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PORCHES AND PUMPKINS + AUTUMN COLOR IN ASHEVILLE October 2019 · Volume 20, Issue 6

Gather Outdoors! OUR BEST-EVER FALL PARTY DÉCOR & TABLE SETTINGS SOUTHERN LADY® A Hoffman Media Publication

OCTOBER 2019 $7.99US $8.99CAN

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DISPLAY UNTIL OCTOBER 8, 2019


CONTENTS OCTOBER 2019 | VOLUME 20-ISSUE 6

41 LAYERED HARMONY

71 PORCHES AND PUMPKINS

51 FEAST FOR THE SENSES

79 AUTUMN INTERLUDE

61 SOUTHERN LITERARY TRAIL: THOMAS WOLFE MEMORIAL

91 SPIRITED SMALL TOWN

An Alabama family’s interest in art and music sets the tone for comfortable surrounds in their 19th-century cottage. Soft colors pair with nature’s blazing palette as a backdrop for an outdoor meal of apple and parsnip soup, pumpkin-cheddar pasta, and herbed pork chops.

Visit the Queen Anne-style boardinghouse in Asheville, North Carolina, where author Thomas Wolfe spent his formative years garnering material for his novels.

’Tis the season for ubiquitous pumpkins and gourds to elevate the welcoming spaces of your home. Sweet and savory caramelized onion tarts kick off our cozy porch supper, featuring a greens-stuffed pork loin, peppery Broccolini, and a finale of Buttermilk Spice Cake. Once a stagecoach stop on the route to the Wild West, the hamlet of Bardstown embraces its past, looks to the future, and celebrates Kentucky’s iconic beverage: bourbon.

OCTOBER 2019

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CONTENTS

SOUTHERN SPOTLIGHTS 15 HEARTFELT GEMS

A North Carolina artist designs jewelry with a personal touch.

17 SEASIDE SANCTUARY

Mixing Old-World charm with the beauty of Florida’s Emerald Coast, The Pearl Hotel is a hidden treasure.

DEPARTMENTS 27 31 33 103

MIX & MATCH INSPIRED DESIGN SEASONAL SETTINGS RECIPE BOX

IN EVERY ISSUE 9

Sincerely

11

From the Editor

13

@SouthernLadyMag

21

Entertaining Touches

23

Pretty Things

29

In Bloom

101

Southern Hostess

109

Simply Delicious

111 Resources 113

Afterthoughts

31 33

103

Autumn brings joyful color to alfresco dining, inviting us to share in the gratitude for all of nature’s gifts. Styling by Tracey MacMillan Russell and photography by Stephanie Welbourne Steele.

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ADVERTISING

Presented by Southern Lady and Kensington Publishing, the SOUTHERN LADY BOOK CLUB brings together a community of readers united by their passion for the written word. The pleasure of falling in love with a new book and sharing your discovery with another person—these are some of the many rewards of a reading life. Join us at southernladymagazine.com/bookclub to learn more about this issue’s Southern Lady Book Club selection, All the Forgivenesses by Elizabeth Hardinger, see previous selections, and enjoy access to: • Book club discussion guides • Author interviews • Special giveaways

• Tips, ideas, playlists, and recipes for hosting your own book club gathering

• Exclusive sneak peeks • Monthly e-newsletters

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october 2019

Volume 20, Issue 6

EDITORIAL

Phyllis Hoffman DePiano GROUP CREATIVE DIRECTOR EDITOR Lisa Frederick Deanna Rippy Gardner MANAGING EDITOR Marie Baxley SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Tracy Wood-Franklin ASSOCIATE EDITOR Ashley Shaw CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Judy Jamieson ASSISTANT EDITOR Elizabeth Bonner Czapski RECIPE EDITOR Fran Jensen ST YLISTS SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rhonda Lee Lother Courtni Bodiford, Sidney Bragiel, COPY EDITOR Barbara McCarthy Lucy Finney, Mary Beth Jones, Beth K. Seeley, EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Dorothy Walton Melissa Smith EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPHY

Mac Jamieson SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

John O’Hagan PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jim Bathie, William Dickey, Nicole Du Bois, Stephanie Welbourne Steele

TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR Irene Yeh ASSISTANT TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR

Melissa Gray

FOOD ST YLISTS/RECIPE DEVELOPERS

Laura Crandall, Kathleen Kanen, Tricia Manzanero, Vanessa Rocchio, Elizabeth Stringer ASSISTANT FOOD ST YLIST/RECIPE DEVELOPER

Anita Simpson Spain

SENIOR DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST

Delisa McDaniel Clark Densmore

D I G I TA L M E D I A MARKETING DIRECTOR

Tricia Wagner Williams

MARKETING COORDINATOR Vicky Lewis ONLINE EDITOR Janece Maze DIGITAL DESIGNER Stephanie Lambert

A D M I N I S T R AT I V E HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR

Judy Brown Lazenby IT DIRECTOR Matthew Scott Holt DEALER PROGRAM MANAGER Janice Ritter ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/EDITORIAL

Alex Kolar

I N T E G R AT E D M A R K E T I N G S O LU T I O N S ACCOUNT DIRECTORS

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MARKETING DIRECTOR Megan McIllwain Ragland MARKETING COORDINATOR Gretchen Norris ADVERTISING PRODUCTION REPRESENTATIVE

Kimberly Lewis GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Rachel Collins

For assistance with advertising, please call (888) 411-8995.

Kevin Masse

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD/CEO PRESIDENT/COO EVP/CFO

Eric W. Hoffman

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EVP/OPERATIONS & MANUFACTURING VP/DIGITAL MEDIA

Greg Baugh Jon Adamson

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING OFFICE 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50 Birmingham, AL 35243 Phone: (205) 995-8860, (888) 411-8995 Editorial Inquiries: southernlady@hoffmanmedia.com

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southernladymagazine.com Southern Lady ISSN 1525-8580 is published bimonthly (except for September and October) by Hoffman Media, LLC, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243. The cover and contents of Southern Lady are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission. All rights reserved in all countries. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: For the United States, $24.98 per year, 7 issues (JF, MA, MJ, JA, Sept, Oct, ND); add $10 for postage in Canada; add $20 elsewhere. Single issues $7.99 available at newsstands and bookstores. Periodicals postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Southern Lady, P.O. Box 6201, Harlan, IA, 51593, 800-777-1101. NOTE: Southern Lady assumes no responsibility for unsolicited photographs and manuscripts; submissions cannot be returned without a self-addressed stamped envelope.

©2019 Hoffman Media, LLC. Printed in the USA.


SINCERELY

LAST CHANCE TO BOOK!

Only a few spots remain for

SOUTHERN LADY CELEBRATION, OCTOBER 11-13! See more and register at southernladymagazine.com/ celebration2019.

elcome back, October! Not a day this month goes by

W

crowned with cattails and magnolia leaves on page 80. They are

that I don’t take a few moments to appreciate the

as lovely as they are inspiring!

cozy sippers like hot cider, goodies fresh from the oven—what

never get tired of visiting the Biltmore Estate at the height of its

could be better?

fall splendor (or any other time of year). The town also holds a

blessings of autumn all around me. Turning leaves,

One of the most splendid gifts the season gives us is the wealth

Many of you know that I adore Asheville, North Carolina, and

lesser-known treasure: the childhood home of Thomas Wolfe

of natural treasures just waiting to be harvested and used to

(page 61), author of the literary masterpiece Look Homeward,

bedeck tables, porches, mantels, and more. In addition to our

Angel. As long as you’re in the region, you might plan a stop en

annual Pumpkins and Porches feature (page 71), you will find all

route to the pretty mountain community of Highlands and pay a

sorts of fruits, flowers, and foliage sprinkled through our pages,

visit to Jannie Bean (page 15), a wonderful jewelry designer who

like the mums and gerbera daisies mixed with leafy branches

puts her heart and soul into every piece she creates.

and persimmons on page 29 or the beautiful arrangement

May your October be full of joy and delight!

Sincerely,

Phyllis Hoffman DePiano Editor-In-Chief

“WHO CAN FIND A VIRTUOUS WOMAN? FOR HER PRICE IS FAR ABOVE RUBIES.” PROVERBS 31:10 9 SOUTHERNLADYMAGAZINE.COM


FOUND ONLY IN FINE SPECIALTY STORES

WWW.BAILEYBOYS.COM


FROM THE EDITOR

OCTOBER IDYLL have always had a fondness for ginkgo trees, both for the

I

rusty orange with turquoise and indigo, while Mix & Match

delicate fan shape of the leaves and the way they seem to

(page 27) stars a fanciful garden-motif plate in rich plum tones.

explode into brilliant gold overnight as fall reaches its

For the alfresco meal on page 51, crimson and mauve mingle

zenith. When late afternoon sunlight beams through the

with serene gray, a compelling contrast between warm and cool

branches, the glow is pure magic—as you'll see in our outdoor

(just like this month’s weather).

table setting on page 33. We loved working with the gracious

When busy schedules spark a need for make-ahead suppers,

folks at the Mitchell House, a white-columned belle near

our casserole recipes (page 103) are the answer. There’s a

Alabama’s Lake Martin, to create a tableau that so beautifully

simple pasta and meatball pairing, a twist on good old poppy

captures the spirit of autumn in the South. As luck would have

seed chicken, and more. And if you are hosting an elegant get-

it, our timing was spot-on: the day after we wrapped the shoot,

together, whet appetites with the mushroom and cheese grits

almost all of those leaves fell to the ground.

parfaits on page 109. It’s one of my favorite recipes ever

Throughout this issue, we offer lots of ideas to enhance classic fall colors with unexpected hues for a fresh seasonal look. Our elegant supper on the porch (page 79) weaves together

to appear in Southern Lady—give it a try! I wish you a beautiful October filled with the very best the season has to offer.

Lisa Frederick EDITOR

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@SOUTHERNLADYMAG

WHAT INSPIRES YOU? WE’D LOVE TO SEE—TAG US IN YOUR PHOTOS!

Get a glimpse of the beautiful images our social media friends have shared with us, capturing their own inspiration from the pages of Southern Lady. Top row: From @simplysoutherncottage’s porch to @fostermomfarmhouse’s table, pumpkins look impeccable in seasonal décor! Leaves are the jewels of fall along @my_marialva’s stunning pathway. Middle row: Harvest time is sweeter with cinnamon apple biscuits baked by @goingforgrace and topped with a delectable glaze. Copper-colored chargers and pretty china are a pleasant pairing on @followtheyellowbrickhome’s autumn table. Bottom row: Decorative and inviting, variegated gourds create a warm welcome to @welivedhappilyeverafter’s home. Cinnamon and spice mingle in @laralyncarter’s seasonal beverage. The flicker of candlelight and scent of citrus enhance an elegant centerpiece by @touchesoftime_bydesign.

