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AUGUST 19–25, 2015 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 34

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The Real

BOURBON

Shortage IT’S NOT THE PRECIOUS LIQUID — IT’S THE BARRELS. HOW ST. LOUIS DISTILLERIES ARE SURVIVING IN A TIGHT MARKET. B Y PAT R I C K H U R L E Y


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P H OTO BY JA R R E D G AST R E IC H

“When I first moved here, I recognized a foundation for weirdness. Since living here for four years, I’ve seen the weirdos feeding off each other to create inspiring shit. The Screwed Arts Collective is a good example.” – FREDERICK REQUADT, SPOTTED DURING CHEROKEE NIGHTS ON CHEROKEE STREET, AUGUST 13.

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VOLUME 39 NUMBER 34 AUGUST 19–25, 2015

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10 THE REAL B O U R B O N S H O R TA G E It’s not the precious liquid — it’s the barrels. How St. Louis distilleries are surviving in a tight market. BY PATRICK HURLEY

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Jeff Mizanskey About to Go Free

Devin James Dubs Himself “Voice of the Voiceless” in New Book

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evin James is back. In a memoir published earlier this month, the fired PR representative for Ferguson blames city leaders, police officials and politicians for their failures in the aftermath of Michael Brown’s death. Marketed with his characteristic flair, the book, Inside Ferguson: A Voice for the Voiceless, also appears to function as a public-relations vehicle for James himself (as memoirs usually do). The publisher touts the book as “an explosive missile of truth from a man uniquely positioned to uncover the real mechanics of damage control and race relations.... James’ account will make you question the progress America has made in the quest for racial equality and reflect upon the true meaning of ‘Black Lives Matter.’” 8

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Jeff Mizanskey could be free from prison by the end of the month.

Viets says his main concern now is the issue of supervised release. Typically, an offender who gets paroled must spend the remainder of his James, readers may recall, served as Ferguson’s point-person for media inquiries and public relations until September 26, 2014, the day when the St. Louis Post-Dispatch revealed James had been convicted of a felony for fatally shooting an unarmed man in 2004. After the news broke, the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, which had officially hired him, cancelled James’ contract. James’ firing, however, was hardly the first bump in his employment with Ferguson. He was the mastermind behind former Ferguson police chief Thomas Jackson’s disastrous (and widely mocked) video apology to Michael Brown’s family. James also did himself no favors when he engaged in an ill-advised Twitter spat with Post-Dispatch reporter Paul Hampel, who remarked that “Ferguson could not have chosen a more tone-deaf spokesman.” Ten months later, James now seems to be doing a bit of rebranding. In the book’s promotional blurb, James’ firing is described as “character assassination that occurred when James refused to play along” with Ferguson’s inept and duplicitous city leaders. We should note that James is currently

sentence under the watch of the authorities, but in Mizanskey’s case, that would mean forever. Says Viets: “I’m very anxious to know whether he’ll be kept under the thumb of the government for the rest of his life.” — NICHOLAS PHILLIPS

Devin James.

YO U . T U B E . C O M

ast May, Jeff Mizanskey was serving a life sentence for non-violent marijuana-related offenses when Governor Jay Nixon commuted his sentence. Now he’s about to be released. According to Mizanskey’s attorney, Dan Viets, the 62-year-old is set to be freed within the next sixteen days. “It depends on the whim of the Department of Corrections,” Viets says, adding that it may happen sooner rather than later, because authorities may want to avoid a crowd gathering to greet him. “Obviously he’s very happy,” says Viets of his client, who has already served more than twenty years after being convicted under a law designed to punish prior and persistent drug offenders. A Riverfront Times feature in 2013 drew attention to his case. Mizanskey’s parole hearing was last Thursday. Originally, Viets says, the parole board said they would render a decision in six to eight weeks, but they responded much more quickly than that.

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suing St. Louis public relations firm Elasticity for breach of contract. He alleges that the firm failed to pay his company, Devin James Group, for its work in north St. Louis County. The case will go to trial next month. — DANNY WICENTOWSKI


Legal Observer Files Federal Lawsuit Against St. Louis County for I-70 Protest Arrest

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sympathizer with the “Black Lives Matter” protest that briefly shut down I-70 on August 10 is now accusing local police of responding with illegal tactics. Mustafa Abdullah, a program associate with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and legal observer for the National Lawyers Guild (NLG), filed a federal lawsuit on August 12 against St. Louis County. He alleges that right after the protest, county officers arrested him without probable cause, thus violating his constitutional rights. He says his ordeal lasted eighteen hours. Abdullah is a native of Egypt and cofounder of Muslims for Ferguson, an organization of American Muslims who support the police reform movement in that municipality. In his complaint, he says he attended the protest on “Moral Monday” wearing an

ACLU shirt and a green NLG hat. He was one of about ten other NLG legal observers on hand to document any police behavior that might infringe on free speech rights. Ironically, Abdullah says his own rights were violated. He says that after the human chain across I-70 broke up, he went down to a church parking lot where protesters had gathered. A police officer asked the crowd to disperse. Abdullah says he then walked to his car with some colleagues when a pair of county police officers approached in a patrol car, exited and rushed toward them, commanding that they get on the ground. Abdullah claims that he asked several times why he was being arrested. After being transported to the police academy, he was told he’d be charged with interfering with a law enforcement officer. He was finally released without charges eighteen hours later. His car had been towed, and his storage fee was $230, he says in his complaint. Abdullah is alleging that county police violated his Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment protections against unlawful seizure. The St. Louis County Police Department doesn’t comment on pending litigation. —NICHOLAS PHILLIPS

Phone Stolen During Ferguson Protest Reveals Thief’s Love of Erotic E-Books

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he “Moral Monday” actions in Ferguson on August 10 did more than reveal ongoing problems between police and protesters — they also revealed one thief’s appreciation for smutty literature. A St. Louis woman says that her Kindle purchase history had been all science-fiction novels and anthologies, but after her phone was stolen in Ferguson Monday night, it began listing fiction of a much steamier variety. First came Secrets of a Side Bitch, followed by Zane: Pleasure Extraordinaire (Part: 1) and Emerald’s Billionaire Boyfriend. “I was seeing all these weird emails in the account I associate with my Kindle, and I think, ‘Huh, did I download a bunch of free books?’” says Jessica, a St. Louisan who spoke to Riverfront Times on the condition that we not publish her last name. “Then I start reading the title, and it’s like, ‘Oh some of these sound like bad fantasy books I would read.’ Then I got to Orally Yours.” All in all, the thief managed to purchase a total of ten titles before Jessica could change her account’s settings. (She’s now contesting the purchases with Amazon.) Jessica ventured out to Ferguson on “Moral Monday” to film police actions and provide medical aid to protesters. She says that while she was filming an officer who was pointing a less-than-lethal shotgun-type weapon at a protester, someone snatched the phone from her hand. “I chased him down, and one of his friends was body blocking me. So I shoved

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him really hard out of the way, but the friend caught up to me and very deliberately tripped me,” she says. “It was a talented move, because I was focused on running after the kid who had my phone.” When Jessica hit the ground, her head smacked onto the concrete. She says a doctor later diagnosed her with a concussion. After her tumble, Jessica says, she pursued the thief, who appeared to be a black male teenager. At one point, she spotted the thief’s friend throwing rocks at police officers. “Some older guys, who as far as I know didn’t have anything to do with the kid with my phone, came and kind of gently pulled me away, because by then I was kind of getting incoherent because of the head injury,” she says. Asked why she didn’t request assistance from one of the many officers on the scene, Jessica says that would have been a dangerous choice — for the thief. “I thought [police] would kill the kid. That’s not worth it for a phone. I didn’t want someone trying to make an arrest.” — DANNY WICENTOWSKI

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The Real

BOURBON

Shortage 10

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IT’S NOT ABOUT THE PRECIOUS LIQUID — BUT THE BARRELS THAT HOLD IT. HERE’S HOW ST. LOUIS-AREA CRAFT DISTILLERIES ARE SURVIVING IN A TIGHT MARKET.

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W R I T T E N B Y PAT R I C K H U R L E Y P H OTOS BY ST E V E T R U E S D E L L

issouri native Mark Twain famously said, “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” He surely would have trembled at the dreaded phrase “bourbon shortage.” Both the Wall Street Journal and Time have reported on a “bourbon shortage” within the past year — serious reports echoed by numerous clickbait-y versions of the same story. Responding to claims the bourbon shortage is just industry hype, Business Insider defended its stance with an article titled “The Bourbon Shortage Is ‘Very Real,’ and It’s Coming for the Good Stuff.” It turns out, there really is no such thing. With large distilleries making as much whiskey as ever and new micro-distilleries opening all the time, we may be heading toward “too much good whiskey” — provided, that is, we have ample barrels for aging it. “As far as a bourbon shortage, it’s just not true,” says Ted Kilgore, coowner of Planter’s House and St. Louis’ expert on all things booze-related. “There’s more juice on the market now than ever before. The amount of barrels produced is the real problem.” So why exactly do barrels matter — and why aren’t there enough of them? The first distillers, in an effort to make a crop of grain more portable and long-lasting, quickly discovered that wooden barrels did more than just store the highly concentrated (and thus compact) booze that they made from corn, wheat, rye or barley. Barrels changed it in some wonderful ways. Unaged white whiskey is rough and hot. Put that same juice in a charred new American white oak barrel, and taste what happens after it has been allowed to mature there a couple of years or so: In addition to mellowing and coloring the whiskey, that oak imparts beautiful flavors, primarily vanilla and warm spice ones like clove and cinnamon, but also subtle stone fruit and some tropical notes. The charcoal from the charred oak also acts to filter the whiskey. For bourbon, the process is part of its very DNA: By definition, bourbon is at least 51 percent corn and must spend two years in new American oak. Whether it’s bourbon or rye whiskey, or a wheat-based whiskey or a blend, that time spent reposing in oak barrels is what makes it into the magical spirit we love. And we’re loving it more than ever. The demand for brown spirits has grown substantially over the last few years. Steve Neukomm, owner of Square One Brewery and Distillery, reasons that it’s part of a general increase in demand for more flavor, which explains everything from the rise of craft breweries to the explosion of the foodie continued on page 12

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Dave Weglarz in Still 630’s distillery.

Bourbon continued from page 11

movement. “Vodka was the drink in the ’60s, and people were eating a lot of fast food. People weren’t going for taste. But now people are getting more discerning and want more flavor,” Neukomm says. The industry wasn’t necessarily ready for the increase in demand. And there wasn’t much it could do in real time to sate it. “When it comes to whiskey, people think older is better,” Neukomm says. “So people went out and bought older whiskey. You can’t go back in time and make more of it to age.” Even so, there’s little evidence of a serious shortage of whiskey, though distilleries seem to be less inclined to boast about how old their precious liquid is. Plenty of good bourbon fills liquor-store shelves. A recent piece in Whisky Advocate claims the eight major distilleries currently have no supply problems. Says Patrick “Pops” Garrett, founder of Bourbon & Banter, “There’s plenty of bourbon to drink now and will be for the foreseeable future.” But as the number of smaller distilleries grows exponentially, barrels might be a different story. Craft distillers, says Garrett, face the biggest challenge: “Most of the majors have existing contracts that get them first right to the barrels that are being made.”

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For new St. Louis-area distilleries, that’s particularly galling, as much of the white oak used to age whiskey is grown right here in Missouri. White oak is quite hard, but still pliable, making it the perfect wood for barrel staves. It also happens that American white oak has especially high concentrations of a compound called tylose, which makes the finished barrels watertight. According to the United States Forest Service, Missouri has ideal growing conditions for American white oak, and so trees grown here are prized by both barrel and bourbon makers. David Weglarz, owner and distiller at Still 630, is proud of his award-winning Missouri whiskeys. “One of the great things about my distillery being in Missouri is that the best oak grows right in our back yard in the Ozarks. We use Missouri oak barrels, and our handmade pot still was also made in Missouri,” Weglarz says. But his barrels are getting more expensive and taking longer to arrive. “The last shipment I got from Independent Stave Company took three months,” Weglarz says. Meanwhile, the price has gone up — Weglarz reports that Independent Stave’s basic barrel costs at least 25 percent more than it used to. “Even if you’re able to get barrels, the prices are skyrocketing,” Weglarz says. One cooperage that used to charge $160 per barrel now charges $275. Steve Neukomm of Square One complains about these price increases as well. Previously, “$125 a barrel was typical. Barrels in my latest order were over $165, with no notice at all,” Neukomm says. continued on page 14


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Square One’s Steve Neukomm in the warehouse.

