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JUNE 17–23, 2015 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 25

RIVERFRONTTIMES.COM I FREE

BrE A KING THE

MOLD

For St. Louis’ music scene, the only constant in the last year has been change

MUSIC

ISSUE


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THIS SATURDAY !

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SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risk To Your Health.

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the lede

P H OTO BY JA R R E D G AST R E IC H

“The pool re-opening is an opportunity to get to know my neighbors. How often do we get to mingle like this? I wish there was a pool party every weekend. And there’s no better way to get a suntan. I used to be a camp counselor, and it reminded me of those days that I miss. Kids are so outgoing that the smallest suggestion of a game gets everyone together. I was taken back when a girl said, ‘I wish you were my mom.’ I never had that connection before. My first thought was, ‘But I’m not old enough!’” –AMBER MUSCHELLI, SPOTTED AT MARQUETTE POOL PARTY IN DUTCHTOWN, JUNE 13.

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C O N T E N T S

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VOLUME 39 NUMBER 25 J U N E 1 7- J U N E 2 3 , 2 0 1 5

Publisher Michael Wagner Editor in Chief Sarah Fenske E D I T O R I A L Associate Editor Kristie McClanahan Arts & Culture Editor Paul Friswold Music Editor Daniel Hill Staff Writer Danny Wicentowski Deputy News Editor Nicholas Phillips Restaurant Critic Cheryl Baehr Editorial Interns Emily McCarter, Derek Schwartz Contributing Writers Drew Ailes, Mike Appelstein, Allison Babka, Nicole Beckert, Mark Fischer, Sara Graham, Joseph Hess, Patrick J. Hurley, Roy Kasten, Dan LeRoy, Jaime Lees, Todd McKenzie, Bob McMahon, Tef Poe, Christian Schaeffer, Alison Sieloff, Mabel Suen, Ryan Wasoba, Alex Weir A R T Art Director Kelly Glueck Art Intern Brittani Schlager Contributing Photographers Jarred Gastreich, Abby Gillardi, RJ Hartbeck, Shelby Kardell, Alex Kendall, Robert Rohe, Jennifer Silverberg, Mabel Suen, Steve Truesdell, Micah Usher, Theo Welling, Corey Woodruff, Caroline Yoo P R O D U C T I O N Production Manager Robert Westerholt Production Designer Randy Lutz M U LT I M E D I A

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10 BREAKING THE MOLD For St. Louis’ music scene, the only constant in the last year has been change 5

The Lede

8

DailyRFT.com

23 Night & Day® 26 Film 29 The Arts 31

Cafe S H O RT O R D E R S ...............................................34

41 Music B - S I D E S ..............................................................42 C R I T IC S ’ PIC K S ............................................ 44 C O N C E RTS .........................................................45 O U T E V E RY N IG H T .........................................48

49 Savage Love 50 Classified

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Standout dispatches from our news blog, updated all day, every day

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For Uber and St. Louis, an Impasse on Background Checks

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For Ferguson, a New City Manager — with Skeletons in His Past

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erguson mayor James Knowles III might insist his new interim city manager Ed Beasley is “an excellent choice for the city” — but Knowles might as well be trying to hide a grizzly bear under a napkin. Last Tuesday, just hours before the city announced the hiring, the St. Louis PostDispatch reported on the trail of scandals leading from Beasley to his former employer, the financially beleaguered city of Glendale, Arizona, where he worked as city manager from 2002 to 2012. The crux of the Post-Dispatch report was a 2013 audit commissioned by Glendale’s city council, which accused Beasley and other administrators of shifting millions of dollars among several accounts to cover a retirement program’s losses. Beasley, the audit alleged, intentionally concealed the financial 8

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If this guy’s waiting for Uber, it might take a while.

LDPRODUCTION

ber says it could be ready to start taking passengers in St. Louis via its ridesharing app, UberX, in a matter of days — the only thing it’s waiting on is regulatory approval. But you might want to hold off on downloading the app just yet. The company’s general manager for St. Louis, Sagar Shah, says that he believes Uber has reached an impasse with regulators at the Metropolitan Taxi Commission. “We were having what seemed like productive conversations,” he says. “But what they seem to be insisting on now is misaligned from the progress we thought we were making.” At issue: drug tests and background checks performed by the Missouri Highway Patrol. Currently, both are required for drivers regulated by the Metropolitan Taxi Commission — which includes all cab drivers in St. Louis and St. Louis County, and will likely include Uber drivers, too. (The company ’s effort to continued on page 9

shenanigans from the Glendale City Council. “I know the audit is on some folks’ minds,” Beasley said during a Tuesday press conference with Mayor Knowles and the Ferguson city council. “That occurred after I had left the city. I have worked for 27 years in the profession, 17 years for the city, never had a bad review.” But Reverend Jarrett Maupin, a well-known civil-rights activist in the Phoenix area, tells Daily RFT that Beasley’s defense is utter bullshit. “Lord have mercy, I can’t believe they hired him,” Maupin says. “He wrecked this city.” While Maupin faults Beasley for lying about the audit’s conclusions, he saves the brunt of his ire for Beasley’s role in developing three major sports facilities in Glendale: University of Phoenix Stadium, which hosted last year’s Superbowl; Jobing.com Arena, home to the Arizona Coyotes; and Camelback Ranch, the spring training site for the Chicago White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers. “He began these terrible sports partnerships with the city, which has almost totally bankrupted them,” Maupin says. Indeed, in 2013 the city was being

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mentioned in the same sentence as Detroit, and bankruptcy loomed as city leaders grappled with a $26 million negative fund balance. That’s despite Glendale having been a relatively affluent suburb with land prime for development as nearby Phoenix sprawled ever outward. North St. Louis County, this area was not. So how did the city end up teetering on the brink of ruin? Those giant sports deals, which had looked so promising before the 2008 recession, turned disastrous as the country’s economy fell apart. Here’s how the Associated Press described Glendale’s financial unraveling earlier this year, in a stinging report published shortly before the city hosted the Super Bowl: Glendale bet big on professional sports.... Then the economy tanked, and the hockey team went through bankruptcy, with several different owners in recent years. It got so bad for Glendale that leaders were talking about bankruptcy at one point as its credit rating faltered. The city has found stronger financial footing since then and its bond rating has improved markedly, but not without having to raise taxes,

trim 25 percent of the municipal workforce, cut back on paving projects, and reduce hours at municipal swimming pools and libraries. The 9.2 percent sales tax that shoppers and diners pay in Glendale is among the highest in the state. To get another perspective on Beasley, Daily RFT reached to Elaine Scruggs. Scruggs served as Glendale’s mayor from 1993 to 2013 and has been blamed (along with Beasley) for sending the city into its current financial tailspin. “As a former elected official, I know what it’s like to have people second-guessing,” she says, adding that she has “no right or place” to weigh in on Beasley’s ethical qualifications or whether he’s a good fit for Ferguson. “The best thing that Ferguson [residents] can do, if they have doubts or apprehensions, is they should talk to their council members, their mayor, who voted to make this decision and ask them — not someone that is 2,000 miles away. They need to talk to the people who made the decision.” The aftermath of Beasley’s once-respected ten-year career in Glendale left him with few people willing to defend him publicly, and he hasn’t worked in government since his 2012


retirement. His move to Ferguson should prove a far different challenge than his previous gig: Glendale boasts a population of 230,000, while Ferguson has 21,000 residents. Glendale’s future depends on how it deals with its debtriddled sports infrastructure, while Ferguson’s future is mired in the aftermath of a damning U.S. Department of Justice investigation and mounting lawsuits. Still, there may be cause for measured optimism. Norma Alvarez, a Glendale City Council member who served from 2011 to 2014, watched Beasley’s career crumble beneath the city’s debt crisis and the scathing audit. Now retired, Alvarez says Beasley’s doesn’t deserve sole blame for the city’s financial ruin. “Everybody knows in Glendale that we had a corrupted council,” she says. “He let them know what they were doing wrong, but he went along with it because that was his job. I’m not saying that’s a good thing. I would have protested it, but he didn’t.” As for the audit and shady retirement account, Alvarez paints Beasley as a scapegoat for a city council desperate to cover its collective ass.

“The whole business was approved. He couldn’t do anything that wasn’t approved by the council. I was there when he was being investigated, and there was a lot of people making money. It wasn’t that he lied to the council — the council was corrupted, and thank God they’re gone.” As it stands, Beasley’s contract with Ferguson runs only six months, with a total cost to city placed at $84,500. Ferguson also has a new municipal court judge, Donald McCullin, a former St. Louis City Circuit Court judge. But it’s reasonable to assume that Mayor Knowles and the city council are seeking a long-term solution for the city manager position, and that they hope Beasley — an African American with more than two decades of city management experience — can do for Ferguson what he could not for Glendale. “I don’t know what he’s going to do to, but I think he’s a hard worker and he’s a smart person,” Alvarez continues. “But if he’s working with corruption — he did it before. If you have a corrupted council there, he would follow. He does the job.” — DANNY WICENTOWSKI

continued from page 8

“Uber has mad concessions in almost every single market they’ve entered. We’re not encouraging anyone at the the taxi commission to ask for any more than what they’ve agreed to at other places.” sky-high poll numbers is Mayor Slay. Patrick Brown, Slay’s deputy chief of staff, says not only is the mayor committed to bringing ridesharing to St. Louis, but also that “we want this done by July.” The mayor’s spokeswoman, Maggie Crane, adds that Slay appointed Chris Sommers, the Pi restaurateur, to the taxi commission specifically in the hope of getting the job done. But, Brown says, “Uber has made concessions in almost every single market they’ve entered. We’re not encouraging anyone at the taxi commission to ask for any more than what they’ve agreed to in other places.” And that, ultimately, could be why Uber is seeing an impasse. But Hamilton, for one, is ready. Ever since Uber and its ridesharing competitor Lyft first started making noise about entering the market last spring, he’s been the bad guy, Hamilton says, even as he’s tried to work to make things happen behind the scenes. He’s used to it by now. “I have been getting the literal shit kicked out of me on social media,” he says. — SARAH FENSKE

C I T Y O F G L E N DA L E

craft a state ride-sharing plan to supplant local regulations failed to gain traction at the legislature.) Uber wants an exception to those two requirements. Unless the company gets it, Shah says, “it wouldn’t work for us to operate here.” L o u Ha m i l t o n , c h a i r m a n o f t h e Metropolitan Taxi Commission, says he’s still working toward a solution. But, he cautions, Uber may not get everything it wants. “The problem with Uber is that it’s their way or the highway,” he says. “We will try to get creative, but there are going to be sticking points.” And at this point, he says, drug tests and state-run background checks will likely be among them: “If there’s a way around them, we’ll have to figure that out.” Shah says the company is not trying to shirk its duty to riders — but it’s convinced the taxi commission’s requirements are archaic. The company does background checks of its own, but they’re completed electronically, without the fingerprint component insisted on by the highway patrol. And it doesn’t believe in drug tests — because passengers can provide real-time information to dispatchers, Shah says, “in effect, every ride is a drug test.” Drivers who seem loopy to passengers will quickly get drummed out of the system, which Uber believes is much more effective than the “snapshot” offered by a more traditional urine test. Overall, Uber relies on being able to get drivers into its system quickly, without inperson screenings. “Fifty percent of our drivers work less than six hours a week for us,” Shah explains. “When there’s excessive red tape, that turns them off from signing up — and it doesn’t enhance safety.” St. Louis is the biggest city in the U.S. without Uber service, a situation Mayor Francis Slay has been vocal about wanting to change. But negotiations between the taxi

commission and the tech company appear to have broken down suddenly on June 8, thanks to a Post-Dispatch editorial calling for Uber to “compromise” with the regulators on, yes, criminal background checks and drug tests. Although Hamilton insists he had nothing to do with the column’s placement, he admits to tweeting it approvingly — and acknowledges that, at that point, “Uber went nuts.” The company admits to some concern about the editorial, but says the bigger problem was that it suddenly stopped hearing from Hamilton. “We’ve been in the dark with the taxi commission for the last week or so,” Shah says. But Hamilton, a lobbyist who serves the taxi commission in a volunteer role, says he was simply busy with his paying clients. He says his plan hasn’t changed: He’ll talk to County Executive Steve Stenger, who appointed him to the chairmanship, and Mayor Francis Slay, with whom he is close. Then, based on their input, he’ll prepare an item for discussion at the commission’s June 23 meeting. What that looks like, he says, is still a work in progress, and at least partly at the direction of Stenger and Slay. After discussion in June, he believes the item will be ready for a vote in July. However, he says, he’s recently learned that Uber drivers undergo drug tests and background checks, complete with fingerprints, in Houston, Texas — despite the company’s insistence that such regulatory hurdles will be untenable in St. Louis. “Do we have less of a responsibility to public safety than Houston does?” he asks. And though Uber recently released showing that 78 percent of St. Louis residents support bringing the ridesharing app to the city, Hamilton isn’t cowed. “If they had asked in addition, ‘Should Jesus come to St. Louis?’ I have no doubt Uber would have gotten a higher percentage in the polls,” he says. He’s still not convinced that drug tests and fingerprints can’t coexist with Uber’s services. One person who surely also noticed Uber’s

Uber

Ed Beasley.

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Revolutionary Generation

The St. Louis hip-hop community found new life and new unity making provocative music in a very difficult year

B R E A P H OTO G R A P H Y

BY DA N I E L H I L L

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MME’s Mvstermind performing at the Luminary on June 4.

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C O U R T E SY O F M M E

Five of the six members of MME.

T

The opening strains of “#OPFERGUSON he lights are dimmed at the Luminary on Cherokee Street, where WAVE2” rise over the sound system as someroughly 100 hip-hop fans have one grabs a mic, shouting a phrase that has gathered for a special event show- become all too familiar for anyone living in casing the work of St. Louis’ MME the St. Louis area. “Rest in peace Mike Brown!” collective, a tight group of local artists who The crowd erupts into cheers. have been making big noise in the last year. In the ten months since Michael Brown Photos from a recent West Coast outing hang on a wall close to the front of the building, was shot to death by then-Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, St. Louis’ and a stash of merch sits in hip-hop scene has been at the plain sight for anyone walkAS THEY PREPARE TO forefront of artistic dissent in ing through the door. But the region. Sharp criticism no one is interested in any PERFORM THE FINAL of the state of policing has of that right now. It is the led to protest-style lyrics and end of a long night, and the SONG OF THE NIGHT, musical rallying cries, bringfocus is on the stage. ing international attention to The June 4 show kicked MVTERMIND LOOKS a community that hasn’t seen off this year’s LAB series a breakout commercial act at the Luminary, a multiSWEATY BUT DETERin years. media affair that pairs live Some artists, including performance with video MINED. “WE GOTTA DO Tef Poe and T-Dubb-O, have projection. Each member of MME — Dante Wolfe, Mir, THIS SHIT FOR THIS CITY, attracted new audiences by setting their music to the side Lyrique, Con, Ciej and Mvstermind — has already per- MAN. KEEP CULTIVATING.” and picking up protest signs and bullhorns instead. Their formed individually before frequent interviews with joining forces à la Voltron international media organizations and apto close out the show with a group set. As they prepare to perform the final song pearances at the White House and the United of the night, the group’s de facto leader, Mvs- Nations have revealed the folly in dismissing termind, looks sweaty but determined. “We a hip-hop artist as “just a rapper.” In fact, the gotta do this shit for this city, man,” he says. genre’s street-level view and relative agility serve as its greatest continued on page 12 “Keep cultivating.” riverfronttimes.com

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BARRETT EMKE

St. Louis rapper and activist Tef Poe leads a march of hundreds through downtown St. Louis to police headquarters on October 11, 2014.