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SOUTHERN SPOTLIGHT

HEARTFELT GEMS A jewelry designer based in a North Carolina mountain town channels her compassion for others into bespoke baubles. BY

Ashley Shaw | PHOTOGRAPHY BY John O’Hagan

J

eweler Jannie Bean always wears her heart on her sleeve—quite literally. Smaller than a dime, the stippletextured pin is one of Jannie’s signature designs, and she’s customized it for countless clients since its debut almost three decades ago. “I have a heart that I made—it could be a pendant or a pin—and women just love these,” says Jannie, the owner of Jannie Bean Fine Custom Jewelry in Highlands, North Carolina. “I wear one every day on the cuff of my sleeve.” It’s a small, shiny symbol of her life’s work, which ultimately is about more than handcrafting fine accessories. “The real purpose for my being here is to love the person who comes in that door,” says Jannie, who fell into the jewelry manufacturing business as a college student. While studying

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art at the University of Minnesota, she found a part-time job at a local jewelry shop. “I realized I’m a people person. I’m artistic, I’m creative, I love to problem solve, so this kind of fit for me,” says Jannie. She continued to work for the jeweler long past graduation and purchased the business when she turned 39. After she and her husband, Tom, moved to Highlands in 2016 for a dramatic change of scenery, she opened the current location. From engagement rings to necklaces to belt buckles, Jannie starts from scratch with most of her pieces, and nearly all of her designs are one-of-a-kind. In her wellappointed showroom, several glass cases display her artistic talent. Yet, the majority of her work is commissioned by people who long for a wearable sentimental token that


pays homage to a loved one, whether it’s made from new materials or heirloom elements. “It always has a meaning, and you want to help [customers] have the most wonderful experience and have the perfect product to wear with great joy,” she says. With more than 40 years of experience, Jannie recognizes that we all have distinctive tastes, especially when it comes to jewelry. If someone comes into her store with an inherited bracelet or a passed-down brooch they could never see themselves donning, Jannie asks, “How would you wear this?” She listens as strangers share their memories of beloved grandmothers or late husbands, taking inspiration from these fond remembrances to create irreplaceable keepsakes. Even before sitting down at her work bench and picking up her tools, Jannie strives to get to know each patron. “I am determined that my customers become my friends and that nobody leaves unhappy,” she says. Even when it costs her more time and money, she will always redo a piece or make changes to ensure complete satisfaction. “If it isn’t quite perfect, it has to be made perfect,” she says, attributing her strong work ethic to her father. “My dad taught us that you need a job, you need to take care of yourself, because no one is going to take care

of you. [And] do something you love to do, because you’re going to be doing this your whole life.” Single until age 40, when she met and married Tom, Jannie has undoubtedly heeded her father’s advice to a T. In addition to managing her small company with great success, Jannie’s primary role in the design process is model making. “I carve whatever it is you want in wax first, and then I cast it,” she says. Then, she passes the jewelry on to her small team of talented craftspeople as needed for exquisite finishing touches like adding gemstones and polishing the gold. “I’m not a stone setter. I do polish, but I hate to get my nails dirty,” Jannie says with a laugh. “Together we make a beautiful product, whether it’s a minor repair or something major, and we make people happy.” While she’s tailored her heart design by adding birthstones or casting with different precious metals, Jannie’s own version is 14-karat yellow gold adorned with a single sparkling diamond. It’s a tiny reminder, she says, to live everyday with love and gratitude. “People come in here with a thought in mind: ‘Jannie is going to make something special for me.’” And for that, she says, “Lord, I am thankful.” For information, visit janniebean.com. OCTOBER 2019

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SOUTHERN SPOTLIGHT

SEASIDE SANCTUARY In the heart of a distinctively designed community on Florida’s picturesque Emerald Coast, The Pearl Hotel exudes St. Joe Club & Resorts Old-World elegance and exceptional Southern hospitality. Elizabeth Bonner Czapski | BY

I

n the cooling air of October, relish a refined escape along the Gulf where you can enjoy breathtaking rooftop views while sipping a beverage in the atmosphere of one of Ernest Hemingway’s favorite Cuban hangouts. As you take in the blue-green backdrop of the private beach draped in sparkling white sand below, you’ll feel worlds away from any worries at The Pearl Hotel. “Inspired by and named after a pearl concealed within an oyster, The Pearl Hotel was built to be the ultimate hidden gem, where visitors from all regions and walks of

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life can gather for their ideal coastal vacation,” says David Merryman, manager of the scenic resort on the eastern end of Highway 30A in Rosemary Beach, Florida. The Pearl is sure to catch your eye as the sun soaks its signature black-and-white striped awnings, the same timeless motif that graces oversize umbrellas that shade guests lounging on the shoreline beyond. With vintage European architecture marked by striking turrets and abundant terraces—a sophisticated departure from typical beach resort style—the hotel’s aesthetic reflects

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF

the unique vision upon which its West Indiesinfluenced community was built. Classic shapes and silhouettes paired with a palette of natural tones yield architectural harmony and simple splendor. “The Pearl is woven into the fabric of the community,” David says. “The property’s design represents not only the energy of 30A, but also other famed Southern coastal towns, including Charleston and New Orleans, as well as Havana.” Beyond its design, the hotel touts other notable features that span 55 rooms, a


PHYLLIS HOFFMAN DEPIANO

CARRIE MOREY

SUSAN GRAVELY

ASHLEY MCMAKIN

KEYNOTE SPEAKER JEANNE ROBERTSON

KEYNOTE SPEAKER LORI ALLEN

PRESENTS

CELEBRATION A Southern Lady tradition returns! Join Editor-in-Chief Phyllis Hoffman DePiano for an inspiring weekend of behind-the-scenes secrets, including floral design, entertaining advice, recipe tips, and more. Visit southernladymagazine.com/celebration2019 or call 888-411-8995 for more information!

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA | OCTOBER 11—13, 2019 HYATT REGENCY BIRMINGHAM—THE WYNFREY HOTEL


SOUTHERN SPOTLIGHT celebrated restaurant and rooftop lounge modeled after historic El Floridita in Old Havana, and a peaceful adults-only pool and poolside spa. Contemporary sea-inspired décor, which incorporates pieces from acclaimed local artists like Justin Gaffrey, Tommy Crow, and Allison Wickey, contributes to the relaxed yet polished air. Each room boasts a balcony that brings the beauty of the coast indoors, adding a final flourish to every space. Though you may not want to leave The Pearl, make time to appreciate the charm of Rosemary Beach, which draws from the past with easy-to-walk neighborhoods. “Guests can explore the town’s sugar-white sand beaches, quaint downtown shops, Western Lake, and all the romantic cobblestone streets in between,” says David, noting that October is one of the most beautiful times of year to visit as summer crowds

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have dwindled and temperate weather enhances the alfresco appeal. Complimentary membership privileges with the St. Joe Club & Resorts, a company that manages The Pearl and many other local properties, ensure endless options for recreation nearby: family-friendly pools, kayak and paddleboard rentals, boating, golf, tennis, biking, and more. Ideal for an autumn evening, the club also offers a beach bonfire service, which includes a prepared fire, chairs, and all the tasty trimmings. These open-air activities will undoubtedly work up an appetite, and you won’t want to miss the original culinary creations of the on-site Havana Beach Bar & Grill, serving

cuisine that captures the diverse flavors of the Gulf Coast with a Caribbean spin. Creative dishes abound—for instance, Hemingway’s Mariscos brims with Gulf fish and shellfish, chorizo, olives, vegetables, and toasted couscous drenched in a delectable tomato, fennel, and saffron sauce. Guests are greeted at check-in with sparkling wine and a Southern delicacy of pimiento cheese, while each day ends with a luscious turndown treat—all gestures that showcase The Pearl’s dedication to the region’s hospitality. “Above all else, we want our guests to feel welcome, revived, and inspired to return,” David says. For information, visit thepearlrb.com.


ENTERTAINING TOUCHES

Strands of Autumn STYLING BY

Mary Beth Jones | PHOTOGRAPHY BY Jim Bathie

October’s brisk air beckons us to embrace the comforts of home, so welcome guests to your fall table with a simple yet festive seasonal flourish: a distinctive runner made from ribbon and pine cones. Start with a roll of thick ribbon in an earthy hue and cut pieces long enough to hang over the table’s edge. Using a hot glue gun, secure the tops of the pine cones to the ends of the ribbons, then fashion bows from excess ribbon and attach for the finishing touch. Create as many runners as you like—from several at the table’s center to a few under each place setting. Accent the autumnal presentation with richly colored florals, mini pumpkins, and translucent votives that cast a warm glow across the scene.

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ADVERTISING

SERENITY BY THE SEA Step away from reality and escape to historic Pawleys Island, where laid-back charm meets natural beauty.

N

estled just between Charleston and Myrtle Beach and hidden from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, the picturesque oceanside community of Pawleys Island creates the perfect opportunity to reconnect with loved ones while giving yourself a much-needed reboot. One of the oldest seaside destinations in the country, the four-mile-long island is completely uncommercialized and feels like a true step back in time. Lined with understated vacation homes, there are no grocery stores, gas stations, restaurants, or hotels, aside from two classic inns—the Sea View Inn and the Pelican Inn. The Sea View Inn features rustic rooms with relaxed décor and ocean views. All meals are included for those who don’t want to worry about cooking or driving, and the quaint atmosphere includes plenty of rocking chairs, a library, and a cozy living room where you can curl up fireside.

The Pelican Inn is an eight-room bed-andbreakfast that overlooks the island’s stunning salt marsh. Breakfast and lunch are served to guests, and a boardwalk offers direct beach access with a private dock and hammocks ideal for a day of relaxation. In the 1700s, plantation owners began moving their families to the island to escape mosquitoes and take respite from the heat. Today, the island is lovingly referred to as “arrogantly shabby” and is famous for its cypress cottages and for being the birthplace of the Pawleys Island Rope Hammock that was specially created for catching the sea breeze in the late 1800s. Visitors can experience privacy and tranquility as they stroll along the quiet, pristine coastline, or experience activities such as crabbing, fishing, shelling, biking, canoeing, and kayaking through the salt marsh. If shelling is on your itinerary, be

sure to look for the famous Pawleys Island shell. These beautiful shells are only found along the coast of the island, and legend has it that if you find a shell, your trip will be blessed. While its exclusivity and secluded sands make the island unique, the modern conveniences and comforts of home are not far away. Those wanting to venture a little farther out can make the short drive down the causeway to take advantage of the area’s best restaurants and shops, and can even take home a piece of Pawleys Island by purchasing their own rope hammock. For the golfing enthusiast, some of the nation’s most awarded golf courses are close at hand. With plenty of cottages and beachfront properties to choose from, there’s no better place than Pawleys Island to gather your family and friends for quality time and an unforgettable get away.

Start planning your getaway now. Visit onlypawleys.com for booking information.