Patrick Garrett of Bourbon & Banter at Planter’s House. 14

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ndependent Stave Company is a massive global enterprise out of Lebanon, Missouri. Company materials call it the leading cooperage company in the world: It supplies barrels to Jim Beam, Wild Turkey, Heaven Hill and many others, and it provides a special “craft distiller series.” But new craft distillers are out of luck. According to its online sales page, the company is currently unable to take any new orders. And they’re not the only ones. McGinnis Wood Products is a family-owned cooperage (employing some 150 people) that’s been making white oak barrels in Cuba, Missouri, since 1968. They may be dwarfed in size by the giant Independent Stave Company, but the McGinnis family prides itself on the quality of their oak barrels, calling them “the finest crafted white-oak bourbon barrels in the world.” Though it has been reliably supplying many of the smaller distilleries, it may not be able to take on new customers for the foreseeable future. Last September the company sent out an email to everyone on its mailing list saying they wouldn’t be accepting new customers in 2015. Ralph Haynes at Pinckney Bend Distillery in New Haven says his company is in good shape, barrel-wise. “We use fifteen-gallon barrels from McGinnis, and we currently only fill about ten per month, so there is no shortage for us.” But, Haynes says, Pinckney Bend would be out of luck if it were looking at larger barrels: “Fifty-three-gallon whiskey barrels are another story, and new ones are tough to come by.” Oddly, the larger barrels are almost the same price as the smaller ones — which leads some distilleries to go up a size. That was the case for Square One. “We started with three-gallon barrels, just for service in our restaurant,” Neukomm says. But at $110 for a single-use cask, he had to move to larger barrels, especially as Square One increased production. “We started using ten-gallon barrels from Gibbs Brothers in Arkansas,” Neukomm recalls. Then the Gibbs Brothers Cooperage Co. started having trouble getting Missouri oak. “The small coopers like Gibbs and McGinnis were having trouble getting wood,” Neukomm explains, adding that the biggest coopers were buying most of the wood on the market. Now Neukomm primarily uses fifteen-gallon barrels from McGinnis. “The smaller barrels yielded a deeper, richer color, so we use five-gallon barrels for coloring,” Neukomm says. He has a monthly allocation with McGinnis now, and things seem to be going smoothly, but it continued on page 16

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Bourbon continued from page 15

wasn’t always that way. “There was a period of four months when I couldn’t get any barrels — I was starting to panic,” Neukomm recalls. That was just over a year ago. McGinnis president Don McGinnis confirms that the need for Missouri white oak remains acute. He traces the trouble to the economic downturn in 2008. The decline in the housing market and related factors put sawmills out of business and caused loggers to be laid off. (The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported in 2012 that, between slackening demand for paper and the housing market’s bust, more than 22,500 logging jobs had been lost in the last decade.)

“THERE WAS A PERIOD OF FOUR MONTHS WHEN I COULDN’T GET ANY BARRELS—I WAS STARTING TO PANIC.” This coincided with the historically unprecedented rise in the demand for bourbon. “With the growing demand for barrels and then the shortage of loggers, the problem has escalated,” McGinnis concludes grimly. Things seem to be stabilizing, at least for existing distilleries with established connections to the barrelmakers. McGinnis is serving its regular customers, even if it can’t take on new ones. And though David Weglarz has to deal with delays and price increases, he too is getting his barrels. He worries about new distilleries, though. “This is such a tough industry to get started in because all of your operating capital sits in your rickhouse for years before it brings any return. And the whole while, it’s literally evaporating! And now the cost of barrels keeps increasing, which directly impacts the amount of whiskey you can afford to put away,” Weglarz laments. Only time will show the true impact. Today’s decisions about how much whiskey to make and age have everything to do with how much whiskey will be available to drink several years from now. If the barrelmakers can’t get enough wood, there won’t be enough barrels to age all that whiskey. For now, anyway, small Missouri craft distilleries are getting by. If barrel prices don’t keep skyrocketing and delays don’t keep stretching out, Missouri’s hardworking distillers may make a few dollars, and thirsty Missourians may still have access to plenty of good native whiskey. With enough loggers, we could get the oak needed to make enough barrels, and maybe even bring the prices back down. That would be good for everyone. But if you were thinking about opening up a new craft distillery, now might not be the best time. Q

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Fri & Sat at 7:00pm, Sun at 2:00pm Journey with the STL Symphony back to the land of Hyrule with The Legend of Zelda:™ Symphony of the Goddesses. Master Quest is a never-before seen or heard multimedia concert experience that celebrates the beloved 28-year-old The Legend of Zelda™ franchise. The Legend of Zelda™: Symphony of the Goddesses is produced by Jason Michael Paul Productions, Inc., and Nintendo. The Legend of Zelda is a trademark of Nintendo. All music and associated trademarks are owned and used under license from Nintendo.

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T H U R S D AY |08.20

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[THEATER]

ONE FLEA SPARE

The Snelgraves have just about run out the clock on their enforced quarantine. It is 1665 and plague ravages London outside their doors, but in a few hours they will be able to flee to the relative safety of their country manor. But the family’s quarantine is sure to restart when the guard watching the house discovers that a sailor and a young girl have broken into the home seeking sanctuary. In a lonely house in a city gripped by fear and imminent, grisly death, these four people must confront their own mortality, their imbalances in social standing and the ever-present truth that their bodies will betray them. Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble continues its season with Naomi Wallace’s One Flea Spare. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (August 19 to 29) at the Chapel (6238 Alexander Drive; 314-827-5760 or www.slightlyoff.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. — PAUL FRISWOLD

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[ART EXHIBIT]

PAINTING THE MIDWEST

Timothy Drone began seriously collecting art in the 1970s. In the intervening 40-odd years, he’s amassed a healthy collection with an emphasis on pieces by Midwestern artists such as Joe Jones, George Caleb Bingham and Fred Conway. But Drone was also canny enough to recognize the quality of work done by women, and added paintings by Aimee Goldstone Schweig, Emily Summa and Kathryn E. Bard Cherry to his growing hoard. Now he and his wife, Jeanne, share their passion with the city in Painting the Midwest: Selections from the Collection of Timothy and Jeanne Drone Collection. The exhibition opens with a public reception at 5 p.m. Friday, August 21, at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art (3663 Lindell Boulevard; 314-977-2666 or sluma.slu.edu). The show remains up through Sunday, December 20, and the gallery is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is free. — PAUL FRISWOLD [COMEDY]

KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW

Kevin Hart is famous for laying out his personal problems in his act. He’s shorter than average, louder than any two people combined, and has dealt with a parent’s addiction, his mother’s death and his own fear of roller coasters in a very public, very funny way. He’s a regular guy who has worked hard to get to the top of the comedy scene, and he’s even hit the big screen. Maybe one day, his and Shaquille O’Neal’s dream of starring together in a remake of the Arnold Schwarzenegger/Danny DeVito film Twins will actually happen. Until then, you can catch him on his What Now tour as it passes through St. Louis. Hart shares his troubles with you at 7 p.m. tonight at Scottrade Center (1401 Clark Avenue; 314-241-1888 or www.scottradecenter.com). Tickets are $46.50 to $147. — PAUL FRISWOLD

Joe Jones. Freda, n.d. Oil on canvas Collection of Saint Louis University High School, Gift of Timothy and Jeanne Drone Fine Arts Trust.

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GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG

The great hero Siegfried, having successfully defeated Wotan in combat and beaten back the flames to win Brünnhilde’s love, now goes in search of new adventures. He meets the Gibichungs, King Gunther and his sister Gutrune, in their castle and agrees to win a wife for Gunther. But what Siegfried does not know is that Gutrune has slipped him a potion that fogs his mind, making him forget Brünnhilde — the woman Gunther wishes to marry. Siegfried is unstoppable. He wins Brünnhilde while magically disguised, and then rebukes her when she figures out what has happened. Poor Siegfried ends up spurning the woman he loves, being betrayed by his new friends and paying the ultimate price for the pride and vanity of the gods. But when a hero this great is destroyed, he brings the entire world down in flames with him. Richard Wagner’s apocalyptic Götterdämmerung rings out across the world once more this weekend courtesy of Union Avenue Opera. This is a

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reduced version adapted by Jonathan Dove and Graham Vick, but it’s still performed in German with English subtitles. Götterdämmerung is presented at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday (August 21 through 29) at Union Avenue Christian Church (733 North Union Boulevard; 314-361-2881 or www.unionavenueopera.org). Tickets are $32 to $52. — PAUL FRISWOLD

S AT U R D AY |08.22

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Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-7464599 or www.mohistory.org), offers a look back at the birth of the Arch and what it was meant to symbolize through photographs and original documents. The exhibit includes a continuing series of forums for people to discuss their interpretation of the monument’s meaning. Is it a promise unfulfilled, a reminder of past glories, or something else entirely? Arch Perspectives is open daily through Sunday, January 24. Admission is free. — PAUL FRISWOLD

[EXHIBITION]

[ F E S T I VA L ]

ARCH PERSPECTIVES

THE ST. LOUIS WORLD’S FARE HERITAGE FESTIVAL

The Gateway Arch has become visual shorthand for St. Louis. It shows up in films, commercials, on signs, T-shirts, bags, postcards. But what does the Arch really mean to the region? It was designed to celebrate Thomas Jefferson and his dream of westward expansion, but the meanings of our civic symbols change as the people who live in its shadow also change. Arch Perspectives, the new exhibit at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

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The 1904 World’s Fair still looms large in St. Louis’ history. The city was big and growing bigger, and Forest Park welcomed the world into its leafy environs to celebrate progress and the future. The St. Louis World’s Fare Heritage Festival recalls that great moment in time, while also celebrating everything going on in the city right now. From 4 to 10 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday (August

22 and 23), you can stroll through art displays, play games and hear music from Looprat, Daughters of Zion and the Schwag. Local restaurants and food trucks will be nearby, waiting to fill you up — stop by I Scream Cakes, Mission Taco Joint, Sugarfire Smoke House and Drunken Fish, though not necessarily in that order. It all takes place in Forest Park’s Shakespeare Glen (www.stlworldsfare.com). Admission is free. — PAUL FRISWOLD [THEATER]

WILD OATS

John O’Keeffe’s 1791 Restoration comedy Wild Oats is about a by-the-book naval colonel named George Thunder who is chasing deserters when he stumbles across the home of his niece. George sends for his son Harry in order to arrange a marriage between the two young people, but his son has been slumming as an actor and would prefer to continue living that dream. Harry’s lookalike (and actor chum) Rover shows up in his place, and begins wooing Kate without the old man noticing the difference. This drawing-room comedy


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was adapted by American playwright James McLure as a Western, with a few names changed but the action mostly the same. There’s a Native American who talks like an Irishman, a Shakespearean actor on the lam and a brief snippet of As You Like It crammed in there as well. St. Louis Shakespeare presents the McLure version of Wild Oats at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday (August 21 to 30) at the Ivory Theatre (7620 Michigan Avenue; 314-361-5664 or www.stlshakespeare. org). There is one 7:30 p.m. show on Thursday, August 27. Tickets are $15 to $20. — PAUL FRISWOLD

S U N D AY |08.23

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[DOCUMENTARY]

A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON

Once thought to be doomed forever to limbo, Les Blank’s 1974 film A Poem Is a Naked Person was officially shown to the public in 2015. This documentary about musician Leon Russoulardconcertsseries_qrtr_pg_aug.pdf sell covered two years of Russell’s life, from

1972 to 1974, as Russell and his extended circle of friends wrote, played and recorded music on the banks of Oklahoma’s Grand Lake. In addition to concert footage and interviews, T H IS C O D E the film includes TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE RIVERFRONT TIMES multiple instances IPHONE/ANDROID APP of Blank’s beloved FOR MORE EVENTS OR VISIT “scene-setting” riverfronttimes.com shots, such as sunsets, different views of the lake and extended sequences of artist Jim Franklin painting a mural in an empty swimming pool. The Webster Film Series screens this highly anticipated documentary at 7:30 p.m. Friday through Tuesday (August 21 through 25) at Moore Auditorium on Webster University’s campus (470 East Lockwood Avenue; 314-968-7487 or www.webster.edu/ film-series). 1 7/22/15Tickets 6:50 are AM $4 to $6. — PAUL FRISWOLD

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[FILM]

DOUGH

Nat is a baker with a failing business. His customer base is slowly dwindling, owing to simple mortality, and his sons have no particular interest in taking over the bakery; furthermore, a hostile businessman develops his own greed-motivated plan to grab the property. What’s a tired, cornered, old-school baker to do? Ayyash to the rescue. Ayyash is a refugee from Darfur whom Nat hired to help with the daily chores; the new guy also happens to peddle weed on the side. One day Ayyash accidentally drops his stash in the dough mix, and the challah begins zooming off the shelves. Dough, which stars Jonathan Pryce as Nat, is a funny and endearing comedy about bridging the cultural and generational gap. The film was part of this year’s St. Louis Jewish Film Festival, and the fest’s organizers have brought it back to satisfy audience demand. Dough screens at 7 p.m. tonight at

From the left: Kevin Hart, Arch Perspectives, World’s Fare Hetitage Festival and A Poem is a Naked Person. the Landmark Plaza Frontenac Cinema (1701 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Frontenac; 314994-3733 or www.stljewishfilmfestival.org). Tickets are $12. — ALEX WEIR Planning an event, exhibiting your art or putting on a play? Let us know and we’ll include it in the Night & Day section or publish a listing in the online calendar — for free! Send details via e-mail (calendar@riverfronttimes.com), fax (314-754-6416) or mail (6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 200, St. Louis, MO 63130, attn: Calendar). Include the date, time, price, contact information and location (including ZIP code). Please submit information three weeks prior to the date of your event. No telephone submissions will be accepted. Find more events online at www.riverfronttimes.com.

