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Issue 01 | 2013

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

KNOW-HOW Top quality put to the test EXPERIENCE Clean business with the sun ENGAGEMENT Score with international drive

Friedhelm Loh Stiftung & Co. KG Rudolf-Loh-Strasse 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 Fax +49 (0) 2773 924-3129 E-mail: info@friedhelm-loh-group.com

INDUSTRY 4.0

Production in dialogue Issue 01| 2013

www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

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AN OVERVIEW OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP COMPANIES

FRIEDHELM LOH STIFTUNG & CO. KG

RITTAL GMBH & CO. KG

Rudolf-Loh-Strasse 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

Auf dem Stützelberg 35745 Herborn, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2772 505-0 www.rittal.com

An der alten Ziegelei 2 40789 Monheim am Rhein, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2173 3964-0 www.eplan.de

Rittal – The System. Faster – better – worldwide.

Eplan – efficient engineering.

KIESLING MASCHINENTECHNIK GMBH

STAHLO STAHLSERVICE GMBH & CO. KG

LKH KUNSTSTOFFWERK GMBH & CO. KG

Mainstraße 20 63128 Dietzenbach, Germany Phone +49 (0) 6074 8290-0 www.kiesling.net

Kasseler Strasse 27 35683 Dillenburg, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2771 302-0 www.stahlo.de

Auf der Birke 2 56412 Heiligenroth, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2602 99942-0 www.lkh-kunststoff.de

Kiesling – We automate the panel building.

Stahlo – Processing steel straight from the line.

LKH – We make more out of plastic.

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EPLAN SOFTWARE & SERVICE GMBH & CO. KG

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EDITORIAL

AN INTERCONNECTED REVOLUTION

Dear Readers, Industry and IT are growing closer together. The spring trade fairs CeBIT and the Hannover Messe shone a light on this trend. Industry 4.0 isn’t just a trendy slogan – it represents a revolution. Before there were visionary ideas but no specific concepts about how information from machines, machined parts and components could be exchanged in real time. Now this has become possible through embedded software – integrated, intelligent software that networks production processes. The opportunities are enormous, and the efforts pay off: Industry 4.0 is expected to achieve productivity increases of up to 30 per cent. The interview with Rob van Kranenburg, a pioneer of the “Internet of Things,” elucidates how industrial customers and even end-users can become part of the production chain. Eplan, Rittal and the company Kiesling, which we recently acquired, vividly demonstrated at the Hannover Messe how customers can be chaperoned along the pathway to Industry 4.0: the interconnection of Eplan’s software platform with Rittal’s complete enclosure system and Kiesling’s automation technology establishes a powerful integrated network in this sector that is one of a kind worldwide.

FRIEDHELM LOH CEO of the Friedhelm Loh Group

The increasing importance of software and IT inevitably accompanies the growing thirst for more computing power. Up to now data centres have been unique specimens; consultation, planning and the subsequent construction with individual components can sometimes take up to two years. In this issue of be top we introduce the RiMatrix S, a standardised data centre based on a building-block principle: it has just one model number and can be completely installed for the client on-site in just six weeks. “That’s faster than the delivery of a fitted kitchen,” said German Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel in amazement during her visit to our stand at CeBIT. Our report on quality management is at times freezing cold, at times as hot as the tropics. Discover how Rittal technology is put through its testing paces, with nothing left to chance. For no matter the climate conditions, only high-quality products keep customers happy and coming back for more. I hope you enjoy reading this issue of be top!

Sincerely,

Friedhelm Loh

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CONTENTS |

NA M E

16 INDUSTRY 4.0

32

40

RIMATRIX S

QUALITY

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78

ADAPTATION

ENGAGEMENT

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CONTENTS

COVER

EXPERIENCE

16 PRODUCTION IN DIALOGUE

52 HERE COMES THE SUN

Products and machines cleverly communicate with each other on the Internet of Things. The fourth industrial revolution provides companies with the opportunity to position themselves anew on the global market.

The global photovoltaic market is growing – and with it, clever partnerships such as the one between Bonfiglioli and Rittal.

56 MASTER OF ADAPTATION

24 FROM THE LOOM TO THE INTERNET OF THINGS

Rittal developed highly robust outdoor enclosures for operation in extreme climate zones. They protect against swings in temperature and high amounts of dust.

Digital networking is leading to an industrial realignment 250 years after the onset of the industrial revolution.

64 SPECIALIST FOR SPECIALISTS

26 MR INTERNET OF THINGS

Innovations from the platics competence centre LKH makes success for Friedhelm Loh Group customers easier.

Scientist, blogger, author, visionary – Rob van Kranenburg is convinced that the Internet of Things will transform the information society, just like the printing press did in its era. SPECIAL Review of the 2013 Hannover Messe starts on page 68

KNOW-HOW

ENGAGEMENT

32 MAKE IT EASY!

74 A GLOBAL PLAYER UP-CLOSE

With RiMatrix S, the world’s first standardised modular data centre, Rittal offers a revolutionary alternative to customised data centre construction.

Working without borders: how more than sixty F.L.G. subsidiaries form a global network.

40 HERBORN EXTREME

Wheelchair basketball. Everything’s possible for the players of RSV Lahn-Dill: these muscular acrobats just brought the German Championship back to Wetzlar, German, once again.

Nothing is left to chance in Rittal’s quality laboratory: every product must withstand the most stringent testing.

78 CHAMPIONS ON WHEELS

46 COMPLEX, SIMPLE, INGENIOUS! Perfectly fitted housings and enclosures with the click of a mouse: Eplan, Rittal and customers work hand in hand in the RiPrio project. THEMA

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Issue 01 | 2013

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

KNOW-HOW Top quality put to the test EXPERIENCE Clean business with the sun ENGAGEMENT Score with international drive

Friedhelm Loh Stiftung & Co. KG Rudolf-Loh-Straße 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 Fax +49 (0) 2773 924-3129 E-Mail: info@friedhelm-loh-group.com

INDUSTRY 4.0

Production in dialogue Issue 01| 2013

www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

STANDARDS 03 06 12 14 30

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50 60 84 85 86

EDITORIAL SNAPSHOTS WORLDWIDE PANORAMA MAGAZINE

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be top was honoured with the 2013 Fox Award in Gold in the category of Cross Media. Scan it! The current issue is again available in a tablet edition for your reading pleasure.

MAGAZINE THE F.L.G. COSMOS F.L.G. COMPACT & PUBLICATION DETAILS TABLET EDITION TOP PERFORMANCES – BE TOP!

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SNAPSHOTS

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SNAPSHOTS

150,000 manuscripts and more than 1.5 million books are held by the Vatican Apostolic Library in Rome. Now the world’s largest collection of antique and handwritten documents is being digitalised, including the two horsemen with falcons from the thirteenth century (pictured). Rittal constructed the appropriate turnkey data centre for the mammoth project and takes care of maintenance and operations. The library’s holdings include the case records of Galileo’s trial and the Biblioteca Palatina, a Renaissance treasure. The first manuscripts can already been seen online at www.vaticanlibrary.va

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SNAPSHOTS

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SNAPSHOTS

70 sextillion – a number with 21 zeros. According to Australian astronomer Simon Driver, there are this many stars in the visible universe. Although the figure cannot be precisely determined and verified, the methodology is steadily improving. Modern high-performance computers have considerably expanded research possibilities in the areas of astronomy and astrophysics. The computers at the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, for instance, currently have a computing power of 100 teraflops, and this power is to triple – without interruption – over the next two years. Rittal won over the researchers with a modular, scalable data centre solution that, along with providing efficient cooling despite the large thermal loads, can also be expanded while the centre continues running operations. www.iucaa.ernet.in

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SNAPSHOTS

5.7 million hectolitres of beer were sold by Krombacher Brewery in 2012 – a record that goes down easy! And the largest independent familyowned brewery in Germany is on an expansion course. Krombacher’s engineering department maintains an overview of electrical design planning, modifications and documentation with the assistance of the Eplan platform. More than one thousand controls and enclosures are installed on the company ground in Krombach, Germany. For electrical engineering, Krombacher depends on Eplan Electric P8 Professional, which is augmented by the Eplan Fluid tool for engineering and the Eplan View tool for visualisations and documentation. The results speak for themselves.

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SNAPSHOTS

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AROUND THE WORLD

THE WORLD OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP F.L.G. worldwide. F.L.G. is present worldwide as a global player. With more than sixty subsidiaries and with locations on every continent, German ideas are moving out into the world. A selection.

USA WATER BEATS AIR The company Quad/Graphics has broken with its established maxim “No water in the data centre!”. The new large data centre for data management at the world’s second-largest printing and service provider is being cooled with nineteen Liquid Cooling Packages (LCPs) from Rittal. The very high packaging density in the centre required an efficient cooling solution for the dissipation of the high thermal loads. “The water-cooled Rittal systems were the clear winner in the efficiency calculations”, said Rick Thomas (photo), Data Center Manager at Quad/Graphics. The cost savings of the rack-based water cooling are more than 60 per cent compared to the climate control of the previous, smaller data centre.

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Germany COLLABORATION EXPANDED Trumpf, a machine tool manufacturer and laser technology specialist, is esteemed worldwide for its precision machines of highest quality. Rittal and Trumpf have a long-standing partnership. Trumpf regularly counts on Rittal products, and Rittal likewise depends on Trumpf metal processing machines for enclosure production. For its new laser press machine, the TruMatic 6000, Trumpf decided to use TS 8 enclosure systems and TopTherm cooling units.

Germany HYGIENIC DELICACIES To produce its Swabian specialities at impressive speeds, Bürger – the indisputable “King of the German Ravioli” – requires state-of-the-art production processes and process technology that meet the highest hygiene standards. Bürger always counts on Rittal’s Hygienic Design (HD) enclosure systems. The stainless steel enclosures dependably protect the control technology both during the running processes and the daily cleaning.

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AROUND THE WORLD

Switzerland HIGH ALPINE DATA SECURITY The Rhaetian Railway offers an incredible Alpine panorama for its 11 million passengers each year. And it also transports 800,000 tonnes of goods. The security of rail transport is ensured by the Landquart Data Centre, whose IT infrastructure was built by Rittal Switzerland in cooperation with its partners Alpiq and Newave. The centre’s location in a very small, low-ceilinged room and the region’s special climatic conditions required unique solutions for cooling and uninterruptible power supply, and Rittal proved up to the task.

Spain ENERGY FLOW SECURED Naturgas Energia, Spain’s second-largest gas supplier, has more than 9,000 kilometres of gas pipelines. To keep the energy flowing, Rittal ensures that the IT infrastructure is secure and operating efficiently. The data centre of this subsidiary of Energias de Portugal (EDP) combines a secure room and RiMatrix components from Rittal: the eleven server racks are cooled using LCPs and IT chillers. The monitoring solution provides a maximum overview for the administrators, including data about temperature, power distribution components and the uninterruptible power supply.

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Korea RELIABLE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY GE Healthcare counts on dependable IT infrastructure to develop modern medical technology solutions and services. Rittal realised a high-availability data centre for the General Electrics subsidiary in Korea. The highest-possible failsafe performance is guaranteed by way of the rack technologies used and the doubleredundancy of two independent modular power supply systems combined with highly efficient climate control using a circulating-air and cold-water system.

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PANORAMA

THE BIG KICK-OFF Joined by Russian President Vladimir Putin, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Lower Saxony’s Minister President Stephan Weil (far right), Friedhelm Loh opened the world’s most important industrial trade fair.

PLATFORM FOR REVOLUTIONS KICK-OFF OF THE HANNOVER MESSE “We remember the high expectations placed in the 1960s and 1970s on CIM – computer-integrated manufacturing – the connection between factory automation, production planning and production steering,” said Friedhelm Loh during his opening speech at the Hannover Messe. Loh, in his position as president of the German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association (ZVEI) and representative for German industry, continued: “Today we are much further along technologically speaking, and rightfully speak of a ‘fourth industrial revolution’,

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of Industry 4.0.” Joined by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Vladimir Putin as representative for this year’s partner country, his speech marked the beginning of the world’s largest technology exhibition. The central theme of this year’s trade fair was integrated industry, where industry, research and science converge. Keeping to this theme, Rittal – one of the fair’s largest exhibitors, with a stand of more than 2,000 square metres – presented solutions for integrated added-value chains in industry and IT (also see page 68).

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PANORAMA

CHAIN NOW LINKED KIESLING ACQUIRED Kiesling Maschinentechnik joined Rittal International in February. With the addition of this specialist in automation solutions, Rittal is continuing to increase its expertise in switching and control systems engineering. “Eplan software platform and Rittal’s end-to-end enclosure portfolio will be instrumental in serving our customers along the entire value chain,” said Friedhelm Loh on the occasion of the acquisition. Rolf von Kiesling and Dr Thomas Steffen form the new management team for Kiesling, which is based in Dietzenbach, Germany. The company’s core products include machining centres for enclosure assembly, cutting centres, automatic assembly systems for terminal strips, assembly frames and enclosure test units. At the Hannover Messe, Kiesling presented the robot-assisted “Averex” wiring centre: it replaces the time-consuming manual wiring of mounting plates, providing a fully automated system to ensure that connections comply with all standards and safety requirements. Kiesling started out as an engineering firm, developing customer-specific solutions in the area of drive technology. In 1998 the mechanical engineering division was added, along with the first processing centre for enclosure engineering. As a result, all mechanical processing steps in enclosure assembly – such as drilling, thread cutting and milling of cut-outs – can be done in a single step.

HONOURED

TRANSPORT ON TOP

DONATION CAMPAIGN

AXIA-AWARD 2012

SHIPPING PARTNERS RECOGNISED

TOTAL 180,000 EUROS FOR THE NEEDY

Rittal has once again – after receiving the award in 2010 – been honoured with the Axia Award from Deloitte. The company was commended for its great successes in globalisation, branding and company acquisitions. At the award ceremony on 14 February in Frankfurt, Friedhelm Loh said that it is a wonderful acknowledgement and a positive incentive. “Our global positioning has proven itself, especially during uncertain economic times, providing us with a crucial competitive edge.” Rittal’s globalisation will continue apace following consistent principles.

For a company to achieve success around the world, it must engage firstclass logistics. Rittal honoured its best logistics partners for the first time with the Rittal Shipping Award. A total of nine companies received accolades in the categories of “National Shippers”, “European Surface Transport Carrier” and “Regional Carriers and Shippers”. The transport companies were rated on criteria including transport duration and quality, whether customers received shipments undamaged and “Green Logistics”.

As they do every year, employees teamed together with company owner Friedhelm Loh before Christmas of last year to collect donations for the needy. This broad campaign effort gathered a total of 180,000 euros. Loh was delighted with the outcome and took pride in his employees’ willingness to donate: “You are all role models and an example to others, and for that I thank you,” he said. A total of sixteen charity organisations near company sites benefited from the donations, among them the Balthasar Children’s Hospice in Olpe, Germany.

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COVER STORY

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I N D U S T RY 4 .0

_DEVELOPMENT COMPLETE_BEEP_ SERIES PRODUCTION CAN START_

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IN D U STRY 4. 0

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COVER STORY

REVOLUTION LOOKS LIKE THIS! Industry 4.0. Manufacturing of the future talks! Products and machines cleverly communicate with each other on the Internet of Things. The fourth industrial revolution provides German companies the opportunity to globally position themselves anew. Text: Boris Hänßler and Jürgen Jehle

SMART FACTORY Rittal supports research in the SmartFactory in Kaiserslautern. The German Research Centre for Artificial Intelligence tests communication between products and machines.

