed the anyway. The www.kraversrestaurant.com “special of the day” mixed-greens salad Bay House Bistro offers fine dining set www.charlesphillipsantiques.com with Champagne mustard vinaigrette in a casual, relaxed environment. Chef www.bayhousebistro.com topped with caramelized onions and Brian Karadimos has done his time in www.esartcenter.org character. The business was started by Charles and Sue Phillips straight out of college in 1975 and, they admit, has seen good times and bad. Today it thrives and two of the Phillips’s grown children work alongside them. We enjoyed meeting the Phillips and watching their craftsmen create unique pieces from salvage. It’s open exclusively to “the trade” Monday through Wednesday; and to the public Thursday through Saturday. If you dig old finds like antique doors, windows, shutters, columns, pottery, sugar kettles, wagons, custom furniture – about anything you can imagine – Phillips Antiques is worth the drive.

Jeff S. Barganier is a freelance writer and business manager of Cindy Barganier Interiors LLC. He travels far and wide upon the slightest excuse for something interesting to write about. Contact Jeff at Jeffbarganier@knology.net. Follow him on Instagram: #jeffbarganier.

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

37


38 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Eating Smart with Tracy Bhalla

Why Choose Organic

What exactly does the word “organic” mean, especially when we are talking about products that we use, whether food or skincare? When we see the word Organic, it can be a little deceiving. Sometimes it says “made from organic ingredients” which may only mean that SOME of the ingredients are organic. On food products - for humans and animals - look for the USDA Organic label. Providing their certification is actually up to date, use of this label means that they have passed a rigorous testing period. Organic products are grown and processed under a set of strict ecological regulations. Soil that the products are grown in has to have been pesticide and chemical free for at least 3 years. Organic always means: • Fewer pesticides and toxic chemicals • No artificial colors & preservatives • The highest standards of animal welfare • No routine use of antibiotics • GM Free • Skincare products are never tested on animals • All ingredients are rigorously checked, sustainably sourced and traceable. • Use only natural colors and fragrances from plants and flowers • Green chemistry principles are followed, minimizing the environmental impact of ingredients and products. The creation of waste during the manufacturing process is also minimized. • Restricted use of petrochemical ingredients • The manufacturing premises are inspected annually The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Did you know that over 320 pesticides can be routinely used in non-organic farming and are often present in non-organic food? That means that even if you vigorously wash your food before you cook it, you are still consuming pesticides at every meal. If you didn’t see this Huffington Post report when it came out in May 2015, take a look at it now, In The Healthy Living Section, “What happened after one family went organic for just two weeks”. (www.huffingtonpost.com/the-organiceffect) In brief, it describes an experiment run by a Swedish food supermarket chain on a family who ate “regular”, non-organic food. The levels of pesticides tested in all of them was high, but after just two weeks of eating organic food, all members of the family had significantly reduced levels of pesticides (poisons) in their bodies. Organic means the very highest standards of animal welfare. Organic animals are truly free range and are reared without the routine use of drugs, antibiotics and wormers. Also, good for you as those harmful chemicals will not be passed on to you too. I am sure you are aware of the national outcry at the superbugs resistant to all known antibiotics. Even large producers like Tyson have finally succumbed to not using antibiotics as a precautionary measure. Those antibiotics are passed on from animal to human and as a result we have the antibiotic superbug crisis we see today. Animals that are allowed to graze out in the pasture, as nature intended, do

not need all those drugs. Organic farming is better for the planet. Organic means working with nature, not against it. No system of farming does more to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, or protect natural resources like fresh water and healthy soils. Organic is higher in nutrients. Research published in the British Journal of Nutrition found significant differences between organic and non-organic farming. For every 3 portions of organic produce you eat, you would have to eat 5 of non-organic in order to get the same amount of nutritional value. So you need to eat (and buy) less in order to eat well. Organic farming combats climate change. The impact of switching to organic farming could save 64 million tons of carbon over 20 years across all UK cultivated land - the equivalent of taking nearly a million family cars off the road! Imagine what it could do in the US! Organic farms are havens for wild life, particularly the all-important pollinators. They provide homes for bees, birds and butterflies – there is up to 50% more wildlife on organic farms! If all that is not enough reasons to go organic, how about this last one - it just tastes better! Especially if you’ve grown it yourself. Tracy Bhalla, Independent Consultant with NYR Organics, website: us.nyrorganic.com/shop/tracybhalla email: nyrbhalla@gmail.com You can also visit Tracy’s blog at Tracybhalla.com, Continuing my obsession with all things organic, I have been working with NYR for two years now, using their skincare products myself for over 25 years! Your skin is the body’s largest organ, it deserves to be well looked after. I am here to answer any questions you may have. R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