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From Discourse to Discord

readings from both men’s writings by Kelsey Grammer and John Lithgow, the former doing a reasonably good impression of Buckley). Was theirs match made in media heaven, or one destined to explode? (And does media heaven even make a distinction?) Buckley and Vidal were both famous, blessed with sharp wits, confident of their debating skills and absolutely convinced of their superior GORE VIDAL AND WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY intellect. (Coincidentally, both had also JR. CREATED MUDSLINGING AS recently failed in their only attempt to achieve political office.) POLITICAL COMMENTARY, MUCH TO Buckley, as founder and editor of the THEIR CHAGRIN National Review, was the central figure in The Best of Enemies a rising movement that was re-shaping the Directed and written by Robert Gordon and Republican party, and he reached a wide Morgan Neville. Starring William F. Buckley, audience as host of the talk show Firing Line. Gore Vidal, Kelsey Grammer and John Lithgow. Vidal had established himself as the author Opens Friday, August 21, at the Landmark of the topical political play The Best Man, but Plaza Frontenac Theatre, 1701 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Frontenac. Call 314-995was currently riding high on the bestseller 6285 or visit www.landmarktheatres.com. list with Myra Breckinridge, a brilliant and notorious comic novel about movie fandom n the summer of a year already shaken by and sexual identity. (Best of Enemies does violence and division, two men, each the Vidal a disservice by using the notoriously bad unofficial figurehead for an ideological move- film version of the novel released two years ment, distilled the unrest of the day into a ver- after the debates as a means of illustrating bal battle that began with forced politeness Vidal’s work. The opportunity to show Raquel and ended in an explosion Welch in Vegas cowgirl garb was evidently of angry threats that made impossible to resist.) BY From all indications, Buckley and Vidal television history and forever ROBERT altered the reputations of the despised each other even before they sat down for their first encounter. Vidal’s dislike of combatants. HUNT ABC was the lowest rated Buckley was largely political; he saw the rising of the three major television strain of Buckley-influenced conservatism that networks when it made the decision to had launched Barry Goldwater’s campaign drop gavel-to-gavel coverage of the 1968 and made a rising star out of Ronald Reagan presidential conventions in favor of a two- as a genuine threat to democracy. Buckley, on hour prime-time digest of each day’s events, the other hand, saw Vidal not as an ideological highlighted by a impromptu discussion by two threat but as a moral one, a living, breathing outspoken figures, the conservative author testament to decadent, liberal immorality. ABC’s original intention was to have the and editor William F. Buckley Jr. and novelist, two men offer opposing sides to the issues of playwright and cultural critic Gore Vidal. the day, moderated by host Howard K. Smith. Things did not go smoothly. The Best of Enemies is a sharp, informed That plan lasted less than two minutes. By documentary about Buckley and Vidal and the the time Buckley and Vidal returned for their second week, they were political and media climates determined to destroy that led to their debates. With FROM ALL INDICATIONS, each other. As violence a wide range of historical raged in the streets of material and a restrained BUCKLEY AND VIDAL Chicago around them amount of contemporary and delegates and talking-head footage (a handful DESPISED EACH OTHER reporters were maced of TV news executives, Vidal and Buckley experts and bigBEFORE THEY SAT DOWN by police, Buckley and Vidal seemed equally name guest stars such as Dick disinclined to restrain Cavett, Andrew Sullivan and FOR THEIR FIRST themselves, and things the late Christopher Hitchens), came to a head in the it ’s an entertaining and ENCOUNTER.” penultimate debate. ambitious cultural history that Vidal called Buckley a deftly works its way through a considerable amount of background material. “pro-crypto Nazi” and Buckley responded by Viewers who have never heard the phrase calling Vidal “you queer” and threatening, “I’ll “Huntley-Brinkley” will learn a great deal sock you in the goddamned face, and you’ll about the media and the way it treats politics, stay plastered.” The rules of debate may have and even more about the two public figures been discarded, but media and political history at the center of the storm. (There are also had been made.

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OUR ONGOING, OCCASIONALLY SMARTASS, DEFINITELY UNOFFICIAL GUIDE TO WHAT’S PLAYING IN ST. LOUIS THEATERS A couple dozen college guys, a random flip of the coin. And with that, the notorious Stanford

Prison Experiment began in August 1971. Professor Philip Zimbardo wanted to see what psychological effects of simulated imprisonment would have on otherwise “normal” college kids. He split the group of 24 into “prisoners” and “prison guards,” telling the latter, “We’re going to take away their individuality in various ways.... We’ll have all the power, and they’ll have none.” Depravation, psychological abuse and rioting followed, and the professor abandoned the experiment after just six days. Imagine the toll taken on actual prisoners over the course of decades. Kyle Patrick Alvarez’s new film is a potent and timely reminder that the imprisoned and those who imprison can sometimes be two sides of the same coin. ● We’ve all seen the wedding-cake topper of the bride grabbing the groom by the collar, dragging him away from a life filled with sexy funtimes and toward the altar of imprisonment, where all that’s left is monogamy and arguing over how to properly squeeze the toothpaste tube (from the bottom up, always). In Trainwreck, it’s beer-slamming, bed-hopping Amy (Amy C O U R T E SY M AG N O L I A P I C T U R E S

Schumer) who’d rather order another round of

Rather than simply describe what could easily have been brushed off as a footnote, The Best of Enemies shows how the Buckley/Vidal debates became more than just a televised event and continued to haunt — or even obsess — both men for much of their lives. Though the film is unfailingly fair and balanced and doesn’t go so far as to label Vidal the winner of the debates, it leaves no doubt that Buckley was the loser. The man whose public image was built on an unshakeable cool lost it on national television, reduced to name-calling and playground threats. His efforts at damage control in the form of a followup essay for Esquire only seemed to embarrass him further, and according to witnesses in the film, he remained embarrassed about the debates for years. (Vidal relished the publicity and cultivated a hatred of Buckley up to the latter’s

death in 2008, even publishing a tactless obituary of his nemesis.) The Best of Enemies looks at a different era in American culture, a time when a public intellectual could actually have influence, but it also warns that any influence can be twisted or distorted by the spectacle-driven media. For better or worse — no, make that for better and worse — the exchanges between Vidal and Buckley had an enormous impact on politics, television and the way both of those forms of entertainment have worked together in the decades since. Whatever positions they may have been arguing, the unfortunate outcome is that people — especially those in the news business — remembered the outbursts more than the ideas behind them. Almost half a century later, the arguments haven’t gotten smarter. They’ve only gotten louder. ■

William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal.

shots than order fine china. Until, of course, she meets Aaron (Bill Hader) who reminds her that, in the words of British philosopher Samantha Fox, naughty girls need love too. Sure, it gets a little formulaic in places, but it’s a hell of a lot more fun than most actual weddings. ● Ah, the trap of the stoner comedy: playing pot for laughs while somehow also advancing the plot. Much like reaching long-term goals, that can be daunting, particularly when high. In American

Ultra Jesse Eisenberg plays Mike, an aspiring comic-book author who makes rent by working at a crappy convenience store. He has just never quite gotten around to proposing to his girlfriend Phoebe (Kristen Stewart). But somehow seemingly dim Mike manages to off a guy using just a spoon, which might begin to explain why CIA agents are after the pair...or are they just mega paranoid? riverfronttimes.com

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

— Kristie McClanahan RIVERFRONT TIMES

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P H OTO S B Y M A B E L S U E N

cafe

Alligator ribs with red, white and blue slaw and brownsugar bacon.

Still Majestic THE BBQ SALOON IS A WORTHY HEIR TO THE CENTRAL WEST END SPOT THAT PREVIOUSLY HELD THE BELOVED GREEK DINER The BBQ Saloon 4900 Laclede Avenue; 314-833-6666. Tues.Thurs. 11-12 a.m.; Fri. 11-1 a.m.; Sat. 3 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sun. 3 p.m.-12 a.m.

T

o anyone who’d dismiss Phil and Tracy Czarnec’s snazzy new restaurant the BBQ Saloon as jumping on the smokehouse bandwagon, consider this: Phil has actually been cooking up his signature ’cue on the corner of Euclid and Laclede avenues in the Central West End for nearly two decades. It just wasn’t within BY the context of a restaurant. The Czarnecs own Wild C H E RY L Flower Restaurant, a successful contemporary American BAEHR eatery that’s been in business for twenty years. Rather than close up shop for vacation every Fourth of July, they shut down their regular service and

turned their patio into a holiday barbecue for family, friends and patrons. Phil developed a reputation as a grill master, and the encouragement pushed him to perfect his craft as a home cook, hoping to one day open a barbecue place of his own. He didn’t realize it would be mere feet from where he got his start. But when their longtime neighbors across the street at Majestic decided to close for good last March, they turned to the Czarnecs. Would Phil and Tracy like to take over the spot? The pair jumped at the chance, and made plans to reopen the Greek diner as a barbecue restaurant that summer. An extensive renovation of the well-worn space pushed their plans back and then back again, until nearly a full year passed. The BBQ Saloon finally fired up the smoker this past May. Those familiar with Majestic — a Central West End institution — would be shocked at its transformation into the BBQ Saloon. Gone is the greasy-spoon look, now replaced with all the trappings of an upscale whiskey bar. Exposed brick walls, vintage-inspired light fixtures, wooden rafters and cowhide details give you feeling that you’ve stepped into a tavern in 1920s Denver, while a glance at the bar suggests the place could have been called the Whiskey Saloon. The restaurant has a shock-

ingly vast collection of whiskeys — Czarnec to tender meat that tastes as though a chicken maintains that the 520 bottles represent the and a swordfish had a love child. The ribs are largest collection in the region and the sixth finished with a mildly spiced apricot and chile largest in the United States. glaze that adds flavor without obscuring the The Czarnecs were smart enough to realize meat’s flavor. that they needed the BBQ Saloon to be more Dare I say, the BBQ Saloon may serve my than just another smokehouse-and-whiskey favorite pulled pork in town. The fork-tenjoint. They’ve distinguished der, succulent meat is gently themselves in the crowded kissed with smoke, best eaten The BBQ Saloon field by being the only barbeas a sandwich over garlic gridCandied bacon ............ $5 cue restaurant in St. Louis to dled Texas toast. Crucially, the Pulled pork offer exotic meats. pork arrives in large, luscious sandwich ................ $10 An off-the-menu kangaroo hunks — not shredded as is so St. Louis BBQ burger proved to be much often the case. Sauce would pork steak ............... $18 more than just a novelty. The have been wasted on this alnaturally peppery meat was ready perfect meat. grilled to a juicy medium rare and served atop a “St. Louis-style” pork ribs were good, simple griddled bun. To make up for the ultra- though “good” is not enough to stand out in lean meat, the burger is served with a side of such a competitive market. The meat, treated rich mushroom bordelaise sauce that was so with a thick, sweet and peppery rub, could have tasty I lapped it up by itself with a spoon. benefited from a slightly longer cooking time. Alligator ribs were another unexpected sur- I like my ribs with some chew, but these had prise. Whereas you’ll typically find the reptile’s a touch too much. I preferred the whopping tail fried up like chicken nuggets, the BBQ twenty-ounce pork steak, another St. Louis Saloon is bold enough to serve it as a double classic that was far superior to what’s served rack of ribs. The meat is slow-cooked to break at a backyard barbecue. The thick cut of meat down the extensive cartilage, though its tiny was brushed with sauce as it cooked so that bones still make for difficult eating. If you have it caramelized, making for a sweet and tangy the patience to pick through it, you’ll be treated glaze. continued on page 26 riverfronttimes.com AM IV IM riverfronttimes.com UO GN UT SH T 1X9X–X - 2 5X, , 22001 0 5X RR IV EE RR FF RR OO NN T TT T IM EE S S 251


A selection of drinks: sangria, housesqueezed lemonade and the Last Word cocktail.