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COVER STORY

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I N D U S T RY 4 .0

_NOW AT ASSEMBLY LINE_BEEP_ INSTALL BRACKET WITH CLIMATE CONTROL SYSTEM INSTEAD OF STANDARD EQUIPMENT_

B

efore the Hannover Messe even began it was clear: this trade show would be the “big bang” for Industry 4.0. The leitmotif permeated all areas in Hanover. “After steam engines, mass production and automation, experts are talking about a fourth industrial revolution in view of this technical development,” said Dr Jochen Köckler, board member of the Hannover Messe. A month previously, Industry 4.0 was also the defining issue at CeBIT. There the results of a representative company survey were presented that sounded almost like an economic miracle: “Huge opportunities are created when mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and automobile manufacturing merge with the IT industry,” said Martina Koederitz from the BITKOM presidium. But what does Industry 4.0 really stand for? In short, it refers to the informatisation of traditional production processes. “Some companies try to isolate themselves, or only open one highly monitored door to the public, but that no longer works,” says Rob van Kranenburg, innovation and media theorist and author of the bestseller Internet of Things (see interview p. 26). “The Internet of Things will tear down one barricade after the other.” As far as van Kranenburg is concerned, all industrial production as we know it is being put to the test – and companies are facing a technical revolu-

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tion. Uwe Scharf, Rittal’s Excecutive Vice President of Product Management, shares this view: “The great challenges for Industry 4.0 are the control of value chains from engineering to manufacturing, intelligent solutions for the fusion of industry and IT, and vigorous implementation of standardisations as well as energy-efficient production.” GERMANY AS A GLOBAL LEADER So far there have been three revolutions in industry: the first saw the introduction of mechanical production plants, the second saw the creation of mass production, and the third brought information technology into play. Now the fourth revolution is coming: intelligent materials will communicate to machines how and in which form they should be processed. Digital product memory enables complete, uninterrupted documentation across a component’s entire life cycle. Components themselves can initiate service or maintenance. Intelligent components in highly complex facilities can independently report mistakes or defects to monitoring systems and, in doing so, can initiate the necessary steps within seconds in order to avoid damage within the facility and arrange for repairs. Industry 4.0 also makes it possible to produce made-to-order products even within swiftly changing product cycles. “With many mass-customisation vendors, customers aren’t purchas-

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ing the product but instead the manufacturing process,” explains Frank Piller, professor for technology and innovation management at Aachen University. A “smart factory” pilot facility in Kaiserslautern gives an idea of what this manufacturing process looks like. Researchers here test the communication between products and machines – for instance for the filling of a soap dispenser. Each and every bottle that journeys through the facility has an RFID label on it – the acronym stands for Radio Frequency Identification. The microchip with antenna stores information. Already omnipresent in the logistics branch, RFID assigns an identification to every work piece. The information is transmitted by radio as soon as the label comes in the vicinity of a reader. The soap dispenser’s unique product memory – including, for 

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IN D U STRY 4.0

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COVER SNAPSHOTS STORY

_PRODUCTION CHECK IN PROCESS _BEEP_22 SECONDS FOR EVERY PASS _OK_

PRODUCTS OF COMMUNICATION Industry 4.0 products transmit special requirements to the machines in the production process.

_COMPARISON EXECUTED _BEEP_ALL PRODUCTS COMPLETED ACCORDING TO ORDER_ BEEP_CUSTOMER INFORMED VIA INTERNET ABOUT START OF SHIPMENT_

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RUBRIKSTORY COVER | N A M| E IN D U S T RY 4 .0

SHIPPING LINE CONFIRMATION RECEIVED_ BEEP_ NOW LOCATED IN THE LOGISTICS LOOP FOR TRANSPORT_

NEW PRODUCT LOGIC Each Industry 4.0 product is clearly identifiable, can be localised at any time and contains its history along its entire journey.

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_REFILL_BEEP_ GOODS IN STOCK IN UNIT 324 AT 65 PER CENT AFTER DELIVERY_

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IN D U STRY 4.0

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COVER STORY

_CLOSING TIME_ BEEP_ REPORT GOODS IN STOCK AT 10 PM_

production for an enclosure, increase the efficiency of enclosure manufacturing. With Eplan data such as wiring schemas, terminal strips and equipment lists, the wiring robot plans an enclosure’s routing and wiring fully automatically. These examples show that Germany has excellent starting conditions for Industry 4.0 and is doing everything it can to lead the world in this field. The German Federal Association for Information Technology, Telecommunications and New Media (BITKOM) estimates that the world market for Industry 4.0 applications is worth more than 71 billion euros; the German market, at 18.7 billion euros, is the third largest following the United States and Japan. No wonder the German federal government has made Industry 4.0 into the star of its high-tech strategy – and wants to promote it with leading industry associations. Moving forward, the German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association (ZVEI), the German Engineering Association (VDMA) and BITKOM will be opening a joint office; “Industry 4.0 Platform” in Frankfurt am Main will promote the development of technologies, standards, business and organisational models and their practical implementation.

example, the client’s requests – is saved on the RFID chips of a smart factory. The chip radioes the production machines as to which soap is to go into the dispenser, or which colour the dispenser’s lid is to have. The intelligent product even knows its target destination. Switching and control system engineering – and the ongoing value-added it can bring – was on display at the Hannover Messe: Eplan, Rittal and Kiesling presented their integrated process chain – from engineering to robot-assisted wiring. The three steps of the value chain consist of the virtual enclosure engineering with Eplan tools, the enclosure system “Rittal – The System.” and enclosure machining and wiring with automated solutions from Kiesling. The networked software tools from the company affiliate Eplan, which capture all levels of

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GERMANY AS A LEADING MARKET Industry 4.0 is of outstanding importance for the associations. “German industry’s

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leading position in the area of softwareintensive embedded systems must be exploited,” says Friedhelm Loh, owner and CEO of the Friedhelm Loh Group, and ZVEI president. “Together we will make Germany the leading market and go-to provider of innovative, Internet-based production technologies.” The many and varied efforts devoted to Industry 4.0 herald a paradigm change away from centralised factory control toward a decentralised control of the work pieces – a reversal of previous production logic. Production in smart factories first begins when customers make a specific order. Each work piece pilots its own way through the production process; the client is informed about the production’s status at all times. But the factory isn’t emptied of employees because of this; technicians inspect whether the product has flaws. Looking at the data from the network, they decide what interventions are necessary, if any. The system offers its own recommendations at the same time. Industry 4.0 requires complex software programmes. Companies such as Siemens invest half of their research and development budgets in information sciences. Of the 30,000 researchers at Siemens, 17,000 develop software. “Information technology and industry are growing together,” Uwe Scharf, Executive 

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COVER STORY

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IN D U S T RY 4 .0

_PRODUCT 543 SELLS VERY WELL_ BEEP_SEND OUT NEW GOODS ORDER_

_ ORDER WITH SPECIAL REQUEST RECEIVED _BEEP_UNIT WILL BE ADAPTED FOR NEXT DELIVERY_

Vice President of Product Management at Rittal, confirms. Even before Industry 4.0, the company had standardised its portfolio for industry and IT with “Rittal – The System.” In many industries nowadays, power distributors, control applications and IT network technology stand side by side and use the same components. Scharf emphasises, “Industry is one of the largest purchasers of our IT products, confirming that we’ve chosen the right path.” REAL OR VIRTUAL? BOTH! Rittal has been supporting the SmartFactory in Kaiserslautern since its inception. The idea of a pilot plant came from a research team headed by Prof. Detlef Zühlke, doctor of engineering, at the German Centre for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). “In 2004 there were many smart homes that demonstrated what can be networked inside a house,” Zühlke recalls. “We thought that we also need to have a smart factory.” Zühlke sent out an invitation to industrial firms – and there was a great deal of enthusiasm. Scientists and companies founded a support association for the financing of research and a demonstration factory, with additional funds coming from the state authorities, federal government and the European Union. The SmartFactory is the world’s largest manufacturer-independent facility of its kind, where compa-

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nies can initiate their own projects on location. For example, researchers have developed applications with which machines can be controlled wirelessly by smart phones or tablets. Augmented reality apps – the fusion of reality with virtual contents – are trendsetting in this context. One example of such an app: when a factory employee aims her smartphone camera at a machine, parameters such as operating temperature and data about the pressure and/or flow rate are shown on the display. Wittenstein AG is working on implementing Industry 4.0 in an actual production environment. The project CyProS is being sponsored by the German federal government, and partners include research institutions and companies such as BMW, Siemens and DHL. Initially, researchers developed a representative spectrum of cyber-physical system modules for the production and logistics environment: intelligent clamping systems, tool holders and the reference architecture for the software. Next came university evaluations. What ultimately emerged is the technological basis for operation in a real production environment: a “showcase factory” at the Wittenstein site in Fellbach, Germany. “Now the facilities are being used and must operate efficiently,” says Senior Project Manager Heiko Frank.

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“We hope to achieve productivity increases with it.” Yet Industry 4.0 starts well before production: products are constructed digitally before manufacturing starts. Rittal International is also taking a leading role in this area; 3D software from Eplan Pro Panel allows engineers to construct a virtual enclosure prototype. In the planning phase they can check the space for components, add accurately fitted clamps, mount the virtual power supply and thus completely populate the enclosure. Eplan additionally offers interfaces to CNC machines and robot-assisted systems that support enclosure machining and wiring. The requisite machines are offered by the company Kiesling, newest member of the Friedhelm Loh Group. As Uwe Scharf points out, “We are now peerlessly positioned on the market and ideally combine the areas of both hardware and software, using these to address our customers’ needs.” The company is thus supporting its customers not only with products, but throughout the entire process – from the engineering phase to manufacturing and assembly. n

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IN D U STRY 4.0

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COVER STORY

VALUE CHAIN FOR INDUSTRY AND IT

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n keeping with the theme of the 2013 Hannover Messe, “Integrated Industry”, Rittal presented new solutions for integrated value chains in industry and IT. Together with its affiliates Eplan, a leading provider of software-based engineering solutions, and Kiesling, an expert in enclosure processing equipment, Rittal demonstrated what continuous value chains in enclosure manufacturing will look like in the future. Rittal illustrated the full potential of such a value chain with a robot-assisted wiring machine from Kiesling (see also p. 72). The complete Rittal enclosure can be constructed virtually by means of data from the Eplan Data Portal and the engineering software Eplan Electric P8 and Eplan Pro Panel.

Averex from Kiesling – a robot-assisted wiring machine – in action.

The appropriate interface ensures that all of the data for exact clamp placement and proper cabling can be used directly to activate “Averex” and other Kiesling machines. The family-owned company Kiesling, based in Dietzenbach in the German federal state of Hesse, is an internationally renowned specialist in automation solutions for enclosure manufacturing. The company has been part of Rittal International since February 2013. With this acquisition, the global group of companies is continuing to expand its solutions skills for switching and control systems engineering – in accordance with integrated industry and the Industry 4.0 value chain resulting from it.

THE FOURTH REVOLUTION IN NUMBERS Industry 4.0. Germany leads the world in supplying factory equipment. But within Germany itself, people are also consistently betting on innovative technologies. An overview.

INDUSTRY 4.0 KNOWHOW IN GERMANY IN INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON

IMPORTANCE OF INDUSTRY 4.0 FOR GERMANY’S FUTURE COMPETITIVENESS

With 7.8 million direct employees and an additional 7.1 million indirect, as well as a trade surplus of more than 100 billion euros through industrial exports, production industries are the backbone of the German economy. The solutions offered by Industry 4.0 are very important for these branches. According to a representative BITKOM survey,

55 per cent 49 % 42 % 6% 3%

43 % 43 % 8% 6%

Very important Important Less important Unimportant

In the top bracket In midfield Below average Global leader

Source: Representative BITKOM/Aris survey for the 2013 CeBIT, implementation recommendations for the future project Industry 4.0, final report of the Industry 4.0 working group, October 2012

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of those polled find Industry 4.0 to be very important. The global market for Industry 4.0 applications is currently estimated to be worth more than 71 billion euros. The German market, at 18.7 billion euros, is the third largest after the United States and Japan.

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COVER STORY

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IN D U S T RY 4 .0

FROM THE LOOM TO THE INTERNET OF THINGS Paradigm shift. The power loom heralded the start of the first industrial revolution. Now, nearly 250 years later, the interweaving of the physical and virtual worlds is leading to a reframing of the global economy, a fourth industrial revolution.

Industry 1.0

Industry 2.0

James Hargreaves, an English weaver, invented the first mechanical loom in 1764, the “Spinning Jenny.” This loom enabled one man to do the work of eight, but it was still driven by muscle power – until Edmond Cartwright invented the steam-powered loom in 1785. These machines subsequently heralded the age of mechanical manufacturing.

The catalyst for the second industrial revolution came from Cincinnati. There, in 1870, conveyor belts were installed in slaughterhouses to transport meat from one worker to another. Inspired by what he had seen, the German businessman Ludwig Roselius (Kaffee Hag) introduced assembly line production. This principle was improved upon by Henry Ford in 1913, who increased production to such an extent that many companies soon followed suit.

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Industry 3.0

Industry 4.0

Microelectronics and information technology rang in the third industrial revolution with the development of transistors. This development continued in the 1970s with the deployment of industrial robots. By means of circuits, and later software, all machines could be operated using logic and were easy to programme.

The Internet of Things is the beginning of the fourth industrial revolution. This term was coined in 1999 by Kevin Ashton, co-founder of the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). It denotes the connection of the Internet to the physical world. For example, during the manufacturing process, machines, factories, machinery components and devices can communicate in real time via RFID (photo).

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INTERVIEW

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R OB VA N K R AN E N B U R G

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INTERVIEW

AN INTERVIEW WITH Who: Rob van Kranenburg. What: Theorist of the Internet of Things, lecturer at several universities and cultural institutions. Co-founder of the Internet of Things Council and of Bricolabs. Where: be top met with this very busy visionary at his home in Ghent, Belgium.

MR INTERNET OF THINGS Interview. Scientist, blogger, author, visionary – Rob van Kranenburg is certain that the Internet of Things will change our information society as much as the printing press did in its time. For over ten years, he has been observing developments – and the concomitant risks and opportunities. His motto: We all need to help shape these developments. Interview: Boris Hänßler

MR VAN KRANENBURG, YOU FOUNDED “COUNCIL”, A EUROPEAN THINK TANK ON THE INTERNET OF THINGS. WHAT WAS YOUR MOTIVATION? In the late 1990s, some visionaries were already discussing how factory products soon would send out radio waves that told where they were in the manufacturing process at any given time. Back then, RFID was already being used for tolls and in agriculture. Somewhat later, in 2000, I was at a conference in Sweden: “Building Tomorrow Today”. There, around two hundred programmers talked about the future of interactive and collaborative systems

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and how they would impact our world – our homes, our streets, our whole environment. One of the speakers described it in this way: In a couple of years, you’ll carry a Bluetooth ring around with you. You’ll be walking in the woods, and if you want to know something about a tree, you’ll just hold your ring up to it; a screen will appear and tell you all you need to know about this tree. SCIENCE FICTION IN THE WOODS. WHAT DID YOU THINK BACK THEN? I was shocked.I suddenly realised that these new technologies would 

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fundamentally change our world. I also realised that the only people talking about this change were a handful of engineers. That wasn’t bad in itself, but I was sure that these developments called for input from many stakeholders from all walks of society – artists, businesspeople, politicians, economists and everyday citizens from all over the world. We wanted to shape these developments, not wait until the technology one day appeared and only very few people understood it. SO FAR, SO GOOD. BUT WHAT DOES COUNCIL AND ITS MEMBERS DO? Council members try to predict what will happen when we’re surrounded by smart objects in smart houses, smart streets and smart cities. We also run a consultancy – the “Internet of People.” It helps businesses, organisations and institutions as well as individuals to actively shape the changes brought on by the Internet of Things. MANY BELIEVE THE INTERNET OF THINGS IS MORE A CURSE THAN A BLESSING. More intensive collaboration is often seen as a threat to any hierarchical system – that was also the case way back when the Internet came into being. The problem with the public discussion of the Internet of Things is that it spotlights horror stories. The focus is usually on increased surveillance and, unfortunately, seldom on the opposite idea – how it can be used to give people more power. AND HOW IS THAT? You just need to think about the fact that with the Internet, people all over the world have access to the same tools. Everyone takes part – there’s never been anything like it in the history of humankind. Boot your computer and open your programmes. That works the same way all over the world. We’re building an infrastructure that looks as if it’s truly for everybody. This is an amazing development, and it’s this aspect of the Internet of Things that we want to highlight. YOUNG USERS, DIGITAL NATIVES, ARE BASICALLY SUCKLING THEIR BROWSERS FROM BIRTH. WHERE WILL THIS LEAD? A browser is the prototypical collaborative tool – everything works together, everything runs smoothly. But when you close your browser and return to the real world, you notice that everything does not work

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so well there. The younger generation realises that and wants to take the experiences it has made in everyday Internet collaboration and transfer them to the real world – it wants to make the world a little bit more like a browser. From their experience with the Web, younger people know that they have to work together in the real world too, otherwise nothing will change.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN IN CONCRETE TERMS FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY? The Internet of Things is sure to change industry just as much as the Internet did in the 1990s; its role is to bring the end user or client into the closed world of the company. DOES THAT ALSO MEAN THAT COMPANIES ARE GOING TO HAVE TO REPOSITION THEMSELVES IN AN INTERNET OF THINGS AND SERVICES? Industry 4.0 is based on just this principle – clients become a part of the production chain; they intervene and demand constant feedback. Businesses therefore have to change the way they think – they need to invest more in client relations than in the actual product. Service needs to become part of the core business and not classic product sales. Some companies have already understood this – Bosch, for example. Early on, Bosch set up an Internet of Things and Services unit. Stefan Ferber, who heads this unit and who is a member of our Council, was able to show his company that open source development often works a thousand times faster than development in isolation. He found a way to create space for risks, and his company is sure to profit from it. Rittal too – as I see it – is a company that sets long-term strategies and wants to shape developments and not ignore them. These companies are rising to today’s challenges.

