Graduation Project Document - Conde Nast Traveller India

Page 1

Graduation Project Report 2020

Art Intern at CondĂŠ Nast Traveller, Mumbai Submitted By

Rishika Kashyap 2016-20

Submitted To

Department of Fashion Communication National Institute of Fashion Technology Mithapur Farms, Patna www.nift.ac.in


Published in 2020 Copyright Š NIFT Patna All Rights Reserved This document is submitted to NIFT Patna as a part of graduation project carried out by the student under the guidance of industry and academic mentor. Reproduction and distribution of this document in any form or any means, without permission of the institute is strictly prohibited. Industry Mentor: Ms. Nikita Rao Art Director, CondÊ Nast Traveller, Mumbai Email: nikita.rao@condenast.in Faculty Mentor: Mr. Deep Sagar Verma CC-FC Email: deepsagar.verma@nift.ac.in Edited and designed by: Rishika Kashyap Email: rishika.kashyap@nift.ac.in


DECLARATION The work presented in this document is authentic and original and is the outcome of the graduation project done by me at CondĂŠ Nast Traveller, Mumbai. No portion of this work has been submitted for another degree or qualification to this institute or any other university or other institute of learning. I also declare that the content of document is the product of my own work except to the extent that assistance from others in the project design and conception or in style, presentation and linguistic expression is acknowledged.

Rishika Kashyap Department of Fashion Communication National Institute of Fashion Technology, Patna

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INTERNSHIP CERTIFICATE

II


DocuSign Envelope ID: D4CFD1FE-3406-4853-9273-80CED2A73D7C

January 8, 2020 Rishika Kashyap Mumbai, India Dear Rishika, We are pleased to appoint you as an Art Intern with Condé Nast India Pvt. Ltd. for the period of January 8, 2020 to April 30, 2020. You will be reporting to the Art Director – Condé Nast Traveller, India. You will be paid a stipend of INR 3,500/- (Rupees Three Thousand Five Hundred only) per month. Please sign and return the duplicate copy of this letter to indicate your acceptance. Yours sincerely, For and on behalf of Condé Nast India Private Ltd.

Ria Ganguly Assistant Manager- HR

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MENTOR CERTIFICATE

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This is to certify that the Internship document submitted towards the partial fulfillment of the course curriculum of the program Bachelor of Design (FC-VIII) by Rishika Kashyap is their original work done under my guidance and the results are made on the research done by me.

Mr. Deep Sagar Verma CC, Department of Fashion Communication National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT) Patna

Signature:_____________________

____________ External Jury

____________ External Jury

____________

External Jury V


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

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I, Rishika Kashyap of the Department of Fashion Communication, National Institute of Fashion Technology, Patna offer a huge thanks to all those who have guided me throughout my graduation project of 16 weeks. This internship was a journey which wouldn’t have been complete without the help of them. I would like to express my deep gratitude towards all those who were involved in this journey of mine even in the simplest possible way. I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Ms. Nikita Rao (Art Director and industry mentor) who provided me with me such an amazing opportunity to execute my internship and who guided me all the time with her utmost support and concern. Her constant suggestions helped me a lot to learn and grow. I would also like to thank all those of the team I worked with including Ms. Siddhi Mehta (Assistant Art Director) and Mr. Rahul Nath (Junior Photo Editor), Ms. Madhura Phadnis, Ms. Smita Menon (Culinary Editor & Associate Digital Editor), Mr. Madan Kumar (IT) and Ms. Saniya Shete (Junior Visual Editor). And I would also like to extend my gratitude to Ms. Rashmi Thakur (Asst. Professor) who gave valuable inputs throughout the internship period. I would also like to thank our Director, Prof. Sanjay Srivastava and my faculty mentor Mr. Deep Sagar Verma (Asst. Professor and CC-FC) along with all the other department faculties for their regular feedbacks and timely motivations. It was their constant guidance, support and love that helped in the completion of this journey. Last but not the least, I would like to thank my family and my friends for their constant support and cooperation during the time of my difficulties and success.

Sincerely, Rishika Kashyap Department of Fashion Communication (2016- 20) National Institute of Fashion Technology

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PREFACE

VIII


This graduation project report is documented after sixteen weeks of industry exposure providing me with an amazing opportunity to learn and grow in the field of editorial publishing. This report documents all the projects that I had worked on during my internship period at CondĂŠ Nast Traveller, Mumbai. This report talks about the company in its first few pages, and then about my internship there. Followed by the tasks and projects I did, it also includes all the processes and learning of each project and task I completed. This internship provided me with the needed exposure to the industry and fetching fruitful results. I got new experiences and a better understanding of the industry.

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CONTENTS


DECLARATION

I

INTERNSHIP CERTIFICATE

II

MENTOR CERTIFICATE

IV

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

VI

PREFACE

VIII

ABSTRACT

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INTRODUCTION

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PROJECT - TRA 2019 • RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

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• DESIGN METHODOLOGY

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OTHER PROJECTS • MASABA GUPTA - SS ‘20

45

• E-INVITE - CNT X EDO RESTAURANT

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CONCLUSION

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REFERENCES

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ABSTRACT

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

ABOUT THE GRADUATION PROJECT: The graduation project I have majorly worked on is for the Top Restaurant Awards 2019 (TRA 2019). The magazine CondĂŠ Nast Traveller organizes various awards for the food and travel industry and one among them is the Top Restaurant Awards which recognizes 50 finest restaurants across the country each year and rates them accordingly. The Top Restaurant Awards is a collaboration with the Himalayan Sparkling Water and CondĂŠ Nast Traveller, India. And the occasion is celebrated with a supplement along with the main issue of Food + Drink special, which is usually in the month of February-March each year. I worked on the image sourcing and layouts for the supplement as my main project for graduation. I interned under the Art Director and my industry mentor, Ms. Nikita Rao, and with her guidance, I successfully completed this project along with various other projects. I started with a little background research and references from old issues and moved to image sourcing from the restaurants and sketches of layouts for the supplement. The graduation project gave me a new perspective in terms of editorial publishing since I had already worked in an advertorial setting. It helped me in a lot of ways that may not be restricted to work but also in terms of personal development. Being my first time in an editorial setting, I was able to differentiate how editorial and advertorial work and their similarities and differences. It was overall an amazing learning experience with amazing sunsets on the Marine Drive.

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EXPECTATIONS FROM GRADUATION PROJECT: This graduation project was supposed to be a learning experience in the industry and to know the working of a editorial publishing house. This graduation project would give me an advantage because of the knowledge of both, advertorial and editorial setting. The experience of four months in the industry would help me make a better employee in terms of work-timings, co-ordination with teams and meeting deadlines without compromising the quality of the work while also learning the possibilities and opportunities that come along working with an employer. The change of fields would also help by giving me an understanding beforehand.

WHY THIS COMPANY? Although Condé Nast Traveller, Mumbai wasn’t the first choice of option for my graduation project, but it was definitely a huge name on the list I had in my mind. My preferences were more oriented towards advertising agencies and though I got through a few of them, various reasons led to not pursuing them. Condé Nast Traveller, Mumbai was like a saving grace for me. Although I had no experience in a magazine, it was definitely a great opportunity for me because of the fact that I would be able to work better in an advertising agency if I could differentiate between the editorial and advertorial. Also, this was an opportunity where I could try out new fields so that I could be sure of my choices and fields I want to pursue. All that said, Condé Nast Traveller, Mumbai was a great opportunity because of the fact that it being related to travel and food industry, I would get to learn a lot more besides the fact it being a magazine. Understanding and usage of images to portray stories and working around the design language of the magazine was something I still had to work and improve on.

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

RESEARCH SYNOPSIS:

“The last word in travel. Whether it’s the current ‘it’ destination or a new way to experience your favourite city, an adventure of a lifetime or a journey that will bring the family together, whatever you’re looking for Condé Nast Traveller India has a trip you’ll want to embark on.” Before I could start my internship period, I did a bit of research so I could understand what the organization is about. As the name suggests, this magazine is about the travel and tourism, while also taking time to address various other topics such as food, sports, business, etc. Condé Nast Traveller is India’s leading luxury travel brand. Through its magazine, website and social media channels, Conde Nast Traveller provides over 4,00,000 readers premium travel inspiration and information. Condé Nast India is a 100% subsidiary of Condé Nast International and was launched in 2010. Condé Nast Traveller has been India’s only source of authentic luxury travel and lifestyle content since the magazine hit stands in 2010. Through the magazine, website, social media and videos, Condé Nast Traveller inspires millions of Indian travellers every day.

FURTHER PURSUANCE: This graduation project gave me a great experience in understanding the fields I would be working in if I continued in editorial and how different it would be from an advertorial setting. Although the experience came along with intense learning, I would like to go forward with advertising because of the challenges it brings. This graduation project helped me realize what I actually wanted to pursue by making me sure of my choice. Being sure of my choice of career field, I will be able to work on my skills and improve upon where needed, while understanding the complexities of an office setting and the industry itself.

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INTRODUCTION

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE ORGANIZATION: Condé Nast is a global media company that produces some of the world’s leading print, digital, video and social brands. These include Vogue, GQ, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Wired and Architectural Digest (AD), Condé Nast Traveler and La Cucina Italiana, among others. Their colleagues and collaborators bring big ideas to life, intelligent storytelling with a diverse point of view underscores all that they do. They reach 84 million consumers in print, 366 million in digital and 384 million across social platforms. Headquartered in New York and London, Condé Nast operates in 31 markets including China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico and Latin America, Russia, Spain, Taiwan, the U.K. and the U.S., with additional license partners throughout the world. In addition to the premium content for which they are known, they also produce incomparable experiences and events; including the Metropolitan Museum of Arts Costume Institute Gala, the Condé Nast Luxury Conference, The New Yorker Festival, the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit, Wired Next Fest Italy, GQ Men of the Year, the GQ Suit Walk Taiwan, Glamour Shopping Week, the Vogue India Wedding Show and Vogue Forces of Fashion. Condé Nast Entertainment (CNE) is their award-winning production and distribution studio that launched in 2011. It extends the company’s reach through the development of original content across film, television, social and digital video and virtual reality. They have ventures in education including the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design in London, the Condé Nast College in Spain and La Cucina Cooking School in Italy. They also run a world-class hospitality division, which extends to branded products and content. They know that conversation, community and diversity make them better at what they do. Their Social Talent Academy, founded by Condé Nast Italy, fosters and mentors digital influencers with expertise in a range of fields including fashion, beauty, sport, travel and automotive. They inform in new and compelling ways, creating beautiful, visually arresting moments that offer new perspectives, and new forms of self-expression. At Condé Nast, they celebrate the extraordinary. Creativity and imagination are the lifeblood of all that they do.

“We are a media company for the future, with a remarkable past. We are Condé Nast.”

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CONDÉ NAST INDIA: Condé Nast India is dedicated to producing high quality, compelling content that connects with India’s most influential audiences. A leader within the market, Condé Nast India produces the premium titles Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller and Architectural Digest (AD). Over the years, Condé Nast India has extended its magazine offering by successfully diversifying into digital, TV and experiential platforms; thereby setting new benchmarks in the industry and establishing itself as a leader within the luxury and lifestyle space. Similarly, the Condé Nast Creative Studio delivers best-in-class brand solutions with the right degree of editorial authority and influence across multiple digital platforms. In 2015, the group added Condé Nast Video to its portfolio; some of its best-known work includes the no-holds-barred A-list celebrity talk show “BFFs” as well as the disruptive format breaker “Feet Up With The Stars”. Condé Nast India has mastered the art of creating experiential properties for consumers. These range from smaller, high-power multi-city events to large-scale marquee properties such as award shows and exhibitions. Flagship properties such as the Vogue Wedding Show, GQ Men of the Year Awards, the AD 100, Vogue Women of the Year Awards, AD Design Show and the Condé Nast Traveller Top Restaurant Awards are hosted with much fanfare and are by far the most anticipated events of the year.

THE FOUNDER: Condé Montrose Nast (March 26, 1873 – September 19, 1942) was an American publisher, entrepreneur and business magnate. He founded Condé Nast, a mass media company, now a subsidiary of Advance Publications, who published and maintained brands such as Vanity Fair, Vogue, and The New Yorker. Nast eventually owned a stable of magazines that included House & Garden, British, French, and Argentine editions of Vogue, Le Jardin des Modes, and Glamour – the last magazine added to the group while he was alive. While other publishers simply focused on increasing the number of magazines in circulation, Nast targeted groups of readers by income level or common interest. Among his staff were Edna Woolman Chase, who served as the editor-in-chief of Vogue, as well as Dorothy Parker and Robert Benchley.

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE PHILOSOPHY & VALUES: For about 100 years, Condé Nast International has set the standard for engaging, visually arresting, innovative publishing, creating the very finest magazine brands in the world. An obsession for excellence that produces authoritative, premium, provocative content has earned the trust of millions of followers in print, digital and beyond. Today, Condé Nast International’s staunch commitment remains: to deliver influential content and brand experiences for discerning individuals who demand to be inspired. An obsession with quality- Condé Nast currently publishes more than 143 titles and numerous digital publications in 30 markets, reaching a worldwide readership of more than 263 million. That success can be ascribed not only to the extraordinary people who have left their mark on the company since the beginning, but also uncompromising editorial standards that are reflected at every level of the publishing house. It is an approach unique in the media industry and it not only captivates readers, but also guarantees the loyalty of creative talent such as notable writers, photographers, illustrators, and art directors. Pride and passion- Among publishing houses worldwide, Condé Nast has one of the richest traditions, and is one of the most unique and influential companies in the field. To be a part of Condé Nast is more than just a job. Condé Nast employees are proud of their work and the company’s brands. They are committed to upholding Condé Nast’s high standards, and bring to the job passion, great personal commitment, a strong sense of responsibility, and a determination to constantly improve the work and re-interpret daily tasks. Entrepreneurial spirit and courage- In its more than century-old history, Condé Nast has always allowed itself the luxury of staying true to itself. Since its founding in 1909, decisions at Condé Nast have been characterized not by thoughts of quarterly returns, but rather by long-term, bold corporate initiatives. The legend that is Condé Nast is based on unique and innovative publishing concepts that have not only changed Condé Nast, but continue to decisively influence photography and how fashion, culture, and style are presented in the international media and fashion. Loyalty and trust- Today, Condé Nast is in excellent financial shape. For decades, the publisher has followed a clear policy of business principles attuned to the long term, as well as great editorial autonomy in individual markets. Condé Nast gives the company’s staff a great deal of managerial and creative freedom. Trust and loyalty are the key factors determining Condé Nast’s attitude.

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PROJECT TRA 2019

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

ABOUT THE PROJECT: Project title - Top Restaurant Awards 2019 Supplement, Feb-Mar issue 2020 Project brief - The brief was to create 3 options for cover, work on the template set for the contents page and the promotional page, create a few options for the opener and work on the layout for the ranking of restaurants from 1-50 along with a promotional spread for Diageo. Scope of project - The scope of the project was to compile a TRA booklet for the FebMar issue 2020, keeping in mind the previous issues of the booklet and the design language of the magazine and yet coming up with a better result. Duration - The duration of this project was for 5 weeks and 3 days, starting from January 8 till February 15 2020, where it includes the duration of research, initial sketches, image sourcing and the final layouts and compilation. Area of work - This project brief gave me to work around image sourcing and layouts/ publication design. Structure of work - The work was structured so that I would work on the rankings first then followed by the layouts for remaining pages, also while constantly receiving feedback from the Art Director & my industry mentor, Ms. Nikita Rao. Role - The role that I played in this project was to come up with layouts backed up with intense research and earlier issues’ references, while also sourcing for images to publish in the respective restaurants’ name. Experience - This project gave me hands-on experience on the know-how of the magazine industry, while receiving constant feedback on the work I was doing. This project helped understand how editorial works and how different it is from the advertorial. I also understood the value of team-work here and how much coordination is required for a magazine to reach such great heights.

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COMPLIMENTARY WITH FEB-MARCH 2020 ISSUE

THE 50 FINEST RESTAURANTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY — AS DECIDED BY INDIA’S TOP TASTEMAKERS Final cover of the booklet

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE

50 THAT MADE

PHOTOGRAPH: DANIEL SHECHTER

THE LIST

Final opener of the booklet

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RAW & FINE Traditional Japanese cuisine uses fresh ingredients and seasonal vegetables, a concept that’s well established at Wasabi by Morimoto. The restaurant imports many of its ingredients from Japan, so diners can enjoy authentic flavours. (tajhotels.com)

18 A page from the booklet

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WASABI BY MORIMOTO THE TAJ MAHAL PALACE, MUMBAI World-renowned ‘Iron Chef’ Masaharu Morimoto consistently wows with one exceptional Japanese dish after another. Wasabi by Morimoto offers diners authentic Japanese culinary treasures made with ingredients specially flown down from Japan, including seafood and wasabi. Located in The Taj Mahal Palace in Mumbai’s Colaba locality, you can enjoy views of the Gateway of India as you dig into sushi, white fish carpaccio or wasabi crème brûlée. It’s the perfect place to celebrate a special occasion with an exceptional meal. Unassuming and intimate, the ambience is minimal but sophisticated to keep all your attention on the food. From personalised chopsticks to an impressive saké collection, there’s a lot that impresses here.


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

GUNPOWDER ASSAGAO, GOA True South Indian delicacies have arrived to the land of fish and feni, and how! At Gunpowder, the casual outdoor ambience with colourful décor, clubbed with the aroma of tamarind and burnt curry leaves in the air, lure diners in. One of Assagao’s most loved restaurants, Gunpowder is the place for appams and mutton stew, tamarind fish curry, pork chops and avial curry. Just be sure to either make a reservation or at least turn up early, or you won’t get a table! Though you could always lounge around in the in-house boutique and pick up some Goan souvenirs while building up an appetite.

RAW & FINE Gunpowder uses local ingredients like coconut, tamarind and curry leaves in its specialities. (facebook.com/gunpowdergoa)

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DAKSHIN CROWNE PLAZA CHENNAI ADYAR PARK This iconic restaurant has been celebrating South Indian cuisine since 1989, and the Dakshin dining experience is nothing short of royal. Stepping into this space at Crowne Plaza Chennai Adyar Park is like walking into another era: the walls are adorned with Tanjore murals; the thalis are silver-coated; the Nataraja at the centre is stunning; and the antique furniture, dim lighting and live music all amplify this opulent journey. The menu features delicacies from all five regions of South India—from Andhra Pradesh’s chapa pulusu and gongura mamsam to Karnataka’s kori talna and Kerala’s ever-comforting ‘ishtew’ and meen moilee. Dakshin is a culinary journey that pays tribute to the diversity of South Indian cuisine, and to celebrate its 30th year, it recently curated a special menu featuring 30 traditional delicacies like the nandu pottu, theeyal and kal dosai. As another way to honour the restaurant’s 30 glorious years, Chef R Deva Kumar and his team also conceptualised two dishes—kozhi ammi masala and Chettinad adu—both packed with the flavours of 30 ingredients.