BBQ Saloon

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To me, eating beef ribs are like attending a Chippendales review: It’s a feast for the eyes, but you don’t get enough meat to feel satisfied. The experience was no different at the BBQ Saloon. Its beef ribs arrive looking like a primal feast — so large they hang over the plate. They’re all bone, though, and it’s a lot of work for the little you actually get off of them. In this iteration, there is no rub to speak of; when you manage to get enough to really dig in, the meat has a deep, savory smoke. The BBQ Saloon offers the expected side dishes, but they’re well-executed. The baked beans and cole slaw are real standouts. The beans come out soaked in so much bourbon you could catch a buzz from them. They’re excellent, accented with brown sugar and large hunks of bacon. The slaw’s yogurt base is tart and creamy. A few blueberries add a pleasant pop. The small appetizer list includes a wonderfully spicy chorizo cheese dip that tastes like something you’d bring to a Super Bowl party — there wouldn’t be any leftovers. Candied bacon that’s so sugary it sticks to the back of your teeth is a fine enough novelty, though it’s hard to eat more than one piece. The best appetizer, however, is one that is not listed on the menu: pulled pork drenched in a molasses-style barbecue sauce that is served atop nachos and smothered in a luxurious Swiss cheese sauce. The bourbon bread pudding is some of the best around: sticky, dripping with caramel and lightly crisped on the outside. And while it may seem strange to think of a cake as a palate cleanser, the BBQ Saloon’s mouth-puckering fluffy lemon cake with a lemon-cream center 26

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The small appetizer list includes a wonderfully spicy chorizo cheese dip that tastes like something you’d bring to a Super Bowl party. There wouldn’t be any leftovers. was oddly refreshing after a heavy meal. Though hospitality is so much a part of the dining experience, I do not often comment on it in my reviews. In this case, however, I was so impressed with my service that it deserves mentioning. In addition to our server, the other two people working the floor went out of their way to accommodate my restless daughter and her equally fidgety friend. They brought chips and drinks to them without us asking, graciously cleaned up our many messes and helped us move to the patio in the middle of dessert when another minute in the restaurant would have been calamitous. They even brought us fresh water glasses outside, even though we’d already closed out our tab. Bravo. It’s things like this — the friendly service, the exotic meats, the extra touches on side dishes — that will make the BBQ Saloon more than just another smokehouse. It’s a restaurant that took an unusually long time to marinate, but it’s off to a pretty good start. ■


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short orders [CHEF CHAT] [RESTAURANT NEWS]

Stellina’s Jamey Tochtrop on the Virtues of Sticking to the Basics

Roll Leads to Lawsuit Against Lambert’s Cafe

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MEGAN GILLIAND

amey Tochtrop believes there is something to be said for focusing on the basics. “You see all of these culinary students coming out of school who want to sous vide and use molecular gastronomy,” the chef of Stellina (3342 Watson Road; 314-256-1600) says. “But they can’t roast a chicken to save their lives. That should be your final project before you graduate — a roast chicken.” Tochtrop’s “less is more” philosophy has been on display at Stellina since he opened the small restaurant in south city in 2007. It was his first independent venture after working in the industry for years in various country clubs and hotels around town. Tochtrop knew he wanted to branch out on his own, but he didn’t T H IS C O D E have the money to do TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE so. He opened StelRIVERFRONT TIMES IPHONE/ANDROID APP lina as a pasta wholeFOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT sale company in 2005, riverfronttimes.com selling his handmade, organic wares to other chefs before eventually gaining the capital to open the restaurant. But Tochtrop’s journey in the restaurant business goes back much further than the pasta company or the country clubs. He was always interested in food growing up, and got his first job working at Windows on Washington as a banquet server at the age of fifteen. “I instantly fell in love with the business,” he says, as he recalls his path into the kitchen and working his way up in the back of the house. He attended Forest Park Community College’s culinary program before landing a gig at the St. Louis Club. Next came a job at the Chase Park Plaza hotel as the banquet chef, and then an executive chef position at the now-shuttered JaBoni’s restaurant. By the time he left that position, he realized he needed to create something of his own. That creative spirit is on display at Stellina, not only in the food but also in the artwork — Tochtrop is the artist responsible for the restaurant’s paintings — and he is also a musician. Not that he has much free time to pursue his other interests: Apparently it takes a lot of time to prepare food with as little manipulation as possible. “I’m just trying to not muck

it up,” he laughs. Tochtrop took a break from the kitchen to share his thoughts on the St. Louis food and beverage scene, his Olympian food crush and the virtues of a simple, well-made drink. What is one thing people don’t know about you that you wish they did? When the season hits, we either grow our own produce or rely on local farms for the majority of our menu. We have been doing so since we opened and have a number of great relationships with nearby farmers. We don’t blast it on our menu, but we have always stayed true to the local scene and cook hyper-seasonal food. What daily ritual is non-negotiable for you? Going to the gym. If you could have any superpower, what would it be? I would like to be able to see into the future. Ordering would be such a breeze. What is the most positive trend in food, wine or cocktails that you’ve noticed in St. Louis over the past year? That’s a tough one. I would like to see more bars going back to the basics. Having a bartender that can make a great drink every time with out using 37 tiny measuring devices and a recipe book to make it is what I look for. Our beer scene is explosive and gaining momentum all the time. It’s impressive! Who is your St. Louis food crush? Ben Grupe [of Soigne pop-up dinners]. He’s just so damn sexy! Who’s the one person to watch right now in

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

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Jamey Tochtrop of Stellina.

the St. Louis dining scene? Again, I would have to say Ben. He is the most talented chef that no one knows about. His skill and dedication to his craft are unmatched in this city. He is the captain of the United States Culinary Team, after all. Not many people have that on their résumé. Which ingredient is most representative of your personality? Salt. ’Cause I’m salty. If someone asked you to describe the current state of St. Louis’ culinary climate, what would you say? I think things are taking a much more basic and simple approach. For a long time everyone wanted to push food forward so much. I see a lot of places using simple quality ingredients and putting the “love” into making something spectacular. Name an ingredient never allowed in your kitchen. Green peppers. They just take over. What is your after-work hangout? Home, usually. Claudia’s Pub and SOHA Bar & Grill are close by work. I enjoy both places for a nightcap. What’s your food or beverage guilty pleasure? Jim Beam and Coke. What would be your last meal on earth? A giant roasted bone-in rib eye, chanterelle mushrooms, and potato gratin along with a bottle of red wine — or six. —CHERYL BAEHR

issouri may soon have its own version of the infamous Liebeck v. McDonald’s Restaurants hot-coffee lawsuit. Lambert’s Cafe, the Sikeston-based restaurant chain proudly known as the “Home of Throwed Rolls,” featuring servers who lob dinner rolls across the dining hall to guests, is being sued for a roll-related injury. The suit was filed yesterday against the Sikeston restaurant by University City-based attorney William Meehan on behalf of a gal named Troy Tucker. Tucker claims she “sustained a lacerated cornea with a vitreous detachment and all head, neck, eyes and vision were severely damaged” after being hit by a roll during a September 2014 visit. The practice of throwing rolls is deemed a “defective condition” of Lambert’s, and the suit claims that the restaurant knew (or should have known) about the danger of this practice. Tucker now seeks an award of at least $25,000 to pay for her medical bills and legal fees. The restaurant’s “carelessness and negligence” has already caused expenses totaling $10,000, the suit alleges, and who knows what future medical costs may emerge from the assault of the freshly baked bread. But we have to wonder how much of a case Tucker has. After all, in June, the Kansas City Royals and their mascot were deemed not to have been at fault after a thrown hot dog hit a man in the face and tore his retina. In that case the “baseball rule” was referenced, and the jury found that the man assumed some responsibility for personal awareness by entering a baseball stadium. Might the “throwed roll rule” become established legal precedent? After all, “Home of Throwed Rolls” is plastered on massive billboards all over the state. Shouldn’t diners at Lambert’s be responsible for some level of situational awareness when entering the restaurant? And if not, does that mean the end to throwed rolls in Missouri? What kind of country are we living in when a restaurant can’t toss a freshly baked dinner roll at a customer’s head? — JOHNNY FUGITT


Thank you St. Louis!!!

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P H OTO S B Y M A B E L S U E N

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t Soulard Farmers’ Market (730 Carroll Street; 314-622-4180), patrons can get a taste of Europe by way of central Illinois. The decade old, Champaign-based Pekara Bakery arrived in St. Louis nearly two years ago and has shared its from-scratch products every Saturday since, including the highly coveted croissants and “croi-nuts.” “We fell in love with Soulard and its charms,” says sales manager Robb Tobias. “Its French roots were a huge attraction for us. We felt we owed it to the market to do something that really captures the essence of its history.” Pekara specializes in an old-world European baking style, with twenty bakers working around the clock to hand-make everything from focaccia and loaves to macarons and pretzels. The self-described “clean-label” bakery features simple ingredients — no preservatives or things you can’t pronounce. The bakery’s croissants — always some of the first products to sell out at the hightraffic stand — go through a laborious process. A dough sheeter meticulously layers highfat butter with a fermented, yeasted dough. The finished product is a croissant with flaky, dreamy texture. And while Pekara typically adheres to tradition, one new-world trend finds its way into the bakery case. Its croi-nuts utilize the same

croissant dough, but they go through a cutting and frying process to give them doughnutlike qualities. Look for these daring desserts in flavors such as chocolate, chocolate with bacon, maple, maple with bacon, lemon-curd and raspberry-jam. Pekara Bakery is open at the Soulard Farmers’ Market on Saturdays featuring around 70 of its 400 products from 7 a.m. until it sells out. Also look for Pekara at the Kirkwood Farmers’ Market on Saturdays starting at 8 a.m., albeit with a smaller selection. For more information, check out the Pekara Bakery website at www.pekarabakery.com. —M ABEL SUEN Find hundreds of restaurant listings and reviews, as well as the latest in Gut Check, at riverfronttimes.com


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Tuesdays, Aug. 25–Sept. 29

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6pm to 8pm • FREE Museum’s Front Lawn Forest Park • mohistory.org Featuring STL’s best food trucks!