CAN YOU GIVE US AN EXAMPLE? A good example of how collaboration furthers developments in the virtual world is the whole open source movement. Without the work of these people, we’d have a very different, much less open Internet today. Similar collaborations are necessary to meet today’s global challenges, such as climate change. WHY ARE YOUNG USERS LESS FEARFUL OF A COMPLETELY INTERCONNECTED WORLD? The world of the Web is more natural to them, more normal. Once I held a lecture about smartphone apps for informatics students. One of the student teams created an iPhone app that warned users whenever they passed one of their Facebook friends on the street. I took the opportunity to ask the students whether they ever approached strangers on the street – to ask directions, for example. They never did. I then asked them to go to the train station and just once approach and talk to a stranger. They refused. Another professor told me that students who worked together on a project didn’t even want to talk on the phone with the other project members – and also avoided personal meetings.

WILL INDUSTRY 4.0 CHANGE THE CLASSIC VALUE-ADDED CHAIN FROM THE PROCUREMENT OF RAW MATERIALS TO THE FINISHED PRODUCT AND CUSTOMER MODIFICATIONS? To some extent, it already has changed. Ownership isn’t as important to the younger generation – a clear trend can be seen in the United States: the Facebook generation buys a lot fewer cars and instead uses car sharing. People no longer feel like they need to have products for themselves alone. Climate change will strengthen this trend. One day it will make more sense to have, for example, washers that are remote-controlled from a central server so that the community uses as little energy as possible. This trend goes way beyond the idea of smart household technology and will also result in people leasing household appliances rather than buying them. They will pay for services, not for ownership

DOES THE WEB DEMAND AND INCREASE TRANSPARENCY? The Internet of Things, the way we envision it, greatly increases transparency, because it is first and foremost about the movement of data. Some companies try to isolate themselves, or only open one highly monitored door to the public, but that no longer works. The Internet of Things will tear down one barricade after the other. People will then be able, as it were, to enter through any window, or any other opening. This transparency is a big problem for some governments, institutions and companies. The young generation no longer believes everything it’s told. They see the real data behind the smokescreen that was constructed for them. All sides are going to have to adjust to this.

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WHAT DOES EACH INDIVIDUAL GET FROM THE INTERNET OF THINGS? I think the most added value lies in a better life – the interconnection of my home, my body, all appliances. Data can help me live an optimised life, as it were, in the sense of a healthier, resource-friendlier, more community-oriented life. But for this to happen, the Internet of Things needs to be trustworthy and secure for all sides. AND YET IT OFTEN SEEMS THAT DATA PROTECTION IS NOT SO SECURE. In Germany, in particular, data protection has been at the centre of most debates. That is good; we need such debates. The Internet of Things only functions with data. Rather than refusing to participate, we need to make sure that the data is transparent so that it can’t be abused. If we can build up an “Internet of People”, Europe will have very good chances of quickly developing both economically and socially.

HOW SHOULD THE INTERNET OF THINGS WORK? I see it like this: the Internet of Things has four levels. The first is the value-added chain, with RFID chips as an example. All objects can be localised; their movements can be tracked and protocolled. Then there is a service level that connects and filters the data in this network for a certain group, which then pays for this service. The next level up is the smart city in which all objects and residents are interconnected, and everything and everyone can interact. The highest level is the interconnected planet. On this level, all natural processes are tracked by a gigantic network of sensors and mirrored digitally in a cloud. ARE THERE ANY PROBLEMS SO FAR? Right now the problem is that these levels are being worked on completely separately. We need a vision for a decentralised system of open hardware and open software so that all four levels are interconnected and interoperable. The members of Council are dedicated to turning this vision into reality. I’m supporting, for example, the start-up CKAB in Paris, which is developing and testing technologies using these principles. n

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY AN INTERNET OF PEOPLE? Essentially it means a network of interpersonal relationships. Our idea is not only to couple people to the Internet of Things, like connecting just any device to a network, but to make people the centre of the network. Already today there is a plethora of data that is being collected with sensors, but we can view very little of this data. In the 1990s, the first trials were run on giving the public access to various data. Some cities tried to provide their residents with real-time feedback on public transportation. The European Union funded research projects such as 2WEAR, ACCORD, FEEL, Interliving, GROCER, ambient agoras and e-gadgets that researched intelligent spaces and wireless applications in vertical markets – that is, applications that are controlled by the public. There is also a social RFID project, Living Memory. In that project, a regional

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community should build a kind of collective memory in which data are shared and jointly prepared. Most of these projects were not on a large scale, because they were for the public but not developed by the public. This top-to-bottom approach is the opposite of an Internet of People.

WHAT PRICE DO WE HAVE TO PAY FOR THESE DEVELOPMENTS? Each side has to give something up: society has to part with some of its privacy, the government with some of its power and businesses with some of their old business models; but in return they all get something they can build together. What is key is trust in the technology, and this trust can only be built when the Internet of Things is jointly developed by the community. We want to foster this climate through our Council.

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BOOK TIP:

The Internet of Things Rob van Kranenburg, Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam, 2007 ISBN: 978-90-78146-06-3 PDF download at www.networkcultures.org

LINK TIPS:

This QR code links to Rob van Kranenburg’s blog at www.robvankranenburgs. wordpress.com This link takes you to the homepage of the Internet of Things Council at www.theinternetofthings.eu

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RED-HOT APP! EPLAN DATA PORTAL As of April, all you need is an iPhone on site at a machine in order to find and order required components during maintenance or in case of a malfunction. With the free Eplan Data Portal App, presented at the 2013 Hannover Messe, users now have mobile access to more than 230,000 parts. Components can quickly be found and selected on location thanks to numerous possibilities for filtering results. Equipped with 3D wiring-plan macros for enclosure assembly as well as a viewer for 3D data, the app is also a highly efficient and valuable project management tool.

TOTALY GLOBAL Around one third of visitors to the Eplan tradeshow stand in Hanover came from outside Germany. Many received informative presentations in their native languages.

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MAGAZINE

COME ABOARD – WORLDWIDE! EPLAN ENGINEERING CENTER ONE The newest version of the Eplan Engineering Center One (EEC One) is finally ready for the world market. For even better interaction of automation at the international level, this all-rounder has mastered four new languages after English and German: French, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. When the EEC One is combined with the Eplan platform, project managers can work together using their own native languages. The new EEC One allows you to put together electronics plans in ladder diagrams or using the US-American IEC standard, both of which can effortlessly be switched back and forth from one to the other, allowing different markets to be targeted from just one data source. Furthermore, users can directly access the Eplan platform’s item database and use that data within EEC One. This capability increases the degree of automation for putting together wiring plans, lowers error rates and results in more ease of use.

SPEEDY ALL-ROUNDER The Eplan Engineering Center One (EEC One) is now available in six languages.

COMBINING FORCES

SETTING STANDARDS

FLUID AUTOMATION

EPLAN COMMUNITY

FOUR-STEP PLAN

TUBING WITH FLUID PROFESSIONAL

Companies are under constant pressure to bring efficient and innovative new machines and equipment to market at an increasingly rapid pace. In order to accelerate development processes, manufacturers of automation technology and users in engineering strive for seamless processes. This mutual concern was worth 100 additional square metres of stand space for Eplan at this year’s Hannover Messe. This “Community of Efficient Engineering” was the first such presentation by Eplan in cooperation with automation providers, key users and software partners. Companies such as Beckhoff, B&R, Festo Didactic, Phoenix Contact and Siemens presented their solutions, processes and interfaces in the area of CAE solutions. “There are great benefits for users from our mutual customers when product development processes can be accelerated through integration and interfaces,” said Maximilian Brandl, Chairman of the Board at Eplan.

Eplan has developed a four-step plan for the introduction of “standardised engineering”. Companies benefit from lower process costs and increased efficiency in engineering. In order to develop organisational and working standards on the process side, one must penetrate the individual steps of the engineering processes and recognise similarities. This process analysis is indispensable before software solutions can even be considered. Eplan’s four-step plan initially incorporates all affected areas as the basis for the change processes. In the second step, product functions are examined from various areas’ points of view. One of the goals is to establish the amount and degree of variance within the rules. This step is followed by an analysis of the reusability of functions and – as the last step – configuration. The four-step plan helps reduce process costs and allows for flexible reaction to customer wishes at any time.

Why shouldn’t a solution for virtual enclosure assembly also work for fluid technology? Eplan developers asked themselves this question, and the results speak for themselves: the coming Eplan Platform 2.3 now has a new “Tubing” function within the Eplan Fluid Professional section. This solution puts together the tubing plans fully automatically on the basis of the fluid plan data and even adds them in the 3D assembly configuration. Project managers can place tubing individually or bundle tubing pathways. They can define pathway influences, such as minimum bending radii that must be considered for positioning. If component positions change after the fact, tubing pathways can be automatically repositioned as necessary and all values are actualised. Another advantage for users is that the system generates a list of all fluid connections, such as piece, tubing and connection lists, for transparent cost analysis.

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MAKE IT EASY! RiMatrix S. With the world’s first standardised modular data centre, Rittal offers a revolutionary alternative to customised data centre construction. Companies save on planning and assembly costs. Text: Boris Hänßler and Jürgen Jehle

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F  

irst the industry specialists came in droves to Rittal’s stands at CeBIT and the Hannover Messe; then there was the endless coming and going of political luminaries. What did German Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel, Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk, German Federal Minister for Economic Affairs Philipp Rösler and the numerous interested parties from industry all have in common? They wanted to learn about RiMatrix S, a world first. This standardised data centre, which Rittal is the first company worldwide to offer, may end up completely revolutionising the world market. Due to its modular and pre-assembled construction, smaller and medium-sized companies will also be able to benefit from the advantages of having their own data centre. Data centres are considered the backbone of each and every company. They hold the data – it is where all of the IT services that the company uses converge. But IT infrastructure requirements vary from company to company. Until now, no one data centre resembled another. Manufacturers and customers typically spend months on planning and design; because this process can be quite time-consuming, budgets sometimes get overstretched. The reason behind this painstaking process is simple: as of yet there’s been a paucity of standardised processes and components that are defined and can be called up time and again. MODULAR DESIGNS NEEDED Yet the demand for standardised infrastructure – in which, for example, the modules’ power supply and thermal management are perfectly matched to one another – is there. Not every element in a data centre must be individually planned and realised. As a consequence, data centres will become increasingly similar to one another in the future. Global players such as Microsoft have long since recognised that rapidly growing companies in particular, urgently need a modular concept in which a data centre can easily be expanded using a building-block system. The modular system saves costs in planning, installation and during later operation. But what does that mean? When talk turns to data centres, these days people are more likely to

MODULAR MASTERPIECE A complete solution including server and networking racks, cooling units, back-up energy supply and power distribution, monitoring systems and early fire detection, RiMatrix S is transforming the market.

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speak of a “Rittal System” – the company foresaw many of these developments in the IT branch and has been investing in the standardisation of its enclosure modules for some time now. Rittal presented its TS IT rack last year, a building-block system that was the first of its kind to be suitable for both network and server technology. Now the company has gone a step further and, with RiMatrix S, right away presented a complete, off-the-rack standardised data centre. RiMatrix S is comprised of pre-defined modules of server and network enclosures, climate control, power supply and monitoring equipment – and it’s all available under just one article number in the catalogue. As a result, RiMatrix S fulfils the requirements of smaller and medium-sized companies in particular that wish to construct a data centre as costefficiently as possible or that want to expand their existing one. Rittal thus offers a lowpriced alternative to expensive customised data centre construction. The system isn’t just an addition to Rittal’s range of products; it’s considered truly revolutionary. “With RiMatrix S, Rittal has accomplished a paradigm shift in the IT world – never before has a complete data centre

been available to order under a single model number,” explains Bernd Hanstein, Vice President of Product Management IT at Rittal. With this completely new concept for standardised data centres, Rittal plans to radically change the rules of the game on the IT market. “We are the first in the world to forge this path,” says Friedhelm Loh, Rittal’s owner and CEO. The biggest advantage of RiMatrix S is clear: elaborate planning for data centres is reduced to a minimum. The data centre can be configured, delivered and put into operation in no time at all. The system can be delivered and up and operating in six weeks. RiMatrix S is available in two versions, the “Single 6” with six server enclosures, and the “Single 9” with nine enclosures. It can also be combined into larger units. Interested parties can use the specially developed RiMatrix S configurator on Rittal’s website – so that with just a few data points they can determine beforehand whether the advantages of speedy delivery, simple assembly and standardised processes will indeed pay off. Typically, the standardised data centre is assembled at the customer’s facilities. Customers also have the option of setting up RiMatrix S in a tested, certified Rittal

THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF RIMATRIX S RiMatrix S complements the RiMatrix product line with its building-block principle: complete data centre modules with pre-defined components including server and network enclosures, climate control, power supply, monitoring and early fire detection.

TEN ADVANTAGES IN OVERVIEW 1. A delivery time of just six weeks and quick commencement of operations thanks to 1,000 service technicians worldwide 2. Reduced complexity and qualitytested components 3. Defined and monitored production processes 4. Low investment costs 5. Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) as low as 1.15 6. Tested characteristics and data sheets 7. Simple integration into new or existing spaces with a corridor enclosure for optimal air routing 8. Installation in system-tested security rooms, in existing buildings or as a flexible container solution 9. Simplified delivery around the world through standardised modules 10. Pre-certification of the data centre module by TÜV Rhineland

“With RiMatrix S, we are again setting new benchmarks – and changing the rules of the game on the IT market.” Bernd Hanstein, Rittal’s Vice President of Product Management IT

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MODULE 1: RACKS RiMatrix S comes with a defined number of network and server enclosures based on the TS IT rack.

MODULE 2: CLIMATE CONTROL There is a space-saving climate control system integrated into the RiMatrix S. Server and technology areas are divided into two separate climate zones – the system’s energy efficiency is considered stellar.

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MODULE 3: ENERGY SAFEGUARDS/DISTRIBUTION Security is a top priority with RiMatrix S. A quality-tested system guarantees an uninterruptable power supply. The batteries make it possible to shut down the server safely.

MODULE 4: MONITORING Every component can be monitored through the CMC III monitoring system, which processes sensor data and can independently inform the IT team.

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DELIVERED FASTER THAN A KITCHEN

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erman Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel was impressed with the innovative drive of the familyowned company Rittal during her visit to the company’s stand at the 2013 CeBIT with Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. She was especially fascinated with RiMatrix S, a world first. Rittal’s standardised data centre can be completely up and running within six weeks. “That’s faster than the delivery of a fitted kitchen,” Merkel said in amazement. Prime Minster Donald Tusk was pleased to note Rittal’s engagement in CeBIT partner nation Poland. Rittal has had a subsidiary in the country since 1999: Rittal operates a large logistics centre in Poland, and together with the affiliate company Eplan it employs about 100 people in the country. Rittal has already installed systems technology in Poland worth more than 181 million euros.