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A page from the booklet

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RAW & FINE All ingredients are sourced from producers in Tamil Nadu, and no imported ingredients are used. (crowneplaza.com)


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

COMORIN GURUGRAM This modern Indian restaurant stays true to the winning formula of elevating classic comfort foods to the next level. Whether it is the Mumbai street-favourite vada pav, the banana leaf bhetki maach that West Bengal swears by, or the Punjabi sarson ka saag, Chef Manish Mehrotra has curated a menu that’s full of familiar flavours made with seasonal ingredients. Aside from the freshness of these ingredients, it’s the presentation where Comorin sets itself apart. And accompanying the grub is a solid menu of spirits and cocktails such as nitro rum punch, khus vermouth negroni and walnut sour, all made using bitters and mixers prepared in-house. In fact, some spirits made here, like the khus vermouth, fennel liqueur and vanilla cognac, can be enjoyed either as cocktails or neat. The restaurant’s setting is sleek and modern. And after you are done dining, you can even shop from the curated selection of ingredients, coffee, table and barware and kitchen and bar implements on sale here.

RAW & FINE “Think small” is the mantra here. Comorin works with small batches of produce acquired from sustainable sources to keep waste to a minimum. And whatever is leftover from the restaurant menu goes towards the day’s menu for the staff. (comorin.in)

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

RESEARCH SYNOPSIS: For this project, I started with primary research and then followed onto with secondary research. I went through the earlier issues of this supplement of 2017 and 2018. And then looked out for layouts from different supplements of CondĂŠ Nast magazines and the internet. I also looked for typography options for the opener page. Following are some references from earlier issues and the ones from the internet as well.

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References of the 2017 & 2018 issues of the TRA booklet

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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Reference from the internet

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

Reference of the 2017 issue of the TRA booklet

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Reference from the internet

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

References from the internet

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DESIGN METHODOLOGY

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

DESIGN PROCESS: After completing a round of primary and secondary research, I started with a few initial sketches and moved on to a template provided by the Art Director. While working with the template layouts, I was also simultaneously sourcing images from the restaurants to be able to make better layouts. Working on the layouts became difficult because I had to get hold of the design language of the magazine and hence had to go back and forth with magazines so that I could create better. I also had a difficult time working with images because of the design language and understanding its usage guidelines.

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Initial sketches I drew after going through secondary research for the rankings page.

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THE BOMBAY CANTEEN MUMBAI When The Bombay Canteen first opened its doors in 2015, it defiantly eluded pigeonholes and called itself an India-inspired restaurant. In the years that followed, it crafted a new identity for Indian food in the restaurant space, with an ever-evolving menu that turned the spotlight on regional delicacies, home cooking and seasonal ingredients, all of which made it No. 1 on the Top Restaurant Awards 2018 list. Its playful vibe and affinity for Mumbai found expression in its cocktail menus inspired in shape and form by the city’s cultural melee, local traditions and food lore. A host of collaborations with farmers, home chefs and food entrepreneurs have kept the going good and marked a move towards sustainable consumption and cooking. One can always expect a surprise—be it in the form of flavour combinations or hero ingredients. Imagine a taco with a guava sabzi accompanied by a salad of the elusive succulent known as moras bhaji. While the approach to food is serious, its presentation is always fun and unpretentious. And clever touches

1

INDIAN ACCENT THE LODHI, NEW DELHI Chef Manish Mehrotra has burnished his reputation by bringing modern Indian cuisine to the world. He picks and chooses from flavours that have been honed over millennia, and here, he reimagines them, presenting them in fresh, interesting ways. Indian Accent, which came in first even at the 2017 Top Restaurant Awards, prides itself on sourcing most of its produce fresh from in and around New Delhi. While Indian Accent is best experienced by indulging in the chef’s tasting menu, it now offers entirely plant-based vegan menus, as well, for those conscious about what they eat and how it impacts the world we live in. Delicacies such as the pulled kathal phulka taco or the green jackfruit, sweet potato and Goan mango curry are as satisfying as the Chettinad chicken keema and the Kanyakumari crab. A meal here is one of those rare

point to the restaurant’s wry take on pop culture—a bowl of pre-liberalisation era

RAW & FINE

candies like Mango Bite and Kismi rests at the entrance while the waitstaff wear

The restaurant sources its fresh

tees emblazoned with ‘bro’ in Hindi.

ingredients from in and around the National Capital Region. Whether it is the deliciously crunchy baby cucumbers and the succulent tomatoes that hero many a dish here, the sweet strawberries used in the desserts and drinks, or the edible flowers used as garnish, a lot of it comes from a hydroponic farm in Greater Noida. Whatever

RAW & FINE “At The Bombay Canteen, our ingredient for the year was curiosity into the wild. Driven by the urge to discover new and

ingredients aren’t used go right back into the soil, thanks to The Lodhi New Delhi’s composting plant.

exciting local ingredients, we reached a new high in 2019 with over 60 unique, seasonal vegetables and fruits indigenous to India highlighted through our menu.”

experiences fit for a milestone celebration.

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19

3

IZUMU MUMBAI In Mumbai, when you think of ramen, you automatically think IZUMI. That’s how high the restaurant has set the bar for Japanese cuisine in the city. What started off as a thriving sushi delivery service—it used to be a 17-seater—has now become one of Mumbai’s favorite spots for food from the East. IZUMI is a powerful combination of Chef Nooresha Kably’s culinary skills and Anil Kably’s command over the Mumbai restaurant scene. The menu showcases the more traditional yet contemporary flavours from Japan. IZUMI reflects the Japanese philosophy of choosing a skill and mastering it to perfection, and thanks to Chef Nooresha and her team, the city of Mumbai has a place to enjoy a fun approach to a cuisine known for its superior craft.

THE TABLE MUMBAI

RAW & FINE “At IZUMI, we have almost no food wastage and nearly everything is made fresh with special efforts to keep the flavours intact. Chef Nooresha clearly espouses clean eating and an ingredient-driven ethic.”

Farm-fresh ingredients, warm hospitality and an elegant ambience define The Table, located in Mumbai’s Colaba neighbourhood. The restaurant has been a favourite among the city’s crème de la crème since it was established in 2011. If you’re wondering what keeps them coming back, it’s without a doubt the ingredients—it uses fresh fish and meat, and some of the greens are from the restaurant’s farm in Alibaug. The menu, which largely features shareable plates, takes inspiration from different corners of the world, from Thailand and Japan to France and the Americas. The boneless chicken wings drizzled with honey glaze, clams and hand-made linguini, shrimp dumplings in a spicy ginger broth, yellowfish tuna tataki and the avocado toast topped on sourdough (from the restaurant’s sister enterprise Magazine Street Kitchen) are some of the star dishes at The Table.

The templates I received for the layout; Next page- First set of variations

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RAW & FINE To ensure that it serves some of the finest ingredients, The Table started its own farm in Alibaug in 2012. A lot of its dishes are prepared with chemical-free vegetables, fruits and herbs sourced from this farm.


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

3

THE BOMBAY CANTEEN MUMBAI

IZUMU MUMBAI

When The Bombay Canteen first opened its doors in 2015, it defiantly

In Mumbai, when you think of ramen, you automatically think IZUMI. That’s how high the

eluded pigeonholes and called itself an India-inspired restaurant. In the years that followed, it crafted a new

restaurant has set the bar for Japanese cuisine in the city. What started off as a thriving sushi delivery service—it used to be a 17-seater—has now

identity for Indian food in the restaurant space, with an ever-evolving menu that turned the spotlight on regional delicacies, home cooking and seasonal

become one of Mumbai’s favorite spots for food from the East. IZUMI is a powerful combination of Chef Nooresha Kably’s culinary skills and Anil Kably’s command over the Mumbai restaurant

ingredients, all of which made it No. 1 on the Top Restaurant Awards 2018 list. Its playful vibe and affinity for Mumbai

scene. The menu showcases the more traditional yet contemporary flavours from Japan. IZUMI reflects the Japanese philosophy of choosing a skill

found expression in its cocktail menus inspired in shape and form by the city’s cultural melee, local traditions

and mastering it to perfection, and thanks to Chef Nooresha and her team, the city of Mumbai has a place to enjoy a fun approach to a cuisine known for

and food lore. A host of collaborations with farmers, home chefs and food entrepreneurs have kept the going

its superior craft.

good and marked a move towards sustainable consumption and cooking. One can always expect a surprise—be it in the form of flavour combinations or hero ingredients. Imagine a taco with a guava sabzi accompanied by a salad of

THE TABLE MUMBAI

the elusive succulent known as moras bhaji. While the approach to food is serious, its presentation is always fun and unpretentious. And clever touches

1

INDIAN ACCENT THE LODHI, NEW DELHI Chef Manish Mehrotra has burnished his reputation by bringing modern Indian cuisine to the world. He picks and chooses from flavours that have been honed over millennia, and here, he reimagines them, presenting them in fresh, interesting ways. Indian Accent, which came in first even at the 2017 Top Restaurant Awards, prides itself on sourcing most of its produce fresh from in and around New Delhi. While Indian Accent is best experienced by indulging in the chef’s tasting menu, it now offers entirely plant-based vegan menus, as well, for those conscious about what they eat and how it impacts the world we live in. Delicacies such as the pulled kathal phulka taco or the green jackfruit, sweet potato and Goan mango curry are as satisfying as the Chettinad chicken keema and the Kanyakumari crab. A meal here is one of those rare experiences fit for a milestone celebration.

Farm-fresh ingredients, warm hospitality and an elegant ambience define The Table, located in

point to the restaurant’s wry take on pop culture—a bowl of pre-liberalisation era candies like Mango Bite and Kismi rests

RAW & FINE

Mumbai’s Colaba neighbourhood. The restaurant has been a favourite among the city’s crème de la crème since it was established in 2011. If you’re

at the entrance while the waitstaff wear tees emblazoned with ‘bro’ in Hindi.

The restaurant sources its fresh ingredients from in and around the

RAW & FINE “At IZUMI, we have almost no food wastage and nearly

National Capital Region. Whether it is the deliciously crunchy baby cucumbers and the succulent

everything is made fresh with special efforts to keep the flavours intact. Chef Nooresha

tomatoes that hero many a dish here, the sweet strawberries used in the desserts and drinks, or the edible flowers used as garnish, a lot of it comes from a hydroponic farm in Greater Noida. Whatever ingredients aren’t used go right back

clearly espouses clean eating and an ingredient-driven ethic.”

RAW & FINE

the restaurant’s farm in Alibaug. The menu, which largely features shareable plates, takes inspiration from different corners of the world, from Thailand and Japan to France and the Americas. The boneless chicken wings drizzled with honey glaze, clams and hand-made linguini, shrimp dumplings in a spicy ginger broth, yellowfish tuna tataki and

To ensure that it serves some of the finest ingredients, The Table started its own farm in Alibaug in 2012. A lot of its dishes are prepared with chemical-free vegetables, fruits and herbs sourced from this farm.

the avocado toast topped on sourdough (from the restaurant’s sister enterprise Magazine Street Kitchen) are some of the star dishes at The Table.

“At The Bombay Canteen, our ingredient for the year was curiosity into the wild. Driven by the urge to discover new and

into the soil, thanks to The Lodhi New Delhi’s composting plant.

RAW & FINE

wondering what keeps them coming back, it’s without a doubt the ingredients—it uses fresh fish and meat, and some of the greens are from

exciting local ingredients, we reached a new high in 2019 with over 60 unique, seasonal vegetables and fruits indigenous to India highlighted through our menu.”

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BOMRA’S GOA Amitav Ghosh had called him “one of the finest and most inventive chefs in the world”, and since then, Jap has gone on to prove why he deserves that endorsement. The simple, airy ambience of bamboo and lanterns at Bomras is distinctly South Asian, as is the food. Jap draws from his Asian heritage to serve cuisine from China, Laos, India and Thailand. The menu may be limited and kinder to non-vegetarians, but it packs a punch. Pork lovers will enjoy the crackling pork, pomelo and

O PEDRO MUMBAI Made in Goa for the city of Mumbai, this all-day bar and restaurant was brought

THE BANGALA KARAIKUDI

This al fresco restaurant in North Goa’s Candolim is run by the reticent but affable Bawmra Jap. In 2011,

‘Authentic’ may be a much abused term in dining circles today, but this hotel-restaurant lays a fair

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claim to it. In the heart of Karaikudi in Tamil Nadu’s Chettinad district, the kitchen at this heritage hotel puts out a fine exposition of Chettiar cuisine.

Chef Jap brought in herbs from his home in

The flavours are spicy but not hot; the masalas are hand-pounded; and the menu reflects the region’s culture and history. So you will find the

Kachin, Myanmar, which he now grows at the restaurant’s garden.

immensely popular uppu kari, a dish made with mutton, shallots, garlic and Tamil Nadu’s famous gundu milagai chillies. But you will also find mint and potato croquettes as a nod to the British, who

pomegranate salad and also the slow-cooked pork belly salad. Pair your meals with a pomegranate margarita or lychee martini and finish it all off

RAW & FINE Your lunch is served on banana leaves grown in

Awards. O Pedro offers simple yet sophisticated food that reflects Goa’s culinary diversity, even drawing from

the hotel’s own gardens, irrigated by wastewater from the property. All leftovers

its Portuguese influences. Its expert mixologists dove deep into the way Goan bars evolved over the years and brought together a menu of inventive drinks that

are processed and used as compost for the garden. How is that for sustainability!

blended homebrews with fresh ingredients and local flavours. Perhaps O Pedro’s best quality is the casual-cum-formal ambience

left their culinary imprint on the region. Meals are taken communally at a teak dining hall and eaten from a banana leaf plate with one’s hands. Bonus:

with the coconut and jackfruit panna cotta or the lemongrass and ginger crème brûlée.

here by the team behind The Bombay Canteen (Hunger Inc Hospitality Pvt Ltd), the winners of the 2018 Top Restaurant

one can also sign up for the seven-day Masterclass, which includes shopping trips, history lessons and hands-on cooking sessions with professional and

clubbed with the lack of rigidity that a lot of fine-dining restaurants come with. Food comes in quarter-, half- and full-plate portions to allow diners to eat and share as they like, options that not many finedining spots offer.

home chefs.

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TOAST & TONIC BENGALURU This Bengaluru restaurant helmed by Manu Chandra celebrates all things local—Bandel from Kolkata, robiola from Maharashtra, chocolate from Puducherry, pork from Tamil Nadu and crabs from Andhra Pradesh—on its menu. Add a Toast & Tonic touch, and you get international dishes that champion these ingredients like slow-cooked pork carnitas served on corn tortillas, smoked Bandel cheese and gin mustard hollandaise, Naga chilli chicken wings with a side of som tam salad and crisp soft-shell crab with a Singapore-style chilli peanut sauce. The interiors, too, transport you from Bengaluru’s Wood Street to New York City’s bohemian East Village neighbourhood. With exposed walls and roofs and floors designed with decade-old sleeper wood, the space is fuss-free and makes you feel at ease. But the real draw here—as one can guess by its name—is the selection of tonics. The bar boasts some of the best G&Ts in the city, homemade tonics infused with aromatics like basil, rose petals and elderflower.

RAW & FINE Executive Chef Hussain Shahzad’s food philosophy is simple—showcase local produce using contemporary culinary techniques that inspire future generations of chefs to cook smarter. Moreover, diners at O Pedro can enjoy what the Goans ate in pre-Portuguese times: the nuanced cuisine of the Saraswat community that loved both seafood and vegetarian fare, coconut and kokum. The restaurant has also been trying to reveal Konkan culinary secrets, traditions and pre-Portuguese history through food festivals and dishes that appear on their menu seasonally.

RAW & FINE Toast & Tonic has its own farmstead, where it grows its own produce. This year, the restaurant also launched Begum Victoria Cheese, which promotes homegrown, artisanal cheese.

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THE BLACK SHEEP BISTRO GOA Sabreen and Prahlad Sukhtankar’s bistro has firmly established itself in Panaji’s premium dining circuit. Situated in a yellow-and-white bungalow in the city’s Latin Quarter, The Black Sheep Bistro channels an elegant but easy vibe. It serves global cuisines prepared with local Goan ingredients: think Malwani chicken stroganoff; tuna + kokam ross, and the Hainanese paneer rice. The highlight, though, is the impressive cocktail programme—with handcrafted concoctions that will add to the evening. Try The Paan, made from fresh betel nut leaf, anise, gin, vodka and lime; the Lau Pani, made from sparkling wine, whiskey and rice, or one of the many Goan feni-based cocktails.

DUM PUKHT ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI The zardozi-embroidered, colonial-style furniture and the Awadhi-style lamps will transport you to an era bygone and the food to the kitchens of the nawabs. ‘Dum pukht’ is the process of slow-cooking food in a handi sealed with dough, which allows the ingredients to mature and brings out the most intense aromas and flavours. The restaurant at ITC Maurya revives

RAW & FINE From seafood to meat to vegetables, the restaurant promotes local produce and growers.

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this traditional technique using centuries-old recipes borrowed from royal courts across the country, from Kashmir to Hyderabad. The melt-in-your-mouth kakori kebab, succulent murg chandi tikka, delicately flavoured baghare baingan and iconic Dum Pukht biryani have

RAW & FINE The restaurant strongly believes in sourcing sustainably and locally, using seasonal ingredients and artisan cooking methods, thus reviving traditional food practices. The ITC Hotels group works closely with local producers and farmers.

won the restaurant several accolades for elevating and redefining classical Indian cuisine.

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1

INDIAN ACCENT THE LODHI, NEW DELHI Chef Manish Mehrotra has burnished his reputation by bringing modern Indian cuisine to the world. He picks and chooses from flavours that have been honed over millennia, and here, he reimagines them, presenting them in fresh, interesting ways. Indian Accent, which came in first even at the 2017 Top Restaurant Awards, prides itself on sourcing most of its produce fresh from in and around New Delhi. While Indian Accent is best experienced by indulging in the chef’s tasting menu, it now offers entirely plant-based vegan menus, as well, for those conscious about what they eat and how it impacts the world we live in. Delicacies such as the pulled kathal phulka taco or the green jackfruit, sweet potato and Goan mango curry are as satisfying as the Chettinad chicken keema and the Kanyakumari crab. A meal here is one of those rare experiences fit for a milestone celebration.

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RAW & FINE The restaurant sources its fresh ingredients from in and around the National Capital Region. Whether it is the deliciously crunchy baby cucumbers and the succulent tomatoes that hero many a dish here, the sweet strawberries used in the desserts and drinks, or the edible flowers used as garnish, a lot of it comes from a hydroponic farm in Greater Noida. Whatever ingredients aren’t used go right back into the soil, thanks to The Lodhi New Delhi’s composting plant.


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE BOMBAY CANTEEN MUMBAI When The Bombay Canteen first opened its doors in 2015, it defiantly eluded pigeonholes and called itself an India-inspired restaurant. In the years that followed, it crafted a new identity for Indian food in the restaurant space, with an ever-evolving menu that turned the spotlight on regional delicacies, home cooking and seasonal ingredients, all of which made it No. 1 on the Top Restaurant Awards 2018 list. Its playful vibe and affinity for Mumbai found expression in its cocktail menus inspired in shape and form by the city’s cultural melee, local traditions and food lore. A host of collaborations with farmers, home chefs and food entrepreneurs have kept the going good and marked a move towards sustainable consumption and cooking. One can always expect a surprise—be it in the form of flavour combinations or hero ingredients. Imagine a taco with a guava sabzi accompanied by a salad of the elusive succulent known as moras bhaji. While the approach to food is serious, its presentation is always fun and unpretentious. And clever touches point to the restaurant’s wry take on pop culture—a bowl of pre-liberalisation era candies like Mango Bite and Kismi rests at the entrance while the waitstaff wear tees emblazoned with ‘bro’ in Hindi.