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AUGUST 19-25, 2015

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HAPPY HOUR 3

TO

TUESDAY-FRIDAY TUESDAY FRIDAY

dining guide

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$5 Dirty Martinis, Apple Martinis & Lemon Drops

L A FAY E T T E S Q UA R E The Dining Guide lists only restaurants recommended by RFT food critics. The print listings below rotate regularly, as space allows. Our complete Dining Guide is available online; view menus and search local restaurants by name or neighborhood. Price Guide (based on a three-course meal for one, excluding tax, tip and beverages): $ up to $15 per person $$ $15 - $25 $$$ $25 - $40 $$$$ more than $40

3265 S . Jefferson Avenue St. Louis, MO 63118 (314) 776-5700

5:00–8:30 PM CENTRAL AVE DOWNTOWN CLAYTON

C L AY T O N 801 Chophouse 137 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton, 314-8759900. 801 Chophouse’s super-size steaks are the most expensive meal in town — and that seems to be the point. The restaurant peddles opulence to holders of corporate cards, as well as regular folks who want to feel like royalty (at least for a day). For the price tag, diners will receive impeccable service, fine wines and shamefully large cuts of beef. Bonein selections are the best offerings: The strip, rib eye, pork and veal all benefit from the extra flavor (and thicker cut). 801 Chophouse offers a variety of steak enhancements, from Oscar-style with crab and béarnaise to a bone-marrow bath. However, the high-quality steaks and chops are delicious enough on their own. Seafood is incredibly fresh, and the oysters taste straight from the coast. Side dishes are served a la carte: The creamy scalloped potatoes and lobster macaroni & cheese are excellent options — just make sure to ask for a half order so you can save room for the Grand Mariner soufflé. $$$$ Avenue 12 North Meramec Avenue, Clayton, 314-727-4141. The long-time patrons who lamented the closure of Bryan Carr’s Pomme Restaurant and Pomme Café & Wine Bar can find respite at Avenue. The Clayton bistro, located just a few blocks away from its popular predecessors, combines the two concepts under one roof, but also allows Carr to up the ante on his classic French-influenced fare. The veteran chef keeps T H IS C O D E some of Pomme’s favorites TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE on Avenue’s menu but also RIVERFRONT TIMES adds several successful new IPHONE/ANDROID APP dishes, such as authentic FOR MORE RESTAURANTS OR VISIT cassoulet with white beans, riverfronttimes.com duck confit, sausage and pork shoulder. The pork schnitzel, topped with brandy-sauteed apples, is another standout dish, and appetizers such as wild mushrooms served with buratta over crusty bread demonstrate Carr’s culinary prowess. Avenue has an excellent brunch, with offerings such as blueberry and lemon pancakes and an overstuffed ham, egg and Gruyere crepe that doubles as a hearty breakfast wrap. Pomme may still be on everyone’s mind, but Avenue proves to be a worthy followup. $$ Cantina Laredo 7710 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton, 314725-2447. Cantina Laredo in Clayton is the first St. Louis location of the Dallas-based upscale Tex-Mex chain. The restaurant’s large, modern bar has quickly become a happyhour hot spot, pouring stiff drinks for the area’s business clientele. On the food side, diners can expect modernized, fusion versions of Mexican and Tex-Mex dishes, anchored by a large selection of fajitas and enchiladas. The restaurant’s signature appetizer, the “Top Shelf Guacamole,” is prepared tableside, with accoutrements added to one’s preferences. The “Enchiladas Veracruz” features two tortillas stuffed with a Mexican version of chicken spinach dip, and the “Costillas Con Fajita” is a gigantic, searing hot platter of ribs, steak and chicken, large enough for three diners. A must-try is the “Torta de Carnitas,” smoked pork topped with goat cheese, apricot jam and an over-easy egg. Though it’s difficult to save room for dessert, one must find a way to manage: The Mexican apple pie, finished with brandy butter tableside on a searing-hot cast-iron skillet is a scrumptious end to the meal. $$-$$$ Whitebox Eatery 176 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton, 314-8622802. White Box Eatery elevates daytime eating for busy Clayton diners with its upscale take on breakfast and lunch

SCAN

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fare. The sleek, modern restaurant offers breakfast and lunch on the weekdays, and Saturday and Sunday brunch, with items such as turkey meatloaf, brioche French toast and smoked-salmon tartine. Pancakes, covered with housemade granola, fresh berries and whipped cream is a must try, as is the breakfast salad — arugula, potatoes, bacon, feta cheese and crispy onions are topped with creamy herbed dressing and poached eggs. White Box Eatery’s freshly baked pastries are the restaurant’s highlight. Fresh doughnuts, chocolate croissants, cheese Danishes and savory scones are a perfect end to the meal — or a tasty grab-and-go snack. $$

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

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Baileys’ Chocolate Bar 1915 Park Ave., St. Louis, 314241-8100. Located at 1915 Park in the heart of the idyllic Lafayette Square neighborhood, Bailey’s Chocolate Bar serves up some of the city’s best desserts and cocktails, in addition to a small but stellar selection of savory offerings. Thanks to its dim lighting and the rich browns and reds that dominate the interior, Bailey’s Chocolate Bar is wellknown as one of the city’s most romantic spots. Selections range from classic desserts like crème brûlée and Bailey’s strawberry sundae to more contemporary creations like their vegan banana split made with strawberry sorbet, as well as a variety of house-made ice creams and truffles. Savory offerings include sandwiches, salads and pizzettas, and a sizeable selection of fine cheeses. The bar serves up a bevy of beers, wines and specialty cocktails – your sweet tooth will thank you. $-$$ Element 1419 Carroll Street, St. Louis, 314-241-1674. Helmed by executive chef Brian Hardesty of Terrene and Guerrilla Street Food fame, Element serves up hearty rustic American food in a beautifully restored historic brick building in Lafayette Square. The two-story, warmly rich space is filled with glass and wood and features an open kitchen in the lower level restaurant area so that every table feels like a chef’s table. Four chefs actually share the kitchen there, each one bringing their own flavor to the collaborative concept. The top floor offers small plates and a gorgeous full bar in an urban chic lounge area. Both levels offer outdoor seating with stunning views of downtown St. Louis. Hardesty and his team use local ingredients with attention to the flavors of the season. Notable dishes include a pork-belly small plate - so creamy it is almost spreadable - served with tangy blue cheese mousse, plums, French prunes and walnuts. The short-rib large plate is equally decadent, the meat falling apart with the slightest prodding of a fork. Served with a rich sweet potato ale, rutabaga and Swiss chard, the short ribs are tailor-made for a chilly day. The wine list is small but thoughtful, the beer list features local craft selections and the bartenders are up to the challenge of customizing a craft cocktail based on a mood. $$$ Planter’s House 1000 Mississippi Ave., St. Louis, 314-6962603. Finally, master mixologist Ted Kilgore gets a house of his own with Planter’s House. This Lafayette Square temple to mixology is a showroom for Kilgore and company’s (wife, Jamie, and business partner, Ted Charak) inspired cocktail artistry. Drinks run the gamut from the approachable “Planter’s House Punch” to the esoteric wormwood-laden “Unusual Suspect.” The joint is, first and foremost, a cocktail room, but it features an inspired food menu. The poutine is magnificent — thick, red-wine pork gravy covers a platter of fried and smashed fingerling potatoes. Or try the duck burger, a mammoth mix of ground duck, pork and bacon is served open-face on a pumpernickel bun with Gouda and a fried duck egg. It’s quite possibly the perfect way to soak up all of that booze. $$-$$$

MIDTOWN Pappy’s Smokehouse 3106 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-5354340. Mike Emerson and Skip Steele now have three muchacclaimed barbecue joints, but the original, in midtown St. Louis, is Pappy’s Smokehouse. The modest joint is more restaurant than shack, but utterly unpretentious. Servers wear T-shirts that say “The Hog Whisperer,” and the pulled pork and pork ribs — cooked dry and slow over apple and cherry wood — are nothing short of extraordinary. Even beef brisket is practically fork-tender. Sides are simple and delicious. Pappy’s closes when each day’s barbecue sells out, so call ahead if you’re headed out late. $ Small Batch Whiskey & Fare 3001 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-380-2040. Restaurateur David Bailey takes the whiskey-bar trend in an unexpected direction with his vegetarian eatery, Small Batch. Bailey doesn’t bill the place as a crunchy vegetarian spot; instead, he hopes that diners will enjoy the vegetable-focused concept so much that they fail to miss the meat. The carbonara pasta, made with housemade linguine, replaces the richness of bacon with smoked mushrooms. Even the most die-hard carnivore will be satisfied by the “burger,” a greasy-spoon-style corn and black bean patty stopped with creamy guacamole, Chihuahua cheese, and Bailey’s signature “Rooster” sauce (tangy mayonnaise). Small Batch’s bourbon selection and creative cocktails are also impressive. The “Smokeysweet,” a blend of smoked cherries, rye and rhubarb, tastes like drinking punch by a campfire. For a taste of summer in a glass, the “Rickey” is a bright concoction of elderflower liquor, grapefruit, lime and white corn whiskey. The gorgeous, vintage setting provides an ideal spot to indulge in some Prohibition-era-style drinking. $-$$


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Parties in the Park

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–Restaurants 2014

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Parties in the Park

Look for the RFT Street Team at the following featured events this week:

Music at the Intersection

Thursday, 8.20.15 What: Not So Quiet Music Festival When: 5:30 PM Where: St. Louis Public Library

Friday 8.21.15

Music at the Intersection

Tower Grove Farmers Market

What: Rise Up Festival When: 4 - 11 PM Where: 1627 Washington Ave.

Tower Grove Farmers Market

Saturday 8.22.15 What: Soulard Concert Series When: 5:30 PM Where: Soulard Market

Music Record Shop 1 Year Anniversary

For more photos go to the Street Team website at www.riverfronttimes.com. riverfronttimes.com

Music Record Shop 1 Year Anniversary

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

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music

B-Sides 36 Critics’ Picks 39 Concerts 42 Clubs

44

All’s Fair in Love and Whiskey War THE MANESS BROTHERS ENTER THE FOURTH YEAR OF THEIR ECLECTIC ST. CHARLES-BASED FESTIVAL Whiskey War Festival 2015 11 a.m. Saturday, August 22. VFW Post 2866, 66 VFW Lane, St. Charles. $10. 636724-9612.

ake and David Maness spend more time together than most brothers. They might be best known for piling ten tons of Southern rock into tiny dive bars throughout the city, armed with the barest essentials — a guitar and some drums. Their band’s name, the Maness Brothers, mirrors the pair’s approach to music: honest and simple. That’s also reflected in the siblings’ Whiskey War Festival, an annual convention of visual art, live music and, of course, booze. For the BY last four years, the event JOSEPH has taken place at VFW Post 2866 — a hop and skip HESS away from Main Street in St. Charles. The fest returns to the venue this year and will bring in more than twenty bands across four stages on Saturday, August 22. “The name has this strong aesthetic that I wanted to get away from,” David says. “We even talked about changing it, but people like the name, and it’s catchy. It sounds podunk and country, but I kind of like that.” The brothers book bands based only on their own personal taste. Straightforward and direct, the duo spares little thought toward profit or marketability, choosing instead to approach acts based on musical merit and little else. “We don’t try to keep it genre specific. One of the things we do when we’re picking bands is make sure that we only have serious artists — like, touring and recording — people trying to further their art,” David adds. The Whiskey War Festival started in 2011 as an overbooked show at a VFW hall. Once word spread that David and his (nowdefunct) band Whiskey War Mountain Rebellion had this huge space secured — and enough pro audio gear to kill a horse — other acts wanted in. What began as just another gig with too many bands soon grew

DREW SHEAFOR

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Jake and David Maness, keeping the Whiskey War Festival in the family.

into something greater than the sum of its parts. “The first year was a success, totally. But it was the weirdest lineup you could imagine,” Jake says. Other acts on the bill started calling the show “Whiskey War Fest,” and the name stuck. Now that the Maness Brothers are touring more, they’re meeting acts outside the city. They consider the fest an excuse to invite their favorite bands from around the country to St. Charles to meet likeminded acts and share in a full day of music. Headliners this year include James Leg (Nashville), Dirty Streets (Memphis), Calliope (Milwaukee) and Chris Black and the Eagles of Unemployment (Paducah, Kentucky). “The biggest difference to me this year, is that we have bands like Path of Might, Anodes and Shitstorm. It’s definitely the most heavy lineup,” David says. The pair takes special care to build momentum throughout the day. Instead

of saving every heavy-hitter for later slots, this year’s fest features a consistent stream of diverse acts, including hybrid hip-hop acts Illphonics and Blank Generation. The brothers themselves will perform throughout the day in their classic duo and also as part of the Barn Mice, their group with Irene Allen and Drew Sheafor. Taking cues from other large-scale events, this year the fest brings a slew of sponsors, including Tallgrass Brewing Company, Defiance Whiskey, Arch City Radio, Big K Entertainment and the St. Louis Blues Society. “We always have the goal to pay our bills off for the next year, and it never ever comes anywhere close,” David says. But the pair seems confident that the festival will grow, granting them money to draw in larger acts and possibly expand the event to satellite cities across the country. The notion seems unlikely, considering the Maness Brothers’ ramped-up touring schedule. But the brothers have a secret weapon hiding in plain sight: family. riverfronttimes.com

“This has turned into a family business, wholeheartedly,” David says. “When springtime rolls around, everyone — Mom, Dad — starts talking about it.” Both parents are deeply involved. Their dad consults on organization, and their mother enlists her circle of friends to staff the event. “Mom has run the ticket booth every year so far. When we’re on tour, they’re out at shows. They both just really like local music,” Jake says. While music is clearly at the core, the family continues to cast an ever wider net, encouraging the greater community to get involved. There are triple the vendors from last year, and artists such as Whiskey War mainstay Jason Spencer (known as Killer Napkins) will sell posters and make live art. Despite the mix of heavy rock, blues, metal and whatever other genre the Maness brothers throw into the blender, the event maintains a strong communal vibe. “That’s the beauty of the whole fest to me: We’ve never had any issues,” David says. “No one’s ever been kicked out, and look at the name: It’s Whiskey War Fest! Everyone’s drinking.” ■

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b-sides Paddle Wheels and Podcasts

“Documentary can be such a weird thing. It can come across as fact, an objective story, when really it’s about the choices the documentarian is making.”