Revolutionary continued from page 11

strengths, enabling artists to react quickly to issues of social injustice. “#OPFERGUSON WAVE2,” for example, was written and released in one day — a day that began when MME’s members attempted to participate in a more traditional form of protest. At a Clayton rally a few days after Brown’s death, Mvstermind explains, “We got a chance to talk on the megaphone and everything. But I swear, people were just driving by, some people wasn’t even looking, some people might honk the horn and yell some cuss words. And I was just like, ‘What the hell? The purpose of this is not working — for me at least.’ So I was like, ‘Yo, let’s go hit the lab, y’all; let’s go and knock this track out.’” Back in the studio, he had one overriding impulse: “Whatever we do, we gotta release this track today.” Artistic expression wound up being a much better fit for the group. “We ended up just writing that song on the spot and releasing it hours later,” Mvstermind says. The powerful track is rooted deeply in cur12

RIVERFRONT TIMES

rent events, with “don’t shoot” repeated again and again as its closing lyrics. The group released a video for the song, shot by Mike Roth of Louis Quatorze video production, which features Mir, Con and Mvstermind. Each rapper delivers one verse, starting in the street and walking toward the camera before arriving at his home and posing with his family. The overall message: Behind every kid on the street is a life and a group of people who love him. These young men aren’t an anonymous “other” — they are us. The video was released on September 24. Two weeks later, on October 8, eighteen-yearold Vonderrit Myers Jr. died in a shootout with an off-duty police officer in south St. Louis. The incident brought the Ferguson protests to St. Louis proper, with already-high tensions and distrust of the police narrative fueling participants’ anger. Myers’ death took place ten minutes after he purchased a sandwich at the Shaw Market, located at the corner of Shaw Avenue and Klemm Street. By coincidence, that corner also happens to be the same spot where the “#OPFERGUSON WAVE2” video opens, with Mir rapping in the street, the corner store visible behind him. “I was trying to interpret it in so many

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different ways. Like, what did that mean?” through the emotions of a very difficult time. And then there’s sometime RFT contribuMvstermind says. “To me personally, I feel like the universe has its ways of just showing tor Tef Poe, St. Louis’ most visible underhow everything is connected, you know what I ground rapper. On the night Brown was killed, Tef was mean? I’m not exactly sure what is the deeper meaning, but I know that that wasn’t just no slated to perform at a party at Blank Space on Cherokee Street. Before the show started pure coincidence.” MME wasn’t the only local hip-hop group he went to Instagram to post a flier. That’s when he first saw photos of to respond in the early days the slain Ferguson teen. of the Ferguson unrest. “I KNEW I WOULD BE “From there I was drawn Souls of Liberty released into the situation,” he ex“Stay Alive (RIP Mike INVOLVED TO SOME plains. “I knew I would be Brown)” just two days afinvolved to some level, but ter Brown’s death. Prince LEVEL. BUT I DON’T THINK I didn’t honestly think this Ea filmed a spoken-word deeply. But I don’t think any piece at the burned-out ANY OF US REALLY of us really knew that this QuikTrip, “Michael Brown, was going to become what Same Story,” which has garKNEW THAT THIS WAS it became.” nered nearly 100,000 views Tef grew up in the Fersince it was uploaded on GOING TO BECOME WHAT guson/Dellwood area; his August 13. Mathias & the mother still lives there. For Pirates, Chris Grindz, Jah IT BECAME.” this to be happening in the Orah & KD Assassin, Bo place he played as a child Dean, Domino Effect, Arshad Goods, TheBlackBruceWayne, members was surreal. “I remembered growing up and standing at of the FarFetched collective, Doorway and seemingly countless others would each offer the corner of West Florissant and Chambers, a take as the months wore on. For these art- and I would watch all the cars go through the ists, music served as an outlet, a way to work intersection as I tried to cross the street,” he


J O N G I TC H O F F

Tef Poe performing at Hip Hop 911: Stop the Violence in 2011.

says. “And I would stand there and think, ‘This is the center of my universe.’ I don’t know what the center of the universe looks like for anyone else, but for me at that time, growing up — that was it.” Before going to Blank Space that night, Tef and his manager, Jay Stretch, went to Canfield Drive to take in the scene. “At that time, nothing was really happening; there wasn’t any violence going on,” Tef says. “The community was just out standing around, trying to grieve and trying to figure out what was happening. When I left, that’s when I saw maybe 30 cop cars swarm into Canfield and get out with their dogs. “It felt like we were living in a small town, somewhere deep in Georgia that nobody knew about,” he continues. “You would have thought Ferguson was Jena [Louisiana] — like it was going to be the next Jena Six or something.” Throughout the show, Tef couldn’t help but think about what he had witnessed, even as social-media feeds filled with images from the increasingly tense scene. He went home, slept, and then went to the Ferguson Police Department the next day to protest. In the months since, he has become one of the most recognizable faces on the ground in Ferguson, helping to organize sit-ins and protests all over town, penning pieces for publications including Time, Huffington Post and Riverfront Times, being interviewed by CNN, MSNBC, BBC and BET, and even flying to Geneva, Switzerland, with Brown’s parents to address the United Nations. But it hasn’t been all green rooms and highprofile bylines. “I’ve honestly damaged my career more than I’ve helped it with the Ferguson situation,” he says. “Some people have forgotten that I was a rapper to begin with. I’ve lost some of my core white fans because they take some of the things I said the wrong way. The pressure of being an artist and an activist in this situation — I wouldn’t wish that upon anyone.” Beyond that, he adds, “In the midst of all this, I really didn’t have time to focus on rap records.” Tef finally broke his musical silence on November 12 with “War Cry.” Billed as a “Jay

Nixon Diss Record,” the track lays into many politicians and public officials who were involved with the situation in Ferguson. The profanity-laced song has the feel of a battle-rap record. At one point, Tef raps, “The system’s full of snakes; the governor can’t fix it/With every breath of my body it’s fuck Jay Nixon.” The song was inspired in part by a speech Nixon gave announcing the formation of the Ferguson Commission, which the rapper watched on TV. “He quoted something that I had said in the speech. He said, ‘As one protester said, “This is not your father’s civil-rights movement.”’ That’s basically a direct soundbite,” Tef recalls. “So everybody that I was with, we all started looking at each other like, ‘What the hell, man? Really, Jay Nixon? For real?’” Tef was unimpressed with the governor’s plan; Nixon had “dropped the ball,” he says. In an interview with MSNBC, the rapper pointed out that “all types of commissions” were started by officials after the civil-rights movement of the late ’60s. This was just more business as usual. “So with that being said, I felt obligated to respond to that,” Tef continues. “I’m a rapper, so my response was a rap record.” Now ten months removed from the height of the unrest, Tef has gotten back to the business of creating music. Through the protests he got close to another local rapper, T-DubbO, who also spent considerable time on the frontlines. At one point the two were slated to meet with President Obama, though flight delays caused Tef to miss the opportunity: “By the time I got to D.C., the meeting was already over.” Since getting to know each other in Ferguson, the two emcees have forged a musical partnership. T-Dubb-O is part of the recently launched Delmar Records label, alongside St. Louis artists Indiana Rome, Legend Camp, James K, Tech Supreme and Average Jo. Tef, who serves as the label’s president, says that their shared experiences strengthened their ties. “I’ve always wanted to align myself with T-Dubb; I’ve always respected his talent and I see a lot of myself in him,” Tef explains. “So when everything pops off in Ferguson, I was with him every day — we’ve gotten to know each other really well. In the midst of that we decided to form an independent label, primarily because we were both starting to look at the challenges that we are going to face being so connected to the Ferguson uprising.” While the Ferguson connection may bring obstacles, it has already resulted in passionate music from artists all over the St. Louis area, and Tef’s upcoming War Machine 3 and T-Dubb’s upcoming Mobstar Maniac 4 will assuredly broach the subject in unique ways. As for Mvstermind, he hopes the tragedy will birth some groundbreaking art in the St. Louis region. “I’ve seen some folks in St. Louis just make some good-ass music that wouldn’t have came without this situation allowing people to tap into different areas, different emotions,” he says. “Any turmoil can turn into artistic triumph, you know what I mean? “When you have the world pressing against you, it makes the most beautiful diamond.” Q

Saturday, June 7 Riverfront Times Music Showcase

atomic cowboy outdoor stage 1 p.m. Lizzie Webber & Emily Wallace Dual Set 2 p.m. Animal Teeth 3 p.m. Jake’s Leg 4 p.m. Mathia and the Pirates 5 p.m. Maximum Effort 6 p.m. Bug Chaser 7 p.m. Indiana Rome 8 p.m. The Domino Effect 9 p.m. Blank Generation 10 p.m. CaveofswordS

3 STAGES 2 p.m. Mother Meat 3 p.m. Breakmouth Annie 4 p.m. The Maness Brothers 5 p.m. Town Cars 6 p.m. I Actually 7 p.m. We Bite 8 p.m. Fumer 9 p.m. The Jockstraps 10 p.m. Yowie 11 p.m. Jah Orah & KD Assassin 12 a.m. Arshad Goods

atomic cowboy lounge 11 p.m. Hylidae 12 a.m. 18andCounting 1 a.m. Black James

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DJ Mahf 3 PM N.N.N. Cook 4 PM Kevin Harris 5 PM Eric Hall 6 PM Arthur and the Librarian 7 PM

RF T M U SIC S h ow cas e

Saturday, June

Endora 8 PM Tawaine Noah 9 PM

20, 2015

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A Whole Bunch of These Bands Are Going to Win Something Soon Meet the finalists for our annual RFT Music Awards

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he RFT Music Awards! Oh, the RFT Music Awards! Call them what you will: An annual celebration of the best and brightest musical acts St. Louis has to offer. A competition between artists, even though art should not be a competition. An excuse to throw a party, when we really shouldn’t even need an excuse. All three seem true enough. You could also call them the city’s premiere awards honoring local music. That one, definitely, is truth. The nominees to the right were chosen by St. Louis’ most in-the-know music lovers – a panel of music critics, venue owners/employees, promoters, talent buyers, record store staff, dedicated diehards and other musical minds from organizations all over the city. The winners? They’re up to you. This Saturday, June 20, more than 80 of these bands will take the stage (or, shall we say, “stages”) in the Grove for the RFT Music Showcase. From 1 p.m. until the wee hours of the morning, bands will perform at 10 different venues in the neighborhood. A $10 ticket gets you access to every last act of your choosing; check out the complete schedule online at blogs.riverfronttimes.com/rftmusic/2015/06/the_complete_2015_rft_music_ showcase_schedule.php. Voting has been open online since May 14 and will stay open through June 22, so you can vote after hearing bands play at the Showcase. Visit blogs.riverfronttimes.com/rftmusic/2015/05/2015_rft_music_awards_ballot. php to cast your ballot. Can’t be bothered to go online and vote? In that case, we sure as shit better not hear from you after we publish the winners’ list next week. These categories tend to be closely fought; your vote could well mean the difference between these bands hitting the big time or disbanding forever in a trail of tears. Please don’t shirk your democratic duty.

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AMERICANA

Beth Bombara Brothers Lazaroff Cara Louise Band CharFlies Loot Rock Gang

BLUES

HARD ROCK

Bug Chaser Fumer Hell Night I Actually Tok

HARDCORE

The Jeremiah Johnson Band The Maness Brothers Rich McDonough & Rough Grooves Rum Drum Ramblers Soulard Blues Band

Everything Went Black Life Like Lumpy & the Dumpers Q RUZ

COUNTRY

HIP-HOP (GROUP)

Cree Rider Family Band The Hobosexuals Jack Grelle Old Salt Union Trigger 5

COVER BAN

Diesel Island Jukebox Hooligans Queens Blvd The Town Drunks We Bite

DJ

Billy “Billy Brown” Brown DJ Boogieman DJ Crucial DJ Mahf Nappy DJ Needles

ELECTRONIC (DANCE)

HIP-HOP (SOLO)

POST HARDCORE

Arshad Goods Con Indiana Rome Tef Poe Tiffany Foxx

JAM/DUB

Fanny Pack Jake’s Leg The Schwag The Stone Sugar Shakedown Unifyah

INDIE POP

ELECTRONIC (ECLECTIC)

INDIE ROCK

EMO

EXPERIMENTAL

Darin Gray Demon Lover Eric Hall Travis Bursik Yowie

FOLK

The Aching Hearts Arthur and the Librarian Cassie Morgan and the Lonely Pine Grace Basement Letter to Memphis riverfronttimes.com

POP PUNK

Better Days Breakmouth Annie Facing Infamy Guy Morgan and the FT Crew The Haddonfields

Dots Not Feathers The Educated Guess Scarlet Tanager Spectator The Sun and The Sea

Carte de Visite Early Worm Foxing I Could Sleep In The Clouds Old State

POP

CaveofswordS Jon Hardy and the Public Golden Curls Middle Class Fashion Vanilla Beans

Domino Effect Doorway Jah Orah & KD Assassin Mathias and the Pirates M.M.E.

Abnormal Black James D-M-Y Parisian Rai

18andCounting .e Hands & Feet Hylidae Syna So Pro

NOISE

Beauty Pageant Ghost Ice Kevin Harris Kingston Family Singers NNN Cook

Bear Hive Bo and the Locomotive Sleepy Kitty Town Cars Whoa Thunder

JAZZ

Blight Future Jr. Clooney Laika LifeWithout Mariner

PSYCH

The Brainstems Kadu Flyer Magic City Mother Meat Strong Force

PUNK

Animal Teeth Antithought Little Big Bangs Maximum Effort Trauma Harness

R&B

Aloha Mi’Sho Brian Owens Coultrain Love Jones “The Band” Theresa Payne

ROCK

The 442’s Animal Children Erin Bode Peter Martin Trio Tommy Halloran’s Guerilla Swing

Banks and Cathedrals Brother Lee & the Leather Jackals Bruiser Queen Cal and the Calories Shitstorm

METAL

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Black Fast Fister Lion’s Daughter Path of Might Tropical Storm

NEW BAND

American Wrestlers Blank Generation Endora The Jockstraps Traveling Sound Machine

Emily Wallace Little Falcon Lizzie Weber Tawaine Noah Zak Marmalefsky

SOUL/FUNK

Al Holliday & the Eastside Rhythm Band Funky Butt Brass Band The Jungle Fire Nikki Hill Rhythm Section Road Show


St. Louis’ Hottest Hot Spot

Once known primarily for its gay nightlife, the Grove is now attracting music lovers of all orientations

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he music industry is a fluid, evolving primarily serves as a vinyl retailer, it occreature in which the only constant casionally hosts in-store performances too. The Gramophone announced that it was is change. Even so, the last twelve to eighteen months have seen a radical up- transforming itself from a music venue to a sandwich shop/tavern hybrid, its lighting, heaval in St. Louis’ live-music scene. Midtown’s Plush closed its doors af- sound system and even its curtain were ter three scattershot but memorable years soon back in action at the Bootleg, the of hosting both local and national talent; new name for the space within the Atomic meanwhile, Livery Company moved two Cowboy that used to be the Demo. Gramodoors down on Cherokee Street and radi- phone’s former soundman, Matt Keune, cally scaled back its live-music bookings. also made the move to the Bootleg, which But the popular street is already filling this ramped up its schedule after acquiring its gap: The Blue Pearl will cater to the late- new equipment and personnel. As summer afternoon/early-evening crowd with live weather arrives, the Atomic Cowboy’s outmusic when it opens this summer, while door stage will start to feature bigger acts. As a result of the Grove’s many changes, Foam has increased its number and varilive music is concenety of music, comedy and experimental bookings THESE VENUES HAVE CO- trated on the eastern part of the Manchester strip. under the reins of new owner Mic Boshans. EXISTED HARMONIOUSLY, But it’s also more abundant in general and feaBut these mutations tures more out-of-town are nothing compared to BUT THERE’S ROOM FOR touring acts than before. the yearlong metamorSo far these venues phosis that happened in IMPROVEMENT. “I HAVEN’T have coexisted harmonithe Grove. In April 2014, ously with the old guard the Ready Room, a midSEEN A WHOLE LOT OF of LGBT-friendly bars size venue run by the CONFLICT, BUT I HAVEN’T and dance clubs that the team behind the Firebird, Grove has been known opened its doors. A month SEEN AS MUCH SYNERGY for, though Cracchiolo later, the Demo moved says there is room for from the space connected AS I’D LIKE TO SEE.” improvement. to the Atomic Cowboy to “I haven’t seen a a space connected to the Ready Room (Mike Cracchiolo, manag- whole lot of conflict, but I haven’t seen as ing partner of both Firebird and the Ready much synergy as I’d like to see,” he says. “I would like to book more events in our Room, is also an investor in the Demo). Initially, neighbors didn’t take kindly rooms that would cater to that audience, to Manchester Avenue’s new live-music and help drive business to their bars as juggernaut. Their protests persuaded city well.” Overall, however, Cracchiolo is pleased hall to shut down the Demo temporarily, even as some residents mounted a chal- with the way the Grove has continued to lenge to the Ready Room’s liquor license. develop. The possibilities continue in its But a lack of signatures doomed the effort, transformation. “It’s experienced a lot of a compromise allowed the Demo to reopen slow, steady growth over the years, but just in the last couple of years, there’s been such by Labor Day weekend. The neighborhood that had been chiefly an influx of new businesses that are genuknown for its gay bars and clubs attracted inely exciting for people, and I think the wider interest. Over the summer, Music neighborhood is really primed to take that Record Shop opened in the space between next step into a full-fledged entertainment —BOB MCM AHON the Ready Room and the Demo. Though it district.” riverfronttimes.com

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Both musician and one-man PR team, Jeremy Kannapell has a hand in just about every interesting experimental show that came to St. Louis last year

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America’s Mustang

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is one-man project Ghost Ice is nominated for a Music Award under that troublesome “Noise” category (more on that later), but Jeremy Kannapell’s contributions to the St. Louis music scene extend far beyond his increasingly frequent live performances. In his words, he has become a “coordinator” — not a booker or promoter — for all manner of experimental shows, whether in DIY spaces or staid concert halls. Think of him as a kind of switchboard for progressive music, connecting artists, venues and audiences, and helping foster a supportive scene for outsidethe-box musicians.