39


How to Teach Your Grandkids

Critical Thinking Skills

and Books That Foster Objective Thought

By Kimberly Blaker "Too often we give children answers to remember rather than problems to solve." - Roger Lewin Ph.D., British anthropologist and science writer Every day we're inundated with information and often from two opposing sides. So how do we teach kids to evaluate the information they read and hear, whether it comes from the media, our leaders, family, or friends? Teaching kids to think critically is the solution and is crucial to their developing the ability to assess information and form logical conclusions about that which is presented to them. Fortunately, there are many ways grandparents can help foster critical thinking in their grandchildren and help them to develop problem-solving skills. WAYS TO FOSTER CRITICAL THINKING Ask your grandchild questions. When your grandkid asks a question or comments on a situation, look for opportunities to ask questions rather than immediately providing an answer. Open-ended questions offer the chance to think and assess. Examples of questions you can ask are: "What would you do to solve this problem?" or "I'd like to hear what you think." Once your grandkid has answered, ask in a nonjudgmental tone for them to defend their answer. "Can you tell me why you think that?" or "What led you to this conclusion?" are a couple of questions to get kids to expound on their answers. Asking your grandchild such questions provides additional opportunity to consider how they arrived at their answer. Through the process of thinking and talking about it, your grandchild might discover any faulty

40 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

thinking in their initial response. Regardless of whether or not your grandchild's thinking was correct or logical, praise your grandkid for their effort in thinking their answer through. Then, if your grandchild's reasoning is faulty, gently explain what you believe and why to help correct any assumptions or misconceptions. Use play as an opportunity to foster critical thinking Kids often learn best through play. Whatever they're playing, encourage them to strategize. If it's a board game, have them think through their next move and consider what their opponent might do. If building with legos, have your grandchild consider how the placement of one piece will affect the placement of other pieces and the look or functionality of the structure. Take advantage of everyday tasks Giving kids real-life opportunities to problem solve is an excellent way to

hone their critical thinking skills. When your grandchild is helping you do chores, for example, allow your grandchild to do it their way a few times to see if he or she can figure out the most efficient way to concur the task. If after several tries it's taking your grandchild longer than necessary or the job isn't getting done as well as it could, ask your grandchild to think of a way to do it that's faster or does the job better. Allow your grandchild time to think about it so he or she can find a solution. If your grandkid can't come up with a solution, offer a tip and ask how that might help. Encourage thinking outside the box Kids already have the innate ability to think outside the box, which is also known as divergent thinking. But as kids grow, thought becomes more convergent. A certain degree of convergent thinking is necessary, so we don't give the same weight to all The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