VIP VISITORS AT RITTAL German Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel received an explanation of the world-first RiMatrix S from Friedhelm Loh, Bernd Hanstein (far left) and Christoph Caselitz (far right) and was impressed by the innovation.

security room; with this option, the data centre is supplemented with a security room that provides additional security against fire, water and smoke. There is also a container solution so that the off-the-shelf data centre can be installed outside. FASTER ASSEMBLY Although RiMatrix S is a complete data centre, it is also an attractive option for companies that plan to retrofit or reorganise their data centre. So that the limitations for customers and employees remain in check, operators normally set a target date on which they combine the retrofitting with the maintenance work required up to that point in time. In this respect, RiMatrix S has the great advantage of considerably quicker assembly that is less complicated than comparable constructions of individual enclosures. This advantage substantially reduces the time for the retrofitting work. Another plus is the low operating costs that can be calculated ahead of time: Rittal provides a defined promise of performance for the power usage effectiveness (PUE) value. The Green Grid Organisation introduced this value in order to improve energy efficiency in the IT branch. It relates the overall energy

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used in the data centre to the energy use of the actual computers. It’s a bad sign if the PUE value is greater than 3, because this means that more than two thirds of the energy is used for climate control and an uninterruptible power supply – as an example – and just one third for the computing power. In general, PUE values of 1.3 are considered ideal. “If the server module is run with a Rittal cooling unit, we guarantee an excellent PUE of as little as 1.15,” says Bernd Hanstein. In other words, for each kilowatt of power that the servers use, additional energy consumption is just 15 per cent. Interested parties can carry out their own individual efficiency calculation using the selector on the RiMatrix S website. Rittal placed great value on energy efficiency when developing their ready-made data centre. For instance, the RiMatrix S project included findings from research and development projects such as the AC4DC – Adaptive Computing for Green Data Centers. The IT2Green initiative, sponsored by Germany’s Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology, researched how energy efficiency could be increased from vendors to end users through intelligent computing load management and infrastructure

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ON CLOUD NINE Innovo Cloud. Cloud computing for small and medium-sized businesses – Rittal and Innovo Cloud offer an innovative solution for this need. Instead of outsourcing the data, only the services are outsourced – in doing so, the idea thus combines data security with the flexibility of the cloud.

C

loud computing for small and medium-sized businesses – Rittal and Innovo Cloud offer an innovative solution for this need. Instead of outsourcing the data, only the services are outsourced – in doing so, the idea thus combines data security with the flexibility of the cloud. IT infrastructure is indispensable for companies, yet smaller companies especially often do not have the resources needed for professional information technology. For this reason, many are turning to cloud computing – to the outsourcing of hardware and software to service providers that are to ensure the system’s security and reliability. Demand is growing: market research shows that German companies have already invested 4.61 billion euros for cloud technologies and corresponding services, amounting to almost 5 per cent of IT expenditures in Germany. However, many companies are reluctant to save their data in the cloud – the fear of losing control is too great. “Small and me-

dium-sized companies want to use the technological possibilities, yet don’t want to share their data outside the company,” explains Hermann-Josef Lamberti, an advisory council member of the Frankfurtbased start-up Innovo Cloud. Working together with Rittal, the company devised a solution for this problem: Rittal provides the standardised components from the new RiMatrix S product line, while Innovo Cloud contributes the appropriate cloud computing hardware and software. The hardware is installed locally. Critical data thus remain within the company. At the same time, Innovo Cloud utilises standardised open source hardware and software components that they get from various partners, which results in cost advantages as compared to cloud solutions from a single manufacturer. This approach makes Innovo Cloud the only provider to establish a private cloud solution for small and medium-sized companies with the assistance of standardised

INNOVO CLOUD COMPACT Who is behind Innovo Cloud? Innovo Cloud is a young start-up company based in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, which sprung from the “Frankfurt Cloud” research project at Goethe University. Are data in the cloud secure? Isolated components in the enclosure guarantee that Innovo can manage the data but not have direct access to them. How long does it take before such a system is up and running? Delivery time is just six weeks. Upon delivery, the system is quick to assemble, usually within two business days. Would this solution make sense for smaller businesses, such as a solicitor’s office? The “cloud in a box” can easily pay off for companies with between 30 and 40 employees.

THE INNOVO CLOUD MANAGEMENT TEAM Stefan Sickenberger, Patrick Falk von Salm, Dr Sebastian Ritz and Hermann-Josef Lamberti (left to right).

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hardware and software components. “What the customer receives is virtually a complete IT department out of a box, including the hardware, software and complete service,” says Innovo Cloud CEO Patrick Falk von Salm. “Our partners bring the expertise and the products, for instance document management systems and financial accounting. Customers can flexibly use the offerings as needed – scale them – and save costs in the process.” Isolated components within the enclosures guarantee that Innovo Cloud manages customer data but cannot directly access it. The Innovo Cloud Container (iNNOVO MCC) for small and medium-sized companies – based on the RiMatrix S container solution – thus offers companies a secure and simple option for accessing this type of IT management. The jury for the Frankfurt Founder Prize was also impressed: at this year’s competition, with prize monies totalling 30,000 euros, Innovo won second place. n

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management. The operation of an ICT system – from user to terminals (PCs), data centres, data networks and even energy suppliers – was optimised across the board. What is more, RiMatrix S is exceedingly flexible. Customers can connect further resources without a problem thanks to clearly defined energy transfer points, thermal management and networking. Uniform components simplify mechanical assembly as well as system maintenance and management. Administrators can use the same monitoring and inspection tools for every RiMatrix S – even when the module is installed at a different location. This capability reduces training times and lowers the pressure on service and IT management. “With RiMatrix S, the return on investment is reached faster, and the time to presence on the market is minimised,” Hanstein says. The RiMatrix S components can be monitored by Rittal’s Computer Multi Control (CMC) III. Rittal offers a large selection of sensors that can be connected to the system: infrared access sensors, leakage sensors, smoke alarms, humidity sensors and airflow monitors. CMC III collects the data using an intelligent bus system and makes them available to network management for further processing. The CMC III also operates autonomously and can, for instance, sound alarms or notify predetermined contact persons. RiMatrix S is without a doubt unparalleled – and follows Rittal’s credo of setting new benchmarks in data centre construction. Rittal’s Chief of Customer Operations Christoph Caselitz says, “We want all of our customers to benefit from minimal planning efforts, short delivery and assembly times, and getting the centre up and running quickly.” ■

PARTLY CLOUDY According to a 2012 BITKOM survey, 65 per cent of large companies with 2,000 employees or more were already using cloud computing. For small and medium-sized companies with between 100 and 1,999 employees, the figure was 45 per cent. BITKOM President Prof. Dieter Kempf has said, “Cloud computing brings tangible benefits: You get better IT performance at lower prices.”

FIGURES FOR THE CLOUD The market for cloud computing in Germany will grow to

7.8 billion euros in 2013 Compared to 2012 this is an increase of

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47 %

LINK TIP:

Scan this QR code to learn more about RiMatrix S

Forecasts suggest that by 2016, cloud services revenues could reach

20.1 billion euros German companies are already investing

4.6 billion

euros in cloud services

63 % of companies in Germany expect to reduce outlays for IT Source: www.bitkom.org

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240

l/min

At full force: Around 240 litres of water slam onto the enclosure’s exterior during the water-jet testing in Rittal’s quality laboratory – please note, this is per minute. The enclosure must withstand this extreme stress without letting one drop into the interior.

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HERBORN EXTREME Put to the test. From icy cold to tropical heat – devices are put through their paces in Rittal’s quality laboratory, where nothing is left to chance. The products are put to use around the world only after withstanding the most stringent tests. Text: Robert Sopella

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RUBRIK KNOW-HOW WISSEN | NA Q|UA MQE LU ITÄT A L IT S MA Y MNAN A GE AGE M EME N TN T

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mbar

Enclosures are sprinkled with talcum powder, under negative pressure of 20 millibars, in order to simulate the most adverse conditions. It’s just one of the ways Rittal ensures that no specks of dust can get inside.

I

t whooshes, hisses and bangs. About 240 litres of water – a whole bath full – shoot out of the hose into the room every minute. The jets of water hammer the Rittal SE 8 enclosure, pummelling it from all sides. Later, after 45 minutes and almost 11,000 litres, the water-jet test in Rittal’s testing laboratory in Herborn, Germany, is completed. The SE 8 remained watertight. The sealing system proved its reliability, the welding seams and seals all held, and not a drop of water managed to get into the interior. Hans-Joachim Becker, Rittal’s Director of Quality Management and head of the test laboratory, is satisfied. “The test impressively demonstrates that our products function flawlessly even under extreme conditions,” he says. Top quality is compulsory for all Rittal products because they ultimately are used all around the world in a wide variety of climatic conditions – from office buildings in megacities to drilling platforms on the high seas. These sorts of protection category tests, which assess to

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growing spectrum of products,” says Dr Martin Lang, Rittal’s Executive Vice President Quality Management & Service. “Together they continuously pose new challenges for our testing facilities.”

what extent foreign matter and water can enter products, play an important role in the quality lab. Aside from the water jets, these tests include a dripping-water test and a continuous rain test that lasts over four hours. “A product can be approved for customer use only once it has passed these stringent tests,” says Becker, who has been working in Rittal’s quality laboratory for eight years. The process can take several weeks due to the multitude of tests. The saltwater spray tests alone – for enclosures being used outdoors – take longer than 720 hours. The various sections of the independently accredited quality laboratory in Herborn conducted around 1,100 testing assignments last year. In an additional 1,500 initial sample tests the engineers examined components from suppliers. It’s no easy task, for the requirements continue to increase, as do the number of testing assignments. “This is due firstly to the fact that our products offer more and more features, and secondly to the

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STRESS TEST IN THE “SHAKER” Almost every situation can be simulated in the lab. Specially trained engineers, 25 in number, examine enclosure resilience by running a series of comprehensive mechanical tests. In special tension and pressure tests they put up to five tonnes of weight on the test object. Electronic displacement transducers and strain gauges measure and record the smallest of movements on the components. The enclosure’s mechanical stability is also examined by means of an impact test in which a ball of a defined weight hanging from a pendulum strikes the enclosure’s exterior. Another testing station has a vibration plate and the shaker, which simulates the dynamic stresses to which the product will be subjected. “Continuous tests on the shaker ensure that

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Ongoing optimisation of testing methods and constant consultations within the team are part of the daily working routine of Dr Martin Lang (pictured at right), Rittal’s Executive Vice President Quality Management & Service.

our products don’t lose any of their functionality even after lengthy transport or when they are used on high-speed railway tracks where passing trains can subject them to enormous vibrations,” Becker explains. This test allows vibration conditions to be assessed beforehand, so that they can either be eliminated through design measures or be reduced to tolerable levels for the materials. Three environmental chambers are used to simulate different weather and climate zones – from Arctic frost to tropical heat, or from –40ºC to 90ºC and an atmospheric humidity of up to 95 per cent. The products must ultimately be able to function perfectly everywhere. As an example, while it can be important for outdoor applications to efficiently reduce high humidity without condensate building up inside the enclosure, for indoor use – for instance in data centres – the main issue is dissipating the servers’ high amount of heat loss. “We had to considerably expand the cold water supply for the environmental chambers so that we

could test the broad range of applications for our cooling units,” Becker says. Now the chambers can simulate heat loss of up to 200 kilowatts. The expansion proved necessary because the demands on climate control equipment have considerably increased over the past five years, especially for IT applications, and will continue to rise. Just a few years ago, each server rack in a data centre lost about 5 kilowatts as heat; nowadays a similar configuration must dissipate between 20 and 30 kilowatts of heat through the cooling units – the amount of energy necessary to heat and provide hot water for a single-family home. Beyond the functionality tests for the cooling units, the engineers also conduct stress tests in the environmental chambers for the materials used within the enclosures. Testing specialist Dr Lang explains, “We test, for instance, how a sealing gasket reacts to changing climatic conditions or whether adhesives hold.” Alongside the purely mechanical and functional tests, engineers pay close atten-

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tion to products’ noise generation during operation. It is examined and optimised in the acoustic chamber, with various methods used to measure noise level and noise intensity. “These acoustic measurements are also conducted throughout the design process,” Becker explains, “allowing us to minimise them as products are developed.” PLUNGE TEST IN THE IMMERSION POND Rittal can conduct all established norm testing (see the info box on p. 45) – in accordance with IEC, EN and UL 50E – in its quality laboratory, including the IPX7 protection category, which ensures protection against water ingress upon immersion. “We can’t do this in the lab,” Becker says with a grin. “We have to borrow the immersion pond of our company’s fire brigade.” In addition to testing for moisture, tests for aridity and dust are also conducted. For protection against foreign matter, for instance, Rittal tests its products to the highest protection category, IP6x, which designates completely dust-proof

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°C C

Temperatures of –40°C to 90°C and an atmospheric humidity of up to 95 per cent can be simulated in the quality laboratory’s three environmental chambers.

products. In order to ensure that the components installed in the enclosures function flawlessly even in the most adverse environments, the dust test is also carried out under 20 millibars of negative pressure. “This verification is indispensable, especially for environments with a high amount of dust, for example the timber processing industry or at cement plants,” says Martin Lang. The look of the equipment is also tested: colour, gloss, structure and lacquer. “We want to guarantee to our customers that our products maintain both their functionality and their look, even after years of service,” Becker emphasises. That is why the surfaces and paints are examined using spectrophotometry and gloss level measurements, and are further treated with solvents, acids, alkaline solutions and detergents in order to test chemical resistance. That way the quality of the surface coating is continually being optimised. Ongoing improvement to the three-step paint finish – which includes nano-ceramic

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pre-treatment, electrophoretic dipcoat priming (also used in the automobile industry) and the final powder coating – means that corrosion resistance and durability are ensured even in extreme environmental conditions.

intensive stress tests. “Our products must satisfy our customers’ high demands, even down to the most minute details,” says Dr Lang. Summarising, he continues: “We consider our customers to be partners who decide on the success of our company. That’s why our products must offer them clear advantages – especially in technical execution and quality.” n

BUCKSHOT TESTING Outdoor applications, on the other hand, place very different demands on the paint finish. Along with the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight, the enclosure surfaces are subjected to other highly corrosive influences, depending on where the enclosures are used. As an example, gravel and stones thrown up by tyres pose an additional challenge to the paint. “We test corrosion resistance within the scope of our condensation testing, in an atmosphere containing sulphur dioxide, as well as in the salt spray test,” Becker says. Rittal conducts gravel impact tests in a multi-impact tester. Even smaller components such as washers, screws and hinges are subjected to

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ONLY THE BEST PASS THE TEST

he quality laboratory at the company headquarters guarantees the highest standards and provides the basis for the impressive customer satisfaction rates. The lab, accredited by DAR/UL/CSA and certified in accordance with DIN EN ISO 17025, has 25 employees. Each section is managed by an engineering specialist. In the 17 testing chambers, products are tested for quality and reliability in accordance with national and international standards, customer requirements and Rittal manufacturing standards. In 2012, around 1,100 internal company testing assignments were carried out, along with 1,500 initial sample tests of supplier components. One main focus is the protection category tests that examine to what extent foreign matter and water can enter the products.

Enclosures are classified by codes that include the abbreviation IP (ingress protection) and a two-digit number. The numbers represent the type and degree of protection. The first of the two – from zero to six – describes protection against impact and against foreign matter ingress; the second – from zero to nine – represents protection against water ingress. The higher the numbers, the greater is the protection. Rittal manufactures products up to the IP69K protection level, meaning the enclosure is dust-proof and protected against an intense water jet (i.e., high-pressure steam jet cleaners). LINK TIP:

You can find an overview of the IP protection categories at: www.rittal.com

Non-stop monitoring is essential at Rittal; over 1,100 internal tests were conducted last year.

TREND: ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT Quality management. Companies will only be able to fulfil high customer expectations by making ongoing improvements to all products and service offerings. How is Germany doing in this area? A quick overview. “Made in Germany” represents quality and functionality. The origin of this identifier can be found in a British law from

Of 500 German companies surveyed…

37 %

have their own QM department with several employees.

1887

26 %

have one employee who, along with her regular job responsibilities, is also in charge of the QM department.

19 %

In 2012, the total number of initial sample tests and testing reports in Rittal’s laboratory was

2,524

have just one full-time QM

manager.