Just don’t expect him to take any credit for it. In his typically soft-spoken and self-effacing fashion, Kannapell, 37, explains away his role with the flick of a wrist. He’s the program coordinator for the New Music Circle, an avantegarde music presenter that just wrapped an ambitious 56th season featuring Matthew Shipp, Roscoe Mitchell and Tim Berne’s Snakeoil. In that context, he says, he’s part of a “democratic process” in staging top-tier experimental music and forward-thinking jazz. Some of that work is public-relations wrangling — an offshoot from his days as showposter artist nonpareil. (His warped, colorful,


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boundary-bursting posters garnered him the nod for Best Poster Designer from this publication’s Best of St. Louis awards in 2014.) On social media, Kannepell is constantly alerting showgoers to what he calls “underground or ‘outer limits’” performances, many of which would have otherwise skipped St. Louis if not for his shepherding. “I just try to coordinate it and hopefully let people know — and not just people I personally know,” says Kannapell. “I hope to get the word out in some form — and this can be a stretch sometimes — where people who are unfamiliar with the music are interested in checking it out.” Outside of his work for the circle, the Dogtown resident has coordinated shows for acts such as Circuit des Yeux, Joe McPhee, Heatsick and Daniel Higgs of Lungfish, staging them at Foam, Schlafly Tap Room, the Stage at KDHX, the Luminary Center for the Arts and more. He’s quick to credit the spaces and artists for doing the heavy lifting. “When the venues themselves, or the billing itself, can extend out into audiences I don’t know, it’s amazing to me, because I’ve seen a lot of new faces at shows that I coordinate, and that’s super encouraging,” Kannapell says. He’s particularly happy with the group’s reach this past season. He doesn’t hesitate to name his personal highlight: “Roscoe Mitchell for sure, who was part of the Art Ensemble of Chicago and spearheaded the AACM — Association for Advancement of Creative Musicians — which is in Chicago and just celebrated his 50th year,” he explains. “The organization says something that we can both bring in people who have been pioneering different types of music for over 40 or 50 years as well as emerging people who are on the fringe or are just starting their history. People like Eli Keszler or Rashad Becker from Germany.” He adds, “That’s something that I personally feel strongly about — having both [young and old] elements represented there. It’s great to do both under the same banner, within the same series. They’re all important, and hopefully it raises some awareness when you see Roscoe Mitchell’s name next to somebody you haven’t heard of yet.” It’s not just fans who appreciate his efforts. Darin Gray, the experimental bassist whose work with the Dazzling Killmen has long since

Jeremy Kannapell performing as Ghost Ice. passed into canon, praised Kannapell in an effusive Facebook post on May 5. That was one day after Gray had played a special Vintage Vinyl in-store as part of Wilco leader Jeff Tweedy’s solo act, Tweedy, as well part of a Kannapellcoordinated show with drummer Tyler Damon at the William A. Kerr Foundation. “I had all but given up playing in the place that I live,” Gray wrote, “and Jeremy more than any other person set me straight, shined a light, and throughout these last few years has helped me create opportunities for myself that have brought out the best performances of my life, right here in my hometown of St. Louis.” Kannapell is typically sheepish in his response. “That was incredibly sweet of him to say,” he says. “I don’t know if it’s true or not.” Of Gray, Kannapell adds, “He’s somebody I listened to as a kid growing up in Florida.” He moved to St. Louis in 2003, but hasn’t forgotten the way Gray sparked his curiousity about the city: “It put some kind of visual analog in my mind for St. Louis and left a curiosity for me, personally: What is going on in St. Louis and the Midwest? What’s that dynamic that I’m hearing in this music? Darin is someone who it has been an honor to partner with even in booking.” Kannapell’s partnerships extend beyond his seemingly nonstop gig coordination. Ghost Ice has been the aegis he’s worked under for years, using an analog Roland synth and some pedals to build rhythms and sculpt sounds. “I don’t think of it really as ‘noise,’” he says of his music, “which sort of a loaded, confusing term at this point, even though I love a lot of that. To me I always thought if it as better described as ‘electronic,’ because it’s pretty much what I’m working with.” Lately Kannapell has taken to working alongside musicians such as synthesist Joseph Raglani (as Skull’s Mind) and drummer Louis Wall for on-the-fly live compositions. “I totally love and appreciate opportunities to do collaborations and throw your course off a little bit — my own personal course of sounds and approaches that I’m used to doing,” he says. “It reconfigures the brain quite a bit trying to improvise with somebody. It’s a learning experience in real time.” —CHRISTIAN SCHAFFER

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RFT MUSIC Showcase Saturday, June

20, 2015

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N AT E B U R R E L

Bands on the Side

The Loot Rock Gang joined Pokey LaFarge on his Central Time tour in late 2014.

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Some of St. Louis’ best musicians are doing their best work in groups that have splintered off from their main gigs

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he most cynical take on the phenomenon known as the “side project” was offered by the staff of the now-closed St. Louis punk-rock club Creepy Crawl (via its website circa 2008, on a page titled “Annoying”): “Side-project is another name for self-indulgent crap so embarrassingly bad they can’t dignify it with a name and gives them a cover why none of their friends will come see them ‘perform.’ (Would you go see your friend masturbate if they asked you to come watch?) Note to bands: think of your side-project as a project never to get booked again.” But even if such projects come and go like so many windshield-stuck show fliers, sometimes they can be more than merely self-indulgent. In the last year, a number of established St. Louis rockers, songwriters and hip-hoppers have reconfigured, rebranded and reimagined their music into wholly new sounds and songs. They probably all eschew the “side project” tag, as well they should, so let’s call them “parallel bands” or “analog acts” or “splinter groups,” even as the bands from whence the new analogs came continue in their own fashion. Led by Brian McClelland (Middle Class Fashion and Tight Pants Syndrome), Whoa Thunder started as a studio project in 2008 and made its live debut last summer. If the synth- and hook-heavy pop-rock band is

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principally McClelland’s outlet for songs and sounds that don’t fit his other projects, Whoa Thunder’s first album, You’re Under Attack, has staying power. Similarly, Cave States, led by Chris Grabau (Magnolia Summer) and Danny Kathriner (Half Knots and Colonel Ford), started out in late 2013 and has found its live legs, performing songs from The Great Divide, a debut that’s

“THEY SHOULD PROBABLY ALL ESCHEW THE “SIDE PROJECT” TAG. CALL THEM “PARALLEL BANDS” OR “ANALOG ACTS” OR “SPLINTER GROUPS,” EVEN AS THE BANDS FROM WHENCE THE NEW ANALOGS COME CONTINUE IN THEIR OWN FASHION.” as atmospheric as it is accomplished. In a similar introspective Americana vein, Fog Lights, led by Justin Johnson (Pretty Little Empire) and Jim Peters (the Upright Animals and Javier Mendoza), has just finished

an exquisite debut album, Manhasset, set for release on July 25. In 2012, the Loot Rock Gang — led by Mat Wilson (Rum Drum Ramblers) and his wife and collaborator Little Rachel — began establishing its own old-time jazz-blues identity with a handful of shows that eventually became a regular run at joints such as Off Broadway and Blues City Deli. Last fall the Gang recorded its first album, That’s Why I’ve Got to Sing, which ought to be on the Victrola of every Pokey fan. Also in the Americana genre, the Wilhelms, led by Andy Ploof and John Wendland of Rough Shop, have been performing regularly both in and out of state on the strength of the debut, Film at 11. With the death of Rough Shop bassist Anne Tkach, it’s likely we’ll be hearing more from the Wilhelms. If any genre owns the “side project that shouldn’t be called a side project” tag, it’s hip-hop. Where one act ends and another begins can be impossible to determine, as is the case with the FarFetched collective, and pivotal newcomers Blank Generation, featuring Hearskra-Z and Loose Screwz. Released early this year, the project’s self-titled album looks back as far as classic, hook-steady Outkast and looks forward to a time when calling out “hands up” in St. Louis could be a party cry again, and not a forceful demand. —ROY K ASTEN


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Studio Time Bands looking to record are finding more options than ever in St. Louis’ thriving studio scene — and sometimes opening spaces of their own

S H AW N M A N N Y

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Musicians at work at Moon Jr.

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hanks to advances in technology, it’s easier and cheaper than ever to record music on your own. Local bands such as Whoa Thunder and Apex Shrine have made greatsounding albums that were mostly, if not completely, recorded in the homes of their members. But by that same token, it’s also easier and cheaper than ever to open your own studio — a place to record your work, as well as that of other bands. Perhaps that’s why a new crop of studios has popped up in St. Louis over the last twelve months. Troubadour Dali frontman Ben Hinn opened Mound Sound Studio in the basement space under Go Music on Delmar in late 2014, while local band Shark Dad raised $1,605 through a crowdfunding campaign to build Moon Jr. Studio. The space, a fully renovated studio that drummer Shawn Manny runs out of his basement, is where the band recorded its


debut album, A Bigger Boat. Manny is putting a few finishing touches on Moon Jr. before opening its doors to the public. (Singer and RFT contributor Jason Robinson estimates it will happen “before summer’s out.”) Meanwhile, existing studios both young and old are packing up for new digs. Suburban Pro Studios made its much-anticipated move from Florissant to its new south-city home on Jefferson Avenue. Native Sound Recording bounced around Cherokee Street and upgraded from an open space to a more controlled, professional studio environment (its higher rates reflect the studio’s better quality). SLAM Productions has put its equipment in storage, but plans to move to an upgraded space soon, possibly on Hanley Industrial Court in Clayton. Despite the increased competition, most of the city’s studios have stayed in business. One notable exception was Smoking Baby Studio, which operated in the basement of the building that once housed Apop Records. Owner Jason Hutto moved to Houston, and while he suggested in an interview with Riverfront Times that he’d continue recording in the Lone Star State, he started selling his equipment before he moved. Most other established brands in town are still going strong. Firebrand, Sawhorse, Phat Buddha, Shock City Studios, Utopia, BSRG and countless others are holding steady. Smaller nearby towns have their own options (see Bird Cloud Recording in Edwardsville, Illinois, which is run by occasional RFT contributor Ryan Wasoba). Relationships are friendly. It’s not uncom-

Mound Sound Studio.

mon to see different St. Louis studio leaders discuss their work and lend each other equipment and expertise. One studio owner recently tagged his counterparts in a Facebook post asking to borrow a cable; plenty responded that they were happy to help. Glenn Burleigh of BSRG and David Beeman of Native Sound also spent a free Sunday doing a “shoot out” — a process where the two tested mics through the same inputs to compare their quality. These cordial relationships have fostered an environment that Hinn says is welcoming. “I have several engineer friends who are

always willing to give me advice and help me out,” he says. “Competition or whatever is part of the game, I guess, but I feel like it’s pretty friendly overall.” And musicians moving into the studio arena see a real payoff. Both Hinn and Manny say that having a studio has changed the way they approach making music, even though their experiences couldn’t be more different: Hinn’s busy schedule has him working on other acts’ music more than his own, whereas Manny has found that his studio allows his band greater creativity. They’ve taken to recording practices

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— and sometimes, they like the innovation they’ve captured. “We could go back and listen to it and those random, spur-of-the-moment ‘Hey, I want to try something [moments],’” Manny says. “Whether it’s a guitar lick, bass lick, maybe a certain drum pattern that you try once, everybody sits down and listens to it the next week and goes, ‘That really worked.’ Or maybe just, ‘Cut this, trim that, it seems a bit dry.’” Room to experiment, room to create: These days, St. Louis studios can provide plenty of both. —BOB MCMAHON

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NIGHT + DAY ®

WEEK OF JUNE 18–24

T H U R S D AY |06.18

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[FRINGE]

ST. LOU FRINGE

With its commitment to equality, artistry and self-expression, the St. Lou Fringe festival feels more vital and necessary than ever. Join dozens of talented creatives (more than 70 percent hailing from right here in our region) for eight days of theater, dance, puppetry, improv and more in Grand Center (3526 Washington Avenue; 314-643-7853 or www.stlfringe.com). As is true of fringe festivals across the globe, St. Lou Fringe offers audience members the chance to see a variety of original and uncensored works (plus plenty of family-friendly fare), at a price point that makes art truly accessible to all. The 2015 St. Lou Fringe runs Thursday through Sunday (June 18 to 27). Tickets for individual shows are $5 to $15, and a required Fringe badge costs $5. — BROOKE FOSTER

F R I D AY |06.19

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[THEATER]

HOUSE

Daniel MacIvor’s House is a play about a man whose persecution complex colors everything. He says his mother suffers from demonic possession, his father is the saddest man in the world and the person he loves doesn’t love him back. Is he an unreliable narrator lost in his own resentments, or is he only partially unreliable? If it’s the latter, doesn’t that make him the same as everyone else? Joe Hanrahan of the Midnight Company performs the one-man show House at St. Lou Fringe this year. The Friday, June 19, show takes place at 9 p.m. at Creative Exchange Lab (3307 Washington Avenue; www.stlfringe. com). Tickets are $10 in addition to the required $5 Fringe badge. — PAUL FRISWOLD [LITERARY EVENT]

For so many, Judy Blume is synonymous with childhood nights spent reading under the covers; she is the author who assuaged our adolescent fears and wrote so realistically about young love. Tonight at 7 p.m. at Maryville University Auditorium (650 Maryville University Drive; 314-367-6731 or www.left-bank.com), Left Bank Books and Maryville Talks Books welcome the beloved author, who will read from her new novel (for adults!), In the Unlikely Event. The story follows Miri Ammerman as she revisits her hometown and her 1950s girlhood, which was filled with tragedy, continued on page 24

TO D D DAV I S

JUDY BLUME

Joe Hanrahan presents House at St. Lou Fringe. riverfronttimes.com

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ELENA SEIBERT

C O U R T E SY C O N T E M P O R A R Y A R T M U S E U M S T. LO U I S

Judy Blume.

continued from page 23

Enter the Labyrinth at CAMSTL.

new romances, complicated friendships and panic about the A-bomb. Admission is $31 for one and includes a copy of the book, or $36 for two people and one book. Ms. Blume will be signing copies of the novel this evening. — BROOKE FOSTER

first recorded polo tournament back in 600 B.C. As for the wolves, being the victims of perennial ingrained human ignorance and lethal prejudice, they always need our aid and protection. A host of kids’ activities and adult beverages and food complement the event, which costs $25 per car or $75 for the VIP package. — ALEX WEIR

S AT U R D AY |06.20

[ FA M I LY E V E N T ]

FAMILY DAY BLOCK PARTY

[SPORT]

CHARITY POLO MATCH

When you think of wolves you don’t ordinarily think of polo, but maybe it’s time to start. Today the St. Louis Polo Club Charity Match for the Endangered Wolf Center takes place at 4 p.m. at Kräftig Field on the grounds of Blue Heron Farm (4020 Benne Road, Defiance; 636-938-5900 or www. endangeredwolfcenter.org). On the face of it polo might seem an odd choice for a game benefiting wild canids, but its current patrician associations notwithstanding, polo is a very old sport that was originally played by some decidedly wild characters: The Turkomans beat the Persians in the

Paul Vandivort hadn’t made a cardboard maze in almost a decade. But the local artist has recently returned to this craft, creating the Labyrinth at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; 314-5354660 or www.camstl.org) as part of the Family Day Block Party, co-presented with the Pulitzer Arts Foundation and the Sheldon. Vandivort doesn’t do small; his newest maze is a real humdinger, spanning an area bigger than a two-car garage and using more than twenty refrigerator boxes for 25 different rooms, corridors and hallways. While those entering may feel a little boxed in, they will encounter no minotaurs. Family Day takes place from 10 a.m.