RAW & FINE “At The Bombay Canteen, our ingredient for the year was curiosity into the wild. Driven by the urge to discover new and exciting local ingredients, we reached a new high in 2019 with over 60 unique, seasonal vegetables and fruits indigenous to India highlighted through our menu.”

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IZUMU MUMBAI In Mumbai, when you think of ramen, you automatically think IZUMI. That’s how high the restaurant has set the bar for Japanese cuisine in the city. What started off as a thriving sushi delivery service—it used to be a 17-seater—has now become one of Mumbai’s favorite spots for food from the East. IZUMI is a powerful combination of Chef Nooresha Kably’s culinary skills and Anil Kably’s command over the Mumbai restaurant scene. The menu showcases the more traditional yet contemporary flavours from Japan. IZUMI reflects the Japanese philosophy of choosing a skill and mastering it to perfection, and thanks to Chef Nooresha and her team, the city of Mumbai has a place to enjoy a fun approach to a cuisine known for its superior craft.

RAW & FINE “At IZUMI, we have almost no food wastage and nearly everything is made fresh with special efforts to keep the flavours intact. Chef Nooresha clearly espouses clean eating and an ingredient-driven ethic.”

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE TABLE MUMBAI Farm-fresh ingredients, warm hospitality and an elegant ambience define The Table, located in Mumbai’s Colaba neighbourhood. The restaurant has been a favourite among the city’s crème de la crème since it was established in 2011. If you’re wondering what keeps them coming back, it’s without a doubt the ingredients—it uses fresh fish and meat, and some of the greens are from the restaurant’s farm in Alibaug. The menu, which largely features shareable plates, takes inspiration from different corners of the world, from Thailand and Japan to France and the Americas. The boneless chicken wings drizzled with honey glaze, clams and hand-made linguini, shrimp dumplings in a spicy ginger broth, yellowfish tuna tataki and the avocado toast topped on sourdough (from the restaurant’s sister enterprise Magazine Street Kitchen) are some of the star dishes at The Table.

RAW & FINE To ensure that it serves some of the finest ingredients, The Table started its own farm in Alibaug in 2012. A lot of its dishes are prepared with chemical-free vegetables, fruits and herbs sourced from this farm.

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3

THE BOMBAY CANTEEN MUMBAI

IZUMI MUMBAI

When The Bombay Canteen opened in 2015, it called itself an India-inspired restaurant. In the years that followed, it crafted a new identity for Indian

In Mumbai, when you think ramen,

food in the culinary space, with an ever-evolving menu that turned the

you think IZUMI. That’s how high the restaurant has set the bar for Japanese

spotlight on regional delicacies, home

cuisine in the city. It evolved from being

cooking and seasonal ingredients—all

a 17-seater eatery and a thriving sushi delivery service to one of Mumbai’s

of which made it No. 1 at the 2018 Top Restaurant Awards. Its playful vibe and

favourite spots for food from the East.

affinity for Mumbai find expression in its

IZUMI is a powerful combination of Chef

cocktail menus, inspired in shape and

Nooresha Kably’s culinary skills and

form by the city’s cultural melee, local

Anil Kably’s command over the Mumbai

traditions and food lore. Collaborations with farmers, home chefs and food

restaurant scene. While IZUMI reflects the Japanese philosophy of choosing a

entrepreneurs have kept the going good

skill and mastering it to perfection, the

and marked a move towards sustainable

menu showcases the more traditional yet contemporary flavours from Japan. And

consumption and cooking. One can always expect a surprise, be it in the

1

thanks to Chef Nooresha and her team, the city of Mumbai has a place to enjoy a fun approach to a cuisine known for its superior craft.

flavours or hero ingredients. Imagine a taco with a guava sabzi, served with a salad of the elusive succulent known as moras bhaji. While TBC’s approach to food is serious, its presentation is always fun and unpretentious. And clever touches point to its wry take on pop culture—a bowl of pre-liberalisation era candies like Mango Bite and Kismi rests at the entrance, while the waitstaff wear tees emblazoned with ‘bro’ in Hindi.

INDIAN ACCENT THE LODHI, NEW DELHI

THE TABLE MUMBAI

RAW & FINE

Chef Manish Mehrotra has burnished his reputation by bringing modern Indian cuisine to the world. He chooses from flavours that have been honed over decades and reimagines them, presenting them in fresh, interesting ways. Indian Accent, which came in first even at the 2017 Top Restaurant Awards, prides itself on sourcing most of its produce fresh from in and around New Delhi. While it’s best experienced by indulging in the chef’s tasting menu, the restaurant now also offers entirely plant-based vegan menus for those conscious about what they eat and how it impacts the world we live in. Delicacies such as the pulled kathal phulka taco or the green jackfruit, sweet potato and Goan mango curry are as satisfying as the Chettinad chicken keema and Kanyakumari crab. A meal here is one of those rare experiences fit for a milestone celebration.

The restaurant sources its fresh ingredients from in and around the National Capital Region. Whether it is the crunchy baby cucumbers and succulent tomatoes that hero many a dish here, the sweet strawberries used in the desserts and drinks, or the edible flowers used as garnish, a lot of it comes from a hydroponic farm in Greater Noida. Whatever ingredients aren’t used go right back into the soil, thanks to The Lodhi, New Delhi’s composting plant. (indianaccent.com)

RAW & FINE “At IZUMI, we have almost no food wastage, and nearly everything is prepared fresh with special efforts to keep the flavours intact. Chef Nooresha clearly espouses clean eating and an ingredient-driven ethic at the restaurant.” (facebook. com/izumibandra)

RAW & FINE “Our ingredient for the year was curiosity of the wild. Driven by the urge to discover new and exciting local ingredients, we reached a new high in 2019, with over 60 unique, seasonal vegetables and fruits indigenous to India highlighted through our menu.” (thebombaycanteen.com)

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Farm-fresh ingredients, warm hospitality and an elegant ambience define The Table, located in South Mumbai’s Colaba neighbourhood. The restaurant has been a favourite among the city’s crème de la crème since it was established in 2011. If you’re wondering what keeps them coming back, it’s without a doubt the ingredients—it uses locally sourced fish and meat, and some of the greens are from the restaurant’s farm in Alibaug. The menu, which largely features shareable plates, takes inspiration from different corners of the world, from Thailand and Japan to France and the Americas. The boneless chicken wings drizzled with honey glaze, clams and hand-made linguini, shrimp dumplings in a spicy ginger broth, yellowfish tuna tataki and the avocado toast topped on sourdough (from the restaurant’s sister enterprise Magazine Street Kitchen) are some of the star dishes at The Table.

5 RAW & FINE To ensure that it serves some of the finest ingredients, The Table started its own farm in Alibaug in 2012. A lot of its dishes are prepared with chemical-free vegetables, fruits and herbs sourced from this farm. (thetable.in)

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TOAST & TONIC BENGALURU Bandel from Kolkata, robiola from Maharashtra, chocolate from Puducherry, pork from Tamil Nadu and crabs from Andhra Pradesh—this Bengaluru restaurant helmed by Chef Manu Chandra celebrates all things local on its menu. Add a Toast & Tonic touch, and you get international dishes that champion these ingredients, like slow-cooked pork carnitas served on corn tortillas, smoked Bandel cheese and gin mustard hollandaise, Naga chilli chicken wings with a side of som tam salad and crisp, soft-shell crab with a Singapore-style chilli peanut sauce. The interiors, too, transport you from Bengaluru’s Wood Street to New York City’s bohemian East Village neighbourhood. With exposed walls and roofs and floors designed with decade-old sleeper wood, the space is fuss-free and makes you feel at ease. But the real draw here—as one can guess by its name—is the selection of tonics. The bar boasts some of the best G&Ts in the city, homemade tonics infused with aromatics like basil, rose petals and elderflower.

RAW & FINE Toast & Tonic has its own farmstead, where it grows its own produce. This year, the restaurant also launched Begum Victoria Cheese, which promotes homegrown, artisanal cheese. (toastandtonic.com)

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13 BUKHARA ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI

GUNPOWDER GOA True South Indian delicacies have arrived to the land of fish and feni, and how! The casual outdoor

While restaurants are competing to add a global twist to their food in the age of modern dining concepts,

ambience at Gunpowder with colourful décor clubbed with the

Bukhara at ITC Maurya, New Delhi, stuck to its roots. A true testimony to India’s culinary tradition, the menu here has remained unchanged for nearly four decades. The food exhibits

aroma of tamarind and burnt curry leaves in the air lure diners in with open arms. One of Assgao’s most loved restaurants, Gunpowder is the place for appams and mutton stew, tamarind fish curry, pork

the brand’s endeavor to preserve India’s culinary heritage, and the Dal Bukhara reflects this knowledge of gastronomy—the signature slowcooked black lentil preparation is

chops and avial curry. Just be sure to either make a reservation or at least turn up early, or you won’t get a table! Though you could

so creamy and flavourful that it has people salivating across the country at all ITC hotels. The interiors, like the menu, haven’t changed since Bukhara’s inception either. The

always lounge around in the inhouse boutique and pick up some Goan souvenirs while building up an appetite.

restaurant was designed to reflect what a traditional home would look like, and the food is served in traditional earthenware. Patrons are also encouraged to eat sans cutlery to

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enhance the dining experience. From food to ambiance and service, they must be doing it all right—Bukhara was voted the Best Restaurant in a Hotel in India in the Condé Nast

WASABI BY MORIMOTO THE TAJ MAHAL PALACE, MUMBAI RAW & FINE

Readers’ Travel Awards 2019.

RAW & FINE Every dish served at Bukhara is guided by a “caringly sourced, mindfully prepared” approach to

World-renowned ‘Iron Chef’ Masaharu Morimoto consistently wows with one exceptional Japanese dish after another. Wasabi by Morimoto offers diners authentic Japanese culinary

Traditional Japanese cuisine uses fresh ingredients and seasonal

showcase produce that’s locally sourced. The “farm-to-plate philosophy guides the preparation of our signature dishes to address both nutritional requirements

treasures made with ingredients specially flown down from Japan, including seafood and wasabi. Located in The Taj Mahal

vegetables, a concept that’s well established

Palace, you can enjoy views of the Gateway of India as you dig into sushi, white fish carpaccio or wasabi crème brûlée. It’s the

at Wasabi by Morimoto. The restaurant imports many of its ingredients from Japan, so guests can

perfect place to celebrate an anniversary or bring the whole family for an exceptional meal. Unassuming and intimate,

and taste and support to farmers.

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the ambience is minimal but sophisticated to keep all your attention on the food. From personalised chopsticks to an impressive saké collection, there’s a lot that impresses here.

enjoy the true flavours of the country.

ITC hotels also accords special emphasis on showcasing regional Indian cuisines while presenting

Gunpowder uses local ingredients like coconut, tamarind and curry leaves in its South Indian specialities.

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global dining concepts.

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MASQUE MUMBAI

Sustainable sourcing and cooking have been at the forefront of Masque’s philosophy since its

In the Masque kitchen, food changes in form and texture—carrots are shaped into wafer-thin shards, lavender flowers become the steak jus and mouthpuckering sea buckthorn berries are transformed into palate-cleansing sorbets. An alumnus of the Culinary Institute of America with stints at Noma and The French Laundry, Chef Prateek Sadhu fuses science with creativity to create tasting menus that are often cuisine-agnostic. A large part of his R&D includes foraging trips to the far corners of India to source and understand the use of hyperlocal ingredients. Masque is all about culinary theatre and bold experiments—and like it or hate it, you will definitely leave with a strong impression.

inception. In the three years since, the team has worked towards executing a zero-waste model in the kitchen: nearly all trimmings and peels are reused in various

THE CHINA KITCHEN HYATT REGENCY, NEW DELHI

an ingredient, as well as pickling and preservation techniques to ensure longevity for produce.

universes of flavours. The contemporary dining space prides itself on offering a first-of-its-kind stylised interpretation of a traditional Chinese dining experience, with more than seven chefs from China. They’re particularly known for delicacies like Peking duck, a host of dim sums and their mapo tofu.

THE PERMIT ROOM BENGALURU Chef Kavan Kuttapa’s quirky spot is a celebration of the various food cultures of South India and how they shaped Bengaluru’s own cuisine over the years. The décor is fun, with big traditional looking Indian paintings on the walls that, on closer inspection, reveal the subjects posing with selfie sticks and collages featuring everything from Bollywood motifs to sketches

We need no reminder that Kerala is a culinary treasure trove. From Malabar dishes and Kallu Shaap cuisine from toddy shops to Syrian Christian and Travancore fare, the food of Kerala is staggeringly diverse. And this is what the menu at Kappa Chakka Kandhari reflects. To make sure that guests truly savour the Keralite experience, the restaurant serves small plates. Though appam stew and sadhya remain the all-time favourites from here, Kappa Chakka Kandhari’s mission is to offer diners the lesser-known delicacies from the state, like chakka vevichathu (boiled jackfruit cooked with freshly ground spices and grated coconut) or mutton pottu biryani (biryani made with steamy pottu layers). This meticulously crafted menu is the result of Chef Regi Mathew’s passion for the food of his hometown. He spent three years travelling across the state, getting to know the essence of Kerala’s culinary fabric and working with more than 265 homecooks, some of whom are now part of his team. Kappa Chakka Kandhari strives to represent Kerala on a plate, and we couldn’t be happier.

RAW & FINE Kappa Chakka Kandhari has engaged farmers in self-help groups to produce the ingredients they use and offers the producers rates better than the market price. This motivates farmers and ensures the best quality of ingredients. Cooks attend inhouse training programmes on food hygiene and don’t use preservatives.

art of cheesemaking flourishing in India.”

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If there was no Google Maps, it would be hard to chance upon Slink & Bardot, or even imagine that the Worli fishing village would be the location of choice for a chic French restaurant and bar. One has to navigate a narrow lane lined with fishmongers, auto garages and a taxi stand to arrive at this teal-coloured bungalow. Yet, it’s the location that’s part of this restaurant’s undeniable charm. That,

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FARZI CAFÉ HYDERABAD

This modern Indian restaurant stays true to the winning formula of elevating classic comfort foods to the next level. Whether it is the Mumbai street-favourite vada pav, the banana leaf bhetki maach that West Bengal swears by, or the Punjabi sarson ka saag, Chef Manish Mehrotra has curated a menu that’s full of familiar flavours made with seasonal ingredients. Aside from the freshness of these ingredients, it’s the presentation where Comorin sets itself apart. And accompanying the grub is a solid menu of spirits and cocktails such as nitro rum punch, khus vermouth negroni and walnut sour, all made using bitters and mixers prepared in-house. In fact, even some spirits like the khus vermouth, fennel liqueur and vanilla cognac, which can be enjoyed either as cocktails or neat, are made here. The restaurant’s setting is sleek and modern. And after you are done dining, you can even shop from the curated selection of food ingredients, coffee, table and barware and kitchen and bar implements on sale here.

RAW & FINE All ingredients are sourced from producers in Tamil Nadu, and no imported ingredients are used.

This Hyderabad favourite is housed in a beautiful glass structure with a sunroof and is adorned with foliage on the outside as well as the inside. With all that natural light and an array of cocktails to choose from, Farzi Café makes for the perfect brunch spot. Come nighttime, though, it transforms into a whole new setting, with fun live gigs and groovy music on most nights. And when it comes to its food, the restaurant takes the term innovation a notch higher. On its menu are progressive Indian fusion dishes like chilli cheese kulcha, chilli chicken patti samosa, galouti burger, four cheese chicken tikka, butter chicken bao and more.

COROMANDEL CAFE PUDUCHERRY

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Put a chef with a deep sense of responsibility towards ethically driven cuisine in a town that’s replete with culturally diverse history, and you’re in for an extraordinary culinary experience. Such a union of Chef Jay Adams and Puducherry is just what works for Coromandel Café. Devoted to representing the town in every possible way, the café serves contemporary British fare blended Indian elements. It’s a produce-driven institution, with all ingredients sourced hyperlocally. From Palladian and Art Deco architecture to tiles from the Coromandel Coast and light fixtures sourced from old ships, the Coromandel experience is Pondicherrian to the core. Much like the town, the café stays true to its identity but is open to new possibilities, right from curating Creole food festivals to exploring Bengali cuisine. It’s this philosophy of showcasing identity through food that put the restaurant on the culinary map.

TRÈSIND MUMBAI

Dedicated to cultivating sustainable dining practices, Coromandel Café sources ingredients only from small, local businesses. They’ve done a great job of finding local substitutes for ingredients that are usually imported. The cold smoked sailfish, for instance, mimics the flavour of smoked salmon. The kitchen waste is entirely composted, and they also source other materials, such as plates and menus, from local potters and woodshops. Even the paper used in their menus is from the Sri Aurobindo Handmade Paper factory.

RAW & FINE RAW & FINE

Think small is the mantra at Comorin. The restaurant works with small batches of produce sourced from sustainable sources to ensure that waste is kept to an absolute minimum. And whatever is left over from the restaurant menu goes towards the day’s menu for the staff.

RAW & FINE Taj West End employs the farm-to-fork concept, sourcing herbs and veggies from their kitchen garden. For a truly organic meal, guests are also given the option to customise dishes according to their preferences.

BLUE GINGER TAJ WEST END, BENGALURU

OLIVE BAR AND KITCHEN NEW DELHI

For over a decade, Blue Ginger has been rustling up Vietnamese delights for Bengalurians: roast duck, wok-tossed soft-shell crab, Hanoi grilled fish and pho served four ways with traditional accompaniments. There are also degustation menus ranging from vegetarian to poultry and seafood. Diners can glimpse chefs at work in the open kitchen as they prep fresh rice-paper rolls. The setting is meditative, artistically illuminated by Tony Corbett and expansive with a lily pond and waterfall. Stone tabletops, silk drapes, hanging lanterns, teak floors and Southeast Asian tiles lend elegance. The flavours and furnishings create a delicate romance, making for an unforgettable dining experience.

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Second set of variations 18

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The restaurant sources fresh seasonal produce locally and sustainably.

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More than 15 years after it started, AD Singh’s trend-setting Delhi restaurant still commands its place at the top of the city’s dining circuit. Its not-so-secret sauce is Chef Dhruv Oberoi, who continues to improvise and reimagine not just the cuisine but the entire dining experience. Oberoi, who cut his teeth under Spanish culinary legend Ferran Adrià, has found innovative ways to infuse local ingredients into the Mediterranean menu. So you have an all new selection of cheeses from around India, another dedicated to promoting “super grains” like barley and millets as well as GinTo sorbets—gin cocktails served with flavoured sorbets—that’s in keeping with the trend of craft cocktails. But to reduce the restaurant to just the food would be a disservice to the relaxed Meditteranean vibe it has preserved through the years. With its white-washed walls and immaculately curated soundscape—paired with the food and drink—Olive creates a dining experience that makes it a hot favourite with the city’s upper crust even today.

The restaurant has an impressive range of homegrown produce on its menu. For cheese, you have kalari from Jammu, zarai from Uttarakhand, bandel from West Bengal. Then there are the grains: heritage bamboo seeds, Kashmiri barley, buckwheat from Leh, organic black rice from the Northeast, emmer wheat grains from the south. And then the fruits and vegetables: plantain, teasel-gourd, jackfruit, carandas plum, Lakadong turmeric, chayote squash, fiddlehead ferns and fresh turmeric from the Northeast, and more.

