Issuu on Google+

00- introduction

Unit 22 Theme DARE TO CARE. Architecture taking care of vulnerable realities. Technification pushed us to hold to the illusion that humans are invulnerable, with our magnificent creations, our cities and our technologies. This resulting system allows economic privilege and the shortsightedness of the economic sphere to overwhelm the ecological and social realities in which we all live. The advances of science and technology and the ‘domination’ over nature, allows us to consider that our environmental worries are no longer about what nature might do to us, but what we are doing to nature. The modern world seems to harbour notions that we stand outside of nature, that we are not embedded in an ecology. Nevertheless newspapers and television remind us that we are far from controlling nature and preventing its risk productions. While natural hazards still pose a major threat, even in the developed world, and the new sort of self-produced risk has been spread all over, the result is that we are substantially more vulnerable. We will measure the quality of architecture by its ability to represent the interest and programs of others, being these others, humans, non humans, institutions or any other aspects and entities of our. BRUNO LATOUR Including the ecological limits and dependence of everything we design. Protecting the context from the damage we are creating using the logic of “Solving for pattern”, coined by Berry in his essay of the same title, as the process of finding solutions that solve multiple problems, while minimizing the creation of new problems and maximizing the amount of opportunitiesWendel Berry

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

3


00.1 SITE AREA INTRODUCTION: LANCASHIRE Lancashire is a North Western English County. It emerged during the Industrial Revolution as a major commercial and industrial region. The county encompassed several hundred mill towns and collieries. By the 1830s, approximately 85% of all cotton manufactured worldwide was processed in the Lancashire area.

HALTON

19th century has seen the area shrink much smaller following a major reform of local government. The boroughs of Liverpool, Knowsley, St Helens and Sefton were removed entirely from Lancashire. By the census of 1971 the population of Lancashire (including all its associated county boroughs) had reached 5,129,416, making it then the most populous geographic county in the UK. The administrative county of Lancashire was also the most populous of its type outside of London, with a population of 2,280,359 in 1961. On 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, the administrative county of Lancashire was abolished, as were the county boroughs. The urbanised southern part largely became part of two new metropolitan counties. The southwestern part became part of Merseyside, the south-eastern part was incorporated into Greater Manchester. Lancaster has become the most urbanised county yet its diminished size and appearance is one of countryside and abundance of land. Its demise of mills has lead to mostly retailers and quarries as its main economic and residents remain large. Agriculture although still present is by far exceeded in economic output by industry.

LANCASHIRE LANCASTER

Map by Goog;e

bridge over river lune

skate park in city

typical lancashire countryside

photographs taken by lancaster co-housing group

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

4


The site is on the north banks of River Lune. Halton, the closest village is only 3 miles away and is easily reachable by car and by bike. 47.5m 5

19

2

6

19

13

44

2

1

ETL

TE

IN

PO

13 8

R

8

IVE DR

DR

E OV GR

10

30

K OA

2

IVE

K OA

28

12

Avondale 1

46 36

bS

ta

18 7

9

6

a

15

1

11

MS

27

7

179

12

KE

2

167

2

lto Ha Fo Fo rgew rgew oo oo d C d Flat ott age

52

76

2 6

9

1

100

78

48

27

72

74

108

94

30

2

50

Sh elt er

1

19

68

31

86 28

50

House

42

70

56

54

38

Su

182

1

5

60

25

8

6 66

1

2

34

1

72

11

44

10

42

52

29

38

3

b 3

2

1

4

8

6

2

3

1

2

FO

11

13 21 1

43

OO EW

RG

Gardens

1

E

RIV

DD

OO EW

RG

FO

24

36

11

13

7

FELL

2

152

LYT HE

10

71

UE AVEN

164

1

10

65

16

63

166

36A

7

172

18

22

20

24

SE

CLO

D

13

Playing Fields Shelter Allotment

1

Courts

Hazelbank House

FB

5

AV

34

El Sub Sta

A

CLOU GH

OO EW RG FO D OO EW RG

d

inga

rth

Whin's Brow

FO

1

Sta

nn

NK

ELBA

176

40 40A

19

21

44 .2m El

LA

N

Su b

Sta

DS GR

171

7

SY

58

15

E

7

54

62

39

31

114

RIV

CLO

11

E

U EN

1

2

K PAR

D

5

Manor House

W LO

AD RO

E

The Old School

IV

AD RO

DR

e les ThStab

5

3

1

2

1

30.8m

m)

h (u

The Granary

39

26

Co

Co

CR

Town End Farm

K

VIEW

1

22

RIVE

E

TOWN END WAY

10.4m

4 22

28

RSID

LUN

PA R

2 1

2

14

13

1

Wenning House

nk

e Ba

Forg

SM

r Wei

16

OSE

1

2

E CL

1 6 to

5

7

6

The Dairy

FORGE LANE

(PH)