NOW HIRING PHOTO GRAPH ERS The Riverfront Times is looking for outgoing, enthusiastic photographers to join the Riverfront Times Street Team. Team members promote the Riverfront Times at local events and take photos, gain e-mail addresses to build our database, and hand out free stuff! If you are interested in part time work (5-10 hours per week- nights and weekends are required) and want to attend the best events St. Louis has to offer, send your resume to emily.westerholt@riverfronttimes.com. Must be 21 years old! 24

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to noon today, and admission is free. — ROB LEVY [KOREAN ART]

PAINTED FIRE

Korea was in political and social tumult in the late nineteenth century — but so was Jang Seung-up, a self-taught artist from the lower class. Jang has obvious artistic talent, but his humble origins preclude him from advancing as an artist. But a merchant recognizes his genius, and acts as his patron. Constrained for too long by societal structures and his own early limitations, Jang eventually breaks free and develops a new style of art in traditional Korea. In doing so, he leads the way for all future Korean artists. Kwon-taek Im’s film Chihwaseon (also known as Painted Fire in the West) documents the turbulent life of a free spirit who rose above the limits of his time and place to achieve immortality through his art. The film screens at 11 a.m. today at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (314-721-0076 or www. slam.org) as part of the Dano Korean Spring Festival. At 2 p.m. Hyunsoo Woo, curator of Korean art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, presents the lecture “The Past Fast-Forwarded:

Korean Art and Culture Through the Window of the Joseon Dynasty.” Jang Seung-up’s work will be discussed. Admission is free for both the film and the lecture. — PAUL FRISWOLD

S U N D AY |06.21

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[SHARK!]

JAWS

Turner Classic Movies has clearly decided that you’re all swimming too much; the cable channel celebrates the 40th anniversary of Jaws with a series of nationwide screenings. Steven Spielberg became a household name thanks to Jaws and its hungry, hungry shark that terrorizes a small resort town during a hot summer. Even if you’ve seen the film countless times, this time it’s different: Spielberg personally approved the 4k restoration that will be shown. TCM’s Ben Mankiewicz introduces Jaws, which screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday, June 21, at Wehrenberg Des Peres 14 Cinema (12701 Manchester Road, Des Peres; www. fathomevents.com). Tickets are $12.50. — PAUL FRISWOLD


COURTESY NASA/JPL-CALTECH AND A.D. ROGERS ET AL. ALIEN WORLDS AND ANDROIDS Š 2013 GLOBAL EXPERIENCES SPECIALISTS, INC.

Ryann Redmond stars as Tracy Turnblad in Hairspray at the Muny.

Learn about aliens of all kinds at the Saint Louis Science Center.

|

M O N D AY |06.22 [SPECIAL EXHIBIT]

ALIEN WORLDS AND ANDROIDS

Hollywood meets hi-tech at the Saint Louis Science Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new exhibition, Alien Worlds and Androids. Visitors discover what extraterrestrial life may be like through the use of advanced laboratories, telescopes, robots and probes. Nine themed areas demonstrate how new technologies are being implemented to discover if we are alone in the universe. A Mars rover simulator journeys to the Red Planet, while movie icons Iron Man and T H IS C O D E TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE C-3PO explain the RIVERFRONT TIMES differences between IPHONE/ANDROID APP androids and robots, FOR MORE EVENTS OR VISIT and why the sci-fi riverfronttimes.com future of the movies

SCAN

LEVINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

CLOTHING FROM NEW BORN TO 86" IN PANTS Cargo Shorts in assorted colors to size 68 Denim Shorts in assorted colors to size 60 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dress Slack Sets up to 8X Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dress Shirts up to 8X Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Suits to Size 72 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Polo Style Shirts to 8X Short Sleeve Shirts to 8X Dickies Pants to Size 72 Dickies Shorts to Size 60 Dickies Boots to Size 14 T-Shirts up to 10X

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is coming faster than we think. Alien Worlds and Androids is open daily through Monday, September 7, at the Saint Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue; 314-2894400 or www.slsc.org). Admission is $4 to $8. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ROB LEVY

T U E S D AY |06.23

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[MUSICAL]

HAIRSPRAY

Tracy Turnblad is a woman on a mission. Her dream is to dance on The Corny Collins Show, and she finally makes it. Even after she becomes an overnight star thanks to her original dance moves, Tracy still isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t satisfied. Baltimore in the 1960s has yet to integrate, and the No. 1 teen dance show is no exception. So Tracy sets out to drag Corny, the nasty Tussle family and all of Baltimore into the future by any means necessary. The John Waters musical Hairspray returns to the Muny for a full week of shows. Performances take place at 8:15 p.m. Tuesday through Tuesday (June 23

through 30) at the Muny in Forest Park (314361-1900 or www.muny.org). Tickets are $14 to $87. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PAUL FRISWOLD

W E D N E S D AY |06.24

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[DOCUMENTARY]

PARAGRAPH 175

Everyone who hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been spending inordinate amounts of time dwelling beneath rocks knows what Hitlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Third Reich did to millions of innocent Jews during World War II. Not quite as universally well known is the fact that the Nazis killed large numbers of others, too â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poles, Roma Gypsies, Jehovahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Witnesses, priests, pastors and the disabled. German dissidents were executed, as were homosexuals. Between 1933 and 1945 the Nazi regime arrested 100,000 men for real or suspected homosexuality. Being gay wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t only frowned upon in Hitlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Germany â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it was outright illegal. The documentary Paragraph 175 (referring to the section of the German penal code outlawing

homosexuality) reveals the fate of these men, only about 4,000 of whom survived the Fuhrerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death machine. Five appear in this film to relate their harrowing stories for the first time to a world audience. Paragraph 175 screens free tonight at 7 p.m. at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www. mohistory.org). â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ALEX WEIR

Planning an event, exhibiting your art or putting on a play? Let us know and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll include it in the Night & Day section or publish a listing in the online calendar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for free! Send details via e-mail (calendar@riverfronttimes.com), fax (314-754-6416) or mail (6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 200, St. Louis, MO 63130, attn: Calendar). Include the date, time, price, contact information and location (including ZIP code). Please submit information three weeks prior to the date of your event. No telephone submissions will be accepted. Find more events online at www.riverfronttimes.com.

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UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND MRC PRESENT A FUZZYCASTIDOORNG PRODUCTION A BLUEGRASS FILMS PRODUCTION MARK WAHLBERG SETH MACFARLANE AMANDA SEYFRIED “TED 2” GIOVANNIDIRECTORRIBOFISI JOHN SLATTERY JESSI CA BARTH AND MORGAN FREEMANPRODUCED BY SHEILA JAFFE DESICOSTUMEGNER CINDY EVANS MUSICBY WALTER MURPHY EDITOR JEFFWRITTENFREEMAN ACE PRODUCTIDESIGNERON STEPHEN LINEWEAVER PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL BARRETT EXECUTIVE DIRECTED PRODUCERS ALEC SULKIN WELLESLEY WILD BY SCOTT STUBER p.g.a. SETH MACFARLANE p.g.a. JASON CLARK p.g.a. JOHN JACOBS BY SETH MACFARLANE & ALEC SULKIN & WELLESLEY WILD BY SETH MACFARLANE A UNIVERSAL RELEASE SOUNDTRACK ON REPUBLIC RECORDS

How I Met Your Personal Trainer: Cobie Smulders leaves guys in her dust in Results.

<50=,9:(3:;<+06:

Physical BRING YOUR Improvements

THURSDAY, JUNE 25 7:00 P.M. PLEASE VISIT WBTICKETS.COM/RSVP AND ENTER THE CODE RFTMAGICMIKE TO DOWNLOAD YOUR COMPLIMENTARY PASSES! RATED R FOR STRONG SEXUAL CONTENT, PERVASIVE LANGUAGE, SOME NUDITY AND DRUG USE. Please note: Passes are limited and will be distributed on a first come, first served basis while supplies last. No phone calls, please. Limit one pass per person. Each pass admits two. Seating is not guaranteed. Arrive early. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. This screening will be monitored for unauthorized recording. By attending, you agree not to bring any audio or video recording device into the theater (audio recording devices for credentialed press excepted) and consent to a physical search of your belongings and person. Any attempted use of recording devices will result in immediate removal from the theater, forfeiture, and may subject you to criminal and civil liability. Please allow additional time for heightened security. You can assist us by leaving all nonessential bags at home or in your vehicle.

IN THEATERS JULY 1

BEST BUD TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING

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Results Written and directed by Andrew Bujalski. Starring Guy Pearce, Cobie Smulders, Kevin Corrigan and Anthony Michael Hall. Opens Friday, June 19, at the Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Boulevard, University City. Call 314727-7271 or visit www.landmarktheatres.com.

A

For your chance to win a screening pass, e-mail conteststl@ alliedim.com with Legalize Ted in the subject line. Employees of promotional partners are not eligible. Duplicate entries will be deleted. One pass per person. One entry per name and email address. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Seating is limited. Arrive early as pass does not guarantee a seat.

magicmikemovie.com | #MagicMikeXXL 26

ANDREW BUJALSKI VEERS CLOSER TO MAINSTREAM FILM WITH HIS ATYPICAL ROM-COM, RESULTS

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IN THEATERS JUNE 26 www.LegalizeTed.com riverfronttimes.com

realistically shaded romcom, Results represents a tentative move into Hollywoodstyle filmmaking by mumblecore pioneer Andrew Bujalski, whose Funny Ha Ha helped launch that ill-defined “genre.” But Bujalski didn’t always fit so neatly into that box — he shot on 16mm, not video, and although his dialogue may have sounded improvised because of its reBY alistic rhythms, it was largely CLIFF scripted. In his previous film, Computer Chess, Bujalski FROEHLICH had even pivoted away from mumblecore’s typical concerns with an affectionate dissection of nerd culture. A deadpan-funny mockumentary set in 1980, Computer Chess was also something of a formalist experiment, with its deliberately smudgy black-and-white images captured with the rudimentary Sony cameras of the protovideo era. Results, therefore, can be seen as a retrenchment, returning the writer-director to the familiar territory of earlier films, which were characterized by their thoughtful explorations of evolving relationships. What primarily distinguishes Results from Bujalski’s other work is its highly polished look, its recognizable co-stars and its reasonable simulation of a traditional romantic-comedy plot. Indie stalwart Kevin

Corrigan — usually relegated to background status as a profane, dyspeptic supporting character — receives a much deserved turn in the spotlight as Danny, a wealthy layabout. Still despondent over his recent divorce — even the fortune he’s unexpectedly inherited can’t ease his melancholy — Danny has decamped from New York to Austin with the vague hope of a fresh start. Rambling about his rented manse where his empty days are mostly filled with dope-smoking and TV-watching, Danny impulsively decides to hire a personal trainer from the fitness center run by earnest Trevor (Guy Pearce), who approaches his job with an evangelist’s fervor. Among Trevor’s employees is Kat (How I Met Your Mother’s Cobie Smulders), a frank-talking, hard-bodied trainer who’s as brutally pragmatic as her boss — and occasional booty call — is sincerely idealistic. When Kat begins visiting her new client for his private sessions, Danny quickly develops an inappropriate romantic interest, leading to a fraught triangle with Trevor, whose feelings for her go beyond the sexual. Unlike the farcical complications of most romantic comedies, the roadblocks to love’s fulfillment in Results seem organic and almost painfully realistic. The film also entertainingly inverts convention by having the men helplessly moon over Kat, who remains emotionally withholding and resolutely averse to commitment. She’s not quite a feminist role model — in fact, there’s a self-sabotaging aspect to her uncompromising, take-nobullshit stances — but we can’t help but admire Kat’s defiant refusal to conform to societal expectations. In addition to its trio of fine lead performances, Results features a pair of delightful minor roles for two other Hollywood recruits: Giovanni Ribisi’s bottomfeeding lawyer and Anthony Michael Hall’s pumped-up fitness guru. Although some indie absolutists may be disappointed in Bujalski’s mainstreaming, his film’s sly subversion and consistent (if gentle) laughs make for undeniably pleasing Results. Q

R YA N G R E E N

film


1 night 3 100 Bands 3 10+ Venues 3 $10

RFT MUSIC S h o w case

Saturday, June

20, 2015

“ENCHANTING! WONDERFULLY ALIVE AND UNPREDICTABLE. PLUS IT’S FUNNY AS HELL. ‘RESULTS’ MANAGES TO REINVENT THE ROM-COM.” -BILGE EBIRI, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

AN IRRESISTIBLE TALE.

A LOVE STORY FULL OF TWISTS AND TURNS.” -ANDREW O’HEHIR, SALON

GUY

COBIE

KEVIN

PEARCE SMULDERS CORRIGAN

STILL ROLLING OUR ONGOING, OCCASIONALLY SMARTASS, DEFINITELY UNOFFICIAL GUIDE TO WHAT’S PLAYING IN ST. LOUIS THEATERS

MICAH U SH E R Pho tog ra p h er

“I don’t, whatever, I don’t want to give it any more press than there already has been. It doesn’t bother me. Whatever.’’ This is not a review of Entourage, the movie, though it is what Eli Manning said about it. The Giants quarterback accepted an offer to appear on

E Events Business Bu Advertising Adv Portraits Po Headshots He

the HBO show — and then backed out after a scene had been written for him, much to the ire of series creator Doug Ellin. It’s been a grownup hissy fit ever since. Still, Manning’s words are markedly nicer than critics’ general

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opinion of the film, which underwhelmed on opening weekend. “The ride ain’t over,” Entourage’s tagline insists, but the Ellin/Piven vehicle should have left it in park when the A FILM BY

ANDREW BUJALSKI

STARTS TODAY magpictures.com/results

From the creators of Spirited Away, My Neighbor Totoro and The Secret World of Arrietty

series ended back in 2011. O Go behind the swoopy hair and glassy-eyed mugshots for a thoughtful, introspective look at Justin Bieber in Far From the Madding Crowd. There he is completing the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzle. Here, he pores over the International Pressed Flower Art Society’s latest newsletter. Hang on, our bad: Crowd is an adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s book of the same name. Set in Victorian England, it follows the strong-willed (if occasionally irrational) lady rancher Bathsheba Everdene — who will not ride side saddle, thankyouverymuch. (The

++++ MAGNIFICENT!

world’s most politely thrown shade?) The film is quite pretty. Bieber remains awful. O Film hounds first said Aloha to Cameron Crowe’s

film six months ago when leaked emails re-

As gorgeously animated as anything Studio Ghibli has ever made.”

vealed that Sony’s execs had this to say about it: “There is no more to do...the satellite makes no

– Time Out New York

sense...it never not even once works.” Bradley Cooper, Emma Stone and Rachel McAdams are

MAGICAL! STUNNING!”

caught in a love triangle in Hawaii. There are misdeeds to atone for, lessons to be learned, and the poor Air Force gets dragged into this

– Los Angeles Times

mess. Crowe urges the audience to treat it as

WONDROUS!”

a “love letter” to the island, and on that front it succeeds: Palm trees, the ocean and that

– IndieWire

trio of actors are nice enough to look at, if you don’t mind the “film” lacking in things such as “plot” and “character development” and “entertainment.”