PRETTY THINGS

FALLING FOR FRINGE Tie up loose ends in your home and wardrobe with luxurious accessories embellished by a favorite autumn trend: tassels. (Clockwise from top right) Cotton Cashmere Tassel Trim Topper poncho in dune, $89 from Island Pursuit, islandpursuit.com. Maria Bucket Bag in cognac, $98 from ABLE, livefashionable.com. Sporting Luxe serving platter, $28 from Emily McCarthy, emilymccarthy.com. ADA Braided Tassel belt in gold, $80 from Lou Lou Boutiques, loulouboutiques.com. No. 33 The Market Tote Suede in cinnamon, $298 from Neely & Chloe, neelyandchloe.com. Elvira Basket, set of 3 for $320 from Paynes Gray, paynesgray.com.


ADVERTISING

Words from the Heart

GOD IS STILL ON HIS THRONE BY MAX LUCADO

Max Lucado’s God Is With You Every Day brings peace and comfort in the midst of difficult situations. His 365 daily devotions focus on prayer, scripture, and reflection. “When the foundations for good collapse, what can good people do? The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord sits on his throne in heaven.” Psalms 11:3–4 NCV “When all that is good falls apart, what can good people do?” Psalm 11:3 NVC Isn’t David’s question ours? When illness invades, marriages fail, children suffer, and death strikes, what are we to do? Curiously, David doesn’t answer his question with an

God answered their question with a declaration. With the

answer. He answers it with a declaration: “The Lord is in his

rumble of the earth and the rolling of the rock, he reminded

holy temple; the Lord sits on his throne in heaven.”

them, “The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord sits on his

His point is unmistakable: God is unaltered by our storms. He is undeterred by our problems. He is unfrightened by

throne in heaven.” And, today, we must remember: He still is. He is still in his

these problems. He is in his holy temple. He is on his throne

temple, still on his throne, still in control. What he did then,

in heaven.

he will do still.

Buildings may fall, careers may crumble, but God does not. Wreckage and rubble have never discouraged him. God

Excerpted from God Is with You Every Day by Max Lucado.

has always turned tragedy into triumph. In our toughest times, we may see what the followers of Christ saw on the cross. Innocence slaughtered. Goodness murdered. Heaven’s tower of strength pierced. The apostles had to wonder, “When all that is good falls apart, what can good people do?”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Since entering the ministry in 1978, Max Lucado has served churches in Miami, Florida; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and San Antonio, Texas. He currently serves as teaching minister of Oak Hills Church in San Antonio. He is America’s best-selling inspirational author with more than 130 million books in print. Learn more about Max’s books at MaxLucado.com.


PRETTY THINGS

(Clockwise from top) Paisley notebook with tassel, $10 from Gartner Studios, gartnerstudios.com. Teal Wood and Glass necklace with teal tassel, $85 from Ink + Alloy, inkalloy.com. Colorful Fete folded notecard, set of 10 for $35 from Dixie Design Collective, dixie-design.com. Tassel earrings in disco, $98 from Lisi Lerch, lisilerch.com. Jaipur napkin in white, silver, and gold, set of 4 for $140; Fiesta napkin ring in natural, yellow, and white, set of 4 for $60; both from Kim Seybert, kimseybert.com. Marrakesh Collection luggage tags in palace blue and regal, $10 each from Cotton & Quill, cottonquill.com. Visit southernladymagazine.com to enter to win some of the featured items.


MIX & MATCH

PAINTERLY APPEAL Shades of purple and glimmers of gold reign over two tabletops fit for fall entertaining. STYLING BY

S

Mary Beth Jones | PHOTOGRAPHY BY William Dickey

tray from the season’s preferred palette of orange and burnished hues, and let Bernardaud’s Prunus dinner plate guide your proverbial paintbrush. Inspired by 14th-century Chinese porcelain, a violet motif composed of bamboo plants, fruits, and other flora mirrors the majesty of Mother Nature. Complement the pattern’s soft watercolor strokes with a textured mauve charger. The salad plate’s mottled metallic border coalesces with a simple taupe table linen while subtly mimicking patinaed leaves. Round out the informal look with a tortoiseshell napkin ring and coordinating silverware, along with a fiery-red nosegay. (Opposite) For an elevated approach, pair the purple-and-white china with gilded top notes. Golden vines on a scalloped-edge dish feel perfectly on point, as does gilt flatware with a delicate dotted design. Mother-of-pearl place mats and a silken abstract-print runner further the setting’s refined air. Etched flowers grace dainty stemware, as posies of fuchsia and white preside over the polished scene.


IN BLOOM

BEAUTY BRIGHT

With striking leaves and seasonal fruits on hand this time of year, it’s easy to put together an array of pretty blooms to add a colorful punch at outdoor parties. A hammered metallic container lends a relaxed air and cool contrast to the warm, blended tones of this floral display. Make a loose bouquet of rich red gerbera daisies, burgundy and rust mums, and magenta ranunculus, and then place it in the vase. Pull the stems to vary the height, and fill in with persimmons on the stem, soft pink wax flowers, bright orange saowers, and branches of dazzling yellow leaves clipped from nearby trees. Present the arrangement as a centerpiece or on a side surface, surrounding it with splendid gourds in a variety of shades, sizes, and textures to complete the jovial tableau.

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INSPIRED DESIGN

Guest Room Glam A punchy pattern and feminine flourishes set the stage for a sophisticated space fashioned for visitors to rest and unwind. BY

Ashley Shaw | STYLING

A

fter fully renovating their 1920s Italian Renaissance-style home last year, these homeowners in Augusta, Georgia, wanted their guest bedroom to exude the comfortable luxury of a chic boutique hotel. Interior designer Brittany Cason Johnston chose a striking, artistic fabric and light-pink ceiling paint to lay the foundation for an elegant at-home retreat.

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AND INTERIORS BY

Brittany Cason Johnston | PHOTOGRAPHY

“It makes you feel at ease, but it still has its glitz and its glory at the same time,” says Brittany, the principal designer at Brittany Cason Interior Design. A common thread through most of her work is an appreciation for history, and she strives to blend authentic nuance with modern flair. While a ceiling fresco might feel appropriate for the Italianinfluenced abode, the glossy blush color

BY

Emily Followill

overhead makes for an eye-catching element more on par with contemporary taste and the homeowners’ vision. The hue also extends to the adjoining bathroom. “It was meant to define the space and set the tone,” says Brittany, who selected the girlish shade based on the homeowners’ desire for a distinctly feminine aesthetic. Reprised in velvet throw pillows, bedding


embroidery, and a vintage bench, pink accents “soften the edges around the drama that we gave the room,” she says. A custom paneled headboard along with matching floor-to-ceiling draperies serve as the dramatic focal point. An abstract interpretation of a tree-lined horizon, the pattern lends bold contrast to daintier décor and traditional pieces. “The homeowners wanted more of a modern touch and didn’t want a French headboard that overtook the room,” says Brittany. So, she mixed timeless and up-to-date accessories to achieve a layered yet unfussy look. Crisp white bed linens embellished with stitchwork impart a classic sensibility, while antique French chairs, vintage marble lamps, and Art Deco-style pieces reflect Brittany’s knack for blending objects of disparate heritage. “I don’t like to concentrate on one particular period, but more or less pick my influences from multiple places to come up with my own design,” she says. Original charcoal sketches by Brittany’s mother-in-law, Susan Johnston, depict a woman who appears to be lounging and relaxed, the exact experience the homeowners want for those staying in the suite. Not only does the model’s posture add to an easygoing ambience, but the pair of gilt frames complements other dabs of gold, like the decorative swans on a 1930s bench and ring pulls on a mid-century modern dresser. “A home can often tell the story of a person’s heart, their purpose, and, I think, their past,” says Brittany, who also helped the homeowners achieve personalized panache in their living room, kitchen, and powder room. “Each room has its own boldness.” Finishing touches such as fresh flowers and interesting books round out the guest room’s welcoming atmosphere. To create a glamorous yet cozy escape for the owners’ friends and family, Brittany ultimately channeled her philosophy on what makes any house a haven: “You should feel like you’re on vacation at home,” she says. “It’s a place where you relax, and the day goes away.”

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SEASONAL SETTINGS

CROWNING GLORY Autumn’s grandeur as inspiration for outdoor entertaining knows no bounds in the shade of a spectacular ginkgo tree. STYLING BY

Tracey MacMillan Russell Stephanie Welbourne Steele

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


SEASONAL SETTINGS


BRIGHT REPAST

Bask in the shimmer of a ginkgo’s flamboyant canopy as fall’s radiant light filters through the fan-shaped leaves upon a tranquil table set for sharing precious time with friends. A neutral palette lets nature speak boldly as a scene of soaring wild fowl adorns a bowl framed by a creamy dinner plate and a shining golden charger—a nod to the regal tree. The avian motif is repeated with feathered napkin rings holding vine-embroidered linens, paired with a taupeand-white plaid tablecloth that brings subtle interest to a centerpiece of plump white pumpkins. Piled high in the table’s center, the gourds intermingle with seeded eucalyptus and tumbled leaves that emphasize the season’s outdoor allure. A bold brass vase recalls the brilliant light of the autumnal equinox; flowers spilling forth with ethereal charm include poppies, anemones, peach snapdragons, gold brunia berries, and pale-yellow ranunculus. Striking a carefree pose, pewter pheasants in the form of a salt-and-pepper set seem ready to help host the day’s event before the magnificence of a quintessential Southern porch.


SEASONAL SETTINGS

RADIANT FALL

Adorn your outdoor fête with distinctive pieces that speak to the spirit of your surrounds. Clear goblets with a frosted ring evoke chilly days to come, while subtle smoky gray water glasses and pearlescent flatware lend a serene quality bolstered by the four stately white columns of the Mitchell House near Alabama’s Lake Martin. Harkening back to days gone by, the broad veranda awaits the gathering of friends for intimate after-dinner conversation and most entertaining tales.

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LAYERED HARMONY A REVAMPED 1880S COTTAGE IS FINELY TUNED TO SUIT AN ALABAMA FAMILY’S ENTHUSIASM FOR ARTFUL ACCENTS AND RELAXED LIVING. BY

Ashley Shaw |

Beverly Farrington Mac Jamieson

STYLING AND INTERIORS BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


A

rt and music course through the veins of Ginney and

create a shotgun-style layout. They also had incorporated two cottages

Foster McDonald’s historic Huntsville home. Paintings

on the street behind the main house as separate guest quarters and a

by contemporary masters like Nall, Mark Singer, and

garage—both 19th-century structures were originally owned by Helen

Steve Penley accompany antiques from London and

Keller’s cousin, Annie Keller Turner. Ginney and Foster were captivated

pieces crafted by local artisans, a concordant blend of

by the warmth and informality of the small estate.

“If it speaks to us, we will find a place to hang it,” says Ginney, who

dining area at the front of the primary residence—one of four rooms

has turned to designer Beverly Farrington time and again for various

original to the 1885 home—into a music room. But other than adding

projects since the family moved in more than 15 years ago.

built-in shelves and a snug window seat to the space, Beverly says, “We

high and low that illustrates the family’s distinctive taste.