possibilities. Still, a certain amount of divergent thinking is crucial to the ability to solve problems. When the opportunity arises, ask your grandchild to think of all the possible ways a problem might be solved, or something can be done. Then ask your grandchild to consider and weigh out the pros and cons of each solution to determine which is best. BOOKS THAT TEACH CRITICAL THINKING The following books encourage kids to think critically and show them how to evaluate situations, examine beliefs, and understand the methods of science. Some of these books also contain activities to help kids hone their critical thinking skills. Horoscopes: Reality or Trickery? by Kimberly Blaker. Grades 4 to 8. In this book, kids discover the tricks astrologers use to create horoscopes, which create the illusion of horoscopes being valid forecasts or assessments of personality. Kids can do a fun personality test to help them see how horoscopes are created. Then they can test the validity of horoscopes in real life. The book contains seven activities to entertain and educate kids on the scientific process and making deductions as they sleuth for the truth about astrology. Bringing UFOs Down to Earth by Philip J. Klass. Grades 4 to 7. In this fun book, kids learn fascinating facts about UFOs and how UFO reports are investigated. They also learn about rational and scientific explanations for UFO sightings and reports. How to Fake a Moon Landing: Exposing the Myths of Science Denial by Darryl Cunningham. Grades 7+. This book addresses eight hotly debated science topics in which the author discusses the research and current thinking on each issue. Readers discover how people on all sides of the issues manipulate information to suit their views. In the end, teens are armed with the needed information to draw conclusions on each topic. The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments by Ali Almossawi. Grades 7+. This beautifully illustrated and handy book introduces readers to a variety of faulty arguments people use including ad hominem attacks, the straw man fallacy, slippery slope arguments, and more. Throughout the book, the characters commit every error in reasoning imaginable thereby providing readers clear examples of logic failures. How Come? Every Kid's Science Questions Explained by Kathy Wollard and Debra Solomon. Grades 4 to 6. Kids discover the answers to more than 200 mysteries and phenomena in this fun-filled book. They learn the secrets to why stones can skip across water rather than immediately sinking and whether running to shelter when it's raining keeps you drier than walking. Logic to the Rescue: Adventures in Reason by Kris Langman. Grades 5 to 9. In this sword-and-sorcery fantasy story, kids learn about logical fallacies, how to test a hypothesis, and set up experiments in biology, chemistry, and physics. Flat Earth? Round Earth? by Theresa Martin. When a school teacher passes out clay spheres to the class to be decorated, one student crushes his arguing the earth is flat. This leads to a trip to the principal's office where the boy, unwilling to succumb to "common knowledge," poses several arguments. The narrator then takes on the challenge of providing proof the earth is round. The book teaches kids the value of questioning and not taking things at face value. Philosophy for Kids: 40 Fun Questions That Help You Wonder About Everything by David White. Grades 4+. In this interactive book, kids have the opportunity to grapple with philosophical questions that have been discussed and debated as far back as the ancient Greeks right on through modern-day thought. Philosophy for Kids is filled with fun and exciting activities to help them understand philosophical concepts.

How Do You Know It’s True? Discovering the Difference Between Science and Superstition by Hy Ruchlis. Grades 7 to 10. In examining a variety of superstitions such as astrology and the unlucky number 13, the author addresses the problem that the nature of superstition is that it's unobservable. He also does an excellent job illustrating the dangers of magical thinking. The book helps readers walk away with a better understanding of science. Sasquatches from Outer Space: Exploring the Weirdest Mysteries Ever by Tim Yule. Grades 4 to 7. Have you ever wondered if there's any truth to the stories about Big Foot, the Loch Ness Monster, UFOs, or astrology? These mysteries and more are explored in this book, which also provides readers handson experiments they can do to get to the truth of these tales. Nibbling on Einstein's Brain: The Good, the Bad and the Bogus in Science by Diane Swanson and Francis Blake. Grades 3 to 7. In this book, kids learn how to tell the difference between good science and faulty. The author encourages critical thinking through a combination of fascinating fictitious scenarios and real-world examples. Nibbling on Einstein's Brain includes fun activities to help kids develop critical thinking skills. The Magic Detectives: Join Them in Solving Strange Mysteries by Joe Nickell. Grades 4 to 6. This book contains thirty short mystery stories of paranormal investigations, each one containing clues to uncover the mystery. At the end of each story, kids flip the book upside down to read the 'magic detectives' conclusions. Stories include haunted stairways, the mummy's curse, poltergeists, and more. Kimberly Blaker is a lifestyle and parenting freelance writer. She also writes a blog, The Young Gma's Guide to Parenting at www.theyounggma.com Copyright © 2018 Kimberly Blaker, All rights reserved.

Digital & Interactive free subscriptions www.riverregionboom.com

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

41


By Greg Budell

The Mayor of BOOMTOWN

GREETINGS FROM LAKE GOOSE (The Wedding, Part 1)

On the night she was born, I held the miracle we named Janelle Carole Budell in my arms, gazing down on the tiny face of my sleeping angel- grateful she seemed so comfortable in her Daddy’s arms.

I think I can lay genetic claim to Janelle’s whimsical sense of humor, and it started young.