—Kristie McClanahan

www.marniefilm.com © 2014 GNDHDDTK

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Handel’s

STARRING TIM MEAD “VOCALLY AND DRAMATICALLY OUTSTANDING”

- GRAMOPHONE

NOW OPEN! JUNE 11, 13, 20, 24, 26

THE AMERICAN PREMIERE

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“GIVE IN TO THE JOY! JOY!” – St. Louis Magazine

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the arts Watch the Throne THE NEW MAGIC SMOKING MONKEY GAME OF THRONES PARODY IS INCREDIBLY CHAOTIC — AND VERY, VERY FUNNY Game of Thrones: GoT Parody? Through June 27 at the Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar Boulevard. Tickets are $10 to $15. Call 314-361-5664 or visit www.stlshakespeare.org.

hen watching Magic Smoking Monkey’s Game of Thrones: GoT Parody?, you have two choices. You can either try to remember actors’ faces and names so you know who is playing whom, or you can lean into it and just let the show explode all over your face. I strongly recommend the latter. This advice holds even if you’ve never seen the TV show — I haven’t — or read the books. (I read one, and it was OK at best. George R.R. Martin is no Maurice Druon.) Cramming the entire first season of HBO’s Game of Thrones into about 80 minutes was ambitious, to say the least. Jaysen Cryer’s adaptation retains the big moments, but many of them occur at warp speed. BY Bran Stark, who spies on an incestuous tryst in the tower PA U L between Cersei (Suki Peters) and Jaime Lannister (Ed FRISWOLD Cole), is played by a puppet. And in this production, instead of pushing him from the window, Jaime instead tosses him completely over the set and into the backstage area. It took you longer to read the previous two sentences than it did for Jaime to spot, chuck and forget Bran. But not everything is accelerated. The fan-favorite scene in which Tyrion (a very tall Casey Boland on his knees) smacks some sense into his little shit of a nephew Joffrey (Kimberly Byrnes, who is wonderfully shitty) becomes a group collaboration, with actors streaming across the stage from both wings so they can get in on the slappin’. It is just as satisfying as you would hope. Even with director Donna Northcott’s whiplash pacing, the actors are occasionally able to invest their characters with distinct personalities. Suki Peters’ Cersei always has a drink in hand, and she slips into a selfrighteous and wobbly rage that is reminiscent of Edina Monsoon from Absolutely Fabulous — you expect her to call Joffrey “sweetiedarling” at any moment. Ed Cole cycles through a food court’s worth of accents for swordmaster Syrio Forel, and he transforms the art of “water dancing”

STEVE TRUESDELL

W

into a wiggly jig that is more silly than deadly. The folks in the front row, who are about eighteen inches from having an actor in their lap, got a close-up look at Syrio’s technique that was nearly a bit too close: His foam sword forced one audience member into a couple of sinuous dodges during one frantic duel. The real star here is Carl Overly, who plays Khal Drogo with a warlord’s swagger, and also portrays Lysa Arryn as a terrifying (and heavily lactating) pile of femininity. Drogo enters “riding” a hobby horse, which he disdainfully hands to someone sitting in the front row. His braid stars in a brief porn interlude (complete with the appropriate soundtrack), before he gets down to fathering children with Daenerys (Shannon Nara) — an act of coition prefaced by Drogo bellowing

Meet Joffrey, Jaime, Cersei, Tyrion and the rest — albeit quickly! — in Magic Smoking Monkey’s Game of Thrones.

“sexual chocolate!” Overly is a very large man, and in the performance I attended, he twice nearly brought down the backdrop with his enthusiastic action scenes. The second time it happened, it appeared that someone backstage pushed the plywood set back into place an instant before calamity. Which might be the perfect way to describe Magic Smoking Monkey’s whole approach to theater. It’s fast, loud, obviously cheap and very funny, but there’s just enough control to keep everything, always, an instant from calamity. Q riverfronttimes.com

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Join us for Father's Day! Featuring Chef Specialties: Oceano French Toast - $9 Brioche, battered and pan fried, served with fresh berries. Smoked Salmon & Tomato Frittata - $12 Fresh eggs with tomatoes, spinach and caper cream cheese with our Oceano breakfast potatoes. Chorizo and Mushroom Hash - $12 Turkey chorizo, tomato, bell peppers and onion with a poached egg and rustic bread. Baja Shrimp Hash - $13 Sauteed shrimp, bell peppers, tomatoes, onions and potatoes in a lobster broth with two poached eggs and rustic bread. Smoked Salmon Grilled Cheese - $12 Cold smoked salmon, three cheese blend, smoked gouda and tomato on grilled sourdough with garlic aioli. Grilled Beef Tenderloin with Poached Egg - $16 With spinach ragout, hollandaise and Oceano breakfast potatoes.

Also featuring Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day dinner specials! 44 North Brentwood Blvd. Clayton, MO 63105 314-721-9400 www.oceanobistro.com 30

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cafe Welcome to the Circus THE NEW FAST-CASUAL TACO JOINT IN SOUTH ST. LOUIS IS AN AFFORDABLE TEX-MEX DELIGHT Taco Circus 4258 Schiller Place; 314-808-2050. Mon.Thurs. 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri. 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.

hen Christian Ethridge told his loved ones his business plan, he may as well have told them he was running off to join the circus. You’re moving to St. Louis? From Austin? To open a taco joint in a Bosnian neighborhood? Saying he was going to take up the trapeze with a bearded lady might have seemed more plausible. Austin, after all, is booming — but that’s precisely why Ethridge and his business partner Mikey Carrasco chose to set up their fastcasual Tex-Mex spot, Taco Circus, 800 miles to its northeast. After moving to St. Louis several years ago BY so his wife could go to film C H E RY L school, Ethridge discovered that the cost of living and BAEHR ascendant restaurant scene made opening a place of his own in this city a realistic proposition. Moving back home for a few years after his wife finished school confirmed to him that he had a choice: Stay in Austin and cook for other people, or move back to St. Louis and work for himself. It didn’t take much to convince his longtime friend Carrasco to leave Texas to join him in the venture. As soon as Carrasco arrived in St. Louis, the pair began making preparations to go into business. The result of their efforts is Taco Circus, just down Morgan Ford Road from the iconic Bevo windmill. Taco Circus is Ethridge and Carrasco’s love letter to the taco counters they grew up eating at in Texas. The friends met as teenage graffiti artists and lived on the streets, off and on, during their high school years and early twenties. They stretched their dollars by filling up on cheap eats — taco counters are everywhere in Austin — and wanted to offer St. Louis diners a similar option. Just like back home, they keep things casual. The restaurant has counter service, and chances are the person who takes your order and rings you out is the same one who makes your food — all within about three minutes. The food works well for takeout, but those who choose to dine in are treated to a festive atmosphere. Alternating bright blue and red walls are plastered with a mix of vintage circus

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A pork steak taco (top) as well as a chorizo and egg breakfast taco, with sides of guacamole and salsa.

and sci-fi themed artwork; a 1950s-style futuristic silver light fixture hangs above the cash register. A half-dozen small wooden tables and a few bar stools offer seating space, and there’s usually an eclectic mix of music playing at a raised yet inoffensive level. Though Ethridge and Carrasco were inspired by the low-key taco joints of their hometown, they’ve made one significant change: the quality of the ingredients. Taco Circus uses only humanely and sustainably raised meats sourced from local farms, specifically, Root + Holler for the pork and Rain Crow Ranch for the beef. The pair blends their own spices and makes everything from scratch, except the tortillas. The quality of these ingredients shines through in Taco Circus’ simple preparations. The restaurant’s namesake dish is served on either soft flour, soft corn or crispy corn tortillas, and simply trimmed with diced onions and cilantro. Fillings include juicy chicken or steak fajitas, seasoned with mild chiles and char-kissed by the grill. Taco Circus’ version of carnitas is a grilled and shredded pork steak, a homage to Ethridge and Carrisco’s adopted home. The Berkshire pork is rubbed with a guajillo-heavy spice blend that gives it a deep, smoky-sweet tang. The meat is so well-marbled it set off the smoke alarm on

one of my visits — blame all of the fat dripping them every day and never get bored. Flour tortillas and a generous helping of scrambled onto the flames. But the humble ground beef is perhaps my eggs form the base, and diners then customize favorite meat at Taco Circus — in part because their taco with other fillings. I especially enjoyed the breakfast taco with of the grass-fed beef’s deep, full flavor, but also because the preparation here is so rich and potato and housemade chorizo. The Mexican juicy I almost mistook it for Texas-style chili. sausage is spiked with vinegar and a hearty Ground guajillo and New Mexican red peppers dose of paprika, and the potatoes are perfectly mingle with the rendered beef to form a sub- cooked to the point that they’re like mashed potatoes on the inside but still tly spiced jus. It’s positively retain a crispy edge. However, heavenly when stuffed into a Taco Circus my favorite version, by a landsweet, crispy corn tortilla. Pork steak slide, is the breakfast sausage Taco Circus’ monstertaco ...................$1.99 taco. The ground housemade sized burrito is a flour tortiBreakfast sausage sausage is seasoned with a lla overfilled with a choice of and egg breakfast simple, traditional spice blend meat (the chef on duty rectaco ....................$2.49 Burrito ..................$8.99 amped up with extra black ommended chicken fajitas), pepper and chile flakes. The chile-spiced rice, slow-cooked not-so-secret ingredient is the beans, cheese, shredded lettuce, diced tomatoes and white onions, and high-quality pork. The difference between cilantro. I got mine “loaded,” which means Taco Circus’ product and one made with confilled with guacamole and sour cream on top ventional meat is overwhelming. I ordered my of all that, then doused with spicy salsa verde. taco with the works — potatoes, eggs, cheese If I closed my eyes, I would have sworn I was and salsa verde. It was possibly the best $3 I’ve ever spent in my life. in a border town. Taco Circus rounds out its menu with hot But that isn’t even the highlight of the menu. It’s been three days, and I still can’t stop and mild salsas (a verde and a red chile), housemade guacamole and a version of the classic thinking about Taco Circus’ breakfast tacos. I understand why Ethridge and Carrasco Texas breakfast dish known simply as migas. lived off of these back in Austin — I could eat Judging the book simply continued on page 32 riverfronttimes.com

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Crispy corn ground beef tacos.

Enjoy a St . Louis Summer

on our patio!

Taco Circus

continued from page 31

Ta p a s A l l d a y & S a n g r i a A l l n i g h t !

M u s i c a l We d n e s d a y s O P E N 7 DAY S A W E E K ! 314-863-9909 barcelonatapas.com 32

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by its cover, I’d say the migas are a train wreck: scrambled eggs, cheese, salsa and crumbled up corn tortilla chips are sautéed together, looking like someone took a Southwestern omelet and rolled over it with their car. I was shocked by how flavorful the corn tortilla and egg combination was. Drizzled with hot sauce, Austin’s version of the slinger is definitely worth ordering. That’s the thing about Taco Circus: It doesn’t serve the prettiest food in town. Items prepared “for here” are served in the red-andwhite paper boats commonly used for French fries, and the to-go tacos are wrapped in aluminum foil. The cheese sticks to the wrapper, and I found myself having to scrape off a smashed mess of toppings back into the tortilla. The aesthetics do not obscure the flavor and quality, though, and for a few bucks, it’s a steal. As soon as the place gets its liquor license (they hope within a few months), it should have a

The breakfast sausage taco with the works — potatoes, eggs, cheese and salsa verde — was possibly the best $3 I’ve ever spent in my life. line out the door. Ethridge and Carrasco joke that they’ve been pacing around rooms for years trying to find ways to make money — and somehow, the rooms keep getting nicer. I don’t think it’s much of a mystery why this is so: Taco Circus shows that when it comes to authentic TexMex, these guys aren’t clowning around. Q


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short orders [CHEF CHAT]

Salt + Smoke’s Tom Schmidt on Becoming a Barbecue Maven

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om Schmidt admits that opening Salt + Smoke (6525 Delmar Boulevard, University City; 314-727-0200) was an enormous leap of faith. “My wife was pregnant with our first child, and there were about five different articles published in local papers about how there are too many barbecue spots opening up and that we were all going to fail miserably,” he recalls. “Loyal customers of Nico were coming in every day to tell me I was making a huge mistake. I stood to lose my business, my house, my passion and reputation, and the security of my family. It was absolute insanity.” His gamble paid off. After shuttering his sophomore effort, Nico, last June — a concept he “knew wasn’t right” from the outset — Schmidt reopened the space five days later as Salt + Smoke, which has become one of the city’s most acclaimed barbecue restaurants. The concept may seem like a stretch considering that Schmidt made his name at Franco, a French bistro in Soulard known more for cassoulet than baked beans. Schmidt, however, sees it as a natural extension. “Meat is the basis of what we do at Franco. We make all of our own charcuterie,” he explains. “If you say ‘saucisson’ to someone, their eyes glaze over. But if you say, ‘We’re making jalapeño bologna,’ they’re like, ‘OK, great.’” Within three months of opening Nico, Schmidt wanted to rebrand as a barbecue spot, but he had to convince the restaurant’s investors. “I couldn’t act unilaterally,” he says. “That ended up being a blessing in disguise because I had two years to conceptualize Salt + Smoke.” Still, he says, “It was a difficult leap.” When he finally worked up the courage to let his cooks in on the plan, “they lit up,” Schmidt recalls, and began collaborating on recipes that would be the basis of the new restaurant, including the signature brisket — a dish that is good enough to convince any naysayers that Schmidt made the right move. Schmidt took a break from the smoker to share his thoughts on the St. Louis restaurant scene, being brainwashed by Blueprint Coffee and what it’s like to be painfully shy in the restaurant business. What is one thing people don’t know about you that you wish they did? That I wish people knew less about me. My job is extremely social and it is a great gift to be able to interact with and learn about hundreds of people a day, and I am grateful and really love it. That being said, I’m secretly shy. I actually refused my first job [as] a waiter. I had been a busser at Paul’s in Clayton, a small

Tom Schmidt, photographed at the now-shuttered Nico.

husband-and-wife restaurant, for three years when they offered me a serving position. The caveat was that I would have to “actually talk to people.” I said I would prefer to stay a busser. What daily ritual is non-negotiable for you? A pour-over coffee from Blueprint. Those jerks have made themselves indispensable to my daily life, as nothing tastes right after they brainwash your tongue. If you could have any superpower, what would it be?

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I wish I could heal super fast so that evil doctors could fuse a new incredibly strong metal alloy to my bones, thus making me nearly indestructible. Metal claws optional. What is the most positive trend in food, wine or cocktails that you’ve noticed in St. Louis over the past year? I don’t know if its a trend or an ethos discovered, but I am thrilled that so many talented people are really pursuing their passion and finding ever-evolving ways to

implement them. Traditional restaurants are not the only way to deliver food and beverage to people now, and I think guests are eager to find new avenues to enjoy consumption. Food trucks, gift horse [bags], high-low, local restaurants at Rams, Cardinals and Blues games, home delivery, CSAs, community gardens, so on and so forth. I think the best ideas are ahead of us. Who is your St. Louis food crush? Dave Bailey [Rooster, Small Batch Whiskey & Fare, Baileys’ Range]. What he’s doing now and has built over the last ten years is incredibly ambitious and outstanding, but he never rests. I always feel like I have a lot of growing/catching up to do after hanging with Dave. Who’s the one person to watch right now in the St. Louis dining scene? Mike Randolph [Half & Half, the Good Pie, Publico] has made the best dish in St. Louis with his tacos al pastor. It’s the only dish I can remember in a long time having and then waking up the next day and planning my next trip to get. It’s been a few months, and I’m still excited about those damn tacos. Which ingredient is most representative of your personality? Brisket. It’s like the dad bod of meat. Fullflavored, a little fatty, really salty and smokey. If someone asked you to describe the current state of St. Louis’ culinary climate, what would you say? My wife and I like to travel a lot, all over. We research a ton in the food capitals of the world on where to eat. It’s rare when we find a restaurant that is lauded in another city that would crack our top ten in St. Louis. Our restaurant and culinary scene is truly world class. Name an ingredient never allowed in your kitchen. Foam. I chastised a sous chef at Franco eight years ago when he tried to put a lobster foam on a salad. I want to live my life knowing confidently that I never put a damn foam on anything. Not that there is anything inherently wrong with foam, but you need to know who you are and what your food says and represents. It’s just never been my thing. What is your after-work hangout? My kitchen. Bars after dinner service are a distant memory with a six-month-old around. Leftover Bolognese and the second half of the bottle of wine my wife started before she went to bed is pretty great company these days. What’s your food or beverage guilty pleasure? Pork buns from Wei Hong Bakery & Restaurant on South Grand. On a scale of 1-Even, I can’t. I can’t even. What would be your last meal on earth? My mom’s chili. Or...I always thought I will probably die in a shark attack at sea. I will definitely take a bite out of that fish before he brings me down. — CHERYL BAEHR


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A margarita and wings at the U Bar.