Beverly takes inspiration from the McDonalds’ eclectic collection of artwork for each update, infusing their interiors with a personal flair that reflects a laid-back lifestyle and affinity for art. “Instead of

With three musically inclined sons, the McDonalds repurposed the

did what I call ‘cake and powder.’ They obviously liked the house and the plan, but we came in and started changing colors and fabrics.” In addition to showcasing the family’s treasured paintings and other

going in and doing it all at once, [the décor] has evolved over the years,”

collectibles, Beverly balances traditional elements with modern touches

says Beverly.

to complement the cottage’s Victorian-era character, which includes

When the McDonalds purchased the property in 2002, the previous

shiplap walls, several original fireplaces, and beautiful pine paneling in

owners had completely renovated the small Victorian cottage (built by

Foster’s office. “It looks more like an acquired and curated environment

the grandson of Huntsville’s founder, John Hunt) and expanded it to

versus something that we went out and just bought all at one time,” says

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the designer. Her most recent undertaking involved redecorating the master bedroom based around a set of six antique botanical prints the couple brought back from a European excursion. Beverly also bears in mind the McDonalds’ wish to create a welcoming retreat that’s always primed for gracious hospitality, opting for easy-to-maintain surfaces and floor coverings along with plenty of cozy seating areas throughout. “They aren’t trying to make it look like it’s a show house,” says Beverly. “They want to have a very comfortable house. That’s why the art is so important: it represents them.” Over the years, the McDonalds have hosted an array of guests, including classically trained musicians and performing artists who travel to the area every year for world-class events such as Twickenham Fest. Now in its 10th year, the free concert series is spearheaded in part by the McDonalds’ oldest son, Matt, the principal bassoonist of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra in New York. “We love supporting artists and performers, and being around interesting people,” says Ginney, who previously chaired the Huntsville Museum of Art Gala and also helped establish a society that funds free family admission to select Huntsville Symphony Orchestra performances. The McDonalds encourage visitors to enjoy the comforts of their home as much as their own family has. “The property has an emotional karma that lures people to stay and linger,” Ginney says. “Every bit of it is lived-in and loved.”


FRESH TAKE

Since previous owners had extended the floorplan of Ginney and Foster McDonald’s historic cottage, designer Beverly Farrington incorporated seating to capitalize on the kitchen’s extra space. Beverly and her team at Accents of the South covered an antique table with a custom-made zinc surface. Surrounded by navy leather chairs, the piece abuts a marble-topped island. Ecru paint and contemporary hardware bring cohesion to the mix of old and new cabinetry, while a white subway tile backsplash rounds out the bright, updated aesthetic.


CURATED FINESSE

Beverly gleaned inspiration for

the master bedroom from Ginney’s collection of botanical artwork. Bespoke draperies and pillows fashioned from striped and floral-print fabrics coalesce with the green velvet bed frame and lustrous chocolate-brown wall paint. (Opposite) Above an original fireplace, a painting by Huntsville, Alabama, native Alan Davis reflects the couple's artistic interests.


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feast for the senses A ROBUST OUTDOOR SUPPER SATISFIES THE SPIRIT AMID SPLENDID VIEWS AND THE MAGNIFICENT BEAUTY OF FALL. Elizabeth Stringer Tracey MacMillan Russell PHOTOGRAPHY BY Stephanie Welbourne Steele

RECIPE DEVELOPMENT AND FOOD STYLING BY STYLING BY


BLAZING ENCHANTMENT

Like vivid leaves against a wispy blue-gray horizon, this tabletop of deep crimson, flaming orange, and misty mauve stands out for a backyard repast designed to take advantage of the glorious scenery. Stylized maroon flowers dance gaily upon a muted gray background in a tablecloth that blends with bold bicolor napkins and a tall centerpiece of scarletleaved branches plucked from nearby trees. Low flower arrangements glissade down the table’s center, commingling with hurricane lamps that tame the wind and allow pillar candles to glow at dusk. Their light reflects off mirrored stemless wine glasses and highlights mixed bouquets of red dahlias, peach spray roses, bunny grass, Queen Anne’s lace, abelia, and red astilbe. Pears in rich tones of burgundy rest in pastel bowls atop gold-trimmed dinner plates and wooden chargers that echo the natural milieu. Mums and pumpkins, set close at hand, reiterate the prismatic scheme as a claret throw awaits to ward off the evening’s brisk breezes.


ABUNDANT FLAVOR

A hearty menu draws upon the season’s bounty and hues, with a creamy opener of roasted apple and parsnip soup in a nuanced cheese and garlic base. Swiss Chard and Kale Salad with Glazed Pecans reprises the table’s palette, followed by a satisfying pumpkin and smoked cheese pasta. Lamb chops laced with garlic and herbs lead the way for a slightly sweet ending of red pears dipped in caramel and garnished with chocolate, sea salt, and hazelnuts.

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Swiss Chard and Kale Salad with Glazed Pecans MAKES 6 SERVINGS

1 large bunch fresh Swiss chard, thinly sliced 1 (5-ounce) package fresh baby kale 1 cup thinly sliced radish 1 cup glazed pecans* 4 ounces crumbled goat cheese Lemony Dijon Salad Dressing (recipe follows)

Roasted Apple and Parsnip Soup MAKES ABOUT 2 QUARTS

1 pound parsnips, peeled and chopped (about 4 cups) 2 Honeycrisp apples, peeled and quartered 1 medium yellow onion, chopped (about 1½ cups) 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted 4 cups vegetable broth 4 ounces Camembert cheese*, cubed 2 cloves garlic, minced ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper Garnish: thinly sliced apple, plain yogurt, ground black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 425°. 2. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss together

parsnips, apples, onion, and melted butter until coated. 3. Roast for 30 minutes. Transfer mixture to a large stockpot. Add broth, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes. 4. Working in batches, transfer soup to the container of a blender; purée until smooth. Return soup to pot; stir in cheese. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, just until cheese is melted. Sprinkle with garlic, salt, and pepper. Garnish with apple, yogurt, and pepper, if desired. *Brie can be substituted. KITCHEN TIP: If soup thickens upon standing, add more broth, and reheat gently.

1. In a large bowl, toss together chard, kale, and radish. Place on a large serving platter. Top with pecans and goat cheese. Serve immediately with Lemony Dijon Salad Dressing. *We used Goodfields Glazed Pecans. LEMONY DIJON SALAD DRESSING MAKES ½ CUP

¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon lemon zest 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon maple syrup 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper ⅛ teaspoon kosher salt 1. In a small bowl, whisk together all ingredients until emulsified. Use immediately. OCTOBER 2019

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2. In a medium stockpot, melt butter over medium heat. Whisk in flour until thickened. Add milk, stirring until slightly thickened. Add pumpkin, cheese, salt, and pepper, whisking until cheese is melted. Pour pumpkin mixture over pasta, and stir until evenly coated. Garnish with paprika, if desired.

Chocolate-Salted Caramel Pears MAKES 6

Garlicky Herb Lamb Chops MAKES 6 SERVINGS

6 (1¼-inch-thick) lamb loin chops 2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 4 large cloves garlic, pressed 4 sprigs fresh thyme 4 sprigs fresh rosemary 1. Preheat oven to 400°. 2. Pat lamb chops dry with paper towels, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. In a large castiron skillet, heat oil and butter over high heat. Add lamb chops; cook until seared on both sides, about 3 minutes. Add garlic, thyme, and rosemary; transfer skillet to oven. 3. Bake until desired degree of doneness, about

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10 minutes for medium (145°). Cover and let rest for at least 5 minutes before serving.

Pumpkin and Smoked Cheddar Pasta MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS

1 pound cavatappi pasta 1 tablespoon sea salt ¼ cup unsalted butter 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 cups reduced-fat milk 1 (15-ounce) can pumpkin purée 2 cups shredded smoked Cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper Garnish: smoked paprika 1. In a large stockpot, cook pasta according to package directions, adding sea salt; drain.

1 cup unsalted butter 2¼ cups firmly packed light brown sugar 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk 1 cup light corn syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 red Anjou pears Maldon sea salt Garnish: melted dark chocolate, chopped hazelnuts 1. In a large stainless steel saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add brown sugar, condensed milk, and corn syrup; bring to a boil. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture registers 236° on a candy thermometer. Stir in vanilla. Remove from heat; let stand until cooled to 200°. (Do not stir.) 2. Line a baking sheet with foil. Dip each pear halfway into caramel, letting excess drip off. Sprinkle with salt. Place on prepared pan. Let stand until caramel is set. Dip in melted chocolate and sprinkle with hazelnuts, if desired.


THOMAS Southern Southern WOLFE MEMORIAL

LITERARY TRAIL

VISIT THE DWELLING IN DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA, THAT SPAWNED AUTHOR THOMAS WOLFE’S EPICS OF THE SOUTH AND CREATED UPHEAVAL AMONG THE TOWNSFOLK HE PORTRAYED.

BY

Marie Baxley | PHOTOGRAPHY BY William Dickey


F

or a boarder at Thomas Wolfe’s sprawling childhood home in the early 1900s, it could be a nightmare: a curious young boy, left to roam freely in the oddly configured structure, spies on life around him and later

turns his observations into a renowned novel, Look Homeward, Angel. The book, published in 1929, was a coming-of-age, tell-all tale set in the western North Carolina town of Altamont, a fictitious name given Asheville, where the novelist grew up in the boardinghouse run by his enterprising mother, Julia Wolfe. The domicile, known as Old Kentucky Home and called “Dixieland” in the book, caused a rift in the large Wolfe family. Today, it stands amid modern city buildings as a monument that brings to life the writer’s somewhat skewed childhood. “As soon as the book was published, people started showing up to see [the house]. It is a character in his writings,” says Tom Muir, historic site manager at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in the heart of the bustling mountain burg. “Look Homeward, Angel launched him onto the American literary scene and immortalized this house.” Almost immediately after Look Homeward, Angel’s release, lists appeared identifying the real people in Asheville upon whom the 200-plus characters were based. Not all of them, including his own mother, appreciated Thomas’s vivid and less-than-complimentary descriptions. Some even spewed death threats. The author, avoiding the backlash of family and hometown friends, didn’t return to Asheville for nearly eight years, instead teaching and writing in New York and traveling throughout the U.S. and Europe during his self-imposed exile. Yet the Old Kentucky Home remained a part of the family’s fabric during his entire lifetime: Thomas’s brother Ben and his father, W.O. Wolfe, died there; his two sisters married there; and Thomas’s own wake was held in the parlor. Boardinghouses were popular lodgings in the early 20th century, particularly for single women and widows on a fixed income, families moving to the city from rural areas, and travelers. Tom says the menagerie of tenants gave Thomas ample fodder for his novels, plays, and

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Thomas, the youngest child, lived at his mother Julia’s boardinghouse, Old Kentucky Home, while the rest of the family mostly stayed with his father at another home two blocks away. The oldest child, Leslie (below), died of cholera as an infant. (Right) Thomas’s father, W.O., spent his final days in a brass bed at the boardinghouse, where Julia could nurse him. (Opposite) The kitchen at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial was a hub of activity where deliveries were accepted and meals prepared for boarders each day.