St Robert's RC Church

ard W & nst Bdy

The Coach House

14.0m Greyhound Hotel

Club

Shelter

21

ETL

19

Post

Intake

Threshers Barn

33

17

23

13

The Farmhouse

35

15

7 1

29

TCB

ne

Lu

Post

Pat

37

13

GP

er Riv

12

H

14

2

2

D

39

12

14

26 40

L

33

10

IL

G

31

6

SH RU

2

elw oo

The Centre at Halton

10

Track

6

8

10

Riverside House 28

Pumping Station

Intake

SM

ESS

36

11

MILL LANE

Rosenlavi

Track

Playground

Halton Bridge

11.6m

Lo we r

k

Trac

Hal

CR

&W ard Bd

y

r Wei

Co Const

ton

Ivy Cottage

River Lune

Path

)

(um

Breakwaters

Slipway

Path

Slipway

ay

yclew

&C

Pond

MS 37.5m

FB

Path (um)

Boat House

Path (um)

Path & Cycle Path

Car Park

Path and Cycleway

Car Park Beckside

10.7m Sewage Works

39.3m

Bulk Bridge

Stepaside

North Lodge

Denny Beck Barn

Denny Beck Farm

3

A 68

Ashrigg

Cattle Grid

Woodfield

37.9m

11.3m

Kilindi

Den

Woodlands

ny

Be

DEN

ck

Cae Newydd

CG

38.2m

Beck House

NY BECK LANE

Caravan & Camp Site Issues

16.8m

Glendale

ck

a Tr

Trac k

ETL

Denny Beck Cottage

37.8m Lay-by

Denny Beck Bridge

GVC Track

by Lay-

CG CG

Depot

TCB

CG

Sinks

Lay-by

Beach Croft

CG

5

2

LB 7

RECTORY

11 19

3

TH HA

UG

13

10

4

D'S ILFRI 33

21

Forge wood

UE

AVEN

9

5

Haz

Cu

45

29

Rectory Barn

21.6m

27

25

LB

El

8

22 41

19 3 11

Hazel View Cartref

PW

GP

61 59

57

HIG

2

m

8

36.0

97

83

55

25

1

27

Thorn Field

HAZ

Victoria Place

CK

DO

D PA

Rectory Cottages

43

24

m

35.1

LB

85

73

SE

83

37

37

View

26

ST W

1

101

20

32

Tel Ex

PI

4

2

ks Wor

105

NCOURT

93 89 81

LO

3

111

1

HTO UG

ET STRE NEW

34

Church

75

C NE

75

65

LYTHE FELL AVENUE

45

High

42

34A

Play Area

55

m

Annie's Fold

Scholar Green

El Sub Sta

PO 53

Green Beck House

El Sub Sta

1

LD

WFIE DOOSE MEA CL

m

38.8

125 103

3

30

HAYLOT DRIVE

m

40.8

LB

39

CO

HO

RK

'S PA

ILFRID

ST W

SCHOOLHOUSE LANE

TCB

39.1

139

Beck

16

12

51

41

NK

HIG

141

2

52

AM

Green

23

79

URT

9

TH WAL

59

53

BA

D OA HR

10

Halton

20

61

IEW

2

17

20

LD

FIE

OW

29

13

11

19

LB

Halton Green Cottage

)

(um

4

22

AD RO

67

St Wilfrid's C of E Primary School

AD

ME

5

157

5

67

1

42.0m

15

9

5

3

1

11

EV

28

E N O ST

ry

ra

Lib

ND S

UE EN AV

Y N N PE

Tank

FB FB

Path

2

Tank

6

LA

21

L DA

30

KE

Mayfield

20

31

48

27

S NE

1

Fairacre

LU

10

53

SY

18

46

51

49

1

8

GP

n

11

0

20

34

1

11

13

RO AD

40

12

H

2

22

EC

K PAR ALE WD RRO HA

52

BE

13

Su

9

El

Denny Bank 35.4m

New

29.9m

40.9m

GRIM

ESHA W LA

NE (Tr

ack)

Parkside Farm

1:2000 Site map. Site market by red line

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

5


00.2 ACCURATE DEFINITION OF SITE

1 in 3 people now live alone in Britain

Site is a 2.5 acre plot on the outskirts of Halton, North West England. It runs alongside the river Lune, and is 3.4 miles away from Lancaster town center. It is easily navigated by bike and car. Historically, it was a site for an engineering company ‘Luneside Engineering’ and in 1950 they built mechanical life size elephants which they took on tour around the country. Before this there were several mills on the site for cotton, linseed, fabrics before the businesses ceased and the properties sold. These mills did use the water from the river nearer the eastern end to use in ponds and building processes. It now houses one out of use old mill building.