On average, German companies spend only about 20,000 EUROS on QUALITY MANAGEMENT TRAINING per year, although the topic is considered extremely relevant by most everyone. Source: German Quality Association (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Qualität)

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THE MAIN REASONS FOR CUSTOMER LOSS

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68 % 14 % 9% 5% 3% 1%

Poor service quality Poor product quality Wrong pricing policies Change of purchasing habits Relocation Other

Source: German Service Quality Initiative (Initiative Servicequalität Deutschland)

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3. CREATION OF PRODUCTION DATA Once customer requests have been noted and the order is made, the production process begins automatically.

1. VIRTUAL CONFIGURATOR Our pre-selection tool makes it easier to find your way among 5,700 different items.

2. ENCLOSURE DESIGN Choose size, set drill holes and select a finish as well as accessories at the touch of a button.

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COMPLEX, SIMPLE, INSPIRED! Simple complexity. Eplan, Rittal and our customers work hand in hand in the RiPrio project. Fast and uncomplicated solutions for perfectly fitted enclosures are now possible with only a few clicks of the mouse. Text: Thomas Schneidewind and Jürgen Jehle

E

very customer appreciates transparency. And when transparency also means finding the right product faster, innovation and a competitive advantage are united. Take the example of a built-in kitchen. Let’s assume a customer uses a large furniture store’s online configurator to plan his dream kitchen from the comfort of his own home. He plans it according to his own individual desires, and is satisfied with the end result. The probability that he’ll buy the kitchen is relatively high. This principle is behind Rittal’s RiPrio project – even if it’s much more complex. Up to now, customers had to refer to Rittal’s 838-page product catalogue if they needed racks and enclosures including accessories. With 5,700 items, that’s a time-consuming search, and finding the right parts among such a variety of products is often an arduous task. To simplify planning and acquisition, since 2010 Rittal has been developing RiPrio – a virtual product configurator that shows which elements fit which base application. This tool makes timeconsuming searches a thing of the past, as RiPrio’s pre-selection guides the customer to the best solution. “We’re talking about more than 350,000 technical data sets – mostly 3D models, 2D drawings and parts lists – that we need to manage,” explains Bernd Lehnert, Director R&D at Rittal in Herborn, Germany, and responsible for technology and support. These data sets are at the core of RiPrio’s product configurator. The configurator helps customers find their way within the

4. ENCLOSURE DELIVERY Shortly after the order is made with RiPrio, the custom-made solution is delivered.

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product range and offers different variants of each product with suitable accessories. At the touch of a button, the enclosure’s measurements can be changed, different doors and locks can be added, and paint finish varied. But that’s not all. After the enclosure is designed and the order is made, the commission goes directly into production because the configurator also creates the data needed for manufacturing. INSTANTANEOUS PRODUCTION Complex processes are thus made as simple as possible. “I believe it’s important for management to think about the issue of complexity. Companies that don’t ask themselves this question are at some point buried under their own complicated structures and products. That’s why we decided to digitalise our entire product portfolio and all concomitant processes in the areas of distribution, order processing and production,” explains Dr Thomas Steffen, Director of Research and Development at Rittal (see interview p. 49). Scientific studies have proven the truth of Dr Steffen’s claim. Customers more frequently buy a product from the same manufacturer if not only the quality and service are good, but also the effort of ordering is reduced to a minimum. Currently, this process can be used to order simple products. In the future, Rittal will automate its entire product range – from the initial order to delivery. As Dr Steffen points out, “If our customers can  order more easily and the right

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accessories are automatically recommended, it’s a decisive advantage for them.” THE POWER OF COMBINED KNOW-HOW As Dr Steffen points out, the role models for this process chain are the Web configurators of automobile manufacturers. However, they have no automated process for ordering and production. A clear disadvantage, because a dream car designed in the virtual world can only go into production if the customer visits a dealer. RiPrio doesn’t have this problem. The configurator creates not only the order, but also and simultaneously the data needed for order processing and production. This process is much more complex and sophisticated, because production data must also be included in the system. “Our goal is to be able to automatically generate all technical order data,” explains complexity expert

Our system automatically proposes matching accessories because the customer doesn’t always realise all of his options,” Steffen explains. What is needed is variety management, standardisation and intelligent configuration so that both sales and processing can work efficiently. By now, almost all Rittal departments are integrated in the project. Whether distribution, order processing, design, production or controlling, employee know-how from all departments goes into RiPrio. Or, as Thomas Steffen succinctly puts it, “The project is like an enormous magnet that draws know-how and data from the entire company and brings it together.” Rittal has had an electronic product catalogue for quite a while, and configuration in itself also is not new. Customers can already put items together online. But until now, there was no connection to the company’s other IT systems. “We need interfaces between

Dr Steffen. That’s why the Eplan configurator is only an optical surface behind which innumerable data from the entire organisation are stored. “In a complex product world, we have to offer our customers well-defined solutions.

different IT applications, and we need uniform data,” Dr Steffen stresses. In many cases, RiPrio causes workflow readjustments. As soon as data and production processes are captured, the question arises as to how they can be optimised.

Make Make

That’s why RiPrio is more than just a configurator. It’s an efficiency programme. All relevant processes in design, distribution and production undergo analysis and are optimised by Rittal if need be. Cutouts provide a perfect example, or rather the online configuration of cut-outs for front, side or rear panels. To date, if a customer wanted a custom-made cut-out, the design department needed to be involved. In the future, employees in distribution will also be able to meet this need with the aid of the configurator. All of the data needed for manufacturing are automatically created by the system. While the product data for the entire product range of the Herborn company is being transferred to the Eplan Engineering Center (EEC), the production data will continue to be managed using a SAP configuration solution. In order to make accessible both the data needed for the product configuration and the technical data needed for production, Rittal is installing Autodesk Vault Professional for five hundred users across the globe as a product data management solution. Production sites such as Italy and the United States will thus be integrated in what Eplan believes is the biggest Vault roll-out in Europe. n

easy. easy.

RiMatrix RiMatrixS:S:The Thefifi rst rstmass-produced mass-produceddata datacentre. centre. Simply Simplyplug plugininand andit’s it’sready readytotouse. use.

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MAKING COMPLEXITY COMPREHENSIBLE

DR THOMAS STEFFEN President Research and Development at Rittal on complex product portfolios and the advantage of transparency for customers.

WHY ARE YOU DIGITALISING RITTAL’S ENTIRE PRODUCT PORTFOLIO? The RiPrio project began with the question of how we could better organise the complexity of our company’s product range and processes. Companies that don’t ask them-

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selves this question are at some point buried under their own complicated structures and products. That’s why we decided to digitalise our entire product portfolio and all concomitant processes in the areas of distribution, order processing and production.

as a helpful overview of our portfolio, speedy processing of orders and a good cost-benefit ratio. After an order has been placed, the product can be produced and delivered directly, because we’ve also digitalised the production data.

HOW ARE YOU PROCEEDING? We’re collecting all data in a uniform system and in this way bundling all knowledge about our products. Previously, this knowledge was always connected to certain individuals. Soon it will be in one database and accessible through a virtual configurator, which will provide a clearer overview of our product range for both customers and employees and allow us to speed up production processes.

TO WHAT EXTENT CAN BATCH PRODUCTION BE INDIVIDUALISED AND MADE TO FIT CUSTOMER NEEDS? It is definitely possible to integrate individual requests into production efficiently when we know the needs of our customers. What is important is to offer as many potential variations as possible so that these can, for the most part, be automatically integrated into batch production. On the other hand, we have clearly improved our product portfolio. As we continue to modify our portfolio to meet our customers’ needs, we will receive fewer and fewer custom orders in the future. But of course we will always be ready to fulfil customer requests when something is needed that cannot be batch-produced. That is only a question of production technology and of cost – as a rule, everything is possible.

WHAT ARE THE DECISIVE ADVANTAGES FOR CUSTOMERS? Transparency is a key customer advantage. When customers can find the right product and accessories more quickly, it’s a big step forward. What is more, through digitalisation we can improve our internal processes. This improvement in turn provides clear customer advantages, such

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MAGAZINE

IT AT SEA FOURTH SHIP & SEA INDUSTRY DAY The economic efficiency of ships via optimised routes and fleet management is becoming increasingly important the world over. The ongoing development of IT systems, communications systems and software solutions offers great potential in this area. At Rittal’s fourth “Ship & Ocean” industry day on 16 May 2013 in Hamburg, specialists from the maritime sector presented what these solutions might look like and how they can be implemented. Guest speakers included Prof. Carlos Jahn of Hamburg’s University of Technology, who discussed “The importance of modern IT and communication systems in the maritime sector,” and Stefan Pree of Eurogate, who reported on “IT as a competitive factor for ports.”

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WWW.KIESLING.NET NEW KIESLING WEBSITE As the newest member of the Friedhelm Loh Group (F.L.G.), Kiesling Maschinentechnik GmbH has completely revamped its Web presence. The company’s website now uses the group’s corporate design and offers plenty of information about the entire spectrum of services and products: from machining centres for enclosure assembly and cutting centres to automatic assembly systems for terminal strips, assembly frames and enclosure test units. An animated film explains the advantages of the integrated process chain of Eplan, Rittal and Kiesling. The website also includes in-depth information, such as Kiesling’s new twenty-page service brochure and information pamphlets about the Friedhelm Loh Group. “Thanks to the distinctive Internet presence, Kiesling Maschinentechnik is now recognisable as a new member of the Friedhelm Loh Group,” says Dirk Miller, Executive Vice President Marketing at Rittal.

TÜV-COOLED

STRONG PARTNERSHIP

RITTAL FOUNDATION

RITTAL TESTS COOLING SERIES

RITTAL AND ABB INTERNATIONAL

POSITIVE INTERIM RESULTS

In order to guarantee a defined level of performance, Rittal has become the world’s first manufacturer to subject its complete cooling unit series to testing by TÜV Nord, a Germany technical inspection organisation. All of the measurements were taken according to the current DIN EN 14511-2 standards at the testing labs for cooling, climate control and ventilation technology run by TÜV Nord in Essen, Germany. There are clearly defined testing criteria for cooling capacity and energy efficiency. The extensive TÜV Nord testing showed that all cooling units of Rittal’s TopTherm series can achieve the declared performance levels. In some cases the cooling capacity was even up to 10 per cent better than the manufacturer’s stated values. All TopTherm cooling units are now certified with the TÜV Nord seal. At the same time, this seal also means that Rittal is obligated to allow regular testing of its products.

Rittal and ABB have intensified their partnership at the international level. Moving forward, Rittal will be utilising uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems from ABB as standard modules and will also be using ABB services. Rittal has been successfully delivering ABB UPS systems in an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) version for years now. “ABB and Rittal are connected by a successful long-term partnership,” says Rainer Weigle, Vice President of Global Sales & Marketing at ABB Product Group Power Protection. “With this new setup, both companies increase the global growth of these brands in the segment of flexible data centres.” The ABB UPS systems are also used in RiMatrix S, the standardised modular data centre. The two companies expect that this closer cooperation of global subsidiaries – for example through efficient project management – will strengthen their competitive positions on the data centre market.

A year after the first meeting of the foundation’s executive committee and board of directors, the Rittal Foundation reported its first successful interim results: to date the foundation has supported fourteen day-care centres in Lahn-Dill county as well as hospitals in Wetzlar and Braunfels, Germany, with more than 50,000 euros. Supported projects include the initiative “The Little Scientists’ House”, which focuses on scientific education for children, as well as the emergency clinic in WetzlarBraunfels, whose use of micro-cameras can increase the survival chances for accident victims. “We don’t just talk about corporate responsibility, we also put it into practice,” says Christoph Caselitz, member of the Rittal Foundation’s executive committee and Rittal’s Chief of Customer Operations.

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P H OT OV OLTAIC S

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PH OTOVOLTA I CS | EXPERIENCE

HERE COMES THE SUN Solar energy. Drastic losses in market earnings have made the past months difficult for the European photovoltaic industry. The good news? The global photovoltaic market is growing – as are smart partnerships such as that between Bonfiglioli and Rittal. Text: Thomas Schneidewind and Jürgen Jehle

U

nfortunately, doing business with the sun, or photovoltaics (PV), also has its dark side. The European photovoltaic industry has learned this all too well in past years; beleaguered by cheap imports from East Asia, one company after another has declared bankruptcy. Milan Nitzschke, spokesman of EU ProSun, the joint initiative of EU solar companies, sums up the situation as follows: “China has adopted a five-year plan for its solar industry. Anyone who makes a solar panel in China receives state subsidies and can of course export much more cheaply.” As a result, more than 80 per cent of newly installed solar panels in Germany are from Asia. In contrast, Germany holds a leading position in power electronics for photovoltaic plants. But competition is continuously growing in this branch as well. One possible answer to this increased pressure is specialisation and concentration on global boom markets – and offering top-of-the-line service. Rittal and Bonfiglioli – both owner-operated businesses – have chosen precisely this path. Bonfiglioli, an expert in power inverters

SOLAR POWER FOR THE WORLD In 2012, around 30 gigawatt of solar power output was newly installed worldwide. The most important markets are in Europe, the United States and Asia.

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and high-tech electronic components, is cooperating with Rittal for its expertise in enclosure systems. Power inverters are a key element of solar panel systems. Because the electricity that comes out of wall sockets is alternating current, inverters are needed to convert the direct current produced by solar panels. Bonfiglioli entrusts its inverters to Rittal enclosures.

ter all, pressure to innovate in this market is high, and the competition is always quick to catch up to any technological advantage. That’s why Rittal’s cooperation with Bonfiglioli begins in the developmental stages. Engineers from both firms work

INCREASING PRESSURE TO INNOVATE Key to this partnership is the fact that Rittal and Bonfiglioli have a global presence. As an international company with eleven production sites in Europe, Asia and North America, Rittal is able to deliver goods to Bonfiglioli worldwide and to provide the same reliable service at each site. Bonfiglioli also needs a partner for its manufactured goods, a company that is present in nearly all markets to ensure that deliveries are quick and cost-efficient. “We act as a central contact for Bonfiglioli in all markets and can support our client in project management questions,” says Jan Oliver Kammesheidt, Rittal’s Global Market and Key Account Manager for Renewable Energies. Rittal has put together a team just for Bonfiglioli, which consists of employees from the most important sites and from many different departments. Joint efforts with Bonfiglioli now go far beyond the mere delivery of industrial enclosures. Af-

660 million euros; 3,500 employees) is one of the top ten manufacturers of power inverters. The global market share of the company, based in Bologna, is 5 per cent. Rittal provides 100 per cent of the enclosures for the central power inverters.

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Bonfiglioli (annual turnover

together on applications for the solar market. In the end, not only the inverters have to be state-of-the-art technology; the enclosures also must be adapted to the demands of solar industry clients. Climate control plays a key role here, because large solar parks – like Bonfiglioli’s 170-megawatt model project Centinela Solar Energy in Calexico, California – are usually found in places with 300 or more days of sun per year. At such

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P H OT OV OLTAIC S

SOLAR MARKET OPPORTUNITIES The export ratio of German power inverters is estimated to climb to 88 per cent in 2020; the global market share for German inverters is estimated to reach 28 per cent in 2020.

sites, robust technology and on-site support are very important. Not that they aren’t in other parts of the world. Bonfiglioli gains one more advantage from working together with Rittal. “When we want to open new markets, Rittal is already there,” says Robert Lenke, doctor of engineering and Product Manager for Photovoltaic Solutions at Bonfiglioli. Bonfiglioli has been active in the renewable energy market for around fifteen years. Power inverters and photovoltaic components are developed and manufactured by the Bonfiglioli subsidiary Vectron in Krefeld, Germany. The North American market in particular is attractive to the supplier of photovoltaic components. “American projects are much larger than the average European power plant,” Lenke explains. Foreign markets are becoming increasingly important for commercial success. America and Asia are just beginning to embark on a path long tread upon in Europe. New studies have shown that German companies will continue to play an important role on the PV market, as both manufacturers and exporters. The export ratio of German power inverters is estimated to climb to 88 per cent in 2020, and the global market share for German inverters in 2020 is estimated to reach 28 per cent. A sunny forecast, because across the globe there are plans for new solar parks in the works.