stories. “Business convention traffic, traveling salesmen,

respect by running her own business. “It’s evident she was

overnight members of barnstorming baseball teams,

willing to give up her own comfort to make money,” says

vaudeville performers, circus performers—it gave Thomas

Tom, noting that Julia did not think people died frequently

Wolfe a colorful cast of characters to write about,” he says.

enough to make carving headstones a solid business. Yet

A tour of the dimly lit yet enlightening memorial reveals

W.O. was moderately successful with the family’s

much about the source of the writer’s material. Built in

monument shop, which used carved angels on the porch

1883 as a seven-room abode with no electricity and no

that later appear in Thomas’s writing.

plumbing, the edifice had expanded to an 18-room

Ten years into her ownership, Julia’s hard work and

boardinghouse with running water by the time Thomas’s

success allowed her to add 11 rooms. She paid little

mother bought it in 1906. Julia quickly realized that to

attention to quality or craftsmanship but increased the

operate the establishment properly, she would have to live

capacity of Old Kentucky Home to 40 patrons. The

there, moving out of the home two blocks away where her

residence, described in Look Homeward, Angel as painted

husband, a stonecutter, lived with their children. She

“dirty yellow,” has strange angular halls upstairs and

brought with her only Thomas, the youngest of eight

uneven wood floors that creak with age. Although well

offspring. The oldest, Leslie, had died as an infant.

maintained by the state of North Carolina since 1974, it is

Although their relationship was somewhat discordant, W.O. and Julia never divorced, and she sought to earn

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old and was cheaply constructed. “It has probably outlived its normal lifetime,” says Tom.


The dining area (rebuilt after a fire in 1998) includes tables set with Limoges china, silverware, and linens that were typical department store staples for the time. The

names to his characters to avoid lawsuits from those described so meticulously in his tomes. Julia resided at Old Kentucky Home until she died in

kitchen contains the original two stoves, cookware, and a

1945. Thomas’s surviving siblings worked to create the

blue-and-white linoleum mat on the floor that is based on a

memorial, which opened four years later. “They made sure

swatch found behind a baseboard. For the first few years,

the original furniture was here and rooms were arranged

Julia and Thomas shared a room at the front of the house

the way they remembered them to be, and, in some cases,

until she moved into a tiny bedroom off the kitchen. Once

arranged to tell a story they thought was important to

she cast him off into the house, he slept wherever a bed

tell,” says Tom. The family recorded stories that can be

was open.

heard in the visitor center at the memorial.

Thomas lived there from the age of six until he left for

Also on display are a recently acquired portrait of the

the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1916. He

six-foot, six-inch Thomas, some of his clothing, furniture,

felt he had become a vagabond with no bedroom or even a

and details of his most intimate relationships, including his

blanket of his own. “He very much resented that he was

long-term affair with New York stage and costume

brought here to live with strangers and that he was

designer Aline Bernstein. Among the events sponsored by

separated from his father’s home, which he remembered

the memorial are biannual tours of Asheville-area

as a place of warmth and abundance,” says Tom. He spent

cemeteries where the locals who inspired Thomas’s

a good bit of time in the local library reading as an escape.

characters are buried, and his descriptions of them are

After college, Thomas studied playwriting at Harvard University for three years, but eventually realized his style

read aloud. The memorial, like the novels, tells the story of what

was too cumbersome for the stage. His first novel,

Tom describes as a “young man who, against great odds,

an 825-page epic initially called O Lost, was trimmed

wanted to become an artist. In order to do that, he had to

significantly and renamed Look Homeward, Angel. It was

escape his crazy family and the tumult of this house and

published when he was 29. He did return to Asheville in

get an education.” While Thomas did escape for a time, he

1937 and, for the most part, was greeted graciously. For

learned later that you might indeed want to go home again.

many, his huge popularity as a celebrity author outweighed their dismay over any public humiliation from the book. About a year after his homecoming, 37-year-old Thomas died of tuberculosis, a disease doctors believed he contracted as a youth that became active when he got a respiratory infection. He wrote three other novels: Of Time and the River (1935) and two published posthumously, The Web and the Rock (1939) and You Can’t Go Home Again (1940). He was often considered in a league with literary giants F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, and the three shared the brilliant editor Maxwell Perkins of Scribner’s. It was Maxwell, one of Thomas’s dearest friends and executor of his estate, who insisted on cutting large portions of Look Homeward, Angel to make it easier to market. The posthumous novels were edited by Tennessean and fellow Harvard alum Edward Aswell of Harper and Brothers, with whom Thomas had begun working shortly before his death after a falling out with Maxwell and Scribner’s. Both editors urged Thomas to give fictitious

For information, visit wolfememorial.com.


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ASHEVILLE APPETITE

Breakfast is a popular meal in this mountain resort, and tempting treats are easy to find. Hole Doughnuts (below) has gained a national following with its single-yeast, hand-rolled doughnuts that are made to order as you watch. Old World Levain Bakery (above) serves a variety of leavened breads and scrumptious pastries. For a sweet with Hungarian flair, try Old Europe (right) where chef Melinda Vetro bakes her mother’s recipes. Sightseeing or hiking in the Blue Ridge Mountains builds an appetite, and a meal at The Corner Kitchen (left), near the Biltmore Estate, is sure to satisfy. (Opposite left) In the heart of downtown, award-winning chef Katie Button offers sublime Spanish flavors at Cúrate Bar de Tapas. Don’t miss the cured hams or the white asparagus tossed in lemon vinaigrette with fluff y tarragon mayo. Nearby, chef John Fleer specializes in American fare at Rhubarb (opposite right), where fresh bounty headlines and the house-pickled veggies are sublime.


SIGHTS TO SEE

No matter your interests, Asheville has you covered. A stroll through the Biltmore Estate offers a glimpse into the grandeur of the Gilded Age, when 19th-century entrepreneurs like George Vanderbilt accumulated immense wealth. In the nearby Biltmore Village, gardeners will delight in plant and gift store The Gardener’s Cottage (below right). Bookworms will love Malaprop’s Bookstore downtown (below left), which builds community by bringing together readers and writers. A short drive from the city center, visual arts abound in the colorful River Arts District (right), with a myriad of galleries.

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RELAXING NATURE

Explore the great outdoors with a visit to the North Carolina Arboretum (above right), a delightful 434-acre public garden just south of town. Asheville is filled with bustling specialty retail venues, including Porter & Prince (above), a luxe linen, nightwear, and gift shop in Biltmore Village. After a busy day of activities, return to the cozy Windsor Boutique Hotel (below and right), where each of the 14 rooms is a fully equipped suite, all located within walking distance of the city’s lively restaurant scene and entertaining nightlife.


porches and PUMPKINS ORNAMENT YOUR ENTRYWAY WITH A PLETHORA OF PUMPKINS AND OTHER FESTIVE FRILLS AS A TRIED-AND-TRUE TRIBUTE TO AUTUMN.


GARDEN VARIETY

As fall unfolds in all its grandeur, we’re gifted with an abundance of natural décor ripe for the taking. Peruse your local farmers’ market and collect an assortment of gourds—the more variety, the better! Seasonal flora makes for striking arrangements with blossoms like red dahlias, auburn mums, and bright white anemones filled in with kangaroo paw and wild grass, as well as textural accompaniments such as cabbage and artichokes. (Opposite) A basketful of pumpkins gains interest with simple finds like bittersweet, changing leaves, pine cones, and dried ears of corn.


HARVEST HERALD

A mix of produce comes together for a lively tabletop display highlighting the best of the season’s beauty, from pumpkins in orange and cream shades to persimmons and jewel-toned blooms in a copper vessel. Break up the traditional scheme with china in blue and white—a beloved duo that introduces a timeless twist. (Opposite) From the comfort of a rocker, enjoy the radiant scene evolving outside with a door bedecked in a wreath made from fall foliage. Minimal embellishments in bold hues complement the landscape ahead, allowing it to shine all the brighter.


NESTING INSTINCTS

While gourds have become a staple autumn greeting on

verandas around the South, you can still showcase the signature fruit with creative flair. Repurpose a large vintage planter and a garland of twigs to fashion a nestlike stack of varieties that descend in size and span a spectrum of colors. Finish o the look with classic additions like sunny yellow mums and vivid orange pumpkins scattered about the steps.


AUTUMN INTERLUDE SEEK THE COZY SANCTUARY OF A BACK PORCH BEDECKED WITH PUMPKINS APLENTY FOR A DINNER OF FALL-INSPIRED DISHES AND A DIVINE DESSERT. Melissa Gray Missie Neville Crawford PHOTOGRAPHY BY Stephanie Welbourne Steele

RECIPE DEVELOPMENT AND FOOD STYLING BY STYLING BY


COMFORTS OF HOME

As autumn washes over the scenery outside your window, seasonal gourds and other natural finds dance across tables and mantels inside. Extend the parade of pumpkins and harvesttime treasures onto an enclosed porch to ready the space for a family supper. With dashes of blue, a traditional color palette of orange and earth tones takes on an updated look. French blue napkins trimmed in delicate fringe lend contrast to rust-and-white china bearing a fall motif. Layering the scalloped rim of porcelain plates with the curves of an all-white charger creates an interesting composition. Brilliant like a cloudless sky, aqua sofa cushions and cup-andsaucer sets, ideal for after-dinner coffee, harmonize with the scene’s warmer notes. Clear glassware and gold flatware catch the early evening light without distracting from an extraordinary centerpiece. Set in a hefty ironstone tureen, white roses and sunset-hued safflowers peek through dried magnolia leaves, while ornamental cattails top off the towering display. Complete the lovely vignette with a trayful of miniature squash.

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HEARTWARMING FEAST

Prepare a meal that entices loved ones to linger, swapping news and making memories while savoring every bite. Phyllo cups dolloped with fig preserves, caramelized onions, and melted cheese are a tasty appetizer. For a pepped-up take on a classic cocktail, craft a Pear French 75 using a homemade simple syrup infused with lemon, pear, and thyme. Guests will delight in the bubbly beverage as they mingle before the arrival of the main course: Fennel and Mustard Greens-Stued Pork Loin and a trio of flavorful sides that reflect this bountiful time of year. Composed of all the spices that stir up fall remembrances, a buttermilk cake cloaked in molasses-laced buttercream makes for a decadent denouement.


Pear French 75 MAKES 1 SERVING

1½ ounces dry gin 1 ounce Pear Syrup (recipe follows) ½ ounce fresh lemon juice 2 ounces brut sparkling wine Garnish: fresh thyme sprig 1. In a cocktail shaker, combine gin, Pear Syrup, and lemon juice. Add ice. Cover and shake until chilled, about 15 seconds. Strain into a coupe glass or Champagne flute; top with sparkling wine. Garnish with thyme, if desired. KITCHEN TIP: To make this drink for a party, stir together gin, Pear Syrup, and lemon juice in a pitcher; refrigerate until ready to serve. Pour gin mixture into glasses; top with sparkling wine. Garnish with thyme, if desired. PEAR SYRUP MAKES ABOUT 1½ CUPS

1 cup sugar 1 cup water 1 medium pear, thinly sliced 5 sprigs fresh thyme 1. In a small saucepan, bring all ingredients to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low; simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; cover and let stand for 1 hour. Strain; discard pear and thyme. Let cool completely before serving. Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 month.