Trèsind prefers unrefined, natural foods over processed ones. Its ingredients, including meat and seafood, are sourced fresh daily and locally. And it has substituted sugar with jaggery in several dishes, including their chutneys.

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6 BALLYGUNGE PLACE KOLKATA While Bengali food—of both the street and fine-dining variety—is ubiquitous in Kolkata today, 6 Ballygunge Place remains a pioneer. Despite being one of Kolkata’s earliest fine-dining restaurants dedicated to the region’s cuisine, its culinary repertoire remains unmatched. The menu is a result of meticulous research into traditional family recipes and centuries-old cookbooks and features a mix of classics like dab chingri (prawns cooked inside a tender coconut) and lesser-known dishes like Dhakai pora mangsho (a mutton preparation from Dhaka that’s charcoal black in colour). Chef Sushanta Sengupta is known for his special curations, which include collaborations with chefs from Bangladesh as well as menus inspired by seasonal produce and historical recipes like a monsoon all-hilsa menu to a Sabarna Roy Food Festival, which showcased 300-year-old recipes from the pre-Raj era.

RAW & FINE “We believe in freshness. The meat and fish we choose come from the best suppliers in Kolkata. Also, this is regional cuisine vis a vis a pan-India cuisine and is very vernacular in its traditions. But Bengal, being the state it is, has a huge amount of variety. So that helps us to do justice to our philosophy.”

RAW & FINE The ingredients used at Mum’s Kitchen are sourced from local Goan vendors. Right from the toddy for the sannas to the dry fish and Goan chillies, everything comes from local markets, including the Friday Mapusa Market, where pretty much the whole of Goa does its weekly shopping! The restaurant also doesn’t use any artificial preservatives in its food, only natural products like local palm vinegar and salt.

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This restaurant in Mumbai’s Bandra-Kurla Complex serves modern Indian cuisine—a feat several establishments have been attempting with mixed results. But Trèsind gets it right, courtesy Chef Himanshu Saini who earned his chops under Manish Mehrotra, the master of modern Indian cuisine. The presentation is smart, often playful, without being gimmicky, and the flavours are distinctly Indian. The highlights of the menu include the mutton khari, vegan carpaccio, ajmeri kachori, Rajasthani cucumber curry, and the kosha mangsho, though the most audacious idea, arguably, is the Gujarati farsan, made from khandvi ice cream, papaya chutney and fafda crisp. But the dish that garners the most attention—and Instagram fame—is the Khichdi of India, a smooth, flavourful rice preparation with ingredients from across the country. In keeping with its philosophy of ‘less is more’, the restaurant serves only fixed menus (five courses at lunch, 10 at dinner) to minimise wastage, which is the most sincere reflection of the Indian dining ethos.

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RAW & FINE The Fatty Bao endeavors to source clean, sustainable ingredients—the seafood comes from the cleanest and most audited waters near Kochi; the greens are from farms that use nearly zero pesticides and follow organic practices. The vegetables and meat are sourced locally.

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COMORIN GURUGRAM

This iconic restaurant has been celebrating South Indian cuisine since 1989, and the Dakshin dining experience is nothing short of royal. Stepping into this space in the Crowne Plaza Chennai Adyar Park is like walking into another era: the walls are adorned with Tanjore murals; the thalis are silver-coated thalis; the Nataraja at the centre is stunning; and the antique furniture, dim lighting and live music all amplify this opulent journey. The menu features delicacies from all five regions of South India—from Andhra Pradesh’s chapa pulusu and gongura mamsam, Karnataka’s kori talna and the ever-comforting ‘ishtew’ to Kerala’s famous meen moilee. Dakshin is a culinary journey that pays tribute to the diversity of South Indian cuisine, and to celebrate their 30th year, they recently curated a special menu featuring 30 traditional delicacies like the nandu pottu, theeyal and kal dosai. To honour their 30 glorious years, Chef R Deva Kumar and his team also conceptualised two dishes—kozhi ammi masala and Chettinaad adu—both packed with the flavours of 30 ingredients.

If you’re a fan of Asian fare, The Fatty Bao is one of your best bets. This restaurant ties together inventive food, vibrant décor and a fresh twist to casual dining—a blend of a chic, laid-back vibe and upscale culinary offerings, a new scene in Bengaluru brought to you by the experienced F&B team of The Olive Group of restaurants. The menu, which draws inspiration from Asia’s vast and diverse culinary history, is a blend of

SLINK & BARDOT MUMBAI

and its classic chequerboard tiles and the edgy jazz music that permeates through. Slink & Bardot combines a relaxed lounge vibe with sophisticated hors d’oeuvres and décor to match. Think low slung, overstuffed armchairs with Art Deco lamps and cocktails to match. Picture-perfect small plates reimagine European classics, so a steak tartare is paired with mustard ice cream, while a seafood paella is reinvented with Assamese black rice. The bar has a ready repertoire of housemade tonics and tinctures, as well as barrel-aged drinks to create grown up, spirit-forward cocktails.

DAKSHIN CROWNE PLAZA CHENNAI ADYAR PARK

THE FATTY BAOASIAN GASTRO BAR BENGALURU

fresh, simple ingredients and bold flavours. Be it a mouth-watering bowl of exotic mushroom ramen or some fatty oysters with soy and chorizo, lamb shanks braised in a Masssaman curry or tobiko-rolled California rolls, all the food here will make you smile and sigh in content. The edgy yet comfortable décor only adds to its appeal: various artists gave the space its own character and made the walls of the restaurant come alive, some with pandas and others with a story map tracing the journey of the bao. Put it all together, and it’s no wonder that this al fresco dining space attracts foodies in droves.

The plates are carefully portioned to reduce wastage.

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off of Mumbai’s coast to promote local varieties of fish across its menu.

25 RAW & FINE “We deal with local, sustainable produce, most of it sourced directly from organic farms. We also pursue the use of artisanal cheeses on our menu to keep the

depicting Saint Teresa. The food is an equally light-hearted take on the classics. You bite into the southern comfort dosa to find a filling of delicious roasted beetroot or even pulled pork. The meen moiled kappa here is served on a bed of tapioca mash (not the traditional steamed rice) and the eggs Benedict come on a malabar porotta. Every dish here plays with familiar flavours tweaked ever so slightly to keep your taste buds guessing.

“A big focus for The China Kitchen is clean eating and authenticity. Most of our sauces and ingredients are either sourced from Beijing or imported from other parts of China. We own a farm where we grow our own vegetables and fruits that are used across all our restaurants to promote organic, healthy eating.”

RAW & FINE Gajalee refrains from stocking up or serving frozen and preserved packaged seafood items, as part of a strict company policy to discourage bulk buying and wastage.

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KAPPA CHAKKA KANDHARI CHENNAI

favourites are presented and served here.

While Gajalee is constantly innovating in terms of its offerings, it’s the old classics that bring diners back for more.

surmai thali, prawn biryani, tandoori crab and tisrya masala—all stellar in terms of quality and consistency. The restaurant sources a bulk of its seafood

constantly researching how to extract flavour from every part of

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RAW & FINE The Permit Room is championing local and regional ingredients and dishes that have, over the years, slowly fallen off the pages of menus around the city. Its nostalgic ‘Old School Classics’ menu is bringing back delicacies such as the pandi curry of Kodava pork served with kaki roti, Mysuru saaru curry and egg or lamb. The only difference is that there’s nothing old-fashioned about the way these old

Chinese food is now officially considered comfort food in India. And, of course, it’s not a cuisine that would be recognised by the Chinese, thanks to its complete assimilation with Indian flavours. The China Kitchen, however, stands apart, especially because chefs hired from different regions in China curates its flavours. Sichuan, Hubei, Guangzhou, Anhui and Hunan—each of them comes with a mini

GAJALEE MUMBAI

From small families out for a treat to Bollywood’s biggest stars, everyone lines up at this outpost in Mumbai’s Vile Parle neighbourhood for a taste of the impossibly-crispy bombil fry,

forms, often as powders, oils, or in sauces, and offal features regularly across each menu. The chefs and bartenders are

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SAN GIMIGNANO THE IMPERIAL NEW DELHI Named after a quaint medieval walled Tuscan town, this chic, fine-dining restaurant at The Imperial New Delhi stays faithful to the cuisine of the region. Chef Prem Pogakula achieves this by employing authentic ingredients—balsamic vinegar, olive oil, cheeses, pastas, butters and creams—sourced straight from Tuscany. The result is that whether you go with the crema di Parmigiano soup, the risotto con fungi porcini or the bianca royale pizze, the flavours will transport you to the narrow alleys of the old town from where the restaurant gets its name. You can dine in the beautiful, wood-panelled, trattoria-style setting indoors or in the pretty courtyard adjoining it. But for a truly atmospheric meal, you have to take your meal at the restaurant’s gazebo terrace, Paradiso Divino. When you are sitting here, enjoying your pizza and a glass of Italian white, you could be forgiven for a second for thinking you are in San Gimignano itself.

MUM’S KITCHEN PANAJI A visit to Mum’s Kitchen isn’t just another lunch; it’s a walk down memory lane to discover the history and culture of a state in one delicious meal. Since 1997, the folks behind the restaurant have been on a mission to save the Goan cuisine. From beef croquettes to chourico pao and fried bombil, you’ll get all your local favourites here, recipes passed down for generations. Each dish makes use of traditional Goan ingredients like coconut oil, kokum and palm jaggery, all sourced from local farmers and producers. Also, Mum’s Kitchen prides itself on its commitment to women’s empowerment, and most of its recipes are hand-picked from Goan villages. In fact, ‘Ethnic Prawns Curries of Goa’ is a section on the menu that’s dedicated entirely to recipes by local women.

RAW & FINE Authenticity is the name of the game here. Not only does it source some of the most important ingredients for its signature dishes from Tuscany, the restaurant has also tied up with the Belmond hotels in Italy for cross-cuisine training. The goal is to really understand the building blocks of authentic Tuscan flavours so diners can have as real an experience of the cuisine as possible without actually visiting Central Italy.

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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BOMRA’S CANDOLIM, GOA is run by the reticent but affable Bawmra Jap. In 2011, Amitav Ghosh had called him “one of the finest and most inventive chefs in the world”, and since then, Chef Jap has gone on to prove why he deserves that endorsement. The simple, airy ambience of bamboo and lanterns at Bomra’s is distinctly South Asian, as is the food. Jap draws from his Asian heritage to serve cuisine from China, Laos, India and Thailand. The menu may be limited and kinder to non-vegetarians, but it packs a punch. Porklovers will enjoy the crackling

Made in Goa for the city of Mumbai, this all-day bar and restaurant was brought here by the team behind The Bombay Canteen (Hunger Inc

THE BANGALA KARAIKUDI, CHETTINAD

This al fresco restaurant in North Goa’s Candolim

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‘Authentic’ may be a much abused term in dining circles today, but this hotel-restaurant lays a fair claim to it. In the heart of Karaikudi in Tamil

Chef Jap brought in

Nadu’s Chettinad district, the kitchen at this heritage hotel serves up

herbs from his home in Kachin, Myanmar, which he now grows at the restaurant’s garden. (bomras.com)

pork, pomelo and pomegranate salad and also the

RAW & FINE Your lunch is served on

a fine exposition of Chettiar cuisine. The flavours are spicy but not hot;

banana leaves grown in

the masalas are hand-pounded; and the menu reflects the region’s culture and history. So you will find the immensely popular uppu kari, a

the hotel’s own gardens, irrigated by waste water from

dish made with mutton, shallots, garlic and Tamil Nadu’s famous gundu

the property. All leftovers are processed and used as

milagai chillies. And as a nod to the British, who left their culinary

slow-cooked pork belly salad. Pair your meals with a pomegranate margarita or lychee martini and

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O PEDRO MUMBAI

imprint on the region, you will also find mint and potato croquettes.

compost for the garden. How

Meals are taken communally at a teak dining hall and eaten from a

is that for sustainability!

banana leaf plate with one’s hands. Bonus: one can also sign up for the

in Panaji’s premium dining circuit. Situated in a yellow-and-white

drawing from its Portuguese influences. Its expert mixologists dove deep into the way Goan bars evolved over the years and brought together a menu

bungalow in the city’s Latin quarter, The Black Sheep Bistro channels

of inventive drinks that blended home brews with fresh ingredients and

an elegant but easy vibe. It serves

local flavours. Perhaps O Pedro’s best quality is its casual yet chic ambience

global cuisines prepared with local

clubbed with the lack of rigidity that a lot of upscale restaurants come with.

Goan ingredients: think Malwani

Food comes in quarter-, half- and full-plate portions to allow diners to eat and

chicken stroganoff, tuna + kokam

share as they like, options that not many fine-dining spots offer.

ross and Hainanese paneer rice. The highlight, though, is the impressive cocktail programme here, which includes handcrafted concoctions that will add to the evening. Try The Paan, made from fresh betel nut leaf, anise, gin, vodka and lime; the

(thebangala.com)

Lau Pani, made from sparkling wine, whisky and rice; or one of the many

and hands-on cooking sessions with professional and home chefs.

cotta or the lemongrass and ginger crème brûlée.

Sabreen and Prahlad Sukhtankar’s bistro has firmly established itself

Hospitality), the winners of the 2018 Top Restaurant Awards. O Pedro offers simple yet sophisticated food that reflects Goa’s culinary diversity, even

seven-day Masterclass, which includes shopping trips, history lessons

finish it all off with the coconut and jackfruit panna

THE BLACK SHEEP BISTRO PANAJI, GOA

Goan feni-based cocktails.

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DUM PUKHT ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI

Chef Hussain Shahzad’s food philosophy is simple—showcase local produce using contemporary culinary techniques that inspire future generations to cook smarter. Diners here can enjoy what Goans ate in prePortuguese times: the cuisine of the Saraswat community that loved both seafood and vegetarian fare, coconut and kokum. The restaurant has also been trying to reveal Konkan culinary secrets and pre-Portuguese history through food festivals and dishes that appear on their menu seasonally. (opedromumbai.com)

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EDO - JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND BAR ITC GARDENIA, BENGALURU

“EDO’s cuisine is highly ingredient-driven. It reflects our culinary philosophy that incorporates the use of high-quality ingredients procured from sustainable sources.”

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style of after-hours dining, EDO’s source of inspiration, came about. Located at ITC Gardenia in Bengaluru, the idea was to bring Japan’s vibrant after-hours culture to Indian diners. The menu is a celebration of Japanese bar food, showcasing favourites like sushi and sashimi, robatayaki,

seasonal produce and fresh ingredients, from local spices to infused oils. ITC Hotels place a strong emphasis

prepared this way have a complex, smoky flavour that can only be achieved by

the southern and western coasts of India. Located at The Gateway Hotel in Bengaluru, its menu is a collection of the greatest hits from the region over the years and features dishes like

on quality ingredients and signature menus; business

cooking fresh ingredients over extreme heat. The food is stir-fried in a small

clients can opt for the Alert Meets menu that’s designed

amount over a few minutes (unlike frying or boiling), which helps maintain the crisp

to boost clear thinking and energy levels.

texture and nutrients in the ingredients. Our guests love the wok-fried lobster

a fiery crab milagu fry, tiger prawns roast and Alleppey meen curry, among others. The focus is on clean, authentic flavours and cooking techniques, as well as a diverse selection of recipes

AVARTANA ITC GRAND CHOLA, CHENNAI At Avartana, everything from the décor to the cuisine presents South Indian traditions with a modern twist. Think lamb brain fritters, infused tomato rasam, idiyappam with asparagus and coconut stew and fennel panna cotta! The lights are shaped like banana flowers, and there’s a mural of a Kerala canoe crafted in mother-of-pearl. The focus is on reimagining South Indian food, from presentation to the degustation menus, while maintaining the authenticity of flavour. Guests can choose from a seven-course tasting menu to a 13-course seafood menu. Avartana is not just a city favourite; the restaurant’s offerings have travelled to Mumbai, Bengaluru, Delhi and Kolkata in pop-ups.

in spicy XO sauce, stir-fry lamb in black

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pepper sauce, kung pao chicken with cashew nut and the stir-fry lotus root, asparagus and water chestnut—all dishes prepared the wok hei way.

YAUATCHA MUMBAI

its traditional ingredients and highquality produce.

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An all-day dim sum teahouse from London, Yauatcha stands out in the world of eclectic food expression. Modern authenticity is at the root of the cuisine and service at this restaurant, and the result is Cantonese cooking with a contemporary flair—

BENGALURU OOTA COMPANY BENGALURU

subtle and thrilling at the same time. A fusion of Chinese fare, mixology

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Would you eat an idli made of jackfruit? The smelly fruit may seem unappetising to most, but one bite of the pelata gatti

The restaurant’s ‘by reservation only’ format, which requires guests to book a table at least 24 hours in

is enough to turn the opinion of most jackfruit naysayers. This Mangalorean preparation that’s paired with a chicken curry is just one of the many glorious dishes on Bengaluru Oota’s menu that

advance for the dine-in experience, stems from a food philosophy of buying and using only fresh, local ingredients on a daily basis to ensure zero wastage. The menu

recreates traditional Gowda and Shetty cuisine. Sold? You’ll have to book a meal in advance at the tasting room in Ulsoor run by an all-female kitchen. Diners here

champions lesser-known fruits and vegetables. During mango season, the mensakai (house speciality relish) is made with sugar baby

submit to a menu that changes every day based on the availability of local and

mango, the relatively unknown local variety, and is a hit with diners.

seasonal ingredients.

and French patisserie offers patrons a unique culinary experience, which,

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one could say, reflects the spirit of a modern-day teahouse, or even a

“Karavalli showcases regional dishes as made by mothers and grandmothers, and to do that, we

traditional Hong Kong-style chatter house, as you can interpret from the

continue to procure ingredients from the original source, like perfectly smoked kudampuli from Kerala, toddy vinegar from Goa and Kundapur coconuts from Karnataka for their firm

seating here. Yauatcha’s successful initiatives this year includes the launch

white flesh. We use organic vegetables, spices, pulses and grains to a great extent, just the way they are used in homes in these regions. Our kitchen

of dessert cocktails to be appreciated on their own (unlike the dessert wine list most restaurants offer) at the end of the meal. This list includes the

the Infusion List—a curated list of over 30 homemade liqueurs and bitters— and the Liquid Sweet Shop, a collection

was designed to accommodate traditional cooking methods and

Raspberry Delice Martini that was inspired by the patisserie favourite

home-style equipment.”

here, the Raspberry Delice.

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A fine dining experience that was born in Goa and brought to Mumbai in 2018, Mustard beautifully brings together two seemingly varied cuisines—Bengali and French—that go surprisingly well together. The menu boasts traditional Bengali and fine French fare, and as the name suggests, mustard is the star of every dish. What impresses is the way the ingredient isn’t abused or overused in the food. Insead, the restaurant showcases mustard—most varieties of which it makes in-house—in numerous, innovative ways in its drinks and dishes. The menu at Mustard was designed on the basis of the simplest and most basic techniques of grassroots cooking. The Mezze Platter, for instance. The Banglar Ghorowa Niramish Thala (heritage Bengali platter), on the other hand, is a good example showcasing healthy techniques of homestyle cooking. Bengali classics like Begun Pora (charcoal-roasted brinjal), paturi (fish, paneer or red pumpkin cooked in banana leaves) and posto bora delight customers, as do the flavours from France in the Piscaladire, Tartine A La Provencale and Financier Aux Framboises. The beautiful chintz-splattered interiors, ornate chandeliers, French windows and warm colours only add to the experience.