One night during bedtime prayers we were going down the list of “who should God bless”. As I knelt next to her Greg holding new born daughter, Janelle bed, she said “Mommy, Daddy, Grandma, Buttons” (family Yorkie) and then she paused. Hopes and dreams flowed like a raging “Who else?” I asked with fatherly river that night. sincerity. She weighed 6 pounds 6 ounces, a She looked about number dwarfed by the weight of new her room for a responsibility I was feeling. That’s a real baby you’re holding there Greg Budell! moment and I daydreamed of all the experiences I’d finally announced bring to her, the lessons in life I would “God bless ceiling teach; the wisdoms I would impart fan”. I burst out guiding her through the process of laughing, gave her the vigorous growing up. tickling she As time passed, it turned out quite the deserved and said opposite. “GOOSE!”. When Janelle turned 13, I thought back to that first night at Mt. Sinai hospital and realized how many experiences she’d provided me, how much I learned about life through raising her, that she in fact, taught me to finally grow up!

and the Barbie Corvette she hoped to get for Christmas (and did). “Goose” stuck as Janelle’s nickname. Before I knew what hit me, she was graduating kindergarten, and after the sweet little ceremony, she noticed my eyes were a little moist. She looked at me and said, “Dad, when I get married everybody’s going to have to wear rubber shoes to splash through your tears!”. I am sentimental to a fault, but did not realize how intuitive my little girl was when it came to her old man. I thought I’d done a better job of concealing that part of my persona. Well, That Wedding is almost here. Several years ago, Janelle asked if I’d mind going to the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Science with her.

It became a running gag at When we arrived, bedtime. After she casually Ryan and Janelle going down the dropped the list of family, friends and pets deserving news we’d be getting a special guided God’s blessing, she eventually sought His tour by a friend of hers named Ryan. protection for the cars, major appliances

Greg Budell's column is proudly sponsored by McDonald & Hagen Wealth Management

42 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


The tour was great but Ryan really proved to be someone special. Exhibit after exhibit was described by an incredibly articulate, smart young man. He was quite quick witted, fast on his feet. Everything Ryan explained was done in an extemporaneous fashion. I’ve been in radio for a hundred years known people who couldn’t identify their radio station without a cue card. Ryan Martinez made a great first impression, and had a clear gift for entertaining people.

notice I used the word “outdoors”? If I don’t hold it together my daughter will be reminiscing through wedding photos featuring lakes and mudslides. Seated guests will be sinking into the grass. If I can take my daughter’s arm and walk her to the podium, waiting to conduct the ceremony will be a fella named Ron Magill. Ron is the Curator at Zoo Miamithe guy you see on Good Morning America when the zoo is threatened by hurricanes. Ryan left the Museum several years ago to become a zookeeper for Ron (he does amazing demonstrations with wild birds and critters in the Zoo

You can see how the wedding joy and drama plays out in the MAY issue of BOOM. While I may lack confidence in my comportment, I am 100% confident in this marriage and said so at a beautiful engagement dinner last September. The event was hosted by Ryan's parents, and they- and his entire family are wonderful, loving people.

A toast began going around the room. The event was noisy and beyond cheerful until my time came. I rose to speak, After the tour, during lunch I broke the and the first sound I articulated was Dad code of not asking nosy questionssomething akin to “Is Ryan someone special?”. the squeak of a small Ryan & Janelle's Wedding Location animal toy. My eyes “Yeah, I really like him”, she Before Greg After Greg filled. The cheer in said somewhat wistfully. the room died into a My Dad-quisition ended silence reserved for a there. “Good! He seems ceiling fan on its last like a really nice guy!”, I spin. replied. “I hope it works out”. “Tears of joy, folks, tears of joy!” I Again, before I knew what croaked out. That hit me, I was looking at reassurance allowed a beautifully produced breathing to resume. wedding invitation (by my I glanced down at graphic designing Goose) Janelle who smiled with the words “You’re a “that’s my Dad” invited to the wedding of smile. Janelle and Ryan…” as my eyes welled up. “Since the day she was born”, I said, For 20 years my daughter “I’ve told anyone willing to listen that the amphitheater). Zoo graphic designer has insisted I’ll be a blubbering, greatest thing that can happen to any Janelle Budell’s work is on display all over Griswoldian mess at her wedding and man is to be the father of a daughter”. I the grounds, so this is a family wedding now, here comes the bride! In vulcanized paused before finishing my soggy toast in more ways than one! heels! with words that came from the very depths of my heart. Ron is one of the greatest people on this Will I hold it together? A few dignified planet. I met him 8 years before Janelle tears are expected by fathers of the bride “Tonight I can say the greatest thing that was born when he came to my radio at weddings. It’s certainly OK. I love the can happen to a man is to be the father studio dragging along a giant drum filled young man she is marrying. It’s truly a of a daughter who’s going to marry this with 20 feet of snake. happy occasion! Can I keep my tear ducts wonderful young man right here”. in check? Ron told me he’d never seen a whiter See you next month! Invest in Kleenex. man than me that morning. EVERYTHING ELSE IS WORKING AGAINST ME! Greg Budell lives in Montgomery with his wife, Roz, So, walking Janelle to the little and dogs Hershey and Briscoe. He’s been in radio since wooden altar, before an ancient, First, the ceremony will be outdoors 1970, and is marking 12 years in the River Region in glorious, banyan tree- to this great friend at a beautiful animal sanctuary I took 2017. He hosts the Newstalk 93.1FM Morning Show who will perform the ceremony could be her to as a little girl so there’s a huge with Rich Thomas, Jay Scott & Emily Hayes, 6-9AM Monday-Friday. He returns weekday afternoons from enough to open the floodgates. sentimental rub there. When we were 3-6PM for Happy Hour with sidekick Joey Clark. Greg last there she was in a stroller. Did you can be reached at gregbudell@aol.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