Gruyère, Fig, and Caramelized Onion Bites MAKES 15

2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 small yellow onion, quartered and thinly sliced 1½ teaspoons chopped fresh thyme 1½ teaspoons sugar 1½ teaspoons sherry vinegar ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ½ cup shredded Gruyère cheese 1 (1.9-ounce) package frozen mini phyllo cups, thawed 7½ teaspoons fig preserves Garnish: fresh thyme 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion; cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add thyme and sugar; cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are deep golden brown, about 25 minutes. Remove from heat; add vinegar, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Stir in Gruyère just until combined. 3. Place phyllo cups on prepared pan. Spoon ½ teaspoon fig preserves into each cup. Top with 1 rounded teaspoon onion mixture. 4. Bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Garnish with thyme, if desired. Serve warm. KITCHEN TIP: To make ahead, follow instructions through step 3, filling cups. Cover and refrigerate. Just before serving, bring to room temperature, and bake until warmed through and golden brown, 10 to 15 minutes.

Parmesan-Roasted Acorn Squash MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS

1 (3-pound) acorn squash, seeded and sliced ½ inch thick ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley 2 tablespoons olive oil 1¼ teaspoons kosher salt ¾ teaspoon ground black pepper ¼ cup shredded Parmesan cheese Garnish: chopped fresh parsley 1. Preheat oven to 400°. 2. In a large bowl, stir together squash, parsley, oil, salt, and pepper. Place in an even layer on a large rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with Parmesan. 3. Bake until fork-tender, about 25 minutes. Garnish with parsley, if desired.

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Fennel and Mustard Greens-Stuffed Pork Loin MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS

1 (4½-pound) boneless pork loin roast 2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided 1¼ teaspoons ground black pepper, divided 1 large bulb fennel, thinly sliced, fronds reserved 3 cups chopped mustard greens ½ cup chopped cooked pancetta 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 lemon, zested and juiced 2 tablespoons olive oil 10 sprigs fresh rosemary Garnish: fresh rosemary sprigs, crushed red pepper

1. In a large saucepan, heat oil, garlic, and red pepper over medium heat; cook until garlic is light golden brown, about 3 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high. Add Broccolini, zest, and salt; cover and cook until tender, 5 to 7 minutes.

Garnish with zest, if desired. KITCHEN TIP: For an extra zing, add lemon juice along with lemon zest.

1. Preheat oven to 425°. 2. Using a long knife, cut two-thirds of the way into side of pork tenderloin. Open meat at incision as if you were opening a book; cover with plastic wrap. Using the flat side of a meat mallet or a rolling pin, pound to ½-inch thickness. Sprinkle cut side of pork with ¾ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. 3. In a large bowl, stir together fennel slices and ¼ cup fennel fronds, greens, pancetta, garlic, zest, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Spread mixture onto pork in even layer, leaving a ½-inch border. Starting on one long side, roll up meat and filling; place seam side down. Tie tenderloin together with kitchen twine. Sprinkle with remaining ¾ teaspoon salt and remaining ½ teaspoon pepper; brush top with oil. Place pork and rosemary in a large oval Dutch oven; pour lemon juice over pork. 4. Roast until light golden brown, about 45 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400°, and roast until a meat thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 145°, about 10 minutes more. Garnish with rosemary and red pepper, if desired.

Spicy Lemon Broccolini MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS

3 tablespoons olive oil 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper 3 bunches fresh Broccolini, trimmed 1 lemon, zested ¾ teaspoon kosher salt Garnish: lemon zest

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Maple-Bacon Skillet Apples MAKES 8 SERVINGS

6 slices thick-cut bacon, chopped 4 large Honeycrisp apples, cored and sliced ½ inch thick 1 teaspoon lemon zest 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 2 cinnamon sticks ½ cup apple juice 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon cornstarch ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg 1. In a 12-inch cast-iron skillet, cook bacon over medium heat until crisp, about 10 minutes. Remove bacon using a slotted spoon, and let drain on paper towels, reserving drippings in skillet. 2. Add apples, lemon zest and juice, and cinnamon sticks to skillet; cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. 3. In a small bowl, whisk together apple juice, maple syrup, cornstarch, and nutmeg until combined. Stir into apple mixture; cook until thickened, about 5 minutes. Stir in bacon just before serving.

Buttermilk Spice Cake with Molasses Buttercream MAKES 1 (9-INCH) CAKE

1 cup unsalted butter, softened 2 cups sugar 4 large eggs 3 cups cake flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg ½ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground ginger ½ teaspoon ground cloves ½ teaspoon ground allspice 1¼ cups whole buttermilk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Molasses Buttercream (recipe follows) Garnish: molasses 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray 3 (9-inch) round cake pans with baking spray with flour. 2. In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar with a mixer at medium speed until fluff y, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. 3. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour,

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baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, nutmeg, salt, ginger, cloves, and allspice. In a small bowl, whisk together buttermilk and vanilla. With mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with buttermilk mixture, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Divide batter among prepared pans. 4. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Remove from pans, and let cool completely on wire racks. Spread Molasses Buttercream between layers and on top and sides of cake. Drizzle with molasses, if desired. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

MOLASSES BUTTERCREAM MAKES 4 CUPS

2 cups unsalted butter, softened 4 cups confectioners’ sugar ¼ cup molasses ⅛ teaspoon kosher salt 1. In a large bowl, beat butter with a mixer at medium-high speed until creamy, 2 to 3 minutes. With mixer on medium-low speed, gradually add confectioners’ sugar, beating just until combined, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. With mixer on medium speed, add molasses and salt, beating until combined, about 1 minute. Use immediately.


SPIRITED SMALL TOWN IN THE HEART OF THE BLUEGRASS STATE, A STORIED TOWN HOLDS TIGHT TO TRADITION WHILE WELCOMING MODERN ADVANCEMENT AMID A DIVERSE CULTURAL SCENE. BY

Elizabeth Bonner Czapski | PHOTOGRAPHY BY John O‘Hagan


Fall settles in Bardstown like a comfortable, colorful coat that impeccably suits its setting. A prominent tree canopy provides shady respite for pedestrians and takes on warm, radiant hues that complement the charming architecture. This small, tight-knit community prides itself on its many attractions within a walkable distance. You can always find residents and visitors alike ambling through neighborhoods and meandering to the busy historic downtown district where entertainment options abound.

hrough the years, the unassuming community of Bardstown, Kentucky, has earned many flattering labels: the most beautiful small town in America; the best place in the South to raise a family; and, its official title, the Bourbon Capital of the World. While these monikers paint an eclectic picture, it is Bardstown’s great appreciation for its history that binds this array of evolving qualities. From six bourbon distilleries and counting to a downtown district with almost 200 buildings on the National Register of Historic Places, Bardstown embraces its past with a progressive outlook. The second-oldest city in Kentucky, Bardstown was settled in 1780 as explorers from the East began journeys into the wilderness that was the West. The town is named for the pioneeering brothers, David and William Bard, who first surveyed and mapped the land. When their fellow voyagers reached the area, they quickly realized it was the perfect setting for distilling bourbon due to the fertile land for growing corn, wealth of limestone for pure water, and climate made for aging barrels. From the start of this migration that put Bardstown on the map, the 1779 Old Talbott Tavern—the oldest Western stagecoach stop in America—welcomed travelers with a place to rest and recharge. A testament to the city’s dedication to preserving its history, the tavern still operates as a restaurant, bar, and bed and breakfast, offering visitors the same gracious hospitality that greeted guests like Abraham Lincoln and Daniel Boone, as well as

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outlaws like Jesse James. Even royalty like King LouisPhilippe of France and Queen Marie of Romania have passed through. Beyond the tavern, an abundance of other renowned attractions are just a short stroll or carriage ride away through the scenic tree-lined streets of central downtown. One of the first cities in the nation to adopt historic zoning and preservation guidelines, Bardstown’s past is deeply ingrained in its present. A new walking-tour app guides you to notable structures while delivering digital images of the locations through various eras as you view them in person. Among the many well-maintained edifices, you’ll want to see the striking Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral. Another important site in America’s westward expansion, it made Bardstown the first center of Catholicism west of the Allegheny Mountains in the early 1800s. Learn more about the city’s beginnings at a few Civil War museums, a quaint re-creation of a Colonial village, and My Old Kentucky Home State Park, which features the acclaimed Rowan plantation, Federal Hill, that appears on the Kentucky quarter. For nearly 30 years, the Bardstown Main Street Program has worked to uphold the town’s historic significance while promoting a lively contemporary culture, and much of this revitalization is centered around the arts. Galleries, along with shops selling home goods, clothing, and accessories, have cultivated creative flair within the community. This October, the 39th annual Arts, Crafts, & Antiques Fair will showcase more than 250 booths filled with handmade wearables, jewelry, pottery, flowers, woodwork, antiques, and more. While the arts are flourishing, bourbon remains the lifeblood of the city and is commemorated every September with the annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival. Throughout the year, the iconic beverage is celebrated in distilleries in the area—both time-tested, family-run businesses like Heaven Hill and its Bourbon Heritage Center and innovative hot spots like Bardstown Bourbon Company. Specialty shops also offer tributes, such as the Blind Pig Bourbon Market that sells furnishings made from bourbon barrels. It also permeates the culinary scene, where restaurants pair the versatile spirit with everything from down-home Southern cooking to fresh seasonal fare. A dining option you won’t want to miss, My Old Kentucky Dinner Train provides a convenient way to experience many facets of the town while partaking in a leisurely meal aboard a 1940s railroad car. Take in the view as the train travels through the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest to the Jim Beam distillery property, Limestone Springs, and back. You’ll see the best of Bardstown in its natural beauty, distinctive heritage, and its ultimate accolade: a signature Southern charm of days gone by.


There are plenty of ways to experience Bardstown’s celebrated past. The Old Talbott Tavern (above) and Colonel’s Cottage Inns & Suites (left) offer 18th- and 19th-century accommodations, while lavish amenities and convenient downtown locations instill modern appeal. Well-frequented spots like Bottle & Bond Kitchen and Bar (below) at the Bardstown Bourbon Company bring new life to the town’s bourbon heritage. (Opposite) Museum Row touts the largest Civil War collection devoted to the Western Theater, as well as Old Bardstown Village (top), a re-creation of a 1790s frontier settlement. Newer ventures keep company with established ones, like the Gallery on the Square (bottom right), a collective of local artists, and Peacock on Third (bottom left), a clothing boutique that balances high-end with affordability.