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ADAA TAJ FALAKNUMA PALACE, HYDERABAD RAW & FINE The restaurant not only opts for local over imported ingredients but also goes to great pains to ensure that the food does not contain any sort of artificial flavouring or preservatives. All the nuts, fermented foods and eggs used in its food are organically grown. The chefs operate a zero-waste kitchen, something they achieved by carefully planning portion sizes.

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MUSTARD MUMBAI

of chandeliers and glassware. All the while, peacocks strut elegantly by. Delicate kebabs, rich curries and flavourful biryanis are accompanied by a range of wines, cocktails and sorbets. The kitchen is renowned for the Nizam’s favourite pathar ka gosht, marinated for 48 hours and cooked on a hot granite stone.

Avartana draws on

For this, it incorporates traditional cooking techniques like wok hei and steaming to bring out the flavours of the food while retaining the nutrients. Dishes

from Hindu, Muslim and Christian communities across the coastline. Chef Naren Thimmaiah makes sure that there are no shortcuts in his kitchen, and every dish is crafted with

The heart of Nizami cuisine is cooking “itmenaan se” or “with a lot of patience”. Traditional recipes are prepared with a lot of care. “Dum” or slowly cooking food under pressure is the essence of Hyderabadi cuisine and also of the restaurant. Fine ingredients like saffron and vetiver root enhance the carefully curated dishes, which are made in copper vessels, on a wood fire or in a sandpit.

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on Cantonese cuisine, it believes in preserving the flavour of each ingredient.

Nearly four decades old and yet Karavalli remains unfailingly on point in its approach to regional cuisine from

crisp tempura and even meticulously crafted bento meals. It wouldn’t truly be Izakaya-style dining without alcohol, so you can wash down the food with a selection of Japanese saké, wines and whiskies. EDO recently hosted a food promotion curated around temple cuisine and also

The pearl of Hyderabad’s Taj Falaknuma Palace, Adaa sits aloft over the city’s twinkling lights. This fine-dining spot reflects the lush Nizam lifestyle in both atmosphere and cuisine. Lunch, afternoon tea and dinner services begin with a heritage trail through the palace. Walk past artworks of royal hunting expeditions and gorgeous mirrors to dine in the sparkle

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Even though Yauatcha is a modern take

introduced the city to the concept of obento lunches. The restaurant’s fascination with Japanese dining culture is ever expanding, and we aren’t complaining.

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RAW & FINE The restaurant strongly believes in sourcing sustainably and locally, and using seasonal ingredients and artisanal cooking methods, thus reviving traditional food practices. The ITC Hotels group works closely with local producers and farmers. (itchotels.in)

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KARAVALLI BENGALURU

It was between 1603 and 1868—the ‘Edo’ period—that Japan was first exposed to art, music, theatre and the general world of gladness. This was also when the Izakaya

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RAW & FINE From meat to vegetables, the restaurant promotes local produce and growers. facebook.com/ (theblacksheepbistrogoa)

The zardozi-embroidered, colonial-style furniture and the Awadhi-style lamps will transport you to an era bygone and the food to the kitchens of the nawabs. ‘Dum pukht’ is the process of slow-cooking food in a handi sealed with dough, which allows the ingredients to mature and brings out the most intense aromas and flavours. The restaurant at ITC Maurya, New Delhi, revives this traditional technique using centuries-old recipes borrowed from royal courts across the country, from Kashmir to Hyderabad. The melt-in-your-mouth kakori kebab, succulent murg chandi tikka, delicately flavoured baghara baingan and iconic Dum Pukht biryani have won the restaurant several accolades for elevating and redefining classic Indian cuisine.

LE CIRQUE SIGNATURE THE LEELA PALACE BENGALURU

on asparagus and its many forms and textures. From pecorino cheese crème brûlée to the prosciutto roulade, the food is proof that it’s possible to retain the identity of a cuisine even with little tweaks. The Le Cirque experience is a blend of European elegance and Indian opulence, and what better place to enjoy such a meal than a palace hotel.

RAW & FINE Mustard doesn’t have hilsa—a Bengali favourite—on its regular menu. It’s available only when it’s the season for hilsa, a testimony to its commitment to responsible, sustainable eating. It’s also devoted to showcasing regional cuisine and bring back foods that people have forgotten to eat or grow over the years. Ridge gourd over

RAW & FINE Bastian is a firm believer in clean eating and sustainable culinary practices with a strict hygiene regime. It conducts a series of lab tests over the seafood and the white and red meat procured to ensure that they’re safe for consumption. Imports are also kept to a minimum, and produce is sourced from local vendors, which helps to create seasonal dishes like their popular strawberry and mango desserts.

This fine-dining restaurant offers its guests a luxurious culinary experience—a mashup of French delicacy and Italian piquancy. Located at The Leela Palace Bengaluru, the ambience at Le Cirque Signature is cosy yet sophisticated, which also accurately describes the Franco-Italian cuisine. There’s private as well as al fresco dining here, the latter section overlooking the gardens of the hotel. Le Cirque has curated several special menus, either focusing on a single ingredient or a compilation of their signature classics. Earlier this year, they created a menu that focused solely

RAW & FINE The food at Le Cirque Signature is heavily produce-driven and the culinary philosophy here is to focus on the innate flavors of ingredients.

BASTIAN MUMBAI If you’ve lived in Mumbai’s Bandra area long enough, you know there’s no Sunday brunch without the thought of Bastian. Regulars know that few things compare to their tuna crispy rice, (gluten-free) truffle fries and blueberry cheesecake.

zucchini, dalia over quinoa—Mustard uses local ingredients as much as possible and is also a champion of the zero-waste philosophy. It follows an ingredient-driven approach to the menu and everything is cooked fresh. (No processed foods allowed!)

All attention is on the food here, even though most visits to Bastian are a star-studded event, with a pick of celebrities always cruising through for Sunday brunch or late dinners. It’s one of those places that has mastered both seafood and fine vegetarian cuisine, with special emphasis on clean, healthy eating. Named after Sebastian, the cheerful crustacean from The Little Mermaid, Bastian promises global cuisine that highlights the chef’s unique style. The restaurant also caters to a variety of diets. So even if

TRES NEW DELHI Every dish that comes out of chefs Julia Carmen Desa and Jatin Mallick’s kitchen is as pretty as a picture. Whether it is pan-fried scallops and prawn or the goat cheese bavaroise, every plate is part of the culinary theatre here. The dishes are almost exclusively made only with the best local ingredients—you won’t find kale and asparagus at Tres. Instead, the humble spinach, okra and winter carrots, or whatever happens to be in season when you dine here, find favour on the menu. The idea is to serve the most nutritious and delicious food by elevating these ingredients. There’s an equally attractive list of beverages to go with the dishes. Be it the jamun margarita, the Lodi G&T or one of the many tasty mocktails on offer, you know they are going to be Instagram-ready.

you’re a staunch vegan or are grimacing through the keto diet, you’ll find something for you here.

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ROYAL CHINA MUMBAI From a signature chilli oil that you can buy by the bottle and the most delicately flavoured cheung fung, Royal China serves Cantonese cuisine that is sure to convert you if you’re not a fan of Chinese food. It’s been a staple in Mumbai’s cuisine map and held its place of pride despite the many waves of trendy hashtagworthy restaurants that have tried to lure their loyal customers. But once a Royal China fan, always a Royal China fan. Especially with their special lunch dim sum menu, filet steak with black pepper, prawns in XO sauce, steamed Chilean sea bass, and so much more.

7 SHORT 1 LONG GOA

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Tucked away in the quiet village of Moira, this family-run restaurant is an ode to Goan home cooking. Owner Belinda Braganza drew inspiration from her long years working as a chef on a cruise liner while opening 7 Short 1 Long. This nautical-themed restaurant—even named after the general alarm used on ships—is a revamped part of her ancestral home. Carefully curated by Belinda’s mother Clara, the menu features some delicious dishes Belinda grew up eating and changes every week. Some favorites are the chicken liver fry, tongue chilli and beef meatball curry. The gorgeous garden café hosts a number of food festivals that are inspired by various cuisines, thanks to Belinda’s many years at sea and her host of friends from all over the globe. This restaurant is testimony to the belief that coming home, in more ways than one, is never a bad idea.

BOTTICINO TRIDENT BANDRA-KURLA, MUMBAI

RAW & FINE At 7 Short 1 Long, plastic straws are heavily discouraged and all ingredients are locally sourced.

The fine-dining restaurant is named after the beautiful beige Italian marble, Pietra di Botticino, which adorns a large part of this classy yet inviting space. The gentle cove lighting and furnishings in shades of pastel are designed to soothe. As for the food, Botticino’s menu, featuring hearty Italian dishes from regions like Piedmont, Lombardy, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany and Lazio, is sure to please your palates. The lobster and mascarpone risotto, herb-crusted lamb loin, dry-aged duck breast, twice-cooked mozzarella and black truffle risotto are some of its signature dishes. You can wash these down with one of the 120 choices of wines stored in Botticino’s two-storey wine repository.

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RAW & FINE Botticino makes consistent efforts to build an environmentally conscious menu. The robiola, an Italian soft-ripened cheese served at the restaurant, was initially imported from Italy but is now sourced from a local creamery. All the ingredients in the seafood stew also feature the fresh catch of the day, locally sourced.

“We focus on local ingredients. From vegetables to meat, everything is handpicked and butchered in-house. We make our own breads and sauces like hot sauce and mustard. From switching to the very Calcuttan gobindobhog rice for risottos to using a lot of kolmi saag, fresh bhetki maach and gondhoraj lebu (lemon), we believe regional is the way ahead even in global cuisines. We grow Bengal-specific microgreens like mustard, poi saag and kolmi saag, and our kitchen garden is our planter wall full of local produce. We are a zerowaste restaurant and don’t believe in throwing away food. Every ingredient is used in multiple ways to promote sustainability.”

THE SALT HOUSE KOLKATA Risotto made with a Kolkata staple like gobindobhog rice, ravioli with a classic Bengali mutton curry and Bengali samosas made with phyllo pastry—these are just a few examples of The Salt House’s take on global, contemporary Bengali cuisine. Using homegrown spices and ingredients and whipping up chutneys and sauces from scratch in their kitchen, the restaurant has established itself as a modern and stylish update on traditional cooking. It’s also known for its pop-ups, which it hosts in collaboration with other independent brands. The Salt House also curates festive menus—#pandaltotable this year was its most recent one; it featured ghughni hummus and kulcha, edamame and truffle phuchka and French shahi tukda. Their twists are fresh and innovative, like their ode to Anthony Bourdain, where their Kolkata bun cha is still a crowd favourite.

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RAW & FINE Palácio do Deão celebrates Goan seasonal produce with carefully preserved heritage recipes. Traditional techniques and local ingredients are essential to the kitchen to ensure that the aroma and flavour are authentic and that the timeless culinary practices are not forgotten.

Chef Célia Ferrão da Gama opened Palácio do Deão with Ruben Vasco da Gama to offer homemade Goan food influenced by the zest and vigour of Latin flavours with a side of serenity. Built on a hillock in Quepem, the building fuses elements of Hindu and Portuguese architecture. This restored 200-year-old home belonged to Portuguese nobleman José Paulo de Almeida, founder of Quepem town. The de Gamas have painstakingly revived recipes for the sumptuous lunches and teas served in the rooms and verandah of the house overlooking the Kushavati River. Courses include prawn fritters, stuffed crab and, of course, bebinca. It’s a journey into the past that is a labour of love.

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RAW & FINE Sustainable, local produce lends freshness to the plate at La Plage. The restaurant embraces the farm-to-table philosophy and drives its menu with the fresh catch of the day as well as quality ingredients that are mostly locally sourced.

The dishes are authentically Cantonese in nature, and the chillies supplied for their famous chilli oil come from the best suppliers. The restaurant also sticks to a number of Chinese traditions, like not serving dim sums in the evenings (in China, dim sum is not typically served after 5pm). Website: www.royalchinaindia. com ; Near Victoria Terminus, Hazarimal Somani Road, Azad Maidan, Fort, Mumbai.

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47 PALÁCIO DO DEÃO GOA

LA PLAGE GOA Toes in the sand, fine French food on platters, sea breeze rustling the drapes—La Plage in Mandrem, Goa, gives more than a sense of the good life. The ever-popular seaside restaurant exudes a carefree vibe, replete with the easy tunes, hammocks and deck chairs that are perfect for inducing the holiday state of mind. The menu is redesigned every year, and its furnishings refreshed. The signature dishes endure: don’t miss the sesamecrusted tuna fillet, beetroot and mango carpaccio and the chocolate thali. Come for the delicately flavoured seafood, stay for the laid-back ambience.

SAVYA RASA PUNE Hoping to educate diners about South Indian cuisine beyond idlidosa-sambar, Savya Rasa has an exhaustive menu, featuring cuisine from not just Kerala, but also Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Having spent over two years visiting homes, toddy shops and many hole-in-the-wall joints across the southern states, the team—led by Chef Sheik Mohideen—put together dishes and offerings that promote traditional, long-forgotten recipes and techniques of cooking South Indian cuisine. On the menu you’ll find Chettinad kozhi podi varuval alongside a Mangalorean anjal rava fry. Our pick? The gloriously flaky Malabari kottu roti to mop up the uppu kari, succulent cubes of mutton fry finished in coconut oil with curry leaves and shallots.

DAKSHIN ITC WINDSOR, BENGALURU Sourcing the best dishes from across South India, Dakshin serves a delectable range of food, including chef-curated specials for those moments when you want to try a bit of everything but just can’t decide. Their daily specials are always a delight, only to be followed up with the creamiest meen moilee you can imagine. Dakshin yera or masala-coated fried prawns, the Thanjavur speciality vazhai shunti that’s made with spiced raw banana hash, is just one of the many regional specialities you can tuck into. Wash it down with majjige, buttermilk flavoured with ginger, green chillies and fresh coriander paste, and follow with a deep snooze.

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DIVA - THE ITALIAN RESTAURANT NEW DELHI

Dakshin is known to be truly authentic for not just how it sources its ingredients but also in the way it curates and prepares its dishes. A glance at the menu tells you that the experience is going to be a course in South Indian cuisine, and dosa and idli just aren’t it. mustard, poi saag and kolmi saag, and our kitchen garden is our planter wall full of local produce. We are a zero-waste restaurant and don’t believe in throwing away food. Every ingredient is used in multiple ways to promote sustainability.”

Queen of Italian cuisine Ritu Dalmia is the genius behind the culinary magic of DIVA - The Italian Restaurant, the first of the DIVA family. From the sharpest of cheeses to the finest of wines, the restaurant boasts authentic Italian cuisine. When DIVA first came to Delhi, there was nothing like it. It brought authentic Italian cuisine to the land where butter chicken ruled and did a fine job of it, too. For vegetarians, the crispy kale pecorino souffle with red pepper sauce, or the baked eggplant cannoli really hit the spot. Meat eaters should dig into the ravioli with slow-cooked salsiccia and roasted celeriac, pan-roasted salmon, or the New Zealand lamb rack.

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OOTA BANGALORE

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It’s an exciting way to integrate traditional cuisine into contemporary dining, updated with smart portions, keeping local ingredients and original recipes intact.

Apart from growing its own spices that are hand ground into masalas, Savya Rasa also focuses on using clean and fresh ingredients sourced from organic farms across India. It promotes native grains across its menu, as well. Think foxtail millet, pearl millet and more.

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It isn’t always easy to turn a traditional dish into something contemporary and casual—like a chicken ghee roast for starters, or transforming a pork dish from coastal Karnataka into a salad. But that’s what Oota did and excels in. Mangalore buns, goli baje and maddur vade are popular appetisers. Kumbala curry from Malnad and Coorg, nati koli pulimunchi (country chicken in tamarind gravy) from Coastal Karnataka and mutton rassa from North Karnataka, pandi curry from Coorg are all main courses inspired and sourced from regions in and around Karnataka, like the Canara coast, Mangaluru, the Western Ghats, the Deccan track and around. Run by Windmills Brewery, you can tuck into these delicacies with their beer.

RAW & FINE Most of the produce is sourced fresh from local vendors, and there’s a major emphasis on zero wastage and noncommercial processes. Everything from offal cuts to vegetable peels is used in its entirety, and apart from the imported goods, almost nothing comes out of tins or tetrapaks.

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THE BOMBAY CANTEEN MUMBAI When The Bombay Canteen opened in 2015, it called itself an India-inspired

IZUMI MUMBAI

restaurant. In the years that followed, it crafted a new identity for Indian food in the culinary space, with an ever-evolving menu that turned the spotlight on regional delicacies, home

In Mumbai, when you think ramen, you think IZUMI. That’s how high the restaurant has set the bar for Japanese cuisine in the city. It evolved from being

cooking and seasonal ingredients—all of which made it No. 1 at the 2018 Top

a 17-seater eatery and a thriving sushi delivery service to one of Mumbai’s favourite spots for food from the East.

Restaurant Awards. Its playful vibe and affinity for Mumbai find expression in its cocktail menus, inspired in shape and

IZUMI is a powerful combination of Chef Nooresha Kably’s culinary skills and

form by the city’s cultural melee, local traditions and food lore. Collaborations

Anil Kably’s command over the Mumbai restaurant scene. While IZUMI reflects the Japanese philosophy of choosing a

with farmers, home chefs and food entrepreneurs have kept the going good and marked a move towards sustainable consumption and cooking. One can always expect a surprise, be it in the

skill and mastering it to perfection, the menu showcases the more traditional yet contemporary flavours from Japan. And thanks to Chef Nooresha and her team, the city of Mumbai has a place to enjoy

flavours or hero ingredients. Imagine a taco with a guava sabzi, served with a salad of the elusive succulent known as moras bhaji. While TBC’s approach to food is serious, its presentation is always

a fun approach to a cuisine known for its superior craft.

fun and unpretentious. And clever touches point to its wry take on pop culture—a bowl of pre-liberalisation era candies like Mango Bite and Kismi rests at the entrance, while the waitstaff wear

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tees emblazoned with ‘bro’ in Hindi.

INDIAN ACCENT THE LODHI, NEW DELHI

Farm-fresh ingredients, warm hospitality and an

The restaurant sources its fresh

by bringing modern Indian cuisine to the world. He chooses from flavours that have been honed over

elegant ambience define The Table, located in South Mumbai’s Colaba neighbourhood. The restaurant

ingredients from in and around the National Capital Region. Whether it

decades and reimagines them, presenting them in

is the crunchy baby cucumbers and

fresh, interesting ways. Indian Accent, which came in first even at the 2017 Top Restaurant Awards, prides

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succulent tomatoes that hero many a dish here, the sweet strawberries

itself on sourcing most of its produce fresh from in and around New Delhi. While it’s best experienced by indulging in the chef’s tasting menu, the restaurant now also offers entirely plant-based vegan menus

used in the desserts and drinks, or

“At IZUMI, we have almost no food wastage, and nearly

the edible flowers used as garnish, a lot of it comes from a hydroponic

everything is prepared fresh with special efforts

farm in Greater Noida. Whatever

for those conscious about what they eat and how it impacts the world we live in. Delicacies such

to keep the flavours intact. Chef Nooresha clearly espouses clean eating and

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ingredients aren’t used go right back into the soil, thanks to The Lodhi,

as the pulled kathal phulka taco or the green

“Our ingredient for the year was curiosity of the wild. Driven by the urge to discover new and exciting local ingredients, we

New Delhi’s composting plant.

jackfruit, sweet potato and Goan mango curry are as satisfying as the Chettinad chicken keema and

(indianaccent.com)

an ingredient-driven ethic at the restaurant.” (facebook.

reached a new high in 2019, with over 60 unique, seasonal vegetables and fruits indigenous to India highlighted through

Kanyakumari crab. A meal here is one of those rare

com/izumibandra)

arrived to the land of fish and feni, and how! At Gunpowder, the

in. One of Assagao’s most loved restaurants, Gunpowder is the place for appams and mutton stew, tamarind fish curry, pork

or at least turn up early, or you won’t get a table! Though you

up some Goan souvenirs while building up an appetite.

theatre—like it or hate it, you will leave with a strong impression.