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Rittal manufactures indoor and

These new markets provide real opportunities for both companies, because their technology cannot be copied quickly and a good logistics network cannot be built in a day. “We’re able to respond to demand flexibly and to provide local contact people to our clients around the world,” Lenke says proudly. Service and a generous warranty period – currently 25 years is standard – are becoming increasingly important as a key competitive advantage. Manufacturers of power electronics such as Bonfiglioli shouldn’t have to fly in service technicians from Europe. All prognoses anticipate that the photovoltaic market will continue to boom. “The photovoltaic market is known for its dyna-

outdoor enclosures for the

PV market. Other products include compact enclosures for tracking systems and string distribution, climate control concepts and systems, and power distribution components.

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mism and its fast growth,” stresses Lemke, an expert in the field. According to the European Photovoltaic Industry Association (EPIA), in 2012, for the first time, global solar power output reached 100 gigawatts – the equivalent of the annual power output of one hundred large power plants. Currently, most of the world’s solar power plants are installed in Europe, with Germany and Italy clearly heading the list. But the EPIA expects strong growth trends to begin soon in other parts of the world, in particular North America and China. The corporate consulting firm McKinsey even predicts in one market study that by 2020 the power output of all solar plants worldwide will expand exponentially. If this

prediction becomes a reality, the chances for growth in the PV market are sunny indeed for Bonfiglioli and Rittal. Renewables will be decisive in the energy supply of the 21st century, and power electronics will be the key technology – both companies are sure of this. n

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LINK TIP:

Scan this QR code for more information about Bonfiglioli at www.bonfiglioli.com

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M OBIL F K M U N IC AT ION S E UCNOM

MASTER OF ADAPTATION Outdoor enclosures. You need robust technology to make calls in the desert. For a global leader in telecommunications, Rittal developed highly robust outdoor enclosures. They offer protection against extreme swings in temperature and high dust levels. Text: Dietrich Malzacher and Hans-Robert Koch

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MOB ILE C OMMU N IC ATIONS

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urning hot sand, temperatures as high as 50 °C and no water as far as the eye can see. One very special species lives under these climatic conditions – the Namaqua chameleon. To survive in this inhospitable environment, it needs to adapt consummately to the climate and environment. And so its survival strategy is not that different from the requirements for a technological facility that needs to offer climate control and perfect dust protection in an extreme environment. Here, too, the challenge is to withstand swings in temperature from –30 °C to 50 °C. Rittal faced precisely this challenge when it took on the task of developing outdoor enclosures for a global leader in telecommunications. The company was looking for a solution to expanding its mobile telecommunications networks in India and South Africa. To do so, they needed robust enclosures to protect the sensitive transmission technology from these extreme environmental conditions. The decisive question was how to both cool the system and at the same time shield it from dust. Most ventilation and climate control systems require a con-

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EXPERIENCE

nection between the interior and the exterior of the enclosure – a connection that would expose the technology to dust and dirt. THE INTRICATE BUSINESS OF TOP CLIMATE CONTROL One possible solution is the use of air–air heat exchangers. This type of refrigeration technology works with two blowers and a heat exchanger plate. This system has the advantage that, because it is a closed system, the interior of the enclosure is protected from dust. But the disadvantage is that for effective climate control, heat exchangers require a temperature difference of at least 10 kelvin. What is more, the two blowers are very loud and extremely high energy consumers. That’s why Rittal’s experts decided on a less expensive solution using a fan-and-filter unit. This system has the advantage of working with only one blower that sucks the cooler outside air through a filter, directs it to the inside and lets the warm air out again through vent slots. The only problem is that the open system works flawlessly only if the outside air is not too contaminated. But 

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M OBIL E C OM M U N IC AT ION S

KEEP YOUR DISTANCE! A large portion of the Namaqua chameleon’s fighting energy goes towards deterrence. When it becomes colourful, this signals “Get out of here!”. FROM COLOURFUL TO WHITE The Namaqua chameleon (Chamaeleo namaquensis) changes the colour of its skin when the temperature changes. When the sun is burning down and it’s 50°C, its skin becomes white and reflects light.

LYING IN THE DARK On cold desert nights, where below freezing temperatures are the norm, the cold-blooded animals become dark, enabling them to store warmth.

the concentration of fine dust particles in the area is 180 micrograms per cubic metre – five to six times higher than in Frankfurt. At this concentration level, the dust would clog the filter in no time. To solve this problem, Rittal brought a filter expert from Gore on board. In close partnership, the two companies developed an innovative climate control technology which is now proving its merit in India. A FAN–FILTER COMBINATION The results of this partnership are robust filter elements with a high-density weave and a solution for excess pressure that allows air to circulate from outside to inside while the dust remains outside. Although this combined filter and fan has a similar size as the heat exchanger, it has up to three times more cooling capacity and consumes only half the energy, while generating 30 per cent less noise. With this solution, investment costs sank by almost a third. Only service costs are slightly higher, because the filter requires maintenance. The fan motor, however, provides a simple and clear indication of when servicing is necessary; when electricity consumption rises, the cause is almost always a clogged filter.

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Many users of outdoor enclosures are somewhat sceptical about using fan-andfilter units because of the chance of exposure to humidity on site. Rittal therefore subjected all materials and assembly components usually built into outdoor enclosures to stringent endurance tests. No material is used that’s susceptible to corrosion. That’s why Rittal uses only aluminium and stainless steel in its CS Outdoor series. A good decision, because even after months of exposure to extreme test conditions, no surface changes could be observed. This outcome is not entirely surprising, considering the physical properties of the materials. Moreover, the high interior temperature hinders condensation, which could be dangerous for the electronic components. For this reason, humidity is only a very slight threat to the interior workings of the enclosure.

mally used in fighter jets was even used in the test. The results did away with any remaining reservations – the new outdoor enclosures stay dry even in the strongest wind and rain. Fan-and-filter units can thus function effectively when subjected to extreme swings in temperature and high concentrations of dust particles. The only prerequisite is collaboration between partners from the earliest development stages, so that the advantages of the technology can be utilised in full and without restriction. Just as in this case. The jointly developed all-rounder was delivered by Rittal between March and September 2012. Since then, 3,000 outdoor enclosures have been on the job in India and South Africa and are standing up to the high concentrations of dust – just like their living role model at the top of the page. ■

ENCLOSURE STANDS UP TO THE TEST Before building in India and South Africa began, the climate control technology and the exterior protection were subjected to comprehensive testing. To be absolutely certain the enclosure could withstand weather extremes, a turbine engine nor-

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THE OUTDOOR EXPERT IN ADAPTATION

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he enclosures of the CS Outdoor series are made for extreme climate conditions. Special surface coatings make the corrosion-resistant materials even more resilient. Working together with the filter manufacturer Gore, Rittal developed a high-density weave of polytetrafluorethylene for the filter ventilation. The oil- and water-resistant pores of the filter remain unaffected by UV rays and temperature extremes. They let air through, but not sediments. The oil resistance also means that the filters don’t clog and attract dust in urban centres with a lot of traffic. The design of the enclosures has no openings for crowbars or similar tools, and thus helps protect against unauthorised access.

 LINK TIP: Scan the QR code for more information on Rittal CS Outdoor enclosures.

THE DESERT FLOATS ABOVE US Global dust formation. Dust is everywhere and comes from everywhere – but mostly from the Earth’s large deserts. A concise overview. The amount of dust blown in a desert storm is

Dust clouds can cover quite a few square metres:

worldwide even more mineral dust flies through the air. The rough estimate is

Above the Sahara, extreme concentrations of dust are found as high as

100 m tonnes 500,000 2 billion tonnes

5 km

The percentage of sand dust that originates from the Sahara Desert is about

This dust cover blocks a considerable portion of the sun’s rays, probably as much as

60% 25% Source: www.wissen.de

Dust is everywhere: the wind blows BILLIONS OF TONNES, experts estimate, across the globe each year, often for THOUSANDS OF KILOMETRES. These colossal amounts can regularly be seen on satellite images. 01 | 2013

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SOURCES OF DUST IN GERMANY

74,000 t/year 64,000 t/year 33,000 t/year 19,000 t/year 15,000 t/year

Industry Transportation Private homes and consumers Electricity and heating plants Agriculture

Source: German Ministry of the Environment and supplementary sources

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BUSINESS DAYS

GO!

Business Days. The Rittal Business Conference, convened in Wetzlar, Germany, was attended by 320 managers from 52 countries. Held under the motto “Rittal. Go!” the conference focused on goals for the coming years. There were also talks by several guest speakers.

PURE MOTIVATION The event’s motto was expanded on by owner Friedhelm Loh, pictured here with his wife Debora and son Frank, in the final words of his speech: “Go for your future”.

THE CUSTOMER IN FOCUS BITKOM President Prof Dieter Kempf spoke about improving customer satisfaction.

“WE” IS WHAT WINS! A round of drumming illustrated that working together is what makes a company successful.

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GO FOR INNOVATION President of Research and Development Dr Thomas Steffen outlined Rittal’s appreciation for innovation.

LIVING LEADERSHIP Former athlete Boris Grundl disposed of myths about management.

GROWTH CHANCES Chief of Customer Operations Christoph Caselitz is banking on the standardised data centre RiMatrix S.

THE MOTTO SAYS IT ALL Ambitious goals and planned investments of more than 500 million euros were presented in Wetzlar.

DIGITAL NETWORKING Fraunhofer president Prof Reimund Neugebauer sees Industry 4.0 as an opportunity.

THE FOCUSED POWER OF RITTAL Five international Rittal CEOs united: Dr Zheng Qinghao (China), Dr Stephen Hobbs (Great Britain), Douglas Peterson (USA), Marco Villa (Italy) and Ajay Bhargava (India).

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TOMORROW’S SPECIALISTS The Friedhelm Loh Group companies Rittal, Eplan, LKH, Stahlo and Loh Services instruct a total of about 300 trainees in nineteen occupations.

HIGH-FLYERS FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP TRAINEES BID ADIEU At the beginning of this year, thirty-eight young women and men in the Friedhelm Loh Group (F.L.G.) received their completion certificates: twenty industrial-technical, fourteen commercial and four IT trainees. All of them have mastered an important and formative chapter in their lives with their occupational training. “You’re at a great company – take this opportunity to continue growing and developing,” said Michael Weiher, Rittal’s President of International Operations, as his parting words to these young people. During the farewell to the industrial-technical trainees, Matthias Hecker, head of training in Wissenbach, said, “Training with Rittal is something special, especially when you consider that just

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21 per cent of all German companies even offer training.” The Friedhelm Loh Group companies instruct a total of about 300 trainees in nineteen occupations.

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THE F.L.G. COSMOS

EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES MINISTER SCHRÖDER IN HERBORN The number of female managers with technical training is growing. That is just one reason why the Friedhelm Loh Group is engaged in “More Women in Leadership Positions – Regional Alliance for Equal Opportunity,” a programme sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth. “Making family and work life more compatible is very important for a family-owned company like ours,” explains Heike Bingmann, Senior Vice President of Human Resources at the Friedhelm Loh Group. Federal Family Minister Dr Kristina Schröder visited the company headquarters in Herborn, Germany, in March to find out more about the company’s measures. F.L.G. is a partner in the regional Lahn-Dill County network, one of just ten counties across Germany that have been taking part in the programme since 2012.

PRAISE FOR FAMILY FRIENDLINESS German Federal Family Minister Dr Kristina Schröder (fourth from right) with (from left) Maya Heimerl, Angelika Berbuir, Doris Süß-Schnadmann, Roland Wegricht, Dr Thomas Steffen, Heike Bingmann, Dr Helga Lukoschat.

EEC CONNECTS

PLANT VISIT

TOP EMPLOYER

MIND8 AND EPLAN MERGED

VISIT BY COUNSELLING CENTRE

MORE PRAISE FROM THE CRF INSTITUTE

They’ve been working closely for many years. Now the planned international expansion of the Eplan Engineering Center (EEC) has brought about the fusion of the two subsidiaries. Mind8, the specialist for variant management and the developer of EEC, was integrated into the Eplan company structure at the start of the year. “The merger of the two organisations sets the stage for the international EEC rollout,” says Maximilian Brandl, Chairman of the Executive Board at Eplan. Dr Marco Litto, one of the managing directors of Mind8, adds, “We want to roll out the technology of functional engineering on an industry-oriented basis. This requires even closer cooperation.” The management team at Eplan headed up by Brandl will gain reinforcements from the former Mind8 executive board. The EEC development team, based in Stuttgart, will be expanded, and the new branch management will be anchored within the new organisation.

LKH Kunststoffwerk in Heiligenroth, Germany, and Lebenshilfe Dillenburg – a support, counselling and training centre for disabled people – have shared a good working relationship for over a quarter century. Twelve employees of the Dillenburger Werkstätten (workshops providing training and employment) paid a visit to this Friedhelm Loh Group company in March. LKH delivers components for fan-and-filter units to the workshops. The 500 workshop employees build around a quarter-million fan-and-filter units for Rittal enclosures each year. “We are very pleased to be working with Lebenshilfe,” said LKH CEO Dr Guido Stannek during the visit. For him the workshops are “just regular customers” – but the workshop employees are quite pleased about the new supply of components for their work. The quality of the fully assembled fan-and-filter units has always been impeccable. At the close of the company visit, the visitors received a fan-and-filter unit painted bright red, but the filter mat had been replaced with a chocolate bar.

The independent CRF Institute has honoured the Friedhelm Loh Group as a top employer for the fifth year in a row. The institute’s specialists gave the group of companies good notes. Compared to the year previous, the results even improved. The CRF Institute reported that in particular the conspicuous improvement in career opportunities internationally led to the auditors’ even higher evaluation of the Friedhelm Loh Group. Last year a new programme was started for International Associates whereby up-and-coming specialists and managers are prepared for challenging positions on a systematic and long-term basis, including international assignments. Intensified international rotation of employees also brought additional points during the audit. The CRF Institute, headquartered in the Netherlands, was founded in 1991 to provide independent human resources evaluations.

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THE F.L.G. COSMOS || LLKH KH PPROF ROFIL ILEE

HIGH-TECH POWER LKH has more than fifty state-of-the-art, highperformance injection moulding machines. All are networked through a central production centre.

THE SPECIALIST FOR SPECIALISTS LKH Kunststoffwerk. Injection moulding, multicomponents and hybrid technology: LKH, the plastics competence centre within the Friedhelm Loh Group, has built up enormous expertise over the past thirty years. LKH makes its customers’ success easier by continually offering quality and innovation. Text: Beate Schwarz

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ednesday, 17 April at the 2013 Hannover Messe. Rüdiger Braun is satisfied: the Director for Engineering, Sales and Quality Management was just able to sign on the dotted line of a contract that took months to prepare. A large German lighting manufacturer plans to protect the inner workings of in-ground lights with LKH components, eight in total. Braun describes the customer’s needs: “The plastic must be able to withstand a load of 10 tonnes because lorries will be driving over them. And it must be termite-resistant because it’s being installed in South Africa.” The reasons LKH Kunststoffwerk Heiligenroth GmbH & Co. KG received the order are many, but it also had to do with the close cooperation with the material supplier during the production development phase. Early on, by means of mould flow and FEM analysis, the optimal design and the material for the lights were determined and verified using rapid prototyping models. Processing and quality assurance impose high demands. The Friedhelm Loh Group’s plastics competence centre, LKH, has 180 employees and annual sales in the mid-range double-digit millions. The specialist for special requirements doesn’t just manufacture; it also covers everything from engineering to logistics. All of the thermoplastics (with the exception of PVC) are processed using injection moulding and hot-press moulding. LKH is well versed in the three most common technologies – injection moulding, hybrid technology and multicomponent moulding (hard–soft connections) – so that companies don’t have to look for solutions with different vendors. LKH is present in many areas of everyday life. The company manufactures components such as automobile locking systems, housings for induction stoves, water filters and facade panels, as well as special products such as spools for packaging foods, covers for subway power rails and even termite-proof lighting enclosures. “The market for plastic manufacturing is large – and extremely competitive,” Dr Guido Stannek emphasises. He has been running LKH since 2012. In Germany alone there are around 4,200 injection moulders that produce plastic components. Three thousand of them have more than twenty employees. If we narrow that figure down to injection moulders that can manufacture components weighing between 1 gram and 6,500 grams, and that additionally offer development and assembly – as LKH does – approximately 500 German-based vendors remain. “In order to grow here, you must be able to offer customers clear advantages,”

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L KH P ROF IL E

“We examine our customers’ manufacturing and find solutions that considerably increase efficiency.” Stannek explains. LKH meets this challenge by developing special solutions and preparing for the future. One of the future themes is weight reduction. Take the example of car manufacturing: metals aren’t just an expensive raw material, they also require a lot of energy use. That’s why automobile manufacturers are focusing on being able to offer lighter and more economical models. “LKH has been active in hybrid manufacturing for a long time now,” Stannek says. “Not only do we develop new parts; we also examine our customers’ manufacturing and find solutions that increase efficiency considerably.” An LKH task force is currently researching options to replace welding processes. LIGHTER AND MORE DURABLE Where plastics are already being used, there is ongoing testing to make materials even lighter – naturally without any loss in the requirements for impact protection or temperature durability. Large-scale use of thermoplastic injection moulding results in significant weight reduction. Stannek names casings for industrial vacuums and coverings for agricultural vehicles as areas of application. For saving resources, the mono-sandwich technique is interesting. ���Enclosures must be extremely durable, yet

also have an attractive outer surface depending on where they are installed,” says engineering expert Rüdiger Braun. “A top layer of high-quality design material might have beneath it a layer containing a proportion of fibreglass or recycled materials.” In the area of development, LKH works intensively with other companies within the Friedhelm Loh Group (F.L.G.). Services of the group are used for procurement, marketing and the area of human resources. At the Heiligenroth site in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, LKH runs a quality laboratory: 98 per cent of all testing is carried out there, with just 2 per cent in the F.L.G. lab. In the area of process optimisation, LKH employees develop components for and with their customers. LKH opened a new logistics centre in 2012 directly off the A3 motorway: covering 3,000 square metres, it offers 3,200 storage locations. In sales, the plastics specialists bank on regionalisation and cooperation. “Our customers don’t have to deal with changing contact persons,” says Dr Stannek, CEO. n

DR GUIDO STANNEK, CEO OF LKH Stannek has headed LKH since 2012. He is also responsible for supply chain management within the Friedhelm Loh Group.