THE RIVER SIGNAL MAKES A STOP IN ST. LOUIS

JARRED GASTREICH

B

y the time you read this, the good ship The Channel Princess will be miles from its port in St. Louis — if you can call a couple of lines thrown out to a hunk of metal a port — headed downstream on the Mississippi River, final destination: New Orleans. Begun on June 16, 2014 in Minnesota, the maiden voyage of the floating podcast and radio broadcast project The River Signal, piloted by three Portland, Oregon-based friends — Galen Huckins, Brian Benson and Reid Lustig — isn’t really about a riverboat trip down the Mississippi. That’s been done before, and it’s happening every day; you could throw your pontoon boat in the water tomorrow if you wanted to. The three men have something else in mind: genre-twisting storytelling, impressionistic video, unusual music performances and new ways of seeing what will happen along the way. The River Signal is anything but a travelogue. “In terms of doing the podcast as fiction,” Benson explains, “we talked about what it would look like to document the trip. Documentary can be such a weird thing. It can come across as fact, an objective story, when really it’s about the choices the documentarian is making. Especially the three of us, white men from Portland, coming from a part of the country we don’t understand that well. I’m from Wisconsin, so there’s a connection

Brian Benson onboard The Channel Princess when it was tied up in St. Louis.

HOMESPUN INDIANA ROME Dope Dealers 2 indianarome.bandcamp.com

T

he heads over at Delmar Records must have known what they were doing with the long rollout to Indiana Rome’s Dope Dealers 2. It’s been a busy end of summer for the local label, especially as flagship artist Tef Poe released his anticipated War Machine III a few weeks back, but Rome’s capable, increasingly melodic work serves as a personal counterpoint to Tef’s political, topical torment. When we last wrote about Rome in this space, it was for 2011’s Who the Hell Left the Gate Open 2 (gotta love the man’s commitment to sequels). Four years ago his work was plenty hard-edged if a bit one-dimensional; DD2 continues his evolution as a lyricist and performer with solid, engaging production in the background. If earlier albums found Indiana Rome inhabiting his mantle with top-dog braggadocio, his first cut “Dollar Short” opens the album with all the sweat and shortcomings that go into his hustle. It’s a thoughtful, soulful rumination on struggle and regret that’s given wings by a soaring saxophone lines, one of many groove-based tracks that helps

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give DD2 its largely silken feel. (Though, naturally, “Master P” pays tribute to the No Limit soldiers in both lyric and attack.) Long-time collaborator Vega Heartbreak drops in for the AutoTuned, synth-funk slow jam “Rolling” and punctuates the hard-hitting “Woah Woah,” a track that gives Rome enough grist to unleash his most fleet-footed, self-assured verses. Those two songs represent the extremes of the palette this time around; most songs ride on smooth soul samples or center on loverboy hooks. Courtney Orlando sells the love-is-the-drug anthem “Pusha,” and errant piano plinks and a stuttering rhythm turn “Cigarello” into a deliciously trippy cut. These songs challenge the nihilism of the dope-dealer archetype alluded to in the title; the only drug Indiana Rome seems interested in slinging is his music. The album art raises a similar question: A young man’s bare torso is shown, a gun in one hand and a microphone in the other. At least in this case, the mic looks bigger, and possibly more powerful.—CHRISTIAN SCHAEFFER Want your CD to be considered for a review in this space? Send music c/o Riverfront Times, Attn: Homespun, 6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 200, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130. Email music@riverfronttimes.com for more information.

riverfronttimes.com

to the Midwest, but the river is a different space. We didn’t want to produce something that was, ‘This is the Mississippi,’ given to you in this omniscient voice. We wanted it to be subjective and to be clear about that. We are taking what happens to us and spinning it in weird directions.” The River Signal took a year to plan: Huckins brought experience working with The Steam Radio Syndicate, a Portland-based radio show transmitting from a World War II-era tugboat that had been converted into a studio and performance space for storytellers, slam poets and musicians. The series was broadcast on community radio station KBOO; so too is The River Signal, with weekly podcasts and video episodes to expand the narrative. The crew records both on and off The Channel Princess, and uploads the content either from the boat or from a Wi-Fi hotspot they snag on shore. The bulk of the editing and production, however, happens on the water. After a stop in Alton, Illinois, and passage through locks and dams, The Channel Princess first docked at Cementland, fifteen miles north of the Arch. The shoreline there was too thick with brush and poison ivy to allow access off and on the boat, so the crew floated a few miles downriver to the Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing, where they were welcomed by the young men working at the rest area along the bike path. It was an ideal spot, with the Merchants and McKinley bridges in the background, and an accessible — if steep and rocky — path up to the Mississippi River Greenway, where the three could take their bikes into town for supplies and recording sessions. When I met Huckins and Benson (Lustig was on shore leave), they invited me onboard via an inflatable dingy that they pulled to the mothership by means of a slimy rope. We sat on the small front deck, just below the shade of the solar-paneled roofs, and talked about their 800-mile-plus journey thus far (they’re not quite halfway to New Orleans) and their broadcast and podcast continued on page 38


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JARRED GASTREICH

The three-member crew of The Channel Princess is halfway to New Orleans by now.

The River Signal continued from page 36

AUGUST 20

work. It’s their first time on this part of the Mississippi. “In the last 25 miles,” Huckins begins, “after the confluence of the Illinois, the Missouri, and the final lock and dam, my first impressions are that the river is faster and stronger here. The pleasure boaters, people fishing and floating with cocktails in the afternoon, that’s all gone.” “We’ve been in small towns and in some cities, but nothing like this,” says Benson. “Approaching it from the river, St. Louis is hard to access. Scrambling up the banks, and slowly down the bike path, and then past the factories, the waste-treatment plants and into downtown — it’s a cool way to approach the city.” The boat arrived July 30 for a weeklong stay. During their time in St. Louis, the three recorded sessions with local musicians Beth Bombara and Bo & the Locomotive, as well as organ sessions at the City Museum and an Indian classical duo at a church. The previous week they recorded noted songster William Elliott Whitmore on the Missouri, Iowa and Illinois border. And along the way they’ve gotten to know the unique culture of the Mississippi itself. “The most interesting people are the folks living on the river or where the river is their space,” says Huckins. “People on the river know other people all up and down the river. It’s this whole connected area, like its own state. We’re kind of an oddity to people who are not involved in the river. People in St. Louis don’t really access the water. So it’s a bizarre thing. But someone who lives on a shanty boat somewhere understands what we’ve seen and even knows the people we’ve come to know.”

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To pay for this expedition, the team sold the truck and trailer that transported The Channel Princess from Portland to Minnesota and also ran an Indiegogo campaign. Mostly they’ve funded the journey out of their own pockets and relied on the kindness of strangers along the way. “If we look happily incompetent, people will usually take pity on us,” Benson says. “In Hannibal, we tried to tie up at the seawall where The Mark Twain ties up. It was going all right, but not our best operation. There was a guy watching us just upstream from the boat club. He saw us there, and as he was pulling the line on his pontoon, he said, ‘Do you guys just want to come up here?’ He had a really nice dock and let us stay there.” The crew may feign naiveté, but Huskins has been living on the 36-year-old boat for three years. It was originally built on the Missouri River as a mini paddlewheeler, then salvaged by Huskins and completely restored and retrofitted. He gutted the 33-foot craft, installing walls, cabinets and bunks, and he feels confident passing through the locks and dams, navigating the submerged (and potentially treacherous) wing dams, and dealing with the wakes from barges that sometimes swamp the transom. All three crew members share chores, work on scripts, edit podcasts, tweak the sound and keep the boat afloat. And all three will get to know and reimagine the main artery at the heart of the heart of the country in ways that would otherwise be impossible. “A city like St. Louis looks so different from the river,” says Benson. “You do feel like you’re in this altered landscape. It made sense to tell a story from that perspective. On the river, the world is totally different.” —ROY K ASTEN


J AY B L A K E S B E R G

critics’ picks

Clockwise form the top: Hard Working Americans, the Sauce Boss and Michael McDonald.

PARTY TIME AT THE CHURCH OF SK8TAN 7 p.m. Friday, August 21. Sk8 Liborius, 1850 Hogan Street. $5. No phone. This is one of those shows for which the venue itself is half the appeal. Sure, the entertainment is solid — artists from as far as New Zealand, Texas and Tennessee will perform alongside up-and-coming St. Louis-based acts, the majority of them punk-influenced in one way or another — but the Church of Sk8tan (or Sk8 Liborius, as it is sometimes called) is a true gem. An actual, legit church that has been taken over by skateboarders, Sk8 Liborius has ramps in the area that would have once held the congregation, stretching all the way up onto the altar. Brought to you by the same folks who converted the area beneath the Kingshighway bridge into a guerrilla skate park, it is a one-of-a-kind space that must be seen to be believed. A Church Worthy of Your Donation: Rehabbing a crumbling building into a skateboarder’s paradise doesn’t come cheap. Consider donating to the efforts at www.gofundme. com/zbhb3b35w. —DANIEL HILL

THE SAUCE BOSS 7 p.m. Saturday, August 22. BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups. 700 South Broadway. $15. 314-436-5222. Bill “Sauce Boss” Wharton is a man of many (simultaneous) talents. The Tallahassee, Florida-based bluesman does it all, from the slide guitar to the drum set at his feet to the cooking. Oh yeah, that’s right: “Sauce Boss” is not just a clever name. Donning in a chef’s hat and jacket, Wharton whips up his signature gumbo in a giant pot, all while strumming his ’53 Telecaster, stomping on the drums and singing his heart out. The best part? At the conclusion of the set, audience members are treated to a bowl of that delicious stew. What more could you possibly want? Bonus Round: If you are at this show, you are at BB’s! That means a tasty sandwich to round out your meal is just a few bucks away. Expect to leave this one fat and happy.