43


April 2018

{12 Things} for active boomers and beyond

PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA

ENTERPRISE, ALABAMA

Each Spring, Callaway Gardens’ landscape explodes with one of the world’s largest displays of native and cultivated azaleas – more than 20,000 of them – plus fresh blooms of dogwoods, crabapples, daffodils, tulips and more. These sweeping floral vistas form the stunning backdrop to invigorating recreational pursuits, fascinating educational experiences and special events designed to celebrate the grandeur of the season. A series of themed weekends, known collectively as Celebrate Spring!, feature special activities and events for families and friends to share against the backdrop of these dazzling surroundings. For more information visit www.callawaygardens.com

The 44th annual Piney Woods Arts Festival takes place April 7 (9 am – 5 pm) & April 8 (12 – 4 pm), on the running track of Enterprise State Community College. One of the oldest juried arts and crafts shows in the area, Piney Woods features original art and crafts by approximately 100 artists, a children’s fun center, food and entertainment. Special events include a Civil War Living Display and the Weevil City Cruisers Car and Truck Show (Saturday only across campus from the arts festival). Admission is free. For information, call 334.406.2787 or visit www.CoffeeCountyArtsAlliance.com

Celebrate Spring...Azalea Season Callaway Gardens, Pine Mountain, GA The month of April

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

It’s All About the Books The Old Alabama Town Revue in Concert Thursday, April 5th, 7 pm The Old Alabama Town Revue closes out it season with a nod to the Alabama Book Festival. Get ready to enjoy a variety of songs from a Tom Petty tribute to a ballad inspired by To Kill a Mockingbird. It's rock n' roll standards to originals plus lots more! It's free! Call 334.240.4500 for more information or visit www.facebook.com/ events/539258819779079/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Spring Tour of Homes The Waters in Pike Road Friday-Sunday, April 6-8, 1-6 pm

Join us at The Waters in Pike Road for our Spring Tour of Homes! We will have more than 12 NEW homes open to tour - Plus food, fun, and great prizes. For more information give us a call at 334.272.3200 or visit www.TheWatersAL.com

44 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

Piney Woods Arts Festival (A Juried Arts & Crafts Show) Enterprise State Community College Saturday and Saturday, April 7 & 8th

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Maxwell Centennial Bash Riverfront Park, downtown Montgomery Saturday, April 7th, 2-5 pm Open to the public, hosted by the city of Montgomery and the Montgomery County commission, this free event is to celebrate Maxwell and the River Region’s 100 years of friendship and close community partnerships. Food/beverage vendors, family friendly activities, live music by the Air National Guard Band of the South, Maxwell Honor Guard presentation, classic car show, military service representatives and more. Call 334.953.2014 for more information or visit www.maxwell.af.mil/Centennial/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Autism Mudbug Ball-Crawfish Boil Dreamland downtown Montgomery Saturday, April, 7th, 12-5:30 pm

The BEST crawfish boil in the GUMP along with live music and cold beverages will happen Saturday, April 7, 12 – 5:30 pm at Dreamland Bar-B-Que, downtown Montgomery! All proceeds are donated to assist with Autism programs provided by Easter Seals Central Alabama for families in the River Region. We hope you will help us by supporting this event. Tickets are $35. Ages 3 - 10 are $10. VIP tickets are $75. Tickets can be purchased on eventbrite. For more information, please call 334.262.0080. For more info visit www.autismmudbugball.org/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Seafood & Arts Festival Union Station Train Shed Saturday, April 14th, 4-8 pm