RAW & FINE Sustainable sourcing and cooking are at the forefront of Masque’s philosophy. The team works

World-renowned ‘Iron Chef’ Masaharu Morimoto consistently

treasures made with ingredients specially flown down from Japan, including seafood and wasabi. Located in The Taj Mahal

RAW & FINE sourced. The farm-to-plate philosophy guides the preparation of signature dishes to address both nutritional requirements and

Chinese food is now officially considered comfort food in India. And, of course, it’s not a cuisine that would be recognised by the Chinese, thanks to its complete assimilation with Indian flavours. However, The China Kitchen stands apart, especially because chefs hired from different regions in China curate its flavours. Sichuan, Hubei, Guangzhou, Anhui and Hunan—each of them comes with a mini universe of

RAW & FINE The China Kitchen is big on clean eating and authenticity. Most of its sauces and ingredients are either sourced from Beijing or imported from other parts of China. And to promote organic, healthy eating, restaurants at the Hyatt Regency Delhi use vegetables and fruits grown at its farm in the city. (hyatt.com)

depicting Saint Teresa. The food is an equally light-hearted take on the classics. You bite into the southern comfort dosa to find a filling of delicious roasted beetroot or even pulled pork. The meen moilee kappa here is served on a bed of tapioca mash (not the traditional steamed rice) and the eggs Benedict comes on a Malabar parotta. Every dish at The Permit Room plays with familiar flavours tweaked ever so slightly to keep your taste buds guessing.

We need no reminder that Kerala is a culinary treasure trove. From Malabar dishes and Kallu Shaap cuisine from toddy shops to Syrian Christian and Travancore fare, the food of the southern state is staggeringly diverse. And this is what the menu at Kappa Chakka Kandhari reflects. To make sure that guests truly savour the Keralite experience, the restaurant serves small plates. Although appam stew and sadhya remain the all-time favourites here, Kappa Chakka Kandhari’s mission is to offer diners lesser-known delicacies from the state like chakka vevichathu (boiled jackfruit cooked with

Kappa Chakka Kandhari has engaged farmers in selfhelp groups to produce the ingredients they use and offers rates better than the market price. This motivates farmers and ensures the best quality of ingredients. Cooks attend inhouse trainings on food hygiene

freshly ground spices and grated coconut) or mutton pottu biryani (biryani made with steamy pottu layers). This meticulously crafted menu is the result of Chef Regi Mathew’s passion for the food of his hometown. He spent three years travelling across the state, getting to know the essence of Kerala’s culinary fabric and working with more than 265 homecooks, some of whom are now part of his team. Kappa Chakka Kandhari strives to represent Kerala on a plate, and we couldn’t be happier.

and don’t use preservatives. The plates are carefully portioned to reduce wastage. (kappachakkakandhari.com)

If you’re a fan of Asian fare, The Fatty Bao is one of your best bets. This restaurant ties together inventive food, vibrant décor and a fresh twist to casual dining. A blend of a chic, laid-back vibe and upscale culinary offerings, it’s a new scene in Bengaluru brought to you by the experienced F&B team of The Olive Group of restaurants. The menu, which draws inspiration from Asia’s vast and diverse culinary history, is a fusion of

SLINK & BARDOT MUMBAI If there was no Google Maps, it would be hard to chance upon Slink & Bardot, or even imagine that the Worli fishing village would be the location of choice for a chic French restaurant and bar. One has to navigate a narrow lane lined with fishmongers, auto garages and a taxi stand to arrive at this teal-coloured bungalow. Yet, it’s the location that’s part of the restaurant’s undeniable charm. That, and its classic chequerboard tiles and the edgy jazz music that permeates through. Slink & Bardot combines a relaxed lounge vibe with sophisticated hors d’oeuvres and décor to match. Think low-slung, overstuffed armchairs with Art Deco lamps and stylish cocktails. Picture-perfect small plates reimagine European classics, so a steak tartare is paired with mustard ice cream, while a seafood paella is reinvented with Assamese black rice. The bar has a ready repertoire of house-made tonics and tinctures, as well as barrel-aged drinks to create grown-up, spirit-forward cocktails.

RAW & FINE The Permit Room champions local and regional ingredients and dishes that have, over the years, slowly fallen off the pages of menus around the city. Its nostalgic ‘Old School Classics’ menu is bringing back delicacies such as the pandi curry of Kodava served with akki roti, Mysuru saaru curry and egg or lamb. The only difference is that there’s nothing old-fashioned about the way these old favourites are presented and served here. (thepermitroom.in)

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FARZI CAFÉ HYDERABAD

This modern Indian restaurant stays true to the winning formula of elevating classic comfort foods to the next level. Whether it is the Mumbai street-favourite vada pav, the banana leaf bhetki maach that West Bengal swears by, or the Punjabi sarson ka saag, Chef Manish Mehrotra has curated a menu that’s full of familiar flavours made with seasonal ingredients. Aside from the freshness of these ingredients, it’s the presentation where Comorin sets itself apart. And accompanying the grub is a solid menu of spirits and cocktails such as nitro rum punch, khus vermouth negroni and walnut sour, all made using bitters and mixers prepared in-house. In fact, even some spirits like the khus vermouth, fennel liqueur and vanilla cognac, which can be enjoyed either as cocktails or neat, are made here. The restaurant’s setting is sleek and modern. And after you are done dining, you can even shop from the curated selection of ingredients, coffee, table and barware and kitchen and bar implements on sale here.

RAW & FINE All ingredients are sourced from producers in Tamil Nadu, and no imported ingredients are used. (crowneplaza.com)

Adorned with foliage on the outside as well as the inside, this Hyderabad favourite is housed in a beautiful glass structure with a sunroof. With all that natural light and an array of cocktails to choose from, Farzi Café makes for the perfect brunch spot. Come night-time, though, it transforms into a whole new setting, with fun live gigs and groovy music. And when it comes to its food, the restaurant takes the term innovation a notch higher. On its menu are progressive Indian fusion dishes like chilli cheese kulcha, chilli chicken patti samosa, galouti burger, four cheese chicken tikka, butter chicken bao and more.

COROMANDEL CAFÉ PUDUCHERRY

Dedicated to cultivating sustainable dining practices, Coromandel Café sources ingredients only from small, local businesses. They’ve found local substitutes for ingredients that are usually imported. The cold smoked sailfish, for instance, mimics the flavour of smoked salmon. The kitchen waste is entirely composted, and they also source materials like plates and menus, from local potters and woodshops. Even the paper used in their menus is from the Sri Aurobindo Handmade Paper factory. (facebook. com/coromandelcafe)

RAW & FINE RAW & FINE The restaurant sources fresh seasonal produce locally and sustainably. (farzicafe.com)

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41 RAW & FINE Taj West End employs the farm-to-fork concept, sourcing herbs and vegetables from their kitchen garden. For a truly organic meal, guests have the option to customise dishes according to their preferences. (tajhotels.com)

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For over a decade, Blue Ginger has been rustling up Vietnamese delights for Bengalurians: roast duck, wok-tossed soft-shell crab, Hanoi grilled fish and pho served four ways with traditional accompaniments. There are also degustation menus ranging from vegetarian to poultry and seafood options. Diners can watch chefs at work in the open kitchen as they prep fresh ricepaper rolls. The setting is meditative, artistically illuminated by lighting designer Tony Corbett and expansive with a lily pond and waterfall. Stone tabletops, silk drapes, hanging lanterns, teak floors and Southeast Asian tiles lend elegance. The flavours and furnishings create a delicate romance, making for an unforgettable dining experience.

“We believe in freshness. The meat and fish we choose come from the best suppliers in Kolkata. Also, this is regional cuisine vis-à-vis a pan-India cuisine and is very vernacular in its traditions. But Bengal, being the state it is, has a huge amount of variety. So that helps us to do justice to our philosophy.” (6ballygungeplace.in)

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Final layout

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The restaurant has an impressive range of home-grown produce on its menu. For cheese, you have kalari from Jammu, zarai from Uttarakhand, Bandel from West Bengal. Then there are the grains: heritage bamboo seeds, Kashmiri barley, buckwheat from Leh, organic black rice from the Northeast, emmer wheat grains from the South. And then the fruits and vegetables: plantain, teaselgourd, jackfruit, carandas plum, Lakadong turmeric, chayote squash, fiddlehead ferns and fresh turmeric from the Northeast, and more. (olivebarandkitchen.com)

More than 15 years after it started, AD Singh’s trendsetting Delhi restaurant still commands its place at the top of the city’s dining circuit. Its not-so-secret ‘sauce’ is Chef Dhruv Oberoi, who continues to improvise and reimagine not just the cuisine but the entire dining experience. Oberoi, who cut his teeth under Spanish culinary legend Ferran Adrià, has found innovative ways to infuse local ingredients into the Mediterranean menu. So you have an allnew selection of cheeses from around India, another dedicated to promoting “super grains” like barley and millets as well as GinTo sorbets—gin cocktails served with flavoured sorbets—that’s in keeping with the trend of craft cocktails. But to reduce the restaurant to just the food would be a disservice to the relaxed Mediterranean vibe it has preserved through the years. With its whitewashed walls and immaculately curated soundscape—paired with the food and drink—Olive creates a memorable dining experience that makes it a hot favourite with the city’s upper crust even today.

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TRÈSIND MUMBAI

RAW & FINE Trèsind prefers unrefined, natural foods over processed ones. Its ingredients, including meat and seafood, are sourced fresh daily and locally. And it has substituted sugar with jaggery in several dishes, including its chutneys. (tresind.com)

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BLUE GINGER TAJ WEST END, BENGALURU

OLIVE BAR & KITCHEN NEW DELHI

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Put a chef with a deep sense of responsibility towards ethically driven cuisine in a town that’s replete with a culturally diverse history, and you’re in for an extraordinary culinary experience. Such a union of Chef Jay Adams and Puducherry is just what works for Coromandel Café. Devoted to representing the town in every possible way, the café serves contemporary British fare blended with Indian elements. It’s a produce-driven institution, with all ingredients sourced hyperlocally. From Palladian and Art Deco architecture to tiles from the Coromandel Coast and light fixtures sourced from old ships, the Coromandel experience is Pondicherrian to the core. Much like the town, the café stays true to its identity but is open to new possibilities, right from curating Creole food festivals to exploring Bengali cuisine. It’s this philosophy of showcasing identity through food that put the restaurant on the culinary map.

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“Think small” is the mantra at Comorin. The restaurant works with small batches of produce acquired from sustainable sources to keep waste to a minimum. And whatever is leftover from the restaurant menu goes towards the day’s menu for the staff. (comorin.in)

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vegetables and meat are sourced locally. (facebook. com/thefattybao)

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COMORIN GURUGRAM

This iconic restaurant has been celebrating South Indian cuisine since 1989, and the Dakshin dining experience is nothing short of royal. Stepping into this space in the Crowne Plaza Chennai Adyar Park is like walking into another era: the walls are adorned with Tanjore murals; the thalis are silver-coated; the Nataraja at the centre is stunning; and the antique furniture, dim lighting and live music all amplify this opulent journey. The menu features delicacies from all five regions of South India—from Andhra Pradesh’s chapa pulusu and gongura mamsam to Karnataka’s kori talna and Kerala’s ever-comforting ‘ishtew’ and meen moilee. Dakshin is a culinary journey that pays tribute to the diversity of South Indian cuisine, and to celebrate its 30th year, it recently curated a special menu featuring 30 traditional delicacies like the nandu pottu, theeyal and kal dosai. As another way to honour the restaurant’s 30 glorious years, Chef R Deva Kumar and his team also conceptualised two dishes—kozhi ammi masala and Chettinaad adu—both packed with the flavours of 30 ingredients.

RAW & FINE The restaurant endeavours to source clean, sustainable ingredients— the seafood comes from the most audited waters near Kochi; the greens are from farms that use nearly zero pesticides and follow organic practices. The

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fresh, simple ingredients and bold flavours. Be it a mouth-watering bowl of exotic mushroom ramen or some fatty oysters with soya and chorizo, or lamb shanks braised in a Masssaman curry, or tobiko-rolled California rolls, the food here will make you smile and sigh in content. The edgy yet comfortable décor only adds to its appeal: various artists gave the space its own character and made the walls of the restaurant come alive, some with pandas and others with a story map tracing the journey of the bao. Put it all together, and it’s no wonder that The Fatty Bao attracts food lovers in droves.

“We deal with local, sustainable produce, most of it sourced directly from organic farms, and also use artisanal cheeses to keep the art of cheesemaking flourishing in India.” (facebook.com/slinkandbardot)

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DAKSHIN CROWNE PLAZA CHENNAI ADYAR PARK

off Mumbai’s coast to promote local varieties of fish across its menu.

THE FATTY BAOASIAN GASTRO BAR BENGALURU

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THE PERMIT ROOM BENGALURU Chef Kavan Kuttappa’s quirky spot celebrates the various culinary cultures of South India and how they have shaped Bengaluru’s own cuisine over the years. The décor is fun, with big traditional-looking Indian paintings on the walls that, on closer inspection, reveal the subjects posing with selfie sticks and collages featuring everything from Bollywood motifs to sketches

as part of a strict company policy to discourage bulk buying and wastage. (gajalee.in)

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KAPPA CHAKKA KANDHARI CHENNAI

flavours. The contemporary dining space prides itself on offering a first-of-its-kind stylised interpretation of a traditional Chinese dining experience, with more than seven chefs from China. They’re particularly known for delicacies like Peking duck, a host of dim sum varieties and their mapo tofu.

RAW & FINE Gajalee doesn’t stock up or serve frozen and preserved packaged seafood items,

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THE CHINA KITCHEN HYATT REGENCY DELHI

While Gajalee is constantly innovating in terms of its offerings, it’s the old classics that bring diners back to the

fry, surmai thali, prawn biryani, tandoori crab and tisrya masala—all stellar in terms of quality and consistency. The restaurant sources a bulk of its seafood

(masquerestaurant.com)

taste as well as lend support to farmers. (itchotels.in)

GAJALEE VILE PARLE, MUMBAI

restaurant for more. From small families out for a treat to Bollywood’s biggest stars, everyone lines up at this outpost in Mumbai’s Vile Parle neighbourhood for a taste of the impossibly-crispy bombil

are constantly researching how to extract flavour from every part of an ingredient, as well as pickling and preservation techniques.

Every dish served at Bukhara is guided by a “caringly sourced, mindfully prepared” approach to showcase produce that’s locally

RAW & FINE Gunpowder uses local ingredients like coconut, tamarind and curry leaves in its specialities. (facebook.com/gunpowdergoa)

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towards executing a zero-waste model in the kitchen: nearly all trimmings and peels are reused, often as powders and oils, or in sauces. The chefs and bartenders

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sorbets. An alumnus of the Culinary Institute of America with stints at noma and The French Laundry, Chef Prateek Sadhu fuses science with creativity to come up with cuisine-agnostic tasting menus. A large part of his R&D includes foraging trips to the far corners of India to source hyperlocal ingredients. Masque is all about culinary

wows with one exceptional Japanese dish after another. Wasabi by Morimoto offers diners authentic Japanese culinary

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bar boasts some of the best G&Ts in the city, home-made tonics infused with aromatics like basil, rose petals and elderflower.

Traveller Readers’ Travel Awards 2019.

WASABI BY MORIMOTO THE TAJ MAHAL PALACE, MUMBAI

intimate, the ambience is minimal but sophisticated to keep all your attention on the food. From personalised chopsticks to an impressive saké collection, there’s a lot that impresses here.

artisanal cheese. (toastandtonic.com)

space is fuss-free and makes you feel at ease. But the real draw here—as one can guess by its name—is the selection of tonics. The

At Masque, food changes in form and texture—carrots are shaped into wafer-thin shards, lavender flowers become the steak jus and sea buckthorn berries are transformed into palate-cleansing

an enhanced dining experience. From food to ambience and service, they must be doing it all right—Bukhara was voted the Best Restaurant in a Hotel in India at the Condé Nast

or wasabi crème brûlée. It’s the perfect place to celebrate a special occasion with an exceptional meal. Unassuming and

also launched Begum Victoria Cheese, which promotes homegrown,

MASQUE MUMBAI

either. The restaurant was designed to reflect what a traditional home would look like, and the food is served in traditional earthenware. Patrons are also encouraged to eat sans cutlery for

Palace in Mumbai’s Colaba locality, you can enjoy views of the Gateway of India as you dig into sushi, white fish carpaccio

grows its own produce. This year, the restaurant

transport you from Bengaluru’s Wood Street to New York City’s bohemian East Village neighbourhood. With exposed walls and roofs and floors designed with decade-old sleeper wood, the

farm. (thetable.in)

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so creamy and flavourful that it has people salivating across the country at all ITC hotels, where it is also served. The interiors, like the menu, haven’t changed since Bukhara’s inception

could always lounge around in the in-house boutique and pick

authentic flavours. (tajhotels.com)

with chemical-free vegetables, fruits and herbs sourced from this

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the brand’s endeavour to preserve India’s culinary heritage, and the dal bukhara reflects this knowledge of gastronomy—the signature slowcooked black lentil preparation is

chops and avial curry. Just be sure to either make a reservation

Wasabi by Morimoto. The restaurant imports many of its ingredients from Japan, so diners can enjoy

Alibaug in 2012. A lot of its dishes are prepared

boneless chicken wings drizzled with honey glaze, clams and handmade linguini, shrimp dumplings in a spicy ginger broth, yellowfish tuna tataki and

Toast & Tonic has its own farmstead, where it

Tonic touch, and you get international dishes that champion these ingredients, like slow-cooked pork carnitas served on corn tortillas, smoked Bandel cheese and gin mustard hollandaise, Naga chilli

Bukhara at ITC Maurya, New Delhi, sticks to its roots. A true testimony to India’s culinary tradition, the menu here has remained unchanged for nearly four decades. The food exhibits

aroma of tamarind and burnt curry leaves in the air, lure diners

Traditional Japanese

inspiration from different corners of the world, from Thailand and Japan to France and the Americas. The

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Pradesh—this Bengaluru restaurant helmed by Chef Manu Chandra celebrates all things local on its menu. Add a Toast &

chicken wings with a side of som tam salad and crisp, soft-shell crab with a Singapore-style chilli peanut sauce. The interiors, too,

started its own farm in

which largely features shareable plates, takes

Bandel from Kolkata, robiola from Maharashtra, chocolate from Puducherry, pork from Tamil Nadu and crabs from Andhra

While restaurants are competing to add a global twist to their food in the age of modern dining concepts,

casual outdoor ambience with colourful décor, clubbed with the

vegetables, a concept that’s well established at

some of the finest ingredients, The Table

BUKHARA ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI

True South Indian delicacies have

cuisine uses fresh ingredients and seasonal

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without a doubt the ingredients—it uses locally sourced fish and meat, and some of the greens are from the restaurant’s farm in Alibaug. The menu,

TOAST & TONIC BENGALURU

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GUNPOWDER ASSAGAO, GOA

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la crème since it was established in 2011. If you’re wondering what keeps them coming back, it’s

the restaurant’s sister enterprise Magazine Street Kitchen) are some of the star dishes at The Table.