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Start off your day at Fresh (left, top and center) with coffee and a delicious pastry, or choose from an evolving lunchtime lineup of sandwiches, soups, and salads with thoughtful ingredients that contribute to a low-waste kitchen. Drop by At Mary’s (left bottom) for a lovely selection of artwork, antiques, floral bouquets, custom frames, and more. The specialty shop was dreamed up by owner Mary Carey for years before she decided to make her vision a reality. As you survey the area, you won’t miss the Basilica of St. Joseph ProtoCathedral (far left, top). Dating back to 1816, it still shines throughout Bardstown as a beacon of hope, just as it did for its original patrons who braved the New World wilderness and found a home there. If its story piques your interest in the town’s past, hop on My Old Kentucky Dinner Train (above) for an elegant meal paired with a 37-mile express tour of local highlights inside an authentic vintage railroad car.


Just across the street from At Mary’s, Shaq & CoCo (right) is filled with finds for the home, including furniture, lighting, and distinguished gifts. Make time to explore the natural splendor of the Bluegrass State with a trip to Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest (bottom)— 15,000-plus acres of diverse land brimming with rich vegetation and abundant wildlife. The third weekend of October is dedicated to the arboretum’s brilliant fall foliage with ColorFest, an annual celebration of autumn, complete with hayrides, pumpkin launching, live music, and more. After working up an appetite, relish some classic barbecue with a Southwestern spin at Alexander Bullitt’s Brewery & BBQ (below), where menu items feature traditional meat platters, Wild Coho Bourbon Salmon, and Mexican Street Corn.

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At My Old Kentucky Home State Park (above), peruse the 1812 Rowan plantation, and participate in old-fashioned biscuit-making classes or mint julep tours. This friendly town also holds onto its roots by supporting family-run businesses like Mammy’s Kitchen & Bar (bottom left), which serves up Southern comfort food in a relaxed farmstead ambience. Satisfy your sweet tooth at time-honored Hadorn’s Bakery (below), operated by its namesake family for nearly 50 years. They offer luscious doughnuts, Danish, cookies, and cakes, but you’ll want to try their popular Yum Yum, a doughy cinnamon pretzel twist drizzled with chocolate icing. Heaven Hill Distillery (left) has been family-owned since it was founded in 1935. Its mission is to educate customers with tours and tastings at the Bourbon Heritage Center, furthering Bardstown’s legacy of this signature spirit as well as exceptional hospitality.

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SOUTHERN HOSTESS

Stocking Your Party Pantry Prep your cupboard with entertaining essentials that will have you eager to welcome guests when opportunity knocks. BY

Dorothy Walton | PHOTOGRAPHY BY William Dickey

M

ake yourself at home” isn’t just a phrase, but a way of life in the South. We treat our friends like family, so it makes sense they have no qualms about dropping by unannounced. That’s when Southern hospitality kicks in, and entertaining at home is easier when you don’t have to start from scratch. With a little foresight and a well-stocked party pantry, you’ll be able to spend less time preparing for friends and more time enjoying their company.

VARIETY OF GLASSES “Can I get you something to drink?” is usually your first question after welcoming company into your home. Having a collection of glasses in which to distribute beverages is essential, but some can serve dual purposes, like water glasses that work equally well for sweet tea. Expand your collection over time by adding glasses made for specific drinks you enjoy.

LINEN NAPKINS Classic linen napkins are a timeless way to bring sophistication to any gathering. While they require a bit more care than their paper counterparts, cloth napkins serve as an inexpensive way to inject a little panache into your place settings. Stock up on neutral linens that mesh well with your dishware and flatware. Add some extras in festive colors, such as red for Christmastime and pale blue for Easter, to prepare your party pantry for any season or holiday. There’s nothing quite as Southern as a monogram to dress linens up even more.

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SERVING PLATTERS

CANDLES

Serving pieces are heavy-hitting multitaskers for any hostess. A large platter can be used to quickly and creatively arrange everything from sweets to appetizers. Collecting varied sizes of platters and bowls ensures you’ll have a dish to hold whatever nibble you choose. White porcelain can easily be dressed up or down and will go with everything while providing an appealing presentation for foods of all kinds.

Details make the difference and a delightfulsmelling candle is the perfect finishing touch. For a coffee table or open areas, a mild scent will make your home inviting and cozy. If you’re using candles on a dining table, opt for unscented ones that can be placed in votives, as they add ambience yet don’t conflict with food aromas.

VASES Fresh flowers are a surefire way to add color and elegance to your surroundings. It’s not uncommon for visitors to gift these to a hostess upon arrival, so make sure you have a few vases of varying sizes and shapes on hand to hold beautiful blooms. No need to break out the crystal—pitchers, jars, or even glass bottles work well for displaying a bouquet at a moment’s notice.

NONPERISHABLE SNACKS In the South, a gathering isn’t really a party without food. Whether it’s two people or 200, hostesses love to leave their company well fed. Keep shelf-stable noshes in your pantry and freezer: jarred olives, dried fruit, nuts, crackers, cheese straws, and other favorites that keep well. You can easily supplement them with items like cheese or raw vegetables that are already in your refrigerator.


RECIPE BOX

One-Dish Wonders Keep suppertime fuss free—and focused on those around the table— with casseroles rich in hearty ingredients.

RECIPE DEVELOPMENT AND FOOD STYLING BY

MEATBALL AND BOWTIE PASTA CASSEROLE, PAGE 105

Kathleen Kanen | STYLING BY Sidney Bragiel | PHOTOGRAPHY BY John O’Hagan


BLACK BEAN AND CORN ENCHILADA CASSEROLE, PAGE 107

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Meatball and Bowtie Pasta Casserole MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 (12-ounce) bags Italian-style meatballs*, thawed 1 pound bowtie pasta, cooked according to package directions 2 (23.5-ounce) jars marinara sauce 1 cup tomato sauce

MEATBALL AND BOWTIE PASTA CASSEROLE

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 4 cups shredded whole-milk mozzarella cheese, divided 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided Garnish: chopped fresh basil, ground black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a shallow 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray.

2. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add meatballs; cook, turning occasionally, until browned, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat. 3. In a large bowl, combine meatballs, pasta, marinara sauce, tomato sauce, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper. Add 2 cups mozzarella and ½ cup Parmesan, stirring until coated. Spoon mixture into prepared dish. Loosely cover with foil. 4. Bake until heated through, about 30 minutes. Uncover; sprinkle with remaining 2 cups mozzarella and remaining ½ cup Parmesan. Bake until cheese is melted, about 5 minutes more. Garnish with basil and pepper, if desired. *We used Rosina Celentano Italian Style Meatballs.

Smoked Turkey Tetrazzini MAKES ABOUT 10 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 (8-ounce) package sliced fresh mushrooms 1 cup chopped yellow onion 1 pound thin spaghetti, broken in half and cooked according to package directions 1 pound smoked turkey, chopped 1¼ cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus more to serve 1 cup shredded smoked Cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 2 (10.5-ounce) cans cream of chicken soup 2¼ cups whole milk Garnish: chopped fresh parsley, ground black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a shallow 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray. 2. In a large skillet, melt butter over mediumhigh heat. Add mushrooms and onion; cook, stirring frequently, until mushrooms soften and begin to release their liquid, about 6 minutes. 3. In a large bowl, combine mushroom mixture, spaghetti, turkey, cheeses, salt, and pepper. In a medium bowl, whisk together soup and milk. Pour over turkey mixture, stirring until coated. Spoon into prepared dish. Loosely cover with foil. 4. Bake until heated through, about 30 minutes. Garnish with parsley and pepper, if desired. Serve with additional Parmesan. KITCHEN TIP: This will also work with other pasta shapes, such as cavatappi.

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SMOKED TURKEY TETRAZZINI


6. In a medium bowl, toss together crushed crackers and melted butter. Sprinkle over casserole. Bake until crumbs are lightly browned, about 8 minutes more. Serve immediately.

Black Bean and Corn Enchilada Casserole MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons vegetable oil ¾ cup chopped yellow onion 6 cups chopped fresh spinach 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 (15-ounce) can corn kernels, drained 2 (4-ounce) cans diced mild roasted green chiles ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon ground cumin ⅓ cup cream cheese, softened 15 (5-inch) yellow corn tortillas 3 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese with peppers, divided 1¼ cups salsa verde 1 cup sour cream, room temperature Garnish: chopped fresh cilantro, sliced radish, lime slices

CHICKEN, BROCCOLI, AND POPPY SEED CASSEROLE

Chicken, Broccoli, and Poppy Seed Casserole MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS

1½ cups long-grain rice 3 cups chicken broth 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup chopped yellow onion ¼ cup all-purpose flour 3 cups whole milk 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, cubed and softened 1½ tablespoons poppy seeds 1½ teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon garlic powder 4 cups shredded cooked chicken 1 (12-ounce) bag frozen broccoli florets, thawed 1 cup crushed buttery round crackers 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

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1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a shallow 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray. 2. Cook rice according to package directions, substituting broth for water. Set aside. 3. In a 12-inch skillet, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add onion; cook until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium. Sprinkle flour over onion; cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Gradually whisk in milk. Bring to a simmer, whisking constantly. Add cream cheese; cook over medium-low heat, whisking constantly, until cream cheese is melted and smooth, about 8 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in poppy seeds, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. 4. In a large bowl, combine cream cheese mixture, rice, chicken, and broccoli, stirring to coat. Spoon mixture into prepared dish. Loosely cover with foil. 5. Bake until heated through, 25 to 30 minutes.

1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a shallow 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray. 2. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion; cook until lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Add spinach; cook, stirring frequently, until wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in beans, corn, chiles, cilantro, lime juice, garlic powder, and cumin. 3. Spread 1 teaspoon cream cheese onto each tortilla. Cut 3 tortillas in half. Place 4 whole tortillas, cream cheese side up, in prepared dish. Fill in any spaces with 2 tortilla halves. Spread half of bean mixture over tortillas. Sprinkle with 1 cup Monterey Jack. Repeat layers once. Top with remaining tortillas. Spread salsa over top. Loosely cover with foil. 4. Bake until heated through, about 35 minutes. Spread sour cream over top, and sprinkle with remaining 1 cup Monterey Jack. Bake, uncovered, until cheese is melted, about 5 minutes more. Garnish with cilantro, radish, and lime slices, if desired. KITCHEN TIP: When covering a casserole with foil, spray the underside with cooking spray to prevent sticking.