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Digital & Interactive

f re e su bsc r i pt i on s at w w w.rive r re gio n b o o m.co m Montgomery's first annual Seafood & Arts Festival will be held on Saturday, April 14th from 4pm-8pm at Union Station Train Shed in Downtown Montgomery. Come out and enjoy some delicious seafood, crafts and art from local artists. Donation Entry - $1 to $5 to the non-profit organization, Child Protect. Seafood and Art Vendors will be available. Live Entertainment provided by the Rachel Wilson Band. Cash Bar will be available, all ages welcome. For more information, call 334.625.2100 or visit www.funinmontgomery.com/announcements/ seafood-and-arts-festival

leaving her for their friend Marianne, who is in turn leaving their other friend and Marianne's husband Tom, and Bill and Marianne were hosted by mutual friends Jinny and Martha, who are expecting a baby. Janet, understandably upset about her husband cheating on her, texts her absent lover, and the whole night would be a shamble even without the drugs and the gun in the bathroom. The Party is an acerbic black comedy, and a must for anyone wanting their guests to leave early. For more information, call 334.262.4858 or visit www.capritheatre.org

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

Saint James United Methodist Church invites you to attend our 9th Annual Silent Auction: April 21, 2018.The Auction will be held April 21st from 4-6pm. If you'd like to see an item in person, please join us for Preview Day: April 20th from 4-6pm or online at www.sjlifeauction. com. Featured items include antique furniture from Montgomery Interior Antiques, Pickwick Antiques, original artwork, jewelry, salon and boutique certificates, gift cards from local businesses and vacation home rentals. You will be amazed at the many opportunities to place your bid before the evening is over. Proceeds from the 2018 auction will provide financial assistance for youth and children’s summer trips and benefit local mission projects such as Mission Montgomery and local public schools. This is a FREE event. For more information, please call 334.481.0735 or visit www.sjlifeauction.com/home.html.

Southern Homes & Gardens (SH&G) and the American Red Cross present Taste of the Gardens, a benefit for the American Red Cross, held annually at SH&G on Vaughn Road, Montgomery, AL. Taste of the Gardens will be held Thursday, May 10th, from 5:00 to 8:00 P.M. The event includes a silent auction featuring works from local artists; tastings from the River Region’s finest restaurants & caterers; wine and live music. Also, during the Taste of the Gardens event, SH&G will offer 20% off all non-sale items in the store. Event tickets are $25 and may be purchased at SH&G or from the American Red Cross of Central Alabama. For more information, contact Kelly Hodges, 334.260.3981 or mail Kelly.hodges@redcross.org

Saint James 9th Annual Silent Auction Saint James UMC, Vaughn Rd. Saturday, April 21, 4–6 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 3 Faces of the King MPAC Saturday, Aprl 21, 7:30-9:30 pm

3 Faces of the King follows the most significant entertainer of all time through his most important musical eras. The show opens in the early years of Elvis doing Rockabilly with the moves that scared the conservative nation. And moves through Elvis’s movie making years and finally into his Vegas years. For more info call 334.481.5100 or visit www.mpaconline.org/events/

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA

The Party Capri Theatre, Cloverdale 1045 East Fairview Ave, Montgomery, AL 36106 April 27-May 3, Mon-Thurs, 7:30, Fri-Sun, 5 & 7:30 pm Janet gets a promotion and decides to celebrate with a small party of family friends. This turns out to be a bad idea, since her husband Bill is

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

Taste of the Gardens 2018 Southern Homes & Gardens Thursday, May 10th, , 5-8 pm

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Clint Black in Concert MPAC Friday, June 1, 8pm

Clint Black has one of the most storied careers in modern music. Clint Black surged to superstardom as part of the fabled Class of '89, reaching #1 with five consecutive singles from his triple-platinum debut, Killin' Time. He followed that with the triple-platinum Put Yourself in My Shoes, and then a string of platinum and gold albums throughout the '90s. Clint Black is back. The multimillion selling country mega-star is releasing On Purpose, his first full-length album of new songs in a decade and he’s doing it on his own terms. For more info visit www.mpaconline.org or www.clintblack.com

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

45


Tinseltown Talks By Nick Thomas

Hayley Mills puts on her ‘Party Face’ so I don’t get down often enough.”