WHAT LKH MANUFACTURERS FOR WHOM AUTOMOTIVE Chassis components Locking systems Heating systems Preheating units for diesel Air suspension systems Electric components

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ELECTROTECHNOLOGY Power distribution components Climate control units Fan-and-filter units Housings for induction stoves Steering elements Capacitors

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

INDUSTRY Spools for packaging foods End walls Water filters Housings for dualcomponent mixers Condensate collection trays Fastening elements

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Facade panels Drivers for roller shutters Covers for sports fields Covers for subway power rails

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TOP-JOB: LKH DOES IT ALL

ENGINEERING The solutions offered include Mould-flow analysis CAD component design (2D and 3D) FEM calculations Material selection Rapid prototyping (SLA/SLS/vacuum moulding) Manufacturing concepts, plant planning Creation of technical and functional specifications

PROCESSING All parts and modules can be processed or finished on the inline production with

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COMPONENT PRODUCTION LKH focuses on efficient, customer-specific part and module assembly. It accomplishes this with

Precision forms of up to 48 cavities Multicomponent tools (turntables and inserts) Stack moulding Tools using insert-outsert techniques High-gloss tools

More than fifty injection moulding machines and three multicomponent machines Completely and partially automated hybrid technology Process control via the Hydra BDE System Minimised set-up times

ASSEMBLY AND SERVICE LKH fulfils a variety of service requests. A few examples:

Painting, printing, gluing, welding, milling Dual-component foams Module assembly Customer-specific packaging

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TOOL MANAGEMENT LKH has many years of experience in tool construction and tool management and can guarantee short delivery times for

Manual module assembly Assembly according to customer specification on automated assembly lines Specified packaging trays Specified transport packaging with customer label Procurement of additional components

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QUALITY CONTROL LKH is certified according to ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004, OHSAS 18001:2007, ISO TS16949 (in 2Q 2013). For quality management, LKH depends on Employee training 3D measuring machines Camera-controlled production cells Residual moisture measurements Initial sampling according to VDA and PPAP

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H A N N OV E R ME S S E R EVIEW

VERY SPECIAL VALUE CREATION Hannover Messe 2013. Rittal was one of the largest exhibitors at the world’s most important industry trade show. Trade-show visitors and political prominence showed great interest in the integrated process chain and the RiMatrix S standardised data centre. Text: Joscha Duhme

3

577

students came to the Hannover Messe at the invitation of Rittal.

weeks was how long it took to assemble the modular data centre.

I

t’s the industry’s biggest meeting: year for year the Hannover Messe attracts thousands of exhibitors and hundreds of thousands of visitors to its halls. For Friedhelm Loh, owner and CEO of Rittal – one of the show’s largest exhibitors – it’s more than just the most important big event of the year: “The Hannover Messe never ceases to amaze because it allows a glimpse into our future.” With a stand covering more than 2,000 square metres of space in Hanover, Rittal presented solutions for integrated value chains in industry and IT – quite in line with the trade fair’s theme of “Integrated Industry”. That glimpse into the future that Friedhelm Loh mentioned – or, more precisely, the future of switchgear manufacturing – was provided by Rittal together with its affiliated companies Eplan and Kiesling, the most recent addition to the company group (see also p. 72). SHOW WHAT’S POSSIBLE Among the highlights that interested numerous visitors, including German Federal Minister of Economics and Technology Philipp Rösler, was the presentation of an integrated process chain – from development to robot-assisted installation and wiring of enclosures. With RiMatrix S, Rittal also presented a completely standardised data centre (see also p. 32),

STRONG CHAINS Among the highlights at the Rittal stand was the presentation of the value chain in enclosure manufacturing; working in tandem with Eplan and Kiesling, Rittal has the entire process covered.

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H A N N OVER MESSE R EVIEW

1,200 customers and employees of the international affiliates visited the stand.

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2,000 square metres were covered by the Rittal stand.

fully laden tractor-trailers delivered the exhibition materials.

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THE F.L.G.F.L.G. KOSMOS COSMOS | R Ü| C KB H ALNIC N OV K AN E RNME OVS ES REMRESSE EVIEW

TRAINEE INITIATIVE TECTOYOU Every year at the Hannover Messe, TectoYou offers young people the opportunity to experience high-tech up close and in person. The “Rittal TectoYou” team (photo) welcomed around 600 students from nine schools from the local area as well as students from the University of Siegen and Central Hesse College of Technology.

BUBBLING WITH ENTHUSIASM Rittal banks on young talent, including during its trade-show appearance in Hanover – trainees enthusiastically presented product innovations such as the new Flex-Block system.

a world-first that is certain to start a new trend in IT. These developments reflect the aspirations and call for innovation and ongoing improvement that Friedhelm Loh later expressed: “Those who wish to use the opportunities that new technologies provide, who want to break down barriers, to overcome obstacles – those who want to calm people’s fears of technology – must show what’s possible for people in the future.” Loh, in his position as president of the German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association (ZVEI), opened the trade fair together with German Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Russia, the 2013 partner country for the trade fair, is the world’s second-largest market for Rittal. Along with headquarters in Moscow, and branches in St. Petersburg, Yekaterinburg

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“The Hannover Messe never ceases to amaze because it allows a glimpse into our future.” Friedhelm Loh, owner of the Friedhelm Loh Group

and Novosibirsk, Rittal has an additional twelve regional offices in Russia. In 2011 alone, Rittal delivered more than 40,000 large enclosures and 85,000 compact housings to the largest country by area on the planet. Despite the expansion and capture of international markets, Rittal has not lost sight of local young talent. The company participated in the TectoYou initiative at

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the Hannover Messe and invited students and college attendees to the exhibition so that they could experience high-tech up close and in person. Patron of the TectoYou is German Federal Education Minister Johanna Wanka; she also visited the Rittal stand and learned about the occupational training and continuing education opportunities that the company offers. n

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H A N N OVER MESSE R EVIEW

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INNOVATIONS IN PLASTIC Rhineland-Palatinate Economic Minister Eveline Lemke met with Dr Guido Stannek, CEO of plastics specialist LKH – a member of the F.L.G. companies – to discuss recent innovations.

PROMINENT VISITOR German Federal Minster of Economics and Technology Philipp Rösler was impressed by Rittal’s innovative power during his tour of the stand with Friedhelm Loh.

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ADDITION TO THE FAMILY Kiesling. The purchase of Kiesling Maschinentechnik rounds out the offerings in enclosure manufacturing for the Friedhelm Loh Group. With this specialist for automation solutions, the group can now cover the entire value chain in switchgear manufacturing. Text: Joscha Duhme

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t is the youngest member of the family and has already been seamlessly integrated. Rittal International purchased Kiesling Maschinentechnik, which was ready with its presentations at the Rittal stand during the Hannover Messe. The group of companies has thus expanded its solutions expertise for switchgear and control manufacturing. “Kiesling Maschinentechnik pursued bold innovation from the very start,” said Friedhelm Loh, owner of the Friedhelm Loh Group. “By linking the company with Rittal and Eplan, we are opening up splendid chances on the international market for them, and also have expanded our comprehensive offerings for switchgear and control manufacturing with their handling technology.” With Eplan’s software platform and the enclosure systems from Rittal, the group of companies covers the entire value chain in enclosure manufacturing. INNOVATION SETS STANDARDS “We’re looking forward to the collaboration and the opportunity to gain a foothold in the international market with our automation solutions,” said Rolf von Kiesling. He and Dr Thomas Steffen, President of Research and Development, form the new executive management team for Kiesling Maschinentechnik. Founded in 1970, the company’s core products include machining centres for enclosure assembly, cutting centres, automatic assembly systems for terminal strips, assembly frames and enclosure test units. One of Kiesling’s current innovations sets new standards for automation in enclosure manufacturing: the robot-assisted “Averex” wiring centre replaces the time-consuming manual wiring of mounting plates, providing a fully automated system to ensure that connections comply with all standards and safety requirements. The Averex complements the F.L.G. family perfectly (see infographic to the right). n

STRONG INNOVATORS From left to right: Dr Thomas Steffen, Jens von Kiesling, Rolf von Kiesling and Friedhelm Loh are delighted about the affiliation and new innovative potential for the group of companies.

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VALUE CREATION TRIAD

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1 Using the 3D enclosure prototypes and the connection information from the wiring plan, Eplan Pro Panel determines the ideal cabling pathways as well as the lengths necessary for the wires and cables.

If the design conforms to the technical specifications, the “real” enclosure construction with its many components can take place by means of the modular architecture from the programme “Rittal – The System.”

3 The wiring data provided by Eplan and information from the 3D model regarding components and their position on the mounting plates are passed on via machine interface to the Kiesling wiring robot Averex.

EFFICIENT WIRING The average manual wiring procedure takes 180 seconds. The Averex wiring centre requires just 40 seconds.

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A GLOBAL PLAYER UP-CLOSE Working together around the world. Employees of over sixty Friedhelm Loh Group subsidiaries form a network that spans the globe from Singapore to India and Mexico and beyond. Modern technology makes it easy to overcome long distances, and cultural differences are bridged through openness, acceptance and good ideas. Text: Nora F. Scholz

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ompanies that operate internationally need to be able to bridge space and time (zones) around the clock – a requirement that demands stateof-the-art technology and flexible employees. To this end, the Friedhelm Loh Group (F.L.G.) is connected across the globe. “Our IT staff can access any company computer – no matter where they happen to be at the moment,” explains Friedhelm Rücker, Rittal’s Senior Vice President of IT. “And so a team member in Australia, for example, can offer software support to a colleague in Mexico.” WEB MEETINGS Modern technology also makes personal contact possible, so that communication remains smooth on the international level. Virtual meetings, regular video conferences and webinars play an important role in the F.L.G. One example is the introduction of a SAP ERP system connecting forty employees at four sites across Italy in only nine months. This project was aided greatly by WebEx online meetings. “Without this form of international cooperation,” says René Leroux, Director of International Production – Climate Control, “a project of this magnitude could never have been implemented so quickly.” A further example of efficient international cooperation is the “market introduction manager”, that by the end of this year will provide an analysis of the global organisational structures in the twenty countries in which Rittal has the highest sales. This work is taking place almost exclusively

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through virtual communication platforms: joint databases, video and telephone conferences, webinar trainings and a planned e-learning unit to deepen employee knowledge.

important because the F.L.G. is focusing on international markets in order to achieve its targeted level of growth. In the next five years, investments of more than 500 million euros in global manufacturing and logistics are planned. At this growth rate, demands on the quality of international cooperation are continually rising. The Internet is a vital tool in overcoming the limits of place and time; staff can now more easily exchange information and ideas. At the same time, it is increasingly important that employees are flexible and have strong communication and team skills. To this end, not only rules are

GROWTH DEMANDS EXCHANGE Nonetheless, face-to-face exchange of knowledge and arguments remains just as important. In early 2013, senior executives from 52 Rittal subsidiaries came together at a business conference in Wetzlar, Germany, to discuss issues such as innovation, customer management and growth opportunities. This kind of exchange is

EXPERIENCING OTHER CULTURES AT WORK

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ntercultural competence is best instilled on-site and in practice. The Friedhelm Loh Group (F.L.G.) implements this principle through its International Associate Programme. For twelve months, engineering and economics graduates are given the opportunity to participate in different company projects. They work in manufacturing, marketing, monitoring, sales or human resources. At least one of the assignments is completed in a foreign country. Each associate has a personal mentor. Participants regularly share their experiences with one another and also take part in Loh Academy training seminars.

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A ROU N D T H E W OR L D

Almost 7,000,000 people

needed, but also shared convictions. Managers and staff who share their knowledge and work together across borders are also more productive. “Managing our employees’ strengths means, more than anything, turning differences into advantages. Utilising the strengths of employees with different backgrounds – whether young or old, a woman or a man, with a domestic or international background – is what makes our company creative and cooperation more efficient,” underscores Heike Bingmann, Senior Vice President Human Resources. GAINING EXPERIENCE ABROAD The Friedhelm Loh Group International Associate Programme provides employees with the opportunity to gain intercultural experience abroad early on in their careers. Marco-Fabian Inacker, a participant of the twelve-month programme, will soon be leaving headquarters in Herborn, Germany, and going to Shanghai. One of his tasks will be to introduce shop-floor management. To optimise processes in a sustainable way, production workers are involved in defining and solving problems. “In this project, cultural differences are sure to come to light,” says the 29-year-old industrial engineer. He knows that no matter how standardised the processes are – which is vital to quality management – cultural diversity can never be ignored. Employees from different areas of the company take part in the International Associate Programme; each of them has at least

living in Germany come from other countries. Yet in international comparison, German companies still need a boost in CULTURAL DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT.

72 %

of all German companies expect that cultural diversity management will boost their corporate image; 67 per cent believe that it will increase customer satisfaction.

83 %

of all German companies believe that diversity management will substantially contribute to their long-term success.

Variety Variety is our is our speciality. speciality. As As your your steel steel service service centre, centre, we we will will findfind thethe right right steel steel grade grade for for your your requirements. requirements.

 Customised  Customised  Comprehensive  Comprehensive  Independent  Independent SLITTED SLITTED COILS COILS

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Possibilities Possibilities CUT-TO-SIZE-SHEETS CUT-TO-SIZE-SHEETS

STANDARD STANDARD SHEETS SHEETS

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one project abroad. “Young employees who gain practical experience early on in our foreign subsidiaries in projects like this one make an important contribution to the development of a corporate culture that values the resource of diversity,” Heike Bingmann says.

subsidiaries belong to the F.L.G. worldwide. Embracing cultural diversity is one of the factors that leads to success.

SEMINARS STRENGTHEN SKILLS As preparation for their projects abroad, associates participate in seminars at the Loh Academy, where intercultural competence is writ large. There foundations are laid so that culturally mixed teams can work together successfully. Heike Bingmann is convinced that international cooperation will become ever more important for the Loh Group: “Leadership through networking, the managing of diversity as a resource, and flexibility are key skills for future success.” n

In Germany alone, the F.L.G. employs

5,000 people representing 45 nationalities.

The International Associate Programme improves INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION and furthers corporate culture.