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has been a favourite among the city’s crème de

the avocado toast topped on sourdough (from

our menu.” (thebombaycanteen.com)

experiences fit for a milestone celebration.

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THE TABLE MUMBAI

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Chef Manish Mehrotra has burnished his reputation

6 BALLYGUNGE PLACE KOLKATA While Bengali food—of both the street and fine-dining variety—is ubiquitous in Kolkata today, 6 Ballygunge Place remains a pioneer. Despite being one of Kolkata’s earliest fine-dining restaurants dedicated to the region’s cuisine, its culinary repertoire is unmatched. The menu is a result of meticulous research into traditional family recipes and centuries-old cookbooks, featuring classics like daab chingri (prawns cooked inside a tender coconut) and lesser-known dishes like Dhakai pora mangsho (a mutton preparation from Dhaka). Chef Sushanta Sengupta is known for his special curations, which include collaborations with Bangladeshi chefs and menus inspired by seasonal produce and historical recipes like an all-hilsa menu to a Sabarna Roy Food Festival, which showcased 300-yearold recipes from the pre-Raj era.

RAW & FINE The ingredients are sourced from local Goan vendors. Right from the toddy for the sannas to the dry fish and Goan chillies, everything comes from local markets, including the Friday Mapusa Market, where pretty much the whole of Goa does its weekly shopping! The restaurant also doesn’t use any artificial preservatives in its food, only natural products like local palm vinegar and salt. (mumskitchengoa.com)

MUM’S KITCHEN PANAJI, GOA A visit to Mum’s Kitchen isn’t just another lunch; it’s a walk down memory lane to discover the history and culture of a state in one delicious meal. Since 1997, the folks behind the restaurant have been on a mission to save Goan cuisine. From beef croquettes to chouriço pão and fried bombil, you will get all your local favourites here, recipes passed down for generations. Each dish makes use of traditional Goan ingredients like coconut oil, kokum and palm jaggery, all sourced from local farmers and producers. Also, Mum’s Kitchen prides itself on its commitment to women’s empowerment, and most of its recipes are hand-picked from Goan villages. In fact, ‘Ethnic Prawn Curries of Goa’ is a section on the menu that’s dedicated entirely to recipes by local women.

This restaurant in Mumbai’s Bandra-Kurla Complex serves modern Indian cuisine—a feat several establishments have been attempting with mixed results. But Trèsind gets it right, courtesy Chef Himanshu Saini who earned his chops under Manish Mehrotra, the master of modern Indian fare. The presentation is smart, often playful, without being gimmicky, and the flavours are distinctly Indian. The highlights of the menu include the mutton khari, vegan carpaccio, Rajasthani cucumber curry and kosha mangsho, though the most audacious idea, arguably, is the Gujarati farsan, made from khandvi ice cream, papaya chutney and fafda crisp. But the dish that garners the most attention—and Instagram fame—is the khichdi of India, a smooth, flavourful rice preparation with ingredients from across the country. In keeping with its philosophy of ‘less is more’, the restaurant serves only fixed menus (five courses at lunch, 10 at dinner) to minimise wastage, which is the most sincere reflection of the Indian dining ethos.


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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BOMRA’S CANDOLIM, GOA is run by the reticent but affable Bawmra Jap. In 2011, Amitav Ghosh had called him “one of the finest and most inventive chefs in the world”, and since then, Chef Jap has gone on to prove why he deserves that endorsement. The simple, airy ambience of bamboo and lanterns at Bomra’s is distinctly South Asian, as is the food. Jap draws from his Asian heritage to serve cuisine from China, Laos, India and Thailand. The menu may be limited and kinder to non-vegetarians, but it packs a punch. Pork lovers will enjoy the crackling

Made in Goa for the city of Mumbai, this all-day bar and restaurant was brought here by the team behind The Bombay Canteen (Hunger Inc

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‘Authentic’ may be a much abused term in dining circles today, but this hotel-restaurant lays a fair claim to it. In the heart of Karaikudi in Tamil

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Chef Jap brought in

Nadu’s Chettinad district, the kitchen at this heritage hotel serves up a fine exposition of Chettiar cuisine. The flavours are spicy but not hot;

Your lunch is served on banana leaves grown in

the masalas are hand-pounded; and the menu reflects the region’s culture and history. So you will find the immensely popular uppu kari, a dish made with mutton, shallots, garlic and Tamil Nadu’s famous gundu

the hotel’s own gardens, irrigated by waste water from

herbs from his home in Kachin, Myanmar, which he now grows at the restaurant’s garden. (bomras.com)

milagai chillies. And as a nod to the British, who left their culinary imprint on the region, you will also find mint and potato croquettes.

pork, pomelo and pomegranate salad and also the

Meals are taken communally at a teak dining hall and eaten from a banana leaf plate with one’s hands. Bonus: one can also sign up for the

slow-cooked pork belly salad. Pair your meals with a pomegranate margarita or lychee martini and finish it all off with the coconut and jackfruit panna

Sabreen and Prahlad Sukhtankar’s

Situated in a yellow-and-white

drawing from its Portuguese influences. Its expert mixologists dove deep into the way Goan bars evolved over the years and brought together a menu of inventive drinks that blended home brews with fresh ingredients and

The Black Sheep Bistro channels an elegant but easy vibe. It serves

local flavours. Perhaps O Pedro’s best quality is its casual yet chic ambience clubbed with the lack of rigidity that a lot of upscale restaurants come with.

Goan ingredients: think Malwani

Food comes in quarter-, half- and full-plate portions to allow diners to eat and share as they like, options that not many fine-dining spots offer.

chicken stroganoff, tuna + kokam ross and Hainanese paneer rice. The

bungalow in the city’s Latin quarter,

global cuisines prepared with local

highlight, though, is the impressive cocktail programme here, which

the property. All leftovers are processed and used as compost for the garden. How

includes handcrafted concoctions that will add to the evening. Try The Paan, made from fresh betel nut

is that for sustainability! (thebangala.com)

leaf, anise, gin, vodka and lime; the Lau Pani, made from sparkling wine, whisky and rice; or one of the many

seven-day Masterclass, which includes shopping trips, history lessons and hands-on cooking sessions with professional and home chefs.

cotta or the lemongrass and ginger crème brûlée.

THE BLACK SHEEP BISTRO PANAJI, GOA bistro has firmly established itself in Panaji’s premium dining circuit.

Hospitality), the winners of the 2018 Top Restaurant Awards. O Pedro offers simple yet sophisticated food that reflects Goa’s culinary diversity, even

THE BANGALA KARAIKUDI, CHETTINAD

This al fresco restaurant in North Goa’s Candolim

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O PEDRO MUMBAI

Goan feni-based cocktails.

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DUM PUKHT ITC MAURYA, NEW DELHI

Chef Hussain Shahzad’s food philosophy is simple—showcase local produce using contemporary culinary techniques that inspire future generations to cook smarter. Diners here can enjoy what Goans ate in prePortuguese times: the cuisine of the

PHOTOGRAPH: RAHULNATH

Saraswat community that loved both seafood and vegetarian fare, coconut

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procured sustainably.” (itchotels.in)

restaurant promotes local produce and growers. facebook.com/

(opedromumbai.com)

theblacksheepbistrogoa

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An all-day dim sum teahouse from London,

Avartana draws on seasonal produce and fresh ingredients, from local spices

the root of the cuisine and service at this restaurant, and the result is Cantonese

to infused oils. ITC Hotels place a strong emphasis

cooking with a contemporary flair—subtle and thrilling at the same time. A fusion

a fiery crab milagu fry, tiger prawns roast and Alleppey meen curry, among others. The focus is on clean, authentic flavours and cooking techniques, as well as on a diverse selection of recipes

introduced the city to the concept of obento lunches. The restaurant’s fascination with Japanese dining culture is ever expanding, and we aren’t complaining.

revives this traditional technique using centuries-old recipes borrowed from royal courts across the country, from Kashmir to Hyderabad. The melt-in-your-mouth kakori kebab, succulent murg chandi tikka, delicately flavoured baghara baingan and iconic Dum Pukht biryani have won the restaurant several accolades for elevating and redefining classic Indian cuisine.

works closely with local producers and farmers. (itchotels.in)

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Yauatcha stands out in the world of eclectic food expression. Modern authenticity is at

the southern and western coasts of India. Located in The Gateway Hotel in Bengaluru, its menu is a collection of the greatest hits from the region over the years, featuring dishes like

crisp tempura and even meticulously crafted bento meals. It wouldn’t truly be Izakaya-style dining without alcohol, so you can wash down the food with a selection of Japanese saké, wines and whiskies. EDO recently hosted a food promotion curated around temple cuisine and also

The restaurant strongly believes in sourcing sustainably and locally, and using seasonal ingredients and artisanal cooking methods, thus reviving traditional food practices. The ITC Hotels group

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YAUATCHA MUMBAI

Nearly four decades old and yet Karavalli remains unfailingly on point in its approach to regional cuisine from

style of after-hours dining, EDO’s source of inspiration, came about. Located at ITC Gardenia in Bengaluru, the idea was to bring Japan’s vibrant after-hours culture to Indian diners. The menu celebrates Japanese bar food, showcasing favourites like sushi and sashimi, robatayaki,

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The zardozi-embroidered, colonial-style furniture and the Awadhi-style lamps will transport you to an era bygone and the food to the kitchens of the nawabs. ‘Dum pukht’ is the process of slow-cooking food in a handi sealed with dough, which allows the ingredients to mature and brings out the most intense aromas and flavours. The restaurant at ITC Maurya, New Delhi,

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KARAVALLI THE GATEWAY HOTEL, BENGALURU

It was between 1603 and 1868—the ‘Edo’ period—that Japan was first exposed to art, music, theatre and the general world of gladness. This was also when the Izakaya

“EDO’s cuisine is highly ingredient-driven. It reflects our culinary philosophy that incorporates the use of high-quality ingredients

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through food festivals and dishes that appear on their menu seasonally.

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EDO - JAPANESE RESTAURANT AND BAR ITC GARDENIA, BENGALURU

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and kokum. The restaurant has also been trying to reveal Konkan culinary secrets and pre-Portuguese history

on quality ingredients and signature menus; business

of Chinese fare, mixology and French patisserie offers diners a unique culinary

clients can opt for the Alert Meets menu that’s designed

experience, which, one could say, reflects the spirit of a modern-day teahouse,

to boost clear thinking and energy levels. (itchotels.in)

or even a traditional Hong Kong-style chatter house, as you can interpret from

from Hindu, Muslim and Christian communities across the coastline. Chef Naren Thimmaiah makes sure that there are no shortcuts in his kitchen, and that every dish is crafted

the seating here. Yauatcha’s successful initiatives this year include the launch

AVARTANA ITC GRAND CHOLA, CHENNAI At Avartana, everything from the décor to the cuisine presents South Indian traditions with a modern twist. Think lamb brain fritters, infused tomato rasam, idiyappam with asparagus and coconut stew and fennel panna cotta! The lights are shaped like banana flowers, and there’s a mural of a Kerala canoe crafted in mother-of-pearl. The focus is on reimagining South Indian food, from presentation to the degustation menus, while maintaining the authenticity of flavour. Guests can choose from a sevencourse tasting menu to a 13-course seafood menu. And Avartana is not just a city favourite—the restaurant’s offerings have travelled to Mumbai, Bengaluru, Delhi and Kolkata in pop-ups.

the Infusion List—a curated list of over 30 homemade liqueurs and bitters—and

with traditional ingredients and high-quality produce.

the Liquid Sweet Shop, a collection of dessert cocktails to be appreciated on their own (unlike the dessert wine list most restaurants offer) at the end of the meal. This list includes the Raspberry Delice Martini that was inspired by the patisserie favourite here, the Raspberry Delice.

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BENGALURU OOTA COMPANY BENGALURU An idli made of jackfruit may sound unappetising to many, but one bite of the pelata gatti here will be enough to turn the opinion of most jackfruit naysayers around. This Mangalorean preparation, served with a chicken curry, is just one of the many glorious dishes on Bengaluru Oota’s menu that recreates traditional Gowda and Shetty cuisines. Sold? Be sure to book a meal in advance at the tasting room in Ulsoor that’s run by an all-female kitchen. Diners here submit to a menu that changes every day

RAW & FINE RAW & FINE The restaurant’s by reservationonly format, which requires guests to book a table at least 24 hours in advance for the dine-in experience, stems from a food philosophy of buying and using only fresh, local ingredients on a daily basis to ensure zero wastage. The menu champions lesserknown fruits and vegetables. (bengaluruootacompany.com)

“Karavalli showcases regional dishes as made by mothers and grandmothers, and to do that, we procure ingredients from the original source, like perfectly smoked kudampuli from Kerala, toddy vinegar from Goa and Kundapur coconuts from Karnataka. We use

RAW & FINE Yauatcha incorporates traditional cooking techniques like wok hei and steaming to bring out flavours while retaining nutritional value. Dishes prepared this way have a complex, smoky flavour that can only be achieved by cooking fresh ingredients over extreme heat. The food is stir-fried in a small amount over a few minutes (unlike frying or boiling), which helps maintain the crisp texture and nutrients in the ingredients. (yauatcha.com)

organic vegetables, spices, pulses and grains to a great extent, just the way they are used in homes in these regions. Our kitchen was designed to accommodate traditional cooking methods and home-style equipment.” (tajhotels.com)

based on the availability of local and seasonal ingredients.

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29 RAW & FINE The food at Le Cirque Signature is heavily produce-driven, and the culinary philosophy here is to focus on the innate flavours of ingredients. (theleela.com)

LE CIRQUE SIGNATURE THE LEELA PALACE BENGALURU This fine-dining restaurant offers its guests a luxurious culinary experience—a mashup of French delicacy and Italian piquancy. Located at The Leela Palace Bengaluru, the ambience at Le Cirque Signature is cosy yet sophisticated, which also accurately describes the Franco-Italian cuisine. There’s private as well as al fresco dining here, the latter section overlooking the gardens of the hotel. Le Cirque has curated several special menus, either focusing on a single ingredient or a compilation of its signature classics. Earlier this year, it created a menu that focused solely on asparagus and its many forms and textures. From pecorino cheese crème brûlée to the prosciutto roulade, the food is proof that it’s possible to retain the identity of a cuisine even with little tweaks. The Le Cirque experience is a blend of European elegance and Indian opulence, and what better place to enjoy such a meal than a palace hotel.

BASTIAN MUMBAI If you’ve lived in Mumbai’s Bandra neighbourhood long enough, you know there’s no Sunday brunch without the thought of Bastian. Regulars know that few things compare to the restaurant’s tuna crispy rice, (gluten-free) truffle fries and blueberry cheesecake. Even though most visits to Bastian are a star-studded event, with a pick of celebrities always cruising through, all attention is on the food here. It’s one of those places that has mastered both seafood and fine vegetarian cuisine, with special emphasis on clean, healthy eating. Named after Sebastian, the cheerful crustacean from The Little Mermaid, Bastian promises global cuisine that highlights Chef Boo Kim’s unique style. The restaurant also caters to a variety of diets. So even if you’re a staunch

ADAA TAJ FALAKNUMA PALACE, HYDERABAD

vegan or are grimacing through the keto diet, you’ll find something for you here.

The pearl of Hyderabad’s Taj Falaknuma Palace, Adaa sits aloft over the city’s twinkling lights. This fine-dining spot reflects the plush Nizam lifestyle in both atmosphere and cuisine. Lunch, afternoon tea and dinner services begin with a heritage trail through the palace. Walk past artworks of royal hunting expeditions and gorgeous mirrors to dine in the sparkle of chandeliers and crystal glassware.

RAW & FINE The heart of Nizami cuisine is cooking “itmenaan se”, or with a lot of patience. Traditional recipes are prepared with a lot of care. “Dum”, or slow-cooking food under pressure, is the essence of Hyderabadi cuisine and also of the restaurant. Fine ingredients like saffron and vetiver root enhance the flavour of the carefully curated dishes, all made in copper vessels on a wood fire or in a sandpit. (tajhotels.com)

All the while, peacocks strut by elegantly. Delicate kebabs, rich curries and flavourful biryanis are accompanied by a range of wines, cocktails and sorbets. The kitchen is renowned for the Nizam’s favourite pathar ka gosht, marinated for 48 hours and cooked on a hot granite stone.

RAW & FINE Bastian is a firm believer in clean eating and sustainable culinary practices, with a strict hygiene regime. It conducts a series of lab tests over the seafood and white and red meat procured to ensure that they’re safe for consumption. Imports are also kept to a minimum, and produce is sourced from local vendors. (bastianrestaurant.com)

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THE SALT HOUSE KOLKATA Risotto made with a Kolkata staple like gobindobhog rice, ravioli with a classic Bengali mutton curry and Bengali samosas made with phyllo pastry—these are just a few examples of The Salt House’s global, contemporary take on Bengali cuisine. Using homegrown spices and ingredients and whipping up chutneys and sauces from scratch in its kitchen, the restaurant has established itself as a modern and stylish update on traditional cooking. It’s also known for its pop-ups, which it hosts in collaboration with other independent brands. The Salt House also curates festive menus—#PandalToTable this year was its most recent one; it featured ghughni hummus and kulcha, edamame and truffle phuchka and French shahi tukda. Their twists are fresh and innovative, like their ode to Anthony Bourdain, where their Kolkata bun cha is still a crowd favourite.

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ROYAL CHINA MUMBAI

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From a signature chilli oil that you can buy by the bottle and the most delicately flavoured cheung fung, Royal China serves Cantonese cuisine that is sure to convert you if you’re not a fan of Chinese food. It’s been a staple in Mumbai’s cuisine map and held its place of pride despite the many waves of trendy hashtag-worthy restaurants that have tried to lure their loyal customers. But once a Royal China fan, always a Royal China fan. Especially with their special lunch dim sum menu, filet steak with black pepper, prawns in XO sauce, steamed Chilean sea bass, and so much more.

“From vegetables to meat, everything is handpicked and butchered in-house. From switching to the very Calcuttan gobindobhog rice for risottos to using a lot of kolmi saag, fresh bhetki maach and gondhoraj lebu (lemon), we believe regional is the way ahead even in global cuisines. We grow Bengal-specific microgreens like mustard, poi saag and kolmi saag, and our kitchen garden is our planter wall full of local produce. We are a zerowaste restaurant. Every ingredient is used in multiple ways to promote sustainability.” (facebook.com/ thesalthousekolkata)

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BOTTICINO TRIDENT BANDRA-KURLA, MUMBAI

7 SHORT 1 LONG MOIRA, GOA Tucked away in the quiet village of Moira, this family-run restaurant is an ode to Goan home cooking. Owner Belinda Braganza drew inspiration from her long years working as a chef on a cruise liner while opening 7 Short 1 Long. This nautical-themed restaurant—even named after the general alarm used on ships—is a revamped part of her ancestral home. Carefully curated by Belinda’s mother Clara, the menu features some delicious dishes she grew up eating and changes every week. Some favourites are the chicken liver fry, tongue chilli and beef meatball curry. The gorgeous garden café hosts a number of food festivals that are inspired by various cuisines, thanks to Belinda’s many years at sea and her host of friends from all over the globe. This restaurant is testimony to the belief that coming home, in more ways than one, is never a bad idea.