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The Place: The U Bar (6714 Olive Boulevard, University City; 314-349-1100) The Hours: Monday through Friday, 4 to 7 p.m. The Deals: $4 wing-teaser appetizers. $2 domestics, $3 import and draft beers, $4 glasses of wine, and $4 well drinks. The Scene: When it comes to nightlife in University City, most people think about the Delmar Loop. The U Bar, which opened March 18 in the space that previously housed Sirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BarB-Que, aims to offer an alternative neighborhood gathering place with an inviting, catchall concept. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a double meaning,â&#x20AC;? says coowner Jason Spain, who runs the business with his wife, April. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is for U. City, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also all about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we want you to feel comfortable. People come in, mind their own business and kind of blend here.â&#x20AC;? The space retains some of its historic charm from past lives, including exposed brick walls and glass-block windows, but for the most part it keeps things simple and sleek to cater to all types of clientele. Plenty of chairs are available by the bar or on a second-story seating area, both equipped with TVs. The liquor selection features a decent selection of beer and a variety of fruity cocktail options, which a friendly barkeeper will happily mix up at a momentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notice. The Food: The U Barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standard food

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Wing Teasers and Cold Drinks at the U Bar

selection, akin to its overall vibe, is low-key and approachable. The kitchen regularly offers combination baskets of wings and fries, battered shrimp and a variety of sliders. During happy hour, get a taste of the grillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialty by trying a wing teaser, which features ďŹ ve wings for $4. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;originalâ&#x20AC;? ďŹ&#x201A;avor features a six-seasoning blend, while a â&#x20AC;&#x153;trashedâ&#x20AC;? wing coats the chicken in a sweet and spicy sauce. To double down on appetizer deals, check out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taco and Trivia Tuesdaysâ&#x20AC;? for some downhome $1 soft tacos. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like everything else here: simply good and unpretentious. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MABEL SUEN


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Twangfest

Your essential local guide just got better.

Look for the RFT Street Team at the following featured events this week:

Thursday 6.18.15

Twangfest

What: The Ralph Butler Band - Not So Quite Music Fest

Download the new version today.

When: 6:00 - 8:30 PM Where: St. Louis Central Public Library

Thursday 6.18.15

Twangfest

What: Wing Ding When: 5 - 9 PM Where: Family Arena

Friday 6.19.15

Twangfest

What: Atlas Genius and New Politics Concert When: 6 - 10 PM Where: Ballpark Village presents

Saturday 6.20.15 What: Saturday Sessions

Brewers Guild Heritage Festival nOOn rday 10amevery satu rly october

ea mid-may– l pavilion

west pOO ove park

When: 10 AM - 4 PM

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Where: Tower Grove Farmers’ Market

Saturday 6.20.15 What: RFT MUSIC SHOWCASE When: 1 PM - 3 AM

THIS SATURDAY !

RF T MUSIC S ho wc a s e

Saturday, June

Where: The Grove

RIVERFRONT TIMES

20, 2015

M.M.E.ÊUÊSleepy KittyÊUÊJon Hardy & the PublicÊUÊThe Domino Effect CaveofswordSÊUÊIndiana RomeÊUÊDoorwayÊUÊBlank Generation Tommy Halloran’s Guerilla SwingÊUÊBug Chaser

...and 80+ other STL bands! -VYHSSHJJLZZWHZZLZHUKTVYLPUMVYTH[PVU]PZP[^^^YM[T\ZPJZOV^JHZLJVT

For more photos go to the Street Team website at www.riverfronttimes.com. 38

Brewers Guild Heritage Festival

ALL DAY 3 100 Bands 3 10 Venues 3 $10

Brewers Guild Heritage Festival

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Lilly’s Music & Social House Comes to Benton Park

B

ecause St. Louis can be a small town once you get to know people, Kristen Goodman heard Luvy Duvy’s was likely closing long before the news was public. As a musician, she had played at the Benton Park breakfast and lunch spot, and she’d gotten to know the owners — so when she heard they were looking to take a step back from the restaurant rat race and lease their space to someone else, she knew it was the opportunity she’d been waiting for. “I’d been in the industry fifteen years,” she says. “I’d always had this desire to open my own space.” Suddenly the perfect location was right in front of her. At the same time, Goodman believed there was a need she could fill. After Novak’s closed, “there was a gap in the market for a space for women, LGBT women,” she says. Enter Lilly’s Music and Social House. In January, Goodman and her long-time partner, Elizabeth “Lilly” Fuchs, began hosting “preview nights” in the Luvy Duvy’s space, which confirmed to them there was a niche they could serve with a low-key wine bar for lesbians. They signed a lease for the space, and on June 6, two months after Luvy Duvy’s closed its doors, Lilly’s (2321 Arsenal Street) held its soft opening. On June 23 regular hours begin, which will include game nights on Tuesday, “Way Back Wednesdays” with throwback cocktails, live music on Thursday and Fridays, and a DJ on Saturdays. Brunch will be served beginning Saturday at 11 a.m. and Sunday at 10 a.m.; the leafy patio suggests it’ll become a popular hangout. Indeed, while Goodman and Fuchs set out to open a bar, the menu suggests they’ve come up with far more than that. “I always thought we’d have a bar with food,” Goodman says. “But the food ended up being a much bigger part of it than I expected.” Nicole Costello, the former general manager of Benton Park Cafe who now works for St. Louis Bread Company, consulted on the menu; Amy Generally, formerly with Lucas Park Grille and the Block, serves as chef. There are four pizzas, plus an option to build your own, as well as a charcuterie board. Instead of sliders, Lilly’s serves “rye-ders” — four mini sandwiches on rye bread. There are also a host of small plates for sharing, many of them vegetarian. Kale chips are tossed with lemon yogurt dip; stuffed baby sweet peppers are loaded with Greek yogurt and sauteed jalapeño and given a drizzle of honey. This is definitely not the fried bar food you may be used to. The space, too, has a light and airy feel. Big windows allow natural light to pour in from both Jefferson and Arsenal, and the old booths that gave Luvy Duvy’s a classic restaurant feel have been replaced by a high banquette backing an exposed brick wall and tall tables made from gorgeous old butcher block. All those renovations were done by the partners, along with family, friends and

volunteers. Goodman and Fuchs turned to Kickstarter for their initial funding, but they kept their goal modest: just $11,000. Even though they ultimately raised a few thousand dollars more than that, it was still a low enough sum to ensure that opening their doors was entirely a grassroots effort. That’s the sort of effort that could put stress on any relationship, but for Fuchs and Goodman, it ended up doing just the opposite. After eight and a half years together, during the months of working to open Lilly’s, the pair finally got engaged. “It was time,” Goodman says, blushing. “We’re making this big commitment together, so it was important to make that commitment, too.” They’re talking about a February 2017 wedding date. — SARAH FENSKE

The “Italian Rye-der” sandwiches at Lilly’s.

SARAH FENSKE

[FIRST LOOK]

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music

B-Sides 42 Critics’ Picks 44 Concerts 45 Out All Night

Back to the Roots

48

Mike Leahy and Chris Baricevic of Tortuga.

TORTUGA IS A HOMECOMING FOR MIKE LEAHY AND THE BIG MUDDY RECORDS FAMILY Tortuga 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 23. Foam, 3359 Cherokee Street. $5. 314-772-2100.

hose familiar with Mike Leahy as the frontman for 7 Shot Screamers or as the man behind the face paint of Clownvis Presley might be surprised by his new project. Tortuga, a desolate take on country-rock as viewed through a psychedelic lens, is Leahy’s first foray into solo songwriting instead of, as Leahy puts it, “having four guys involved in the writing process like we did in 7 Shot Screamers.” While the dark, sparse tracks on Tortuga’s first EP, West of Eden, were mostly written by Leahy, the album itself is far from a solo effort. Leahy is BY backed by an assembly of artists hand-picked from the local JENN label Big Muddy Records, with members of Pokey LaFarge, DEROSE Rum Drum Ramblers, Loot Rock Gang, the Hobosexuals, Arson for Candy and Jack Grelle’s band all lending their talents. West of Eden also has a silent collaborator: Exene Cervenka of the legendary punk band X. Leahy worked with Cervenka when 7 Shot Screamers backed her as the Original Sinners. “I got a random letter in the mail from Exene sometime after 7 Shot had recorded with her,” Leahy explains. “It had about five pages of lyrics and random lines and phrases, along with a note saying, ‘I wrote these lyrics and think you could use them.’ That’s what really sparked all the Tortuga demos.” Leahy initially tried to put together a band while living in LA, his home for the last five years, but he says he could only think of musicians from St. Louis. “St. Louis seriously has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to talented musicians,” he explains, “and we had a great time recording the songs.” Before moving back to the Gateway City, Leahy sent his demos to Chris Baricevic, captain of Big Muddy. Baricevic said he liked the songs’ “spaghetti-Western” sound and quickly got on board. Tortuga is not the first project on which Leahy and Baricevic have worked together.

ROBERT ROHE

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When Baricevic was just nineteen years old and his label was still in its infancy, he put out 7 Shot Screamers’ last release, In Wonderland. He had admired the band since first seeing an in-store performance at Vintage Vinyl. “They were the coolest,” Baricevic says. “We thought 7 Shot was it. Mike took us under his wing. He was a hero, for sure. All the Johnny Thunders, Iggy and the Stooges, Velvet Underground, Mc5 I heard [through him]. Hanging out with Mike Leahy was like, rock & roll high school — for real.” “Chris was very interested in working with us and let us do whatever we wanted, which is why In Wonderland became the album that it is,” Leahy says. “I don’t think that would have been the case if we stayed the course with [Haunted Town Records], or any other label, for that matter.” The concept of Leahy’s Clownvis Presley character emerged from another collaboration of sorts between Leahy and Baricevic. Leahy was trying to figure out how to make money between tours and told Baricevic that he wanted to be a clown or an Elvis impersonator. Baricevic

replied, “Why not both?” “I literally hung up the phone and put together Clownvis for the first time and never looked back,” says Leahy. “I’ve never been the best magician, and I was too young and wiry to be an Elvis impersonator. So I took the Elvis voice and the bad magic and half-assed clowning and put them together.” During Leahy’s time in LA, Clownvis really took off, thanks in part to an infamous appearance on America’s Got Talent on which he goaded both Sharon Osbourne and Howie Mandel into telling him to “fuck off” on national television. Leahy considers it some of his best work. Though the comedy scene of LA was fertile ground for Clownvis, he found the music scene to be lacking. “There is no comparing the St. Louis music scene to the scene in LA,” he says. “There is absolutely no roots in any music, outside of Mexican culture. Not that I could find, anyway. There is no raw passion, and everything is far too contrived. I would go to shows occasionally and just stand there thinking, ‘Have any of these people ever been to St. Louis? Or any riverfronttimes.com

rock & roll city?’ They simply don’t know how it’s done out there.” Tortuga is in good company at Big Muddy, with its roster of country-leaning artists steeped in roots music. Plus, it’s full of musicians who grew up listening to 7 Shot Screamers. Touring might prove difficult with so many members involved in other projects, but that won’t prevent Tortuga from playing live shows. The lineup will change based on whoever is available. “I think that will be part of the magic of Tortuga,” Leahy says. “If it came down to it, I could do a show completely solo, or with just Chris on keys, or as a three-piece, or so on.” The collaborative, integrated spirit in which West of Eden came together was very natural, he says. “It was just the guys that were the best, and the people we wanted to be around and record with. We’ve all known each other for over a decade now, so its been a long time coming to all work together.” He adds, “I do love the sound and want to take it further, because songs like this can really pour out of me, if I let them.” Q

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b-sides Mock-Blocked “AUNT CLAUDETTE” CHOSEN AS RING GIRL FOR NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK CONCERT, HILARITY ENSUES

Aunt Claudette: Professional Internet troll, amateur ring girl.

Unwilling to pony up a grand for the privilege, but devoted as ever to her favorite boy band, Higgins hatched an idea. She’s been trolling the Internet with her “Aunt Claudette” character since 2007, taking down Target for perceived fat-shaming, claiming to be Justin Bieber’s outraged aunt and even waving a giant floppy dildo at Larry Flynt outside of Hustler Hollywood — all while speaking in a Southern drawl and sporting a neck brace. “I didn’t think I would get any viewership just by talking like most of the people were doing,” Higgins told Daily RFT of her early trolling efforts in an interview last year. “So I had to do something crazy.” Since debuting the character, she has amassed an army of fans — especially on her

Vine account, which has more than 40,000 followers. After seeing the NKOTB show in St. Louis, Higgins already had plans to attend the band’s show three days later in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Claudette, she thought, might help get her a ring-girl gig. “I just thought, ‘Well, I am just going to make a video and see if they’ll pick me.’ Just to do it, just because I thought it would be awesome, first of all, to be in character and do it,” she explains. The resulting short film has all the drama and suspense of a big-budget summer blockbuster, if only said blockbuster centered on a woman wearing a wig, neck brace and “bikini girl” T-shirt.

HOMESPUN

A U D I O V U LT U R E Strange Memories on This Nervous Night audiovultureet.bandcamp.com

F

or the past five years, south-side denizen Ben Davis has made music under the name Audio Vulture, dutifully releasing an album every year or so with little fanfare and few, if any, live appearances. His one-man band name may sound like a post-Napster piracy hub or a particularly nasty piece of malware, but it fits his catchall technique of mixing found sound, canned beats, blues-indebted guitar and wry vocals into fairly catchy tunes about self-abuse and selfloathing. He calls his music “junkie pop,” a genre tag about as cute as a scabrous track mark and one that oversells the music’s narcotic effect. Davis’ sound-collage style and boho-jazz lyrics are closer to MTV-era Eels and Calvin Johnson side projects than, say, Mark Linkous’ blackout fantasias with Sparklehorse. You’d be hard-pressed to call Davis’ delivery “singing” — his low voice hovers over notes and modulates a notch up or down per song. If it were standup comedy we’d call it deadpan, and on a record it can be compelling at first, but a little fatiguing over the sixteen tracks on Strange Memories on This Nervous Night. At his best, Davis shows a poet’s eye for rich detail and a memoirist’s gift for interior honesty. And his songs, usually between 42

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1:30 and 2:30 long, are relatively simple but tightly constructed; a few strike the ear more as song-sketches rather than pure versechorus-verse pop constructs, though he’s clearly comfortable with that format. “An Evening at the Diamond” rides on a simple drum machine track and dirty, twangy guitar licks as Davis spins a travelogue fueled by weed, black coffee and blanket paranoia. Later, over the finger-picked guitar of “A City Shell a Driving Rain,” Davis cops to being “an antisocial paranoid.” Those bad vibrations seep in deeper and deeper as the tracks progress, even while the songs retain a certain ear-worm appeal. “Voodoo Black Eyes Alive and All Wet” tips the scales on the electro-folk vibe, using a metronomic beat and crushing bass synth to create a Faint-like darkwave jam. The second half of the album sticks to this pattern — the beats a little harder, the vibe a little more sinister. As Audio Vulture, Davis creates songs that skirt the edges of these genres while never quite committing. Likewise, his lyrics resemble a stoned epiphany: mindaltering to the one experiencing it, but hard — if not impossible — to convey to others. —CHRISTIAN SCHAEFFER Want your CD to be considered for a review in this space? Send music c/o Riverfront Times, Attn: Homespun, 6358 Delmar Boulevard, Suite 200, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130. Email music@riverfronttimes.com for more information.