As one of the bestknown child actors from the 1960s, Hayley Mills starred in a half-dozen Disney films including box-office hits “Pollyanna” and “The Parent Trap.” Now in her early 70’s, Mills continues to perform with a preference for theater work.

Older sister Juliet Mills is also an accomplished film, television, and theater actress. “Juliet lives in California and I live in London, but we’ve toured together on the stage over the years.”

contract beginning with “Pollyanna” in 1960. The following year “The Parent Trap” was released, perhaps her best-known role playing teenage twin sisters. Remade in 1998, Mills says a theater tour prevented her from accepting a cameo and only has praise for Lindsay Lohan’s performance in the remake. “I’ve never actually met her but thought she was a very good actress. However, it was a rather bizarre experience to watch the film because it felt so similar. I felt like Rip Van Winkle!”

“In January, I opened Both sisters began at the New York City Her next film for Disney was “In Search their careers as Center on Stage II in of the Castaways,” released in 1962, children, but the lovely Irish play where Mills teamed up with suave French were they rivals called ‘Party Face’ by Hayley Mills recent photo - provided by Hayley Mills competing for the entertainer Maurice Chevalier and the Isobel Mahon,” Mills always delightful British character actor same roles? explained recently Wilfrid Hyde-White. while preparing for an evening performance. “No, we never were,” said Mills. “She moved “It’s a sweet, funny, touching play. I knew “I loved them both. Maurice was a genuine to America as a teenager and theater immediately I wanted to do it when I read charmer with a tremendous warmth and became a big part of her career whereas the script.” a wonderful I focused on film. So, our twinkle in his eye. careers took us on different Featuring an all-female cast, “Party Face” Wilfrid Hydetrajectories.” is set during a housewarming party where White was just hilarity and personal conflicts intertwine and a darling man. Despite the dominant family ends in April (see www.nycitycenter.org). He was a huge acting genes – their father horseracing fan was beloved British actor While her appearances in film and on and always had John Mills – Hayley says her television have been rarer in recent years, a portable TV set father never pushed her into Mills doesn’t rule out a return. in his dressing acting. When director J. Lee room to watch Thompson visited the family “As an actor, you just don’t know what you’ll Gina Costigan and Hayley Mills currently the races. It was farm in Sussex to talk with be doing next,” she noted. “But now I have 4 appearing in Party Face at the NY City Center Photo by Jeremy Daniel. Used with permission such a privilege Mills about his role in 1959’s grandchildren and we all live within an hour to work with those two.” “Tiger Bay,” Thompson of each other, so I was impressed by Hayley enjoy spending a lot Now a true Hollywood icon herself, Mills as she played in the of time with them.” is still thrilled by the chance to take on garden. rewarding projects, such as the “Party Face” Reunions with her role. “I was messing around siblings are rarer. pretending to do television “As you get older such wonderful commercials. At lunch, he “My brother opportunities don’t come along quite so suggested using me in the Jonathan and his often. It’s a very uncertain business, but I’m film, so I did a screen test.” wife live in Tasmania very grateful for the opportunities I’ve had.” and run a fabulous Hayley Mills with father John Mills in the Barely a teen, her career Bed & Breakfast background as a police inspector in Tiger Bay Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at took off after Tiger Bay’s called Harpers on Montgomery, Ala, and has written features, success. Recognizing her the Beach,” said columns, and interviews for over 650 newspapers talent, Walt Disney signed Hayley to a 5-year Mills (see www.harpersonthebeach.com). and magazines. “It’s just heaven there, but such a long way

46 BOOM!

April 2018

RiverRegionBoom.com

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine


Help Wanted

Seeking Fun Loving, Experienced Boomers to Join Our Part-Time Team

Openings in the area of Sales Development Rep (SDR) and Distribution Manager (DM) Curious? Interested? Send an email to Jim Watson, jim@riverregionboom.com Share some of your story and why you're interested in working with BOOM!

The River Region’s 50+ Lifestage Magazine

R ive r Re gio n Bo o m . co m

April 2018

BOOM!

47


Profile for Boomer Communities

BOOM! April 2018  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine

BOOM! April 2018  

The River Region's 50+ Lifestage Magazine