85% of us don’t know our neighbours

aerial view of site

project The link

food eating Earth Farmland, land River, living Soil, Back garden, Tree, Plants

Lancashire and the world supermarkets, restuarants, farm shops markets

topographical context of site

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

6


00.3 SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 1. River Lune 2.View of site from river side 3. Fishing Hut and Boat House (still running) 4. Old Mill Building ( empty) 5. River Lune on boat 6.View of mill building from west side.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

7


00.4 PROGRAM AND AGENDA Housing and public shared facilities for Lancaster Cohousing Group. There will be approximately 32 households comprising of houses 1-3 bed, houses and studio units. There will also be common facilities for sharing and preparing food. Laundry, visitors housing, car pooling and other activities will be shared within the scheme. The emphasis on the project is about food sustainablility and general sustainable living. Appreciating where food comes from and the enjoyment of the experience of eating as a social past time. Due to time and money constraints, the inhabitant will move in at an earlier stage than completion and alter their surroundings themselves for their communal spaces in which the building will grow slowly.

floor area required 55m²

LANCASTER CO-HOUSING GROUP DIRECTORS: I’d like to live with a bunch of friends who all ate together and helped look after each other’s children.” - Pete

in

TOWARDS A SLOW FOOD CO-HOUSING TYPOLOGY Kathy

Huw

Luke

1:1000 12 x 1 bed

massing required for different “Living houseson your

65m²

10 x 2 bed 80m²

“I look forward to living in community and hope that others will be inspired by the eco-living side of the project.”- Kathy

own has its attraction, but it is not all it’s cracked up to be!”- Chris

Chris

7 x 3 bed 3 x 3+ bed

100m² 360m²

3 x 3+ bed 1 x communal house

7 x 3 bed

1 x communal house

10 x 2 bed

12 x 1 bed

Fiona -

list of matters to be addressed

1. Architecture will respond to the different layers of private to public spaces that residents will encounter between the communal to the bedroom spaces and encourage interaction between people. 2. The architecture will improve the relationship between the eater and the history of his/her food. The experience and enjoyment of eating will be drawn upon with the appreciation of where it has come from. 3. Architecture will respect and preserve the natural environment that it is housed in. 5. The workings of architectural systems will be made obvious to its users in a friendly and understandable way.

“I always thought I’d suffer from ‘empty nest syndrome’ when my daughter left home, so I wanted to have other people around me when that happened”.- Fiona

Pete

Jan

Jon “I work around the country and often from home - which will be great overlooking the Lune.”- Jan

HOUSING TYPES

IN RELATION T Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

8


00.5 Intentions and motivations Intentions: Aims to improve food quality that is the dietry value, and the enjoyment value as a community and social activity by providing a scheme for living, growing and providing. By being mindful of the surroundings and the existing nature cycles that we are part of, the intention wil be to add to and improve these systems of food waste, cooking, food production and by doing this having more of a connection with where our food comes from. Even though the feeling of these communities are old fashioned, the scheme should bring out it’s modern in attitude and outlook. It should set an example of a new and successful way of living, socialising with the community around you and to have an appreciation of the surroundings. It should promote social activity between all families, races and ages but also respect the privacy of individual households and members of the community that may not live on the premises.

problems on the habitat of the river animals and plants. This is true about foreign water also. So, there will be a motivation to produce a set of systems which will benefit the surroundings not add to the problem. Slow architecture The building will develope over time according to the needs and desires of the residents. Since as a community they get on well and like to be really involved with their surroundings, the architecture will reflect their interests and elements of craft. Some households being responsible for certain areas of the common facilities will allow people to take ownership of the activities while sharing the facilities with others. It will therefore encourage people to look after shared spaces and encourage socialising.

It should be open to all as a way of living, and the process of adjusting to this way of life should be as easy and natural as possible. Motivations: Slow food as a link between land and food. To build a ‘link’ between living and eating in set of building systems which treat the two activities as an engaging and dependent of each other. Treating ‘nature’ not as an all mighty all beautiful object to admire, but as a delicate and almost dangerous world in which to be part of needs close attention to the systems already taking place in it. Therefor the architecture will try to preserve the land as much as possible. Symbiotic relationship between the processes of people, animals and plants. The slow food attitude extends to that of the environment- to protect it as it provides us with nutritional value that we must not destroy. As all the waste products from cooking, cleaning, packaging, heating will have an effect on the surroundings, which will in turn have an effect on the land which provides us food, The motivation of this project is not just to produce a eco villiage but to set en example of the quality of living and feeding ourselves and the environment well.

The earthship building, where residents build their own house

Food sufficiency in the way of production, cooking and waste produced must be dealt with to fit into the local environment and not to pollute it. Many ‘normal’ species of plants may pollute the river which can have dramatic

Design Realisation- Towards a slow food co-housing typology clarissa yee unit 22

9


introductionDR