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C O U R T N E Y S TA B L E R

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laudette Higgins is a blockhead. The 41-year-old special needs teacher from Maryland Heights — real name Libbie Higgins, but Internet-famous as “Aunt Claudette” — is way into the New Kids On the Block. Regardless of whether she’s sporting one of Aunt Claudette’s famously bedazzled neck braces, she’s a fan, and has been all the way back to 1988. So when the seasoned Internet troll attended the recent NKOTB concert at the Scottrade Center in late May, she had a hilarious idea. “The New Kids On the Block tour that they’re doing with with Nelly and TLC, it sort of has a boxing theme, I guess, and they use a ring girl at each show to do round one, two and three,” Higgins explains. “When I saw them in St. Louis, I just noticed the girl walking and nobody really paid attention, I didn’t think.” With each of the three acts on the bill serving as a “round,” organizers grabbed volunteers from the audience to serve as “ring girls” — walking across the stage and holding a sign denoting which “round” was starting, in the grand boxing tradition. That participation came with a price. “They picked them out of the people that are sitting on these bar stools that are on the stage,” Higgins says, “and they paid like $1,000 for those seats. Which is ridiculous.”

“See, a lot of the girls in the New Kids On the Block Twitter world know about Aunt Claudette, because I’ve made other videos that are related to New Kids on the Block,” Higgins says. “So everybody started to retweet it, and Jenny McCarthy retweeted it.” McCarthy, of course, is married to Donnie Wahlberg, a.k.a. NKOTB’s resident “bad boy.” “So when she tweeted it, I was like, ‘I know he is going to see it.’ Then the following morning he tweeted, ‘The neck brace is coming soon,’ and then linked my video,” Higgins says. “But nobody had contacted me yet, so I really didn’t know if it was going to go down.” Higgins and her sister were planning to travel to Grand Rapids either way. So when NKOTB’s people finally got in touch the morning of the show, they were ready to roll. Upon arrival she was briefed on what would be expected from her onstage. One of the security guards on the scene recognized her from her videos and brought her to the New Kids’ dressing room for a meet and greet. “They had me come back and took some group pictures of me with a bikini shirt on, and Donnie Wahlberg said, ‘Did they tell you what they are going to do before you go up?’ And I said, ‘No,’ and he said, ‘You just wait,’” Higgins says. To her great surprise, the video that she had made just days prior was played on the stadium’s jumbo screen immediately before her turn as ring girl. “It’s ridiculous and hysterical, but at the same time it was like a dream come true, even for the other girls that are what are called ‘blockheads,’ because they all really wanted it to happen as much as I did,” Higgins says. “So to have them follow through and actually do it — and then play the video — was just so incredible.” Courtney Stabler was one of those excited blockheads in attendance. She first became aware of Aunt Claudette through Donnie’s tweet. “I thought it was cool that she was so creative in her request, and excited she was going to be at the show I was going to,” she says. “I started following her on Twitter to keep tabs on her to see if she got her wish. Since I had front-row seats, I took a picture and sent it to her. I thought she might enjoy seeing it.” “The best part about the whole experience is that I kind of just made it on a whim, just hoping that it would happen, and it actually happened,” Higgins says. “That it got their attention and they wanted me to do it, and they were just as excited about it as I was.” Most impressive? Higgins was able to achieve something that would cost most people a pretty penny through sheer creativity and force of will. “That’s really all I have, because I don’t have a lot of money,” she says. “So I have to use something else.” —DANIEL HILL


Jazz ´ Blues ´ Bossa Fletcher Moley Group w Willie Akins Bistro & Music House

Saturday June 20 th 7-11pm

512 N. Euclid Ave • St. Louis

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DA N M A R T E N S E N

critics’ picks

TOMMY HALLORAN AND THE APEMEN 7 p.m. Saturday, June 20. Los Punk, 2709 Cherokee Street. Free. 314-560-0626. The Kinks spent decades bringing catchy, genre-spanning tunes over from the UK. “You Really Got Me” was considered the blueprint for rock songs by critics more than 30 years ago. More recently, the Apemen formed in St. Louis to give us a refresher course in the group’s unique style. The first show for this Kinks tribute band (aptly named after the Kinks’ “Apeman”) promises plenty of throwback fun with covers of favorites from the band’s extensive, decades-long catalog. Also on the bill is St. Louis darling Tommy Halloran, who has spent what seems like almost as many decades delivering solid jazz and swing performances. Armed with his formidable chops and unforgettable melodies, his performance alongside the Apemen’s Kinks covers are guaranteed to have songs stuck in your head for days. Keep the Peace: The Kinks were banned from performing in the U.S. after too many drunken onstage brawls, including an incident wherein frontman Ray Davies allegedly punched out a musician’s union rep. Here’s hoping the Apemen don’t follow that lead too closely. — JULIA BURCH 44

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Clockwise from the top: Dawes, John Moreland and Tyler, the Creator.

TYLER, THE CREATOR 8 p.m. Saturday, June 20. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard. $25 to $27. 314-726-6161. Odd Future is no more. The fourteen-member rap collective that gave us Earl Sweatshirt and Frank Ocean — as well as the comeback of snap-back hats and tall socks — hasn’t released an album as a group since 2012’s The OF Tape Vol. 2, so that should come as a surprise to exactly no one. But it still took a recent series of Tweets from de facto leader Tyler, the Creator to finally cement that fact. Worry not, though: There is still plenty of music coming from individual members of the camp, including Tyler himself, whose Cherry Bomb was released to critical acclaim in April and features high-profile guest verses from the likes of Kanye West, Lil Wayne and Pharrell Williams. The More Things Change: Despite the considerable musical growth between his last album, Wolf, and his new one, Tyler still peddles in shock and controversy. He hasn’t stopped using offensive slurs, though he still maintains he is not homophobic. Those offended by offensive things may want to sit this one out. — DANIEL HILL

JOEY KNEISER

8:30 p.m. Friday, June 19. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Avenue. $12 to $15. 314-773-3363. “Nobody Gives a Damn About Songs Anymore” is John Moreland’s definitive statement about being John Moreland. It’s a slice of self-pitying life, sure, but it’s hard not to feel for the Oklahoma-based troubadour every time you turn on a country or alt-rock or whatever station. Voices and arrangements abound, but songs as something more than disposable commodities are as rare as the talent that Moreland undeniably possesses. With a voice as rough as a prairie fence post and a class-conscious streak as deep as folk music ever gets, he will impress anyone who has worn out their Townes Van Zandt and Steve Earle records, in search of another songwriter’s songwriter fix. Son of Anarchy: The FX series Sons of Anarchy featured three of Moreland’s songs, jump-starting his career before just about anyone knew his name. — ROY KASTEN

DAW E S 8 p.m. Sunday, June 21. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Avenue. $25. 314-726-6161. The evolution of the California roots-pop quartet Dawes has been suitably mellow and organic. Acolytes of the folkier end of Laurel Canyon and, to underline the band’s commitment to that sound, onetime backing band for Jackson Browne, Dawes pushes into slightly more modern-rock territory with this year’s All Your Favorite Bands. Singer and guitarist Taylor Goldsmith still writes songs around the small graces and seismic shifts that make up everyday life: The chorus to lead single “Things Happen” — which states that “Things happen — that’s all they ever do” — is either trite, or a Zen koan, or both. Foghorn Langhorne: Langhorne Slim & the Law, whose new LP The Spirit Moves is set to be released in early August, will open the show. — CHRISTIAN SCHAEFFER

MARK PECKMEZIAN

JOHN MORELAND


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concerts THIS JUST IN Bonfires: Wed., July 15, 6 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Bully: Wed., Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. CaveofswordS: W/ Curse of Cassandra, Search Parties, Thu., July 30, 9 p.m., $5. The Heavy Anchor, 5226 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314-352-5226. Devil You Know: W/ Outcome of Betrayal, A Promise to Burn, Noesis, Through the Scope, Tue., Aug. 11, 6 p.m., $15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. DJ Lo Down Loretta Brown: Sat., July 11, 10 p.m., $67$100. Lux, 2619 Washington Ave., St. Louis, 314-531-2920. Erra: W/ Polyphia, the After Image, Sun., Sept. 20, 6 p.m., $13-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050. Frnkiero and the Cellabration: W/ the Homeless Gospel Choir, Sun., July 26, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Ghost: W/ Purson, Tue., Oct. 6, 8:30 p.m., $27.60-$32.60. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161. Grass Is Dead: Tue., July 14, 8 p.m., $8-$10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009. Gregg Allman: Sun., Oct. 18, 8 p.m., $39.50-$59.50. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314-388-7777. Honey and Salt: Sat., Aug. 15, 2 p.m., free. Music Record Shop, 4191 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, 314-272-4607. Ike Reilly AssassinaT H IS C O D E tion: Mon., July 27, 8 p.m., TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE $12-$14. Off Broadway, 3509 RIVERFRONT TIMES Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314IPHONE/ANDROID APP 773-3363. FOR MORE CONCERTS OR VISIT Islander: W/ From Ashes to riverfronttimes.com New, Mon., July 13, 7 p.m., $12-$15. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-5350353. Janet Jackson: Thu., Oct. 29, 8 p.m., $26-$122. Chaifetz Arena, 1 S. Compton Ave., St. Louis, 314-977-5000. Jonathan Jackson + Enation: Sun., June 21, 7 p.m., $12$50. The Bootleg, 4140 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis. Kinky Friedman: Thu., Nov. 5, 8 p.m., $30. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Mountain Sprout: Fri., July 31, 9 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. On An On: Fri., Sept. 11, 8 p.m., $12. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353. Pepperland: A Beatles Revue: Fri., July 17, 9 p.m., $10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009. Reel Big Fish: Tue., Sept. 1, 7 p.m., $20-$22. Pop's Nightclub, 401 Monsanto Ave., East St. Louis, 618-274-6720. Ry Cooder, Sharon White and Ricky Skaggs: Mon., July 20, 8 p.m., $56.75-$62. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-533-9900. Tawaine Noah: W/ Elevator Museick, F.L.Y., Thu., July 23, 8 p.m., $8-$10. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Throwing Things Records Showcase: W/ the HaddonďŹ elds, the Rackatees, Sat., July 18, 2 p.m., free. Music Record Shop, 4191 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, 314-272-4607. Waxahatchee: Sat., Oct. 17, 8 p.m., $13-$15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363. Waybridge Records Showcase: W/ Because Reasons, Something Stranger, Sat., July 11, 2 p.m., free. Music Record Shop, 4191 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, 314-272-4607. We Banjo 3: Thu., Sept. 3, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505. The Weekend Classic: W/ Before the Streetlights, Tue., Aug. 4, 7 p.m., $10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009. The Whiskey War Festival 2015: W/ James Leg, Dirty Streets, The Maness Brothers, Old Capital Square Dance Club, Tok, Calliope, Brother Lee & the Leather Jackals, Chris Black and the Eagles of Unemployment, Path of Might, Shitstorm, the Barn Mice, River Kittens, Cara Louise Band, Illphonics, the Old Souls Revival, the Ol' One Two, Fat Tramp Food Stamp, the Wilderness, Jr. Clooney, Zackary Ă&#x201C; SluaghadhĂĄin, Sat., Aug. 22, 11 a.m., TBA. VFW Post 2866, 66 VFW Lane, St. Charles.

SCAN

LIVE MUSIC 30 WHISKIES 20 BEERS

WEDNESDAY 6.17

THE CAVE SINGERS WE ARE WARM

THURSDAY 6.18 SCHOOL DAMAGE - RAGING NATHANS

THE HUMANOIDS - BREAKMOUTH ANNIE

FRIDAY 6.19

MASS APPEAL DJ MAHF - KID CUT UP - + MANY MORE SATURDAY 6.20

RFT MUSIC SHOWCASE SUNDAY 6.21

MITSKI ELVIS DEPRESSEDLY MONDAY 6.22

ROADKILL GHOST CHOIR TUESDAY 6.23

GEDEON LUKE AND THE PEOPLE AYO AWOSIKA

4191 MANCHESTER AVE - ST. LOUIS, 63110 THEDEMOSTL.COM

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Bowling the way it is now– FUN!

Finals Breakfast Sandwich fried egg, ham, bacon & cheddar cheese between two waffles; with sriracha sauce and syrup!

24/7 PeacockLoopDiner.com

6191 Delmar · 314-727-5555 PinUpBowl.com

6261 Delmar in The Loop

"YOUR #1 CHOICE SINCE 1994!"

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Delmar Loop WEDNESDAY 9/2

ON SALE 6.19!

Saint Louis

FRIDAY 6/19

SATURDAY 6/20

WEDNESDAY 10/26

SUNDAY 6/21

WEDNESDAY 6/24

FRIDAY 7/10

SUNDAY 7/26

WEDNESDAY 7/29

SUNDAY 8/1

UPCOMING SHOWS 8.8 RUBEN STUDDARD

9.27 BEACH HOUSE

8.9 CHARLI XCX & BLEACHERS

9.29 ZZ WARD

9.3 THE GLITCH MOB

10.6 GHOST

9.9 RATATAT

10.7 FATHER JOHN MISTY

9.10 PATTON OSWALT

10.21 LYLE LOVETT & JOHN HIATT

9.11 O.A.R.

10.31 SOMO

9.15 NICK JONAS

11.8 NEW FOUND GLORY/YELLOWCARD

visit us online for complete show information facebook.com/ThePageantSTL

@ThePageantSTL

thepageantstl.tumblr.com

thepageant.com // 6161 delmar blvd. / St. Louis, MO 63112 // 314.726.6161

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out every night â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out Every Nightâ&#x20AC;? is a free listing open to all bars and bands in the St. Louis and Metro East areas. However, we reserve the right to refuse any entry. Listings are to be submitted by mail, fax or e-mail. Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, ten days before Thursday publication. Please include barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, address with ZIP code, phone number and geographic location; nights and dates of entertainment; and act name. Mail: Riverfront Times, attn: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clubs,â&#x20AC;? 6358 Delmar Blvd., Suite 200, St. Louis, MO 63130-4719; fax: 314-754-6416; e-mail: clubs@ riverfronttimes.com. Schedules are not accepted over the phone. Because of last-minute cancellations and changes, please call ahead to verify listings.

T H U R S DAY 2015 Sounds of Summer Tour: w/ Dierks Bentley, Kip Moore, Maddie & Tae, Canaan Smith, Thu., June 18, 7 p.m., $31.25-$56. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944, www.livenation.com/Verizon-Wireless-Amphitheater-St-Louis-ticketsMaryland-Heights/venue/49672. Drainolith: w/ Ghost Ice, Demonlover, Thu., June 18, 8:30 p.m., free. SchlaďŹ&#x201A;y Tap Room, 2100 Locust St., St. Louis, 314-241-2337, www.schlaďŹ&#x201A;y.com. The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion: w/ Daddy Long Legs, Thu., June 18, 8 p.m., $15-$18. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505, www.oldrockhouse.com. Noisem: Thu., June 18, 8 p.m., $10. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. Silent Planet: Thu., June 18, 5 p.m., $5. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com.