MICHAEL MCDONALD 7 p.m. Saturday, August 22. The Sheldon Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard. $79. 314-533-9900. Up until about a year ago, Michael McDonald was the most famous export to come out of Ferguson. His history as a vocalist in Steely Dan, the Doobie Brothers and his solo work is written all over rock radio of yore, and his late-career covers of Motown and soul classics underlined why his are the only blue eyes that matter in blue-eyed soul. Expect an intimate, career-spanning set with, hopefully, some tributes to the sounds (and the city) that formed him. Peg (He Will Come Back To You): If you miss this week’s show, McDonald just announced a Christmas-themed concert at the Fox Theatre on November 28. —CHRISTIAN SCHAEFFER

HARD WORKING AMERICANS 8 p.m. Tuesday, August 25. The Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street. $25 to $28. 314-588-0505. Supergroups tend to take themselves too seriously or too blithely. Hard Working Americans — a band featuring Nashville outsider Todd Snider, Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools, veteran alt-country guitarist Neal Casal, Great American Taxi’s Chad Staehly, steel guitarist Jesse Aycock and drummer Duane Trucks, kid brother of Derek — takes itself for what it is: six buds who mostly cover artists they admire. That includes everyone from Randy Newman to Gillian Welch to the Bottle Rockets. The populist streak of the group’s stoned, rootsy rock & roll never sounds preachy. The band has far too much fun — and far too much weed — to succumb to political grandeur. Tautological Toking: The band’s latest single, “Dope Is Dope,” written by Snider and BR-549’s Chuck Mead, is what it is, smokes what it smokes, and lays out a funky, fuzz-guitar groove. —ROY KASTEN

—DANIEL HILL riverfronttimes.com

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9.11 O.A.R. 9.12 THUNDERHEAD: THE RUSH EXPERIENCE 9.18 KACEY MUSGRAVES 9.25 WARREN HAYNES 9.27 BEACH HOUSE 9.29 ZZ WARD 9.30 PARADOSIO 10.2 FUNK VOLUME TOUR 2015 W/ HOPSIN 10.6 GHOST 10.7 FATHER JOHN MISTY 10.8 BEN RECTOR 10.12 BRING ME THE HORIZON 10.13 CHANCE THE RAPPER

10.14 COHEED AND CAMBRIA 10.15 FLUX PAVILION 10.16 LETTUCE 10.17 GRACE POTTER 10.19 PASSION PIT 10.21 LYLE LOVETT & JOHN HIATT 10.23 YELAWOLF/MEG MYERS 10.24 DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS 10.28 ANDREW MCMAHON IN THE WILDERNESS / NEW POLITICS 10.30 MAT KEARNEY 10.31 SOMO 11.6 TIMEFLIES 11.8 NEW FOUND GLORY / YELLOWCARD

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3 Problems: Sun., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. A Benefit for Tom Alderson: W/ Out Of Time, Blackwater '64, New Lives, Strangers Now, Church Key, Fri., Sept. 4, 7 p.m., $10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-5350353. Alesana: W/ Iwrestledabearonce, Entheos, Artifex Pereo, Cabaret Runaway, Thu., Nov. 12, 6 p.m., $16-$18. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. Alex G: W/ Spencer Radcliffe, Sun., Nov. 1, 7 p.m., $15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. American Dischord: W/ the Kuhlies, Captain Dee and the Long Johns, Thirty Helens Agree, Life on Mars, Tue., Nov. 3, 7 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. The Amity Affliction: W/ Chelsea Grin, Secrets, Fri., Oct. 30, 6 p.m., $16-$18. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314289-9050. B&E Reunion Vinyl Release Show: W/ Shark Dad, Sat., Aug. 29, 9 p.m., $8. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. Beach Slang: W/ Lithuania, Worriers, Tue., Nov. 3, 7 p.m., $10-$12. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-5350353. A Benefit For Drew Franklin: W/ Big Brother T H IS C O D E Thunder & the Masterblasters, TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE Thunder Biscuit Orchestra, RIVERFRONT TIMES Mathias & The Pirates, IPHONE/ANDROID APP Illphonics, Blank Generation, Love Jones, DJ Mahf, Sat., FOR MORE CONCERTS OR VISIT Aug. 29, 8 p.m., $10. Old riverfronttimes.com Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. Biters: W/ Macrobliss, jusTed, Hard Evidence, Black Tar Heroines, Tue., Nov. 10, 7 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Black Tusk: W/ Lazer/Wulf, Wrong, Valley, Thu., Sept. 10, 8 p.m., $12-$14. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-2899050. Bobbing for Dogs: A Tribute to Bob Dylan: W/ the Fog Lights, Cassie Morgan, Sarah Jane & the Blue Notes, Beth Bombara, Sat., Oct. 3, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. The Browning: W/ Evacuate The City, Make Room, Torn at the Seams, Yearlong Hours, Tue., Sept. 22, 6 p.m., $15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. The Chainsmokers: W/ Matoma, Shaun Frank, Super Duper, Thu., Nov. 19, 8 p.m., $25-$30. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. The City On Film: W/ the Color and the Sound, Dog And Wolf, Tue., Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $12. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Cody J. Martin: W/ Irene Allen, Wed., Sept. 2, 8 p.m., $8. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Coheed and Cambria: W/ Cursive, Thank You Scientist, Wed., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $30-$35. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. Combichrist: W/ the Birthday Massacre, MXMS, Echo Black, Thu., Nov. 19, 8 p.m., $20-$23. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Conquer As They Come: W/ Torontario, Capitol Drive, Sozorox, My Legacy My Ghost, Life On Broadway, Fri., Sept. 18, 6 p.m., $7. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Dangermuffin: Wed., Sept. 9, 8 p.m., $8-$10. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. David Bromberg: Thu., Nov. 19, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $30. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Dead Soft: Wed., Sept. 16, 7 p.m., $8-$10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Dear Rouge: W/ Rah Rah, Thu., Nov. 12, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Death and Memphis: W/ Black Tar Heroines, Guy Morgan, Bad Taste, Sat., Nov. 14, 7 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Decedy EP Release: W/ Captains Courageous, Church Key, Seven Eighteen, Yearlong Hours, Sun., Aug. 30, 6 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Deerpeople: Mon., Aug. 31, 7 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Der Weg Einer Freiheit: W/ Barishi, Alan Smithee, Xaemora, Thanatos Eternal, Wed., Sept. 30, 7 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.

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Dibiase Album Release Party: W/ Ashes And Iron, Tilts, Fri., Oct. 9, 8 p.m., $8. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Dilly Dally: Mon., Nov. 9, 8 p.m., $8-$10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Fear the Concept: W/ Kriminals, Post Primal, A Beginnings End, We Are Descendants, Fri., Sept. 11, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Fister: W/ Grand Inquisitor, Bastard, Bill Clinton, Thu., Oct. 1, 7 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Freaker's Ball 2015: W/ the Hobosexuals, Arr!, Frontal Lobe, Mold Dogs, TypeTim Jordan, Fri., Sept. 25, 9 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Gangstagrass: Wed., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $10-$12. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Grapevine Fires: Wed., Aug. 26, 7 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Hollis Brown: Sun., Sept. 13, 8 p.m., $8-$10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Honey Island Swamp Band: Wed., Sept. 16, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314588-0505. The Hotelier: W/ Runaway Brother, Oso Oso, Spirit of the Beehive, Mon., Oct. 26, 7 p.m., $12-$14. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. The Internet: Thu., Oct. 8, 8 p.m., $17-$20. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Israel Nash: Tue., Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Jason Boland & the Stragglers: W/ Mike and the Moonpies, Wed., Nov. 18, 8 p.m., $18-$30. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Jonny Craig: W/ Travis Garland, Sat., Oct. 3, 7 p.m., $15-$17. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Little Green Cars: Sun., Oct. 4, 7 p.m., $12-$14. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Marshall Crenshaw: Thu., Nov. 5, 8 p.m., $18-$25. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. Mikaela Davis: W/ Lauren Shera, Tue., Oct. 6, 7 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314773-3363. Mississippi Clean: W/ Apex Shrine, Fri., Aug. 28, 8 p.m., $7. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. Modoc: Fri., Sept. 18, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. New Years Day: W/ Get Scared, Eyes Set To Kill, New Volume, Another Day Drowning, Sat., Oct. 24, 6 p.m., $15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Nobunny: Tue., Oct. 13, 8 p.m., $12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Old Saints EP Release Show: W/ Brother Lee and the Leather Jackals, the Wilderness, Sat., Sept. 12, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Radkey: Sat., Sept. 26, 7 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Seryn: Sun., Oct. 4, 8 p.m., $12-$15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. Slum Village: Thu., Sept. 24, 8 p.m., $10-$12. 2720 Cherokee Performing Arts Center, 2720 Cherokee St, St. Louis, 314-276-2700. Soma: W/ Banks and Cathedrals, We Are Warm, Fri., Aug. 28, 9 p.m., $8. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Stevie Ray Vaughn Tribute: Sat., Nov. 28, 8 p.m., TBA. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. Stevie Wonder: Sun., Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Stevie Wonder. Scottrade Center, 1401 Clark Ave., St. Louis, 314-241-1888. Taste of St. Louis Night 1: W/ the Well Hungarians, Tyler Lewis, Fri., Sept. 18, 8 p.m., free. Chesterfield Amphitheater, 16365 Lydia Hill Drive, Chesterfield. Taste of St. Louis Night 2: W/ Mix Master Mike, Marsha Evans and the Coalition, Bear Hands, free. Chesterfield Amphitheater, 16365 Lydia Hill Drive, Chesterfield. Tesla Rossa: W/ Tok, Apex Shrine, Wed., Oct. 28, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. Thanksgiving Eve Party: W/ Endora, Traveling Sound Machine, Tok, Mathias and the Pirates, Wed., Nov. 25, 9 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314773-3363. Turbo Fruits: Thu., Sept. 17, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Twiddle: W/ the Werks, Wed., Oct. 28, 9 p.m., $10-$15. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. Two Cow Garage: W/ the Dirty 30s, Wed., Sept. 9, 8 p.m., $10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-7733363. Uncle Lucius: Tue., Sept. 22, 8 p.m., $12. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis. The Vibrators: W/ Life on Mars, Sun., Sept. 27, 7 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis.


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out every night “Out Every Night” is a free listing open to all bars and bands in the St. Louis and Metro East areas. However, we reserve the right to refuse any entry. Listings are to be submitted by mail, fax or e-mail. Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, ten days before Thursday publication. Please include bar’s name, address with ZIP code, phone number and geographic location; nights and dates of entertainment; and act name. Mail: Riverfront Times, attn: “Clubs,” 6358 Delmar Blvd., Suite 200, St. Louis, MO 63130-4719; fax: 314-754-6416; e-mail: clubs@ riverfronttimes.com. Schedules are not accepted over the phone. Because of last-minute cancellations and changes, please call ahead to verify listings.

T H U R S DAY A Crowd Like You: w/ Approaching Troy, Capital Drive, Thu., Aug. 20, 7 p.m., $10-$12. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353, www.firebirdstl.com. GT: Thu., Aug. 20, 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226, www.theheavyanchor.com. IAmDynamite: w/ the Missing Letters, Ursa Major, Apart O' Heart, Thu., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., $12-$15. Pop's Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720, www. popsrocks.com. Noah Guthrie: w/ Gabe Dixon, Thu., Aug. 20, 8 p.m., $10$18. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-5880505, www.oldrockhouse.com. Sloths: w/ Anodes, Path of Might, Thu., Aug. 20, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314772-2100, foamvenue.com/. Southern Brothers: Thu., Aug. 20, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www. offbroadwaystl.com.

INVITE YOU TO ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO SEE

F R I DAY BRAGE: w/ the Station, Fri., Aug. 21, 8 p.m., $10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009, www. ciceros-stl.com. Broken Prayer: w/ Cruelster, Bitchin' Reality, Fri., Aug. 21, 10 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, foamvenue.com/. Brother's Rage: w/ the Station, Fri., Aug. 21, 8:30 p.m., $10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009, www.ciceros-stl.com. Caskey: w/ Lo-Er-Kace, Trenton P, Fri., Aug. 21, 7 p.m., $12$15. Pop's Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720, www.popsrocks.com. Dead Mockingbirds: w/ the Langaleers, Bucko Toby, Fri., Aug. 21, 9 p.m., $7. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226, www.theheavyanchor.com. Dreadnought: w/ Ashes and Iron, Grand Inquisitor, ((ZXEL)), Fri., Aug. 21, 8 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. The Educated Guess: w/ Syna So Pro, Fri., Aug. 21, 8 p.m., $5. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-7733363, www.offbroadwaystl.com. Incubus: w/ Deftones, Death from Above 1979, the Bots, Fri., Aug. 21, 5 p.m., $57. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944, www.livenation.com/Verizon-Wireless-Amphitheater-St-Louistickets-Maryland-Heights/venue/49672. Ivas John Band: Fri., Aug. 21, 10 p.m., $5. BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222, www. bbsjazzbluessoups.com. Kevin Hart: Fri., Aug. 21, 7 p.m., $49.50-$125. Scottrade Center, 1401 Clark Ave., St. Louis, 314-241-1888, www. scottradecenter.com. The Scarlet Locomotive: w/ Riverside Wanderers, Fri., Aug. 21, 7 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, foamvenue.com/. The Twistin' Tarantulas: Fri., Aug. 21, 8 p.m., $10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353, www. firebirdstl.com. Whiskey Myers: Fri., Aug. 21, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505, www. oldrockhouse.com.