SIMPLY DELICIOUS

TWICE AS NICE Layer luscious grits and butter-drenched mushrooms for a petite delight packed with big flavor. RECIPE DEVELOPMENT AND FOOD STYLING BY

Elizabeth Stringer | STYLING BY Lucy Finney

Browned Butter Mushroom and Cheese Grits Parfaits MAKES 8

1 (8-ounce) package gourmet blend mushrooms 1 (8-ounce) package fresh baby portobello mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoon vegetable oil ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 4 cups chicken broth

1 cup stone-ground grits 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese ½ cup shredded extra sharp Cheddar cheese ½ to ¾ cup half-and-half ¼ cup unsalted butter 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme Garnish: chopped fresh thyme

1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line a sheet pan with foil. 2. In a large bowl, toss together mushrooms, oil, salt, and pepper. Place on prepared pan; bake for 20 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, bring broth to a boil over medium-high heat. Add grits, whisking to combine. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; stir in mozzarella, Cheddar, and half-and-half. Cover until ready to use. 4. In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Cook until butter turns a medium-brown color and has a nutty aroma, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat; add lemon juice, garlic, and thyme. Stir in mushrooms. Layer cheese grits and mushroom mixture in serving glasses. Garnish with thyme, if desired.


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RESOURCES

To purchase items featured in our articles, please refer to the information below. If an item is not listed, it is privately owned and not available for purchase. To contact the manufacturers and retail stores referenced below, see DIRECTORY OF COMPANIES. COVER: See FEAST FOR THE SENSES MIX & MATCH: PAINTERLY APPEAL Page 27: Prunus dinner plate, and tea cup and saucer; Bernardaud. J.L. Coquet Hemisphere Metallic Purple Charger, Jaune de Chrome Aguirre Gold Finition Provence salad/dessert plate, and Sabre Bistrot Brilliant Tortoise 5-piece setting; Gracious Style. Festival napkin in plum; Sferra. Oval Tortoise napkin ring and Vienne Clear white wine glass; Juliska. Page 28: Prunus dinner plate, and bread and butter plate; Bernardaud. Fostoria Renaissance claret wine glass, regular wine glass, and Royal Limoges Olivier Gold dinner plate; Replacements, Ltd. Byzantine place mat in ivory and gold; Kim Seybert. Blue Pheasant Louisa Polished Gold flatware 5-piece set and Keon Gold chain napkin ring; Gracious Style. Perry napkins in white/gold; Sferra. INSPIRED DESIGN: GUEST ROOM GLAM Pages 31-32: Interiors; Brittany Cason Interior Design. Headboard and draperies fabric; Norrland Carbon by Villa Nova. Custom headboard and vintage marble lamps; Brittany Cason Interior Design. Velvet euro pillows; Larsen. Matelassé duvet and embroidered shams; Legacy Home. Charcoal drawings; Susan Johnston. SEASONAL SETTINGS: CROWNING GLORY Pages 33-38: Location; The Mitchell House, Dadeville, AL. Wedgwood Cream Color on Cream Color (plain edge) dinner plate, and Wedgewood Liverpool Birds Blue (no trim) salad plate, flat cream soup bowl and

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saucers, and dessert/pie plate; Replacements, Ltd. Nolan black/cream salad/dessert plate, Lucia Pale Gray Tumbler Glass, and 5-piece Sophene flatware set; Blue Pheasant. Two-Tone Vines Embroidered Napkin in gold; Deborah Rhodes. Feather Espresso napkin rings; Juliska. Lastra wine glass and Hibiscus glass amber bud vase; Vietri. Pewter Pheasants salt & pepper set; Vagabond House. LAYERED HARMONY Pages 41-42: Sofa and chairs; Lee Industries. Draperies and throw pillow fabrics; Schumacher. Rug; Accents of the South. Chandelier; Visual Comfort. Wall paint; Ethereal Mood (7639) by Sherwin-Williams. Page 44: Art (above chest); Kevin LePrince. Art (topmost above chest); Mark Andrew Bailey. Page 45: Art (horse) by Meredith Keith; Gallery 1930. Art (poppies); Barbara Flowers. Clay sculpture; Harold Turner. Page 46: Custom swing design; Accents of the South. Paint (swing); Red Tomato (6607) by SherwinWilliams. Cushion and pillow fabrics; Sunbrella and Perennials. Pages 47-48: Navy leather chairs; Hickory Chair. Custom zinc-topped table; Accents of the South. Pendant lights; Visual Comfort. Cabinet paint; White Dove by Benjamin Moore. Pages 49-50: Bed; Lee Industries. Bedding; Accents of the South. Draperies fabric; Lee Jofa for Kravet Inc. Wall paint; Well-Bred Brown (7027) by Sherwin-Williams. Art by Alan Davis (above fireplace); The Little Green Store and Gallery. FEAST FOR THE SENSES Pages 51-60: Noritake Golden Cove dinner plate;

Replacements, Ltd. Organic shaped low bowl in adobe rose, Kaloh cereal bowl in stone, Center stripe woven napkin in cayenne, Metal Stemless wine glass, Tabla Glass Hurricanes candleholders, Metallic Square lanterns, and Round Lush Velvet pillow in pink grapefruit; West Elm. Tablecloth; Williams Sonoma. AUTUMN INTERLUDE Pages 79-90: Spode Indian Tree (orange rust, scallop, red trim) dinner and salad plates, cranberry bowl, 10” oval vegetable bowl, 8” square vegetable bowl, rectangular covered vegetable dish, 14” oval serving platter, and square handled cake plate; Replacements, Ltd. Gold flatware; Chelsea’s Antiques. Napkins; Canvas Home Store. Natura coasters, Solino Home. Pillows; Paige Albright Orientals. White ironstone tureens; Tricia’s Treasures. Dried magnolia (in centerpiece); Weston Farms. Pumpkins and gourds; Andy’s Market and Nursery. DIRECTORY OF COMPANIES: ACCENTS OF THE SOUTH, 256-539-1038, accentsofthesouth.com ANDY’S MARKET AND NURSERY, 205-402-2639, andysgardencenter.com BARBARA FLOWERS (ARTIST), barbaraflowersart.com BENJAMIN MOORE, 855-724-6802, benjaminmoore.com BERNARDAUD, bernardaud.com BLUE PHEASANT, 626-373-9750, bluepheasant.com BRITTANY CASON INTERIOR DESIGN, brittanycasonintdesign.com CANVAS HOME, 212-461-1496, canvashomestore.com CHELSEA ANTIQUES, 205-678-2151, chelseaantiques1.com DEBORAH RHODES, 203-333-8998, deborahrhodes.com GALLERY 1930, 205-870-1930, artgallery1930.com GRACIOUS STYLE, 888-828-7170, , graciousstyle.com HICKORY CHAIR, 828-324-1801, hickorychair.com JULISKA, 888-551-7310, juliska.com KIM SEYBERT, 877-564-7850, kimseybert.com KRAVET INC., 800-645-9068, kravet.com LARSEN, 212-647-6900, cowtan.com/larsen LEE INDUSTRIES, 828-464-8318, leeindustries.com LEGACY HOME, legacylinens.com LEPRINCE FINE ART, 843-452-3935, leprince.com MARK ANDREW BAILEY (ARTIST), baileypaintings.com PAIGE ALBRIGHT ORIENTALS, 205-877-3232, paigealbrightorientals.com PERENNIALS, 888-322-4773, perennialsfabrics.com REPLACEMENTS, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com SCHUMACHER, 800-523-1200, fschumacher.com SFERRA, 877-336-2003, sferra.com SHERWIN-WILLIAMS, 800-474-3794, sherwin-williams.com SOLINO HOME, solinohome.com SUNBRELLA, 336-221-2211, sunbrella.com SUSAN JOHNSTON (ARTIST), susanhjohnstonart.com THE LITTLE GREEN STORE AND GALLERY, 256-539-9699, thelittlegreenstore.net THE MITCHELL HOUSE, 256-307-1225, mitchellhouseevents.com TRICIA’S TREASURES, 205-871-9779, triciastreasures.us WEST ELM, 888-922-4119, westelm.com WESTON FARMS, 919-773-9663, westonfarms.com WILLIAMS SONOMA, 800-812-6235, williams-sonoma.com VAGABOND HOUSE, 626-264-8686, vagabondhouse.com VIETRI, 919-245-4180, vietri.com VILLA NOVA, villanova.co.uk VISUAL COMFORT & CO., 866-344-3875, visualcomfortlightinglights.com


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E As glorious weather gently tugs us to get out and relish nature, make plans to enjoy life on that Southern staple: the porch. Whether warm or cool, shady or bright, update your outdoor space with furnishing and décor ideas for making any veranda more fabulous. And once you’ve given your porch a style refresh, you’ll find it’s the perfect place for entertaining across a spectrum of occasions. Get ample inspiration for party planning with myriad settings for hosting get-togethers in the fresh air, with plenty of details to create your own flair. From upscale, fancy events to casual and more intimate affairs, these tableaux help set the tone. Soon you’ll be ready to kick up your feet and sit a spell—if you’re not already doing so while reading this issue!

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800-361-8059


AFTERTHOUGHTS

ALL MY CANDY BY

A

Ann Dorer |

ILLUSTRATION BY

s the cooler air of autumn brings relief from the South’s summer heat, the appearance of oversize bags of candy heaped onto store shelves announces the approach of many a child’s favorite fall day: Halloween. It means youngsters get to play dress up and get free candy simply by knocking on doors and yelling, “Trick or treat!” For mothers, it means buying that candy. Lots of it. On Halloween night, the large neighborhood where we raised our family literally teemed with trick-or-treaters scurrying from one house to the next. I had to be ready. I usually bought at least two giant bags of inexpensive assorted candy, plus I often snatched up a bag or two of bubble gum to add to the mix. And always, in spite of my best intentions not to do so, I purchased two or three—okay, four—bags of snack-size chocolate candy bars. My favorite. I snacked on them in the tidbits of time between children coming to the door. As dusk descended, it was the youngest trick-or-treaters who first appeared on our doorstep, cutie-pies costumed as fairies, princesses, ballerinas, pirates, or perhaps superheroes. “Say ‘trick or treat,’” their smiling parents encouraged them. And once candy was dropped into the little ones’ pumpkinshaped pails, Mommy or Daddy would prompt, “Say ‘thank you.’”

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Judy Jamieson

As the evening progressed, so did the age of the children, some in store-bought costumes, others in creative homemade attire. I especially remember the girl who wore a ladylike blue dress, a white-haired wig, and a double strand of large pearls around her neck. When she snapped opened the purse on her arm for me to deposit candy, I asked, “Now who are you?” “Barbara Bush,” she answered. Of course, she was! By the time true darkness set in, I could count on one last batch of trick-or-treaters appearing before I turned off our lights: boys on the edge of being too old to trick-or-treat. Wearing camo clothing, they carried pillowcases for their loot. These were the recipients of the remainder of my candy. Giving it all away kept me from eating anymore. Unfortunately, no trick-or-treaters come to where we now live. Thus, I relish the recent story about the time my daughterin-law, Tish, joined my daughter, Kate, to pass out candy in her neighborhood while their husbands took the children trick-ortreating. When a rosy-cheeked toddler with eyes shining under her riot of curly hair came to the door dressed as a ladybug, my daughter-in-law’s heart melted. “Oh, you can have all my candy!” Tish told her. Indeed, candy is sweet. But getting to see precious children having so much old-fashioned fun on Halloween is even sweeter.


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