F R I DAY Atlas Genius: w/ New Politics, Fri., June 19, 6 p.m., $10.57$30. Ballpark Village, 601 Clark Ave, St. Louis, 314-3459481, www.stlballparkvillage.com. Boosie: w/ Luey Da Man, Fri., June 19, 8 p.m., TBA. Ambassador, 9800 Halls Ferry Road, North St. Louis County, 314-869-9090, www. thenewambassadorstl.com/ default.html. The Conformists: w/ Yowie, Maximum Effort, Fri., June 19, 9 p.m., Free. SchlaďŹ&#x201A;y Tap Room, 2100 Locust St., St. Louis, 314-241-2337, www. schlaďŹ&#x201A;y.com. Floetry: Fri., June 19, 8 p.m., $35-$45. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161, www. T H IS C O D E thepageant.com. TO DOWNLOAD THE FREE John Moreland: Fri., June RIVERFRONT TIMES 19, 9 p.m., $12/$15. Off IPHONE/ANDROID APP Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, FOR MORE CLUBS OR VISIT www.offbroadwaystl.com. riverfronttimes.com Peter Bradley Adams: Fri., June 19, 8 p.m., $15. Blueberry Hill, 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-727-4444, www.blueberryhill.com. Schwervon: w/ Whoa Thunder, Fri., June 19, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-7722100, www.facebook.com/FoamCoffeeandBeer?ref=ts. St. Louis Symphony: Classical Mystery Tour: Fri., June 19, 7:30 p.m., TBA. Powell Symphony Hall, 718 N. Grand Blvd, St. Louis, 314-534-1700, stlsymphony.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pioneers of craft beer and live music in St. Louisâ&#x20AC;?

SCAN

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S AT U R DAY Bella & Lily: w/ Flying House, Ramona DeďŹ&#x201A;owered, Sat., June 20, 9 p.m., Free. SchlaďŹ&#x201A;y Tap Room, 2100 Locust St., St. Louis, 314-241-2337, www.schlaďŹ&#x201A;y.com. Hard Rock Invasion 2015: w/ Queensryche, Tom Keifer, Great White, Adler, Strikeforce, Conquest, Planet Granite, Sat., June 20, 1 p.m., $25-$70. Jefferson Barracks Park, 533 Grant Road, South St. Louis County, 314-544-5714, www.co.stlouis.mo.us/parks/j-b.html. Jakubi: Sat., June 20, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www.offbroadwaystl. com.

6691 Delmar In the University City Loop Â&#x2021;ZZZFLFHURVVWOFRP 48

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Summer Gras: w/ Dumpstaphunk, Marc Broussard, Mingo Fishtrap, Sat., June 20, 6 p.m., $10-$25. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-588-0505, www.oldrockhouse.com. Tyler, the Creator: w/ Taco, Sat., June 20, 8 p.m., $25-$27. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161, www.thepageant.com.

S U N DAY Dawes: w/ Langhorne Slim, Sun., June 21, 8 p.m., $25$27.50. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314726-6161, www.thepageant.com. The Dramatics: Sun., June 21, 7 p.m., $22.50-$37.50. Ambassador, 9800 Halls Ferry Road, North St. Louis County, 314-869-9090, www.thenewambassadorstl.com/default. html. Great Lake Swimmers: Sun., June 21, 8 p.m., $15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www. offbroadwaystl.com. Jonathan Jackson + Enation: Sun., June 21, 7 p.m., $12$50. The Bootleg, 4140 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis. Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams: Sun., June 21, 8 p.m., $17-$20. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314773-3363, www.offbroadwaystl.com. Mitski: w/ Elvis Depressedly, Eskimeaux, Sun., June 21, 7 p.m., $12-$17. The Demo, 4191 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, www.thedemostl.com. St. Louis Symphohny: My Sinatra: Sun., June 21, 2 p.m., TBA. Powell Symphony Hall, 718 N. Grand Blvd, St. Louis, 314-534-1700, stlsymphony.org.

M O N DAY Animal Children: Mon., June 22, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314-772-2100, www. facebook.com/FoamCoffeeandBeer?ref=ts. Joe Metzka Band: Mon., June 22, 8 p.m., $5. BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314-436-5222, www.bbsjazzbluessoups.com. Neon Trees: w/ Yes You Are, Mon., June 22, 8 p.m., $25. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, www. thereadyroom.com. Taake: w/ Young and In the Way, WOLVHAMMER, Tyranny Enthroned, Xaemora, Mon., June 22, 7 p.m., $18-$20. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www.fubarstl.com. Tristen: w/ Big Harp, Mon., June 22, 8 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www. offbroadwaystl.com.

T U E S DAY Dads: w/ Choir Vandals, Bad Cover Band Sam, Tue., June 23, 7 p.m., $12. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314535-0353, www.ďŹ rebirdstl.com. Little Hurricane: w/ Young Buffalo, Tue., June 23, 8 p.m., $10. Old Rock House, 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis, 314-5880505, www.oldrockhouse.com. Smashing Pumpkins: An Acoustic-Electro Evening, Tue., June 23, 8 p.m., $45-$55. The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314-726-6161, www.thepageant.com. Stormcaller CD Release: w/ Wilderun, Ă&#x2020;ther Realm, Tue., June 23, 7 p.m., $8-$10. Cicero's, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314-862-0009, www.ciceros-stl.com. The Band of Heathens: Tue., June 23, 8 p.m., $12-$15. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www. offbroadwaystl.com. Tom Hall & Ethan Leinwand: Tue., June 23, 7 p.m., $5. BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis, 314436-5222, www.bbsjazzbluessoups.com. Tortuga: w/ Old Scratch's Burnpile, Tue., June 23, 8 p.m., $5. Foam Coffee & Beer, 3359 Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, 314772-2100, www.facebook.com/FoamCoffeeandBeer?ref=ts.

W E D N E S DAY Hayes Carll: Wed., June 24, 8 p.m., $20-$35. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363, www.offbroadwaystl.com. Lily Tomlin: Wed., June 24, 8 p.m., $47.50-$97.50. River City Casino & Hotel, 777 River City Casino Blvd., St. Louis, 314388-7777, www.rivercity.com. Ptahil: w/ Stormcaller, Manifest, Wed., June 24, 8 p.m., $10$12. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050, www. fubarstl.com. Tinkerbelles: w/ Shitstorm, Wed., June 24, 2 p.m., free. Music Record Shop, 4191 Manchester Avenue, St. Louis, 314-272-4607, www.musicrecordshop.com/.


savage love Jackhammer Hey, Dan: My boyfriend and I both spent a lot of time masturbating when we were young, and pretty much trained our brains to come only one way. He can only come from masturbating furiously, or sometimes from a marathon of jackhammer sex. A few years before I met him, I toned down the masturbating to retrain my brain and pussy and tried a bunch of new things, and I can now come from different acts and positions. It wasn’t easy, but I am so happy with this versatility. I’m starting to get annoyed that he isn’t working harder to overcome this jackhammering BY reliance. He says he’ll masturbate less, and that does help, DAN but I’m still eager for more S AVA G E variety. For what it’s worth, about half the time he just lets me come buckets and then gives up on himself. Can you recommend anything that would help him? Since I know firsthand this can be overcome and I accommodate him as much as possible, I think I’m being reasonable. Hoping A Massive Masturbator Eventually Retrains Exacting Dick

Here’s how you retrain his dick: Your boyfriend stops doing what he’s always done — no more masturbating or fucking in the style to which his dick has become accustomed — but he keeps on having sex and he keeps on masturbating. But he is not allowed to revert to jackhammering away at your pussy or his fist if he doesn’t get off. If he doesn’t come, he doesn’t come. Eventually his dick, in desperation, will adjust to newer, subtler sensations, and he’ll be able to get off without jackhammering. Or not. Some guys can retrain their dicks — and some women can retrain their pussies — but some people have carved too deep a groove into themselves and their junk. Other people really do require intense stimulation — jackhammers and death grips and powerful vibrators — to get off, and they have to figure out how to incorporate that intense stimulation into partnered sex without destroying their partners’ orifices. But the only way to find out if your boyfriend’s dick can be retrained is to try and retrain it. The fact that masturbating less cut his jackhammering down is a positive sign. Hey, Dan: I’m a 25-year-old heterosexual female, and I’ve been in a long-term friends-withbenefits relationship for a little more than four years. My FWB partner and I have recently decided to move from being FWB to actually dating. The issue is that we’ve both become so accustomed to the late-night sexting-andhookup routine that going on dates seems awk-

ward and forced. It doesn’t help that neither of us has been in a relationship before, so we both feel a little in the dark on how to navigate this. I really do like the guy (and our sex life is amazing), but I’m not sure how to move past the inbetween phase we’ve found ourselves in. Have we been in FWB-land too long to come back? Lost In Datingland

Dating is what people do before entering into a relationship — or it’s what most people used to do — and you two are already in a relationship. It was a FWB relationship, yes, but it was still a relationship. And people in relationships don’t typically go out on dates. So, yeah, the reason going out on a date with your boyfriend feels awkward is because you’re not dating, LID, not at this stage. You’re together. So be together: Go places, do things, have dinner, see friends, go home, sex amazingly. Spend more time together, build on what you’ve already established (i.e., the emotional and sexual connection that carried you through the last four years) and stop stressing about performing the roles of “boyfriend” and “girlfriend.” Hey, Dan: Recently, while masturbating, as I was approaching climax, I had a sharp pain in my abdomen. It felt like my intestine wanted to burst though my abdomen, kind of like a hernia. It really sucked and it ruined my orgasm. This has happened a handful of times in the past. I mentioned it to my doctor once, and I tested negative for a hernia. I’m a 52-year-old male in reasonably good shape; I’ve been going to the gym on the reg for the past few months. This sucks in that when my wife and I play, part of it involves my wife putting me in fourpoint restraint, masturbating me, then tickling me post-orgasm. It would really suck for this to happen while tied up and has me concerned about our sex play. Advice, an explanation, or a good theory would be welcome. Gut Ruins Orgasms, Addling Nerves

I would advise you to speak to your doctor, GROAN, but I don’t think you should worry about this too much. And I would theorize that you tense a particular muscle or set of muscles when you masturbate and every once in a great while this muscle group revolts and spasms painfully; your return to gym-going may have contributed to your most recent spasm. So long as your doctor gives you the all clear, GROAN, I don’t think you should stop going to the gym — or masturbating or letting your wife tie you to the bed. Risking the occasional spasm, however painful, seems a reasonable price to pay for regular orgasms and adventurous sex. On the Lovecast, the hype around the “female Viagra”? Don’t believe it: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter riverfronttimes.com

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200 Real Estate for Sale 210 Houses for Sale EAST ST. LOUIS $150 DN, $170/mo 855-671-5655 N. 48 St: 3BR/1BA Single Family. Fixer Upper. Lease Program

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Mark Helfers, 314-862-6666- CRIMINAL former Asst US Attorney, 32 years exp

DWI/BANKRUPTCY HOTLINE: .BLF&WFSZ%BZ4QFDJBMXJUI B-VYVSJPVT"TJBO.BTTBHF

OUTPATIENT SERVICES

763 S. NEW BALLAS RD. STE. 310 SAINT LOUIS, MO 63141

R.O.C. LAW , A Debt Relief Agency, Helping People File For Bankruptcy Relief Under the New Bankruptcy Code. 314-843-0220 The choice of a lawyer is an important decision & shouldn't be based solely upon advertisements.

Personal Injury, Workers Comp, DWI, TrafďŹ c 314-621-0500

ATTORNEY BRUCE E. HOPSON The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should

Spiritual Readings by Randy Call Today for Your Free Mini Reading. 314-744-9160

Thrift Shopping?

Check out Value Village! 3 Locations in St. Louis, MO

Fenton @ 88 Western Plaza 63026 Normandy @ 7400 Natural Bridge Rd. 63121 O'Fallon @ 24 O'Fallon Sq. 63366

PAINLESS TATTOO REMOVAL

ValueVillageThrift.com NEW LOCATION NOW OPEN!!

EarthCircleRecycling.com - 314-664-1450

Las Palmas 1901 Washington Ave. St. Louis 63103. 314-241-1557

not be based solely on advertising. SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 19 OR CALL 866-626-8346

Earth Circle's mission is to creatively assist businesses and residents with their recycling efforts while providing the friendliest and most reliable service in the area. Call Today!

Mon - Sat: 11am - 1am; Sun: 11am - 12am Find us on Facebook

Las Palmas 1901 Washington Ave. St. Louis 63103. 314-241-1557 Looking to sell or trade your metal, punk, rap or rock LP collection. Call us. 4191-A Manchester. musicrecordshop.com , 314-732-0164 Like the Riverfront Times? Make it ofďŹ cial. www.facebook.com/riverfronttimees

SOLDIERS MEMORIAL DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS

EVENT LINE-UP 4:30 PM

BEER TASTING AND FOOD TRUCK ALLEY OPEN

4:30 - 9:30 P.M. FOOD TRUCK ALLEY

5 - 7 P.M.

MUSIC M USIC SIC BY THAT 80'S BAND WITH EMCEE TRISH BUSCH SCH SSC CH C H ON THE BUD LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT STAGE O

8:30 - 9 P.M.

SSTAND-UP ST T COMEDIAN ZACH NOE TOWERS

9-1 11:30 30 P P.M.

Therapeutic Foot Massage 1 Hr. Full Body Massage

Specializing in Chinese Accupressure, Deep Tissue, Hot Oil, Hot Stone, Swedish, Therapeutic Foot Massage 9441 OLIVE BLVD. ST. LOUIS, MO 63132 HOURS 9AM - 9PM

LIVE VE DJ V DJ DANCE D NCE PARTY PA PA ARRTTYY FEATURING FEAT EA ATTURIN NG G TTH THE HE H HOT OTT H O HOUSE HOUS OUSSEE SESSIONS ON SESSION NS O N TTHE HE BU BBUD D LI LLIGHT IGHT H EENTERTAINMENT NTTE N TERRTTA TA NM N SSTAGE TAI STA TA TAGE AGE AG GEE G

TICKETS FOR BREWFEST MAY BE PURCHASED AT:

www.BrewFestWorld.com

314-993-0517

WWW.PRIDESTL.ORG

w w w. S U N R I S E DAYS PA .C O M

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RIVERFRONT TIMES

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McGuire Furniture

Call (314) 997-4500 or visit our showroom at 650 Fee Fee Rd. in Maryland Heights! mcguirefurniturestl.com

Call First Student to pick you up! Charter & School Bus Rental. 866.514.TRIP or www.ďŹ rstcharterbus.com

MICRO BREWFEST

$30 $50

Complete Package Includes: Sofa + Matching Chair + Coffee Table + End Table + 2 Lamps + Dinette Table + 2 Chairs + Queen Bed Frame with Headboard + Nightstand + Clothing Chest with Drawers

CAMPS, WINERIES, SPORTING EVENTS, WEDDINGS, PARTIES, GROUP OUTINGS

4:30 - 10:30 P.M.

Specials

Furnish Your Entire Home or Apartment for Only $790!

Get the Attention of our 461,000+ Readers Call 314-754-5940 for More Info

Get the Attention of our 461,000+ Readers Call 314-754-5940 for More Info

@ the corner of Connecticut & Morgan Ford. 314.664.2737

Specializing in Adolescents, Adults, and Women Medication Management and Therapy 255 SPENCER RD., ST. PETERS MO 63376

Made You Look!

Made You Look!

South City Scooters Great Selection of Scooters! Sales & Service.

NOT AFFILIATED WITH A HOSPITAL OS

Looking to sell or trade your metal, punk, rap or rock LP collection. Call us. 4191-A Manchester. musicrecordshop.com , 314-732-0164 Like the Riverfront Times? Make it ofďŹ cial. www.facebook.com/riverfronttimees

MUSIC RECORD SHOP

Call First Student to pick you up! Charter & School Bus Rental. 866.514.TRIP or www.ďŹ rstcharterbus.com

CALL 636-477-6111 No upfront fees. Covered by most insurance.

MUSIC RECORD SHOP

Mon - Sat: 11am - 1am; Sun: 11am - 12am Find us on Facebook

CAMPS, WINERIES, SPORTING EVENTS, WEDDINGS, PARTIES, GROUP OUTINGS

Are you addicted to Opiates? Pain medications or heroin? SUBOXONE CAN HELP

riverfronttimes.com

South City Scooters Great Selection of Scooters! Sales & Service. @ the corner of Connecticut & Morgan Ford. 314.664.2737

www.LiveInTheGrove.com Ultimate Massage by

Summer!

SWEDISH & DEEP TISSUE FULL BODY MASSAGE Daily 10 AM-5PM

South County Lemay Area

314-620-6386

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Riverfront Time 6.17.15

Combined rft 6 18 15 low  

Riverfront Time 6.17.15

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