Visit riverfronttimes.com /promotions to enter for your chance to win one admit-two run-of-engagement pass to see the movie. *Passes are limited and winners will be selected at random from all entries, while supplies last. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. See passes for additional details. All federal, state and local regulations apply. This film is rated R.

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S AT U R DAY C2 and the Brothers Reed: Sat., Aug. 22, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, www.thedemostl.com.

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Dramatic Acid: w/ Con, Ciej, Mir, Darius Hickman, Chillz, Anthony Lucius, the BigDude Rosegoldman, Meech & Driz, Nick Swisher, Sat., Aug. 22, 7 p.m., $5-$8. Pop's Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720, www. popsrocks.com. Hazel Ra: w/ Strangled Darlings, Les Gruff & the Billy Goat, Sat., Aug. 22, 8 p.m., 8pm. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, foamvenue.com/. Justin Willman: Sat., Aug. 22, 8 p.m., $25. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161, www.thepageant.com. The Lonely Biscuits: Sat., Aug. 22, 9 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www. offbroadwaystl.com. Lucas Jack: w/ Scarlet Tanager, Little Falcon, Aaron Krause, Sat., Aug. 22, 7 p.m., $10. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353, www.firebirdstl.com. Michael McDonald: w/ Brian Owens, Sat., Aug. 22, 7 p.m., $79. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314533-9900, www.thesheldon.org. Opiate: The Tool Experience: Sat., Aug. 22, 9 p.m., $10. Blueberry Hill, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-7274444, www.blueberryhill.com. Tasi: w/ Lioness D Rasta, Da Bredren Band, Jay Spearman, Sat., Aug. 22, 8 p.m., $5. The Bootleg, 4140 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis. Underground Styles Hip Hop Music Festival: w/ Preach, Bates, Beastmode, Sat., Aug. 22, 5 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. The Whiskey War Festival 2015: w/ James Leg, Dirty Streets, The Maness Brothers, Old Capital Square Dance Club, Tok, Calliope, Brother Lee & the Leather Jackals, Chris Black and the Eagles of Unemployment, Path of Might, Shitstorm, the Barn Mice, River Kittens, Cara Louise Band, Illphonics, the Old Souls Revival, the Ol' One Two, Fat Tramp Food Stamp, the Wilderness, Jr. Clooney, Zackary Ó Sluaghadháin, Sat., Aug. 22, 11 a.m., TBA. VFW Post 2866, 66 VFW Lane, St. Charles.

S U N DAY 3 Problems: Sun., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. Blackstreet: Sun., Aug. 23, 7 p.m., $9.55-$100. Ballpark Village, 601 Clark Ave, St. Louis, 314-345-9481, www. stlballparkvillage.com. Dilly Dally: Sun., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $8-$10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, www.thedemostl.com. Sharkmuffin: w/ Lost Boy, Big Blonde, Sun., Aug. 23, 7 p.m., $8. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353, www.firebirdstl.com. Tunic: w/ Skin Tags, Ish, Sun., Aug. 23, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, foamvenue.com/.

M O N DAY Dana: w/ Dinofight!, the Ultraviolents, Mon., Aug. 24, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, foamvenue.com/. Goatwhore: w/ Xaemora, Final Drive, Stormcaller, Mon., Aug. 24, 7:30 p.m., $10-$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. Lights Out Paris: w/ the Last Stanza, Riot For Violet, Mon., Aug. 24, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314289-9050, www.fubarstl.com.

T U E S DAY Bobby Long: Tue., Aug. 25, 8 p.m., $15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353, www.firebirdstl.com. Hard Working Americans: w/ the Steepwater Band, Tue., Aug. 25, 8 p.m., $25. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505, www.oldrockhouse.com. Have Gun Will Travel: w/ Garrett Klahn, Tue., Aug. 25, 8 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, www. thedemostl.com.

W E D N E S DAY Grapevine Fires: Wed., Aug. 26, 7 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. Health Problems: w/ the Crisis, Wed., Aug. 26, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314772-2100, foamvenue.com/. Runaway Brother: w/ Secret Grief, Wed., Aug. 26, 7 p.m., $10. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, www. thedemostl.com.


savage love The Boyfriend Experience Hey, Dan: I’m a woman in a straight relationship. I woke up this morning, and my BF wasn’t in bed with me. He felt ill in the middle of the night and went to sleep in the spare room — where he found a condom in its wrapper behind the nightstand. Now my BF thinks I’m cheating on him. I haven’t cheated on him and have no desire to. I have an IUD and we are monogamous, so we don’t use BY condoms. But I used to keep condoms around to use on an DAN old sex toy that I liked but was allergic to. That toy is S AVA G E long gone (I found out it was made of terrible materials and disposed of it), but I kept the condoms in case I met someone. That someone ended up being him — but by the time we met, I had an IUD. I explained all this to him, but he doesn’t believe me. We’ve lived together for two years and were just talking about buying a house and having kids. Condom Resurfaces And Shatters Happiness

Your boyfriend should ask himself — order him to ask himself — which is the likelier scenario: that his girlfriend scatters condoms around the house because she’s cheating on him? Or that his girlfriend, like almost all sexually active adults who have used condoms for birth control, disease prevention and sex-toy safety, has a few loose condoms rattling around her living space? That your boyfriend can’t accept your perfectly reasonable explanation for that one stray condom, CRASH, has me wondering if the recent talk about buying a house and having kids might be the actual issue. Is he looking for an excuse to dump you, and the stray condom is a convenient casus belli? Or is he really that jealous and insecure? If he doesn’t want to buy a house and have kids, then you obviously shouldn’t buy a house or have kids with him. But the same goes if he’s really this jealous and insecure. You don’t want to be saddled with a partner who sees evidence of infidelity where none exists, CRASH, because life is a parade of incidents and ephemera — an easily misinterpreted text message from a male coworker, a stray pair of underpants left behind by a boyfriend who predates him, a cute waiter/ barista/ personal trainer who catches your eye — that could potentially set him off. Everyone is entitled to moments of insecurity, of course, but you don’t want to be with a man who melts down over nothing.

Hey, Dan: My boyfriend of six months tied me up for the first time a month ago. He didn’t know what he was doing, and I didn’t get turned on because it hurt. I got him two sessions with a professional bondage top as a gift. I was the “model,” and I was very turned on as the instructor walked my boyfriend through safe bondage techniques and positions. The guy was attractive, but not as attractive as my boyfriend. At one point I shuddered, and my boyfriend is convinced I had an orgasm. He says I cheated right in front of him, and now he wants to dump me. What do I do? Helplessly Explaining My Predicament

Call that attractive instructor, HEMP, and tell him you’re single now so you’ll be coming to that second session alone. Hey, Dan: My boyfriend of three years and I have an ongoing problem. His libido is much higher than mine, and at one point I wasn’t making enough of an effort to meet him in the middle. But now we have great sex on average four or five times per week, and I initiate about a third of that. (If it were completely up to him, we’d probably have sex one or two times a day.) This past week, I’ve been working crazy shifts for a work event — fourteen-hour days with a two-hour commute each way. I told him that I very likely would not have the energy to have sex. But when I got home the other day, knowing that I had to get up and leave again in less than seven hours, he initiated sex and I refused. I was too tired. He got very upset. Whenever I say no, he seems to automatically categorize my refusal as evidence of laziness or selfishness. I’m not sure what to do at this point. I really want to make this work.

NOW HIRING PH OTOGRAPH E RS The Riverfront Times is looking for outgoing, enthusiastic photographers to join the Riverfront Times Street Team. Team members promote the Riverfront Times at local events and take photos, gain e-mail addresses to build our database, and hand out free stuff! If you are interested in part time work (5-10 hours per week- nights and weekends are required) and want to attend the best events St. Louis has to offer, send your resume to emily.westerholt@riverfronttimes.com. Must be 21 years old!

Working Hard And Tired

Your boyfriend is inconsiderate — in the most literal sense of the word. He has failed to take into consideration that sex five times a week is a lot of sex, objectively speaking, particularly in a long-term relationship. And your boyfriend failed — utterly failed — to take into consideration your current crushing workload when he attempted to initiate sex after you had worked/commuted for seventeen hours and had to get up in seven hours and do it all over again. I suggest you get your boyfriend a Fleshlight, WHAT, for those moments when you can’t be his human masturbatory aid, and stop feeling guilty about having sex “only” four or five times per week. On the Lovecast, special guest Peter Sagal from Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me!: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter riverfronttimes.com AM OU NS TT H 1X9X–X ER FR IM E S 451 riverfronttimes.com UG - 2 5X, ,22001 0 5X RR I VI V ER FR OO NN T TT IT M ES


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100 Employment 105 Career/Training/Schools THE OCEAN CORP. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

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530 Misc. Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

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DOWNTOWN

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IF YOU DESIRE TO MAKE MORE MONEY AND NEED A NEW JOB EARNING $45-$50 thousand the 1st year, great benefits, call SMTDS, Financial assistance available if you qualify. Free living quarters. 6 students max per class. 4 wks. 192 hours. • More driving time than any other school in the state •

UNIVERSITY-CITY $895 2BR, new kitch, bath & carpet, C/A & heat. No pets

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riverfronttimes.com

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

RIVERFRONT TIMES

47


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8780 Pershall Road Hazelwood, MO 63042 • 314-524-9015 Must be 18-64 years old with valid ID, proof of social security number and current residence postmarked within 30 days. Information at octapharmaplasma.com.

NEW DONORS EARN UP TO $250 FOR THE FIRST FIVE DONATIONS

R.O.C. LAW , A Debt Relief Agency, Helping People File For Bankruptcy Relief Under the New Bankruptcy Code. 314-843-0220 The choice of a lawyer is an important decision & shouldn’t be based solely upon advertisements.

DWI/Traf $50+/Personal InjuryMark Helfers, 314-862-6666- CRIMINAL former Asst US Attorney, 32 years exp

GOLD CONSULTANTS NEEDED www.globalgoldbars.com McGuire Furniture Sells Mattresses! Visit our showroom to find out why McGuire is St. Louis’ best kept secret. 314.997.4500 McGuireFurnitureSTL.com 650 Fee Fee Rd., St. Louis, MO 63043

PAINLESS TATTOO REMOVAL SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 15 OR CALL 866-626-8346

Personal Injury, Workers Comp, DWI, Traffic 314-621-0500

ATTORNEY BRUCE E. HOPSON

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertising.

www.LiveInTheGrove.com

www.HelfersLaw.com The choice of a lawyer is an important decision & should not be based solely on advertising

•Full Body Massage •Deep Tissue Massage •Hot Stone •Couples Massage •Swedish Massage •Chinese Accupressure 109 Long Rd. • Chesterfield, MO 63005

636-633-2929

www.spa-chi.com • Open everyday 9:30-9:30

Ultimate Massage by

Summer!

SWEDISH & DEEP TISSUE FULL BODY MASSAGE Daily 10 AM-5PM

South County Lemay Area

314-620-6386

# 2006003746

A clinical research study for adults 18-70 yrs old, who suffer from depression.

Make Every Day Special with a Luxurious Asian Massage

Are You Addicted to Pain Medications or Heroin ?

Suboxone Can Help.

OUTPATIENT SERVICES

763 S. NEW BALLAS RD. STE. 310 SAINT LOUIS, MO 63141

Outpatient • Confidential • Convenient •Covered by most insurance •Free & confidential assessments

314-292-7323 or

5000 CEDAR PLAZA PKWY., STE. 380 SAINT LOUIS, MO 63128

314-842-4463

ARE YOU DEPRESSED? If you’re feeling exhausted and sad and have no interest in things you used to enjoy, if your appetite has changed and you can’t sleep, you may be suffering from depression. Learn more at www.mac-research.com or call 314-647-1743 to see if you qualify.

Mid-America Clinical Research, LLC

After hours or weekends 800-345-5407

Are You Addicted to Pain Medications or Heroin?

Suboxone Can Help. Outpatient - Confidential - Convenient  Covered by most insurance  Free & confidential assessments

OUTPATIENT SERVICES

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RIVERFRONT TIMES

AUGUST 19-25, 2015

riverfronttimes.com

763 S. NEW BALLAS RD., STE. 310 ST LOUIS, MO 63141 314-292-7323

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