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BLANKS BLANKS

CONTOURED CONTOURED BLANKS BLANKS www.stahlo.de www.stahlo.de

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CHAMPIONS ON WHEELS Wheelchair basketball. The players for RSV Lahn-Dill have it all: these muscular acrobats have just brought the German Championship back to Wetzlar, Germany, once again. Text: Stephanie Backhaus

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5 Michael Paye Year of birth: 1983 Birthplace: Detroit/USA Successes: 6 x German Champion, 6 x German Cup Champion, 2 x Champions League winner, World Cup winner 2010, Paralympics participant 2008

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verything’s possible!” shout the men as they fist-bump each other. They’re sweaty, their voices hoarse. After the final whistle, the basketball team members have gathered around their coach, vow to themselves that they will win the return match in the semi-final playoffs for the German Championship. The team around captain Michael Paye just gave it their all – yet it wasn’t quite enough for the win. “It’s not the best place to be in, but we can still make it,” Paye says. Then he rolls across the court. Michael Paye and the other giants play wheelchair basketball – at the highest level and for one of the world’s most renowned teams: RSV Lahn-Dill. A week later the team proves that “everything’s possible”: on the home court of RSB Team Thüringen, they confidently come back from a seven-point deficit, reach the finals and prevail there as well. It is the tenth title for the RSV – a new record. Is the RSV the FC Bayern Munich of wheelchair basketball? Grinning, winger Björn Lohmann says, “More like FC Barcelona.” Their successes as record-holding German Cup winners, multiple Champions League successes and world championship wins confirm this. Right alongside the RSV is the Friedhelm Loh Group: subsidiary Rittal has been sponsoring the team since 2007. Engage-

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ment in his home region is important to Friedhelm Loh. Just like Rittal, the team is a flagship for the Central Hesse region and is highly respected internationally.

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Year of birth: 1988 Birthplace: Hannover Successes: 2 x German Champion, 2 x German Cup Champion, Champions League winner 2012, Second place at the 2011 European Championships, Paralympics participant 2012

HIGH-PERFORMANCE ATHLETES This international respect attracted top stars such as Michael Paye, Björn Lohmann and Jan Haller to the Lahn area. Paye, an American, is exceptionally talented. The RSV brought this “College Player of the Year” to Germany in 2006. “He is one of the world’s best point guards,” says coach Nicolai Zeltinger. Paye suffers from arthrogryposis, a congenital stiffness of the joints that limits the range of motion in his legs. He joined his first sports team for disabled persons as a child. “They were all in wheelchairs, and I wanted to be as fast as they were,” he recalls. He unceremoniously traded his crutches for a wheelchair. Paye continues, “Although I grew up with a disability, I noticed early on how open I am for this sport. Even with a handicap you can achieve a lot in sports. You just have to pursue your goals.” His teammate Jan Haller requires a wheelchair because of caudal regression syndrome, an abnormal development of the lower extremities whereby the upper body develops normally. The highlight

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Jan Haller

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Björn Lohmann

Year of birth: 1979 Birthplace: Schermbeck Successes: German Champion and German Cup Champion 2013, U-22 European Champion 1999, Paralympics participant 2008 and 2012

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Rules of the game The rules of the game are for the most part the same as for “regular” basketball. Women and men as well as disabled and nondisabled players can all play together on one team in competition.

of his athletic career thus far was participating in the 2012 Paralympics in London. “I really had goose pimples,” the winger explains. “The feeling of playing in front of 16,000 spectators is really beyond description.” He considers himself “semi-pro.” Aside from his career in sports, the office administrator also works in the team’s management office. A second career to fall back on is important in his situation: “With these references on my résumé, I have better career chances in the future.” Björn Lohmann began his sporting career as a talented handball player, but his dreams were cut short by a motorcycle accident. Since then Lohmann is paraplegic. During his hospitalisation he made contact with the wheelchair basketball players. After his release from hospital, he got his driver’s license and regularly drove himself to training. “Sport was always an important part of my life,” he says. “It quickly became clear to me that I would continue with it.” Furthermore, competitive sports offer great chances to talk to people in similar life situations. “That improves your self-confidence,” says the experienced national team player. The athletic achievements of Lohmann, Haller and Paye are a motivation for people to pursue sports whether they are disabled

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or not. Week for week, the RSV team players show that a wheelchair is far more than just a means of locomotion for people with a disability. “It makes the most spectacular game possible on wheels,” raves Andreas Joneck, team manager. And he is aware of its integrative properties. “We try to do justice to our responsibilities in a variety of ways,” the manager continues, “especially with major events such as the Paralympics or the European Championships in Frankfurt am Main at the end of June. We want to give something back to the fans and increase the popularity of our sport.” The European Championships in one’s home country is something very special, says Björn Lohmann, one of the five RSV national players: “We’ve set ambitious goals for ourselves. For the national team and the RSV, everything’s possible.” n

Classification A handicap’s severity is rated between 1 and 4.5. In order to achieve as much parity as possible, both teams must have a blend of players so that they have no more than 14.5 points.

Origin The beginnings of the sport are found in Great Britain and the United States: starting in 1946, wheelchair basketball was used as therapy and pastime for young wounded soldiers at army hospitals.

LINK TIP:

With the team app, you receive all information and scores directly on your smartphone More information at www.rsvlahndill.de

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PASSIONATE SPONSOR

ittal has long been a supporter of sports. The company considers social, cultural and sporting engagement its social responsibility, as a way of giving back to the local community. Rittal supports sports teams everywhere it has production plants; these teams include RSV Lahn-Dill, HSG Wetzlar, HSG Eibelshausen, SG and LAV Dietzhölztal, TSV Rittershausen, VfB Burbach, SSV Wissenbach, TV Haiger and TV Herborn. The support of HSG Wetzlar is reflected in the name of its sports facility, the “Rittal Arena”.

LINK TIP:

Information on dates and events in Wetzlar’s Rittal Arena can be found at www.rittal-arena.de

QUANTUM LEAP IN AWARENESS Interview. Wheelchair basketball is popular: the German Wheelchair Sports Association reports that there are about 2,500 wheelchair athletes in Germany. Andreas Joneck, RSV LahnDill manager, talks about the RSV’s successes, economic challenges and social responsibility. WHY IS WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL SO FASCINATING? Wheelchair basketball is the most spectacular game on wheels – it’s passionate, dynamic and artistic. Once you’ve seen this high level of athletics live, you’ll inevitably be captivated by it. THE RSV IS EUROPE’S MOST SUCCESSFUL WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL TEAM. HOW IMPORTANT ARE INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED PLAYERS FOR THE TEAM’S SUCCESS? Of course, key players of international calibre are indispensable for sporting success, yet at the same time we try to be as independent of key individuals as possible. But clearly, top players do a fantastic job both on the court and on the sidelines. YOU’VE BEEN WITH THIS SPORT FOR A LONG TIME. WHAT’S CHANGED OVER THE YEARS?

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Over the past fifteen years the RSV has developed into an established force in German sports. But what’s more important than winning championships is that society, politicians, the media and businesses perceive us as a dependable and interesting partner with unique characteristics. Wheelchair basketball, especially after the Paralympics in Beijing in 2008 and in London in 2012, has achieved a quantum leap in awareness. We have the advantage of being able to occupy a high position in questions of social responsibility and inclusion and can benefit from a sport beset with very few negative attributes. HOW IMPORTANT FOR THE RSV IS THE ENGAGEMENT OF COMPANIES SUCH AS RITTAL? Rittal significantly contributes to our sporting, social and economic success. Along with its financial support, Rittal also strengthens the network and the competitiveness of the region.

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ANDREAS JONECK Manager of the RSV Lahn-Dill

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F.L.G. COMPACT/PUBLICATION DETAILS

FACTS & FIGURES Simply top. The Friedhelm Loh Group is a regional family-owned company, multifaceted innovation leader, networked global player, top employer and much more. 2012 revenues (in euros)

2.2 billion Trainees

Around 300 in seventeen occupations Employees around the world

In Germany alone, employees represent

Subsidiaries around the world

Agencies around the world

11,500 45 nationalities 64

Production plants around the world

40

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT Jürgen Jehle (managing editor), Karsten Mühlhaus

PHOTO CREDITS

PUBLICATION DETAILS BE TOP The Magazine of the Friedhelm Loh Group Issue 01 | 2013 ISSN 2195-3198 PUBLISHER Friedhelm Loh Stiftung & Co. KG CEO: Friedhelm Loh Rudolf-Loh-Strasse 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone: +49 (0) 2773 924-0 E-mail: betop@friedhelm-loh-group.com www.friedhelm-loh-group.com RESPONSIBLE FOR CONTENTS Dirk Miller EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AND COORDINATION Wolfram Eberhardt, Hans-Robert Koch, Katrin Schemmann, Peter Sting REALISATION AND DESIGN muehlhausmoers corporate communications gmbh Moltkestrasse 123−131 50674 Köln, Germany Phone: +49 (0) 221 951533-0 E-mail: info@muehlhausmoers.com www.muehlhausmoers.com

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Page 1: Heiner Müller-Elsner/Agentur Focus; page 3: F.L.G.; pages 6/7: Vatican Library, Vatican, Rome/Bridgeman; pages 8/9: NASA, ESA, D. Lennon and Sabbi (ESA/STScl), J. Anderson, S.E. de Mink, R. van der Marel, T. Sohn and N. Walborn (STScl), N. Bastian (Excellence Cluster, Munich), L. Bedin (INAF, Padua), E. Bressert (ESO), P. Crowther (University of Sheffield), A. de Koter (University of Amsterdam), C. Evans (UKAT C/STFC, Edinburgh), A. Herrero (IAC, Tenerife), N. Langer (AifA, Bonn), I. Platais (JHU) and H. Sana (University of Amsterdam); pages 10/11: Krombacher Brewery; page 12 (left): F.L.G.; page 12 (middle): F.L.G./ Digital Fotogroup; page 12 (right): F.L.G.; page 13 (left): Redlink/Corbis; page 13 (middle): imagebroker/vario images; page 13 (right): Patrick ALLARD/REA/laif; page 14: ddp images/dapd; page 15: Otto/Rittal; pages 16/17: Michael Hudler; pages 18/19: Heiner Müller-Elsner/Agentur Focus; pages 20/21: David McLain/plainpicture/Aurora Photos; page 23: F.L.G.; page 24 (left): akg-images/picture-alliance; page 24 (right): Hulton Archive/getty images; page 25 (left): f8 Imaging/getty images; page 25 (right): Rolf Vennenbernd/picture-alliance; pages 26/27: Jock Fistick/laif; page 29: Oleg Kozlov; pages 30/31: Eplan; pages 32/33, 37, 38: Nils May; page 34: F.L.G.; pages 35, 36: Günter Muhly Grafik, Marketing- und Werbeberatung GmbH; page 39: Juffin/iStockphoto; pages 40/41: pablohart/ iStockphoto; pages 42–45: Valery Kloubert; pages 46/47, 48: Oleksiy Mark/iStockphoto; page 49: Claus Langer; page 50 (large): Bildagentur Hamburg/plainpicture; page 50 (small): Studio Seekamp; page 51: F.L.G.; page 52: Frederic Neema/photon-pictures.com; pages 54/55: Joerg Lantelme/fotofinder; pages 56–58: Ocean/Corbis; page 59: F.L.G.; pages 60/61: Carsten Lerp; page 62 (large): F.L.G./Digital Fotogroup; page 62 (small): F.L.G.; page 63: Jens Graubner/level-one-foto.de; pages 64–67: LKH; pages 68–71, 73 (bottom): F.L.G.; page 72: Jens Graubner/levelone-foto.de; page 73 (top): Beigl/Kit; pages 75–77: iconeer/iStockphoto; pages 78–83: Valery Kloubert; page 83 (bottom): F.L.G.; page 86 (top): Maciej Frolow/getty images; (middle left): Mexico’s Presidency/Xinhua Press/Corbis; (middle right): Guido Kirchner/picture-alliance/augenklick/ firo Sportphoto; (bottom left): Imagebroker RM Petra Wallner/f1online; (bottom right): Bettmann/Corbis

EDITORIAL STAFF Stephanie Backhaus, Michael Mennig, Elke Weidenstraß (German copyediting), Anthony B. Heric, Beate Schwarz (English translation), Ginger A. Diekmann (English copyediting) AUTHORS Stephanie Backhaus, Joscha Duhme, Boris Hänßler, Jürgen Jehle, Thomas Schneidewind, Nora F. Scholz, Beate Schwarz, Robert Sopella ART DIRECTION Christiane von Bonin, Katrin Kemmerling GRAPHICS AND PRODUCTION Isabel Funken, Annika Nelles, Michael Konrad, Jörn Plenz

© Friedhelm Loh Group 2013, ISSN 2195-3198

klimaneutral

PRINT AND LITHOGRAPHY Wilhelm Becker Grafischer Betrieb e.K., Haiger, Germany purpur Wolfgang Herrig e.K., Köln, Germany

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The magazine as app be top now available for your iPad Experience the variety of our topics in a digital format. With the be top iPad app. Informative videos, vivid photo galleries and useful additional information – for everyone who enjoys keeping up to date.

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MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

be top was honoured with the 2013 Fox Award in Gold in the category of Cross Media.

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

KNOW-HOW Top quality put to the test EXPERIENCE Clean business with the sun ENGAGEMENT Score with international drive

Download the free be top app for the iPad right now! Use the QR code or find us in the App Store. Friedhelm Loh Stiftung & Co. KG Rudolf-Loh-Straße 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 Fax +49 (0) 2773 924-3129 E-Mail: info@friedhelm-loh-group.com

INDUSTRY 4.0

Production in dialogue Issue 01| 2013

www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

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INNOVATIONSFÜHRER

GLOBAL PLAYER

TOP-ARBEITGEBER

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TOP PERFORMANCES – B E T OP !

Data storage of the future

be top!

Researchers have saved texts, photos and music errorfree in artificially synthesised DNA. Kept cool, the biological memory can survive for millennia.

Top performances are the order of the day in all of the Friedhelm Loh Group companies. But the record holders on this page are also in top form.

Marvel of construction

The record striker

The world’s highest bridge, located in Mexico’s Sierra Madre mountains, spans a gorge that is 403 metres deep – even Berlin’s Television Tower (height: 386 m) would fit under it.

Striker Robert Lewandowski scored goals in twelve consecutive matches during the 2012/13 German Bundesliga football season. It was the first real challenge to Gerd Müller’s record sixteen goals in 1970.

Record number of patents

The talking gorilla

The European Patent Office issued 244,000 patents in 2012, setting a new record; 33,000 of the patents originated in Germany.

Koko, a female gorilla, fascinatingly understands more than 1,000 American Sign Language signs. She learned to talk in 1972 and can now form sentences of up to six words.

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AN OVERVIEW OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP COMPANIES

FRIEDHELM LOH STIFTUNG & CO. KG

RITTAL GMBH & CO. KG

Rudolf-Loh-Strasse 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

Auf dem Stützelberg 35745 Herborn, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2772 505-0 www.rittal.com

An der alten Ziegelei 2 40789 Monheim am Rhein, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2173 3964-0 www.eplan.de

Rittal – The System. Faster – better – worldwide.

Eplan – efficient engineering.

KIESLING MASCHINENTECHNIK GMBH

STAHLO STAHLSERVICE GMBH & CO. KG

LKH KUNSTSTOFFWERK GMBH & CO. KG

Mainstraße 20 63128 Dietzenbach, Germany Phone +49 (0) 6074 8290-0 www.kiesling.net

Kasseler Strasse 27 35683 Dillenburg, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2771 302-0 www.stahlo.de

Auf der Birke 2 56412 Heiligenroth, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2602 99942-0 www.lkh-kunststoff.de

Kiesling – We automate the panel building.

Stahlo – Processing steel straight from the line.

LKH – We make more out of plastic.

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EPLAN SOFTWARE & SERVICE GMBH & CO. KG

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Issue 01 | 2013

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

MAGAZINE OF THE FRIEDHELM LOH GROUP

KNOW-HOW Top quality put to the test EXPERIENCE Clean business with the sun ENGAGEMENT Score with international drive

Friedhelm Loh Stiftung & Co. KG Rudolf-Loh-Strasse 1 35708 Haiger, Germany Phone +49 (0) 2773 924-0 Fax +49 (0) 2773 924-3129 E-mail: info@friedhelm-loh-group.com

INDUSTRY 4.0

Production in dialogue Issue 01| 2013

www.friedhelm-loh-group.com

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