The fine-dining restaurant is named after the beautiful beige Italian marble, Pietra di Botticino, which adorns a large part of this classy yet inviting space. The gentle cove lighting and furnishings in shades of pastel are designed to soothe. As for the food, Botticino’s menu—featuring hearty Italian dishes from regions like Piedmont, Lombardy, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany and Lazio—is sure to please your palate. The lobster and mascarpone risotto, herb-crusted lamb loin, dry-aged duck breast, twice-cooked mozzarella and black truffle risotto are some of its signature dishes. You can wash these down with one of the 120 wines on offer in Botticino’s two-storey wine repository.

RAW & FINE Plastic straws are heavily discouraged and all ingredients are locally sourced. (facebook.com/ 7short1long)

RAW & FINE Botticino makes consistent efforts to build an environmentally-conscious menu. The robiola, an Italian soft-ripened cheese served at the restaurant, was initially imported but is now sourced from a local creamery. All the ingredients in the seafood stew also feature the locally sourced fresh catch of the day. (tridenthotels.com)

RAW & FINE Sustainable, local produce lends freshness to the plate at La Plage. The restaurant embraces the farm-to-table philosophy and drives its menu with the fresh catch of the day as well as quality ingredients that are mostly locally sourced. (+91 98221 21712)

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LA PLAGE MANDREM, GOA Toes in the sand, fine French food on platters, sea breeze rustling the drapes— La Plage in Mandrem, Goa, gives more than a sense of the good life. The everpopular seaside restaurant exudes a carefree vibe, replete with the easy tunes, hammocks and deck chairs that are perfect for inducing the holiday state of mind. The menu is redesigned every year, and its furnishings refreshed. The signature dishes endure: don’t miss the sesame-crusted tuna fillet, beetroot and mango carpaccio and the chocolate thali. Come for the delicately flavoured seafood, stay for the laid-back ambience.

RAW & FINE The dishes are authentically Cantonese in nature, and the chillies for its famous chilli oil come from the best suppliers. The South Mumbai restaurant also sticks to a number of Chinese traditions, like not serving dim sum in the evenings (in China, dim sum is not typically served after 5pm). (royalchinaindia.com)

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SAVYA RASA PUNE

DAKSHIN ITC WINDSOR, BENGALURU

Hoping to educate diners about South Indian cuisine beyond idlidosa-sambar, Savya Rasa has an exhaustive menu, featuring cuisines from Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh as well as Telangana. Having spent over two years visiting homes, toddy shops and many holein-the-wall joints across the southern states, the team—led by Chef Sheik Mohideen—put together dishes and offerings that promote traditional, longforgotten recipes and techniques of cooking South Indian food. On the menu, you’ll find Chettinad kozhi podi varuval alongside a Mangalorean anjal rava fry. Our pick? The gloriously flaky Malabari kottu roti to mop up the uppu kari, succulent cubes of mutton fry finished in coconut oil with curry leaves and shallots.

Sourcing the best dishes from across South India, Dakshin serves a delectable range of food, including chef-curated specials for those moments when you want to try a bit of everything but just can’t decide. Their daily specials are always a delight, only to be followed up with the creamiest meen moilee you can imagine. Dakshin yera, or masala-coated fried prawns, the Thanjavur speciality vazhai shunti that’s made with spiced raw banana hash, is among the many regional specialities you can tuck into. Wash it down with majjige, buttermilk flavoured with ginger, green chillies and fresh coriander paste, and follow with a deep snooze.

RAW & FINE Dakshin at ITC Windsor, Bengaluru, is known to be truly authentic for not just how the restaurant sources its ingredients but also in the way it curates and prepares its dishes. A glance at the menu tells you that the experience here is going to be a crash course in South Indian cuisine that will go far beyond just dosa, idli and sambar. (itchotels.in)

DIVA - THE ITALIAN RESTAURANT NEW DELHI

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Queen of Italian cuisine Ritu Dalmia is the genius behind the culinary magic of DIVA - The Italian Restaurant, the first of the DIVA family. From the sharpest of cheeses to the finest of wines, the restaurant boasts authentic Italian cuisine. When DIVA first came to Delhi, there was nothing like it. It brought authentic fare from Italy to the land where butter chicken ruled and did a fine job of it, too. For vegetarians, the crispy kale pecorino souffle with red pepper sauce, or the baked eggplant cannoli really hit the spot. Meat eaters should dig into the ravioli with slow-cooked salsiccia and roasted celeriac, pan-roasted salmon, or the New Zealand lamb rack.

OOTA BANGALORE RAW & FINE The restaurant finds exciting way to integrate traditional cuisine into contemporary dining, updated with smart portions, keeping local ingredients and original recipes intact. (facebook. com/ootabangalore)

RAW & FINE Apart from growing its own spices that are hand-ground into masalas, Savya Rasa also focuses on using clean and fresh ingredients sourced from organic farms across India. It promotes native grains across its menu, as well. (savyarasa.com)

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It isn’t always easy to turn a traditional dish into something contemporary and casual, like transforming a chicken ghee roast into an appetiser or a pork dish from coastal Karnataka into a salad. But that’s what Oota does and excels in. Mangalore buns, goli baje and maddur vade are popular starters. Kumbala curry from Malnad and Coorg, nati koli pulimunchi (country chicken in tamarind gravy) from coastal Karnataka, mutton rassa from North Karnataka and pandi curry from Coorg are all main courses inspired and sourced from regions in and around Karnataka, like the Canara coast, Mangaluru, the Western Ghats and the Deccan track. Run by Windmills Craftworks brewery, you can tuck into these delicacies with their beer.

RAW & FINE Most of the produce is sourced fresh from local vendors, and there’s a major emphasis on zero wastage and non-commercial processes. Everything from offal cuts to vegetable peels is used in its entirety. Apart from the imported goods, almost nothing comes out of tins or Tetra Paks. (divarestaurants.com)

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THE 50 THAT MADE THE LIST

THE 50 THAT

Final opener page

THE 50 THAT MADE THE LIST

Variations of the opener

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

THE

50 THAT MADE

PHOTOGRAPH: DANIEL SHECHTER

THE LIST

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ALL THE WINNERS AT #TOPRESTAURANTAWARDS 2019

ALL THE WINNERS AT #TOPRESTAURANTAWARDS 2019

ALL THE WINNERS AT #TOPRESTAURANTAWARDS 2019

Variations of winners page

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

ALL THE WINNERS AT THE #TOPRESTAURANTAWARDS 2019

Final winners page

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FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD Feeling purple with Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira A celebration of cuisines with Chef Picu Meet Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira, fondly known as Chef Picu. He’s a dyed-in-the-wool Goan, with a penchant for quirky crocs and regional Indian cuisine. And he’s had quite the journey! From having studied at the Institute of Hotel Management Mumbai to having worked in top kitchens across the country, Chef Picu sure has come a long way and his happy smile is proof of how much he’s enjoyed this journey. Back in 2016, Chef Picu became the Executive Chef of À Ta Maison (ATM), New Delhi, where he won multiple awards for bringing to the table the best European cuisine in the capital. In 2017, he brought his culinary prowess over to Jamun, New Delhi, an exquisite regional Indian eatery and bar that celebrates the regional diversity and rich heritage of Indian cuisine. Drawing from his roots, Chef Picu successfully managed to provide diners here with a wonderful taste of Goan food. Think soft, house-baked poi and flavourful chicken Xacuti and

pork vindaloo, to name a few. If that wasn’t all, he was also instrumental in establishing signature properties by Pass Code Hospitality such as Saz & Ping’s in Kolkata and Ping’s Bia Hoi in Goa. And global beverage leader Diageo, has always supported and encouraged creative minds such as these. It’s pretty evident then why Chef Picu is the deserving winner of the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’ award. In fact, Chef Picu is a perfect representation of what Diageo and

Singleton both stand for—the pursuit of the finest taste and providing immense pleasure from the very first sip—in this case, the very first bite! And when asked how it felt to be the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’, Chef Picu said, “I’m elated and humbled, just to be a part of such a great company. The awards are highly motivating for young chefs like myself to push ourselves, to improve and to move forward.” And Jamun, one of his most successful stints yet, is a reflection

of all that he believes in. As he sipped on Singleton’s signature cocktails, he reflected, “Jamun is an ingredient that is found across the country and brings back fond memories of my childhood. The colour is something that we all personally love, for our own reasons. What better way in which to celebrate Indian food?” Brought to you by the creators of PCO, ATM, Ping’s Cafe Orient & PDA, Jamun’s food and beverage menu are steeped in authenticity and honesty, with a splash of style—a true celebration of the diversity of India. Its menu boasts dishes from across the sub-continent that represent the varied flavours of pan-Indian fare, from subtle to sour to spicy. With an

established presence in New Delhi and Goa, Jamun’s expertly curated mix of forgotten recipes and popular dishes from the heart of India are sure to warm your heart, fill your belly and keep you coming back for more. For instance, at Jamun, patrons can enjoy an unconventional farm-to-table experience, with everything from mutton ghee roast to an aromatic fish curry, some of which are recipes from the chef’s own personal collection. Chef Picu also introduces five new dishes to his special blackboard menu at Jamun every five days. He thrives on experimentation and enjoys coming up with new recipes and trying them out with his team, to present to his diners with finesse, every now and then. Now

you know how his infamous chorizo crepes, poha bhaji and jamun kulfi came around! In case you didn’t know it, Chef Picu has often been listed across multiple notable platforms as one among the Top 10 Young Chefs of India. He even represented the country at the World Skills Leipzig fest, an international culinary competition that took place in Germany, when he was only 20 years old. It is this indomitable spirit and quest for perfection in all that he does, both of which are reflections of Diageo’s own beliefs, that makes Chef Picu the perfect choice for the prestigious title of ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’.

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD Feeling purple with Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira A celebration of cuisines with Chef Picu Meet Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira, fondly known as Chef Picu. He’s a dyed-in-the-wool Goan, with a penchant for quirky crocs and regional Indian cuisine. And he’s had quite the journey! From having studied at the Institute of Hotel Management Mumbai to having worked in top kitchens across the country, Chef Picu sure has come a long way and his happy smile is proof of how much he’s enjoyed this journey. Back in 2016, Chef Picu became the Executive Chef of À Ta Maison (ATM), New Delhi, where he won multiple awards for bringing to the table the best European cuisine in the capital. In 2017, he brought his culinary prowess over to Jamun, New Delhi, an exquisite regional Indian eatery and bar that celebrates the regional diversity and rich heritage of Indian cuisine. Drawing from his roots, Chef Picu successfully managed to provide diners here with a wonderful taste of Goan food. Think soft, house-baked poi and flavourful chicken Xacuti and

43

pork vindaloo, to name a few. If that wasn’t all, he was also instrumental in establishing signature properties by Pass Code Hospitality such as Saz & Ping’s in Kolkata and Ping’s Bia Hoi in Goa. And global beverage leader Diageo, has always supported and encouraged creative minds such as these. It’s pretty evident then why Chef Picu is the deserving winner of the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’ award. In fact, Chef Picu is a perfect representation of what Diageo and

Singleton both stand for—the pursuit of the finest taste and providing immense pleasure from the very first sip—in this case, the very first bite! And when asked how it felt to be the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’, Chef Picu said, “I’m elated and humbled, just to be a part of such a great company. The awards are highly motivating for young chefs like myself to push ourselves, to improve and to move forward.” And Jamun, one of his most successful stints yet, is a reflection

of all that he believes in. As he sipped on Singleton’s signature cocktails, he reflected, “Jamun is an ingredient that is found across the country and brings back fond memories of my childhood. The colour is something that we all personally love, for our own reasons. What better way in which to celebrate Indian food?” Brought to you by the creators of PCO, ATM, Ping’s Cafe Orient & PDA, Jamun’s food and beverage menu are steeped in authenticity and honesty, with a splash of style—a true celebration of the diversity of India. Its menu boasts dishes from across the sub-continent that represent the varied flavours of pan-Indian fare, from subtle to sour to spicy. With an

established presence in New Delhi and Goa, Jamun’s expertly curated mix of forgotten recipes and popular dishes from the heart of India are sure to warm your heart, fill your belly and keep you coming back for more. For instance, at Jamun, patrons can enjoy an unconventional farm-to-table experience, with everything from mutton ghee roast to an aromatic fish curry, some of which are recipes from the chef’s own personal collection. Chef Picu also introduces five new dishes to his special blackboard menu at Jamun every five days. He thrives on experimentation and enjoys coming up with new recipes and trying them out with his team, to present to his diners with finesse, every now and then. Now

you know how his infamous chorizo crepes, poha bhaji and jamun kulfi came around! In case you didn’t know it, Chef Picu has often been listed across multiple notable platforms as one among the Top 10 Young Chefs of India. He even represented the country at the World Skills Leipzig fest, an international culinary competition that took place in Germany, when he was only 20 years old. It is this indomitable spirit and quest for perfection in all that he does, both of which are reflections of Diageo’s own beliefs, that makes Chef Picu the perfect choice for the prestigious title of ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’.


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

FOR THE

LOVE OF FOOD A celebration of cuisines with Chef Picu Meet Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira, fondly known as Chef Picu. He’s a dyed-in-the-wool Goan, with a penchant for quirky crocs and regional Indian cuisine. And he’s had quite the journey! From having studied at the Institute of Hotel Management Mumbai to having worked in top kitchens across the country, Chef Picu has come a long way. Back in 2016, Chef Picu became the Executive Chef of À Ta Maison (ATM), New Delhi, where he won multiple awards for bringing the best European fare to the capital. In 2017, he brought his culinary prowess over to Jamun, New Delhi, an exquisite regional Indian eatery and bar that celebrates the regional diversity and rich heritage of Indian cuisine. Drawing from his roots, Chef Picu successfully managed to provide diners here with a wonderful taste of Goan food. Think soft, housebaked poi, flavourful chicken Xacuti and pork vindaloo. If that wasn’t all, he

was also instrumental in establishing signature properties by Pass Code Hospitality such as Saz and Ping’s in Kolkata and Ping’s Bia Hoi in Goa. It’s pretty evident then why Chef Picu is the deserving winner of the ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’ award, which he received at the third edition of Condé Nast Traveller and Himalayan India’s Top Restaurant Awards 2019 (TRA). In fact, Chef Picu is a perfect representation of what Diageo and Singleton both stand for—the pursuit of the finest taste

and providing immense pleasure from the very first sip—in this case, the very first bite! Global beverage leader Diageo, has always supported and encouraged creative minds such as these. And when asked how it felt to be the ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’ at the prestigious Top Restaurant Awards this time, Chef Picu said, “I’m elated and humbled, just to be a part of such a great company. The awards are highly motivating for young chefs like myself to push ourselves, to improve and move forward.”

Jamun, one of the chef’s most successful stints yet, is a reflection of all that he believes in. As he sipped on Singleton’s signature cocktails, he reflects, “Jamun is an ingredient that is found across the country and brings back fond memories of my childhood. The colour is something that we all personally love, for our own reasons. What better way to celebrate Indian food?” Brought to you by the creators of PCO, ATM, Ping’s Cafe Orient and PDA, Jamun’s food and beverage menu are steeped in authenticity and honesty, with a splash of style—a true celebration of the diversity of India. Its menu boasts dishes from across

the sub-continent that represent the varied flavours of pan-Indian fare, from subtle to sour to spicy. With an established presence in New Delhi and Goa, Jamun’s expertly curated mix of forgotten recipes and popular dishes from the heart of India are sure to warm your heart, fill your belly and keep you coming back for more. For instance, at Jamun, patrons can enjoy an unconventional farm-to-table experience, with everything from mutton ghee roast to an aromatic fish curry, some of which are recipes from the chef’s own personal collection. Chef Picu also introduces five new dishes to his special blackboard menu at Jamun every week. He thrives on

experimentation and enjoys coming up with new recipes to present to his diners. Now you know how his infamous chorizo crepes, poha bhaji and jamun kulfi came to life! The multi-talented chef even represented the country at the World Skills Leipzig fest, an international culinary competition that took place in Germany, when he was only 20 years old. It is this indomitable spirit and quest for perfection in all that he does, both of which are reflections of Diageo’s own beliefs, that makes Chef Picu the perfect choice for the prestigious title of ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’.

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD Feeling purple with Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira A celebration of cuisines with Chef Picu Meet Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira, fondly known as Chef Picu. He’s a dyed-in-the-wool Goan, with a penchant for quirky crocs and regional Indian cuisine. And he’s had quite the journey! From having studied at the Institute of Hotel Management Mumbai to having worked in top kitchens across the country, Chef Picu sure has come a long way and his happy smile is proof of how much he’s enjoyed this journey. Back in 2016, Chef Picu became the Executive Chef of À Ta Maison (ATM), New Delhi, where he won multiple awards for bringing to the table the best European cuisine in the capital. In 2017, he brought his culinary prowess over to Jamun, New Delhi, an exquisite regional Indian eatery and bar that celebrates the regional diversity and rich heritage of Indian cuisine. Drawing from his roots, Chef Picu successfully managed to provide diners here with a wonderful taste of Goan food. Think soft, house-baked poi and flavourful chicken Xacuti and

pork vindaloo, to name a few. If that wasn’t all, he was also instrumental in establishing signature properties by Pass Code Hospitality such as Saz & Ping’s in Kolkata and Ping’s Bia Hoi in Goa. And global beverage leader Diageo, has always supported and encouraged creative minds such as these. It’s pretty evident then why Chef Picu is the deserving winner of the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’ award. In fact, Chef Picu is a perfect representation of what Diageo and

Singleton both stand for—the pursuit of the finest taste and providing immense pleasure from the very first sip—in this case, the very first bite! And when asked how it felt to be the ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’, Chef Picu said, “I’m elated and humbled, just to be a part of such a great company. The awards are highly motivating for young chefs like myself to push ourselves, to improve and to move forward.” And Jamun, one of his most successful stints yet, is a reflection

of all that he believes in. As he sipped on Singleton’s signature cocktails, he reflected, “Jamun is an ingredient that is found across the country and brings back fond memories of my childhood. The colour is something that we all personally love, for our own reasons. What better way in which to celebrate Indian food?” Brought to you by the creators of PCO, ATM, Ping’s Cafe Orient & PDA, Jamun’s food and beverage menu are steeped in authenticity and honesty, with a splash of style—a true celebration of the diversity of India. Its menu boasts dishes from across the sub-continent that represent the varied flavours of pan-Indian fare, from subtle to sour to spicy. With an

established presence in New Delhi and Goa, Jamun’s expertly curated mix of forgotten recipes and popular dishes from the heart of India are sure to warm your heart, fill your belly and keep you coming back for more. For instance, at Jamun, patrons can enjoy an unconventional farm-to-table experience, with everything from mutton ghee roast to an aromatic fish curry, some of which are recipes from the chef’s own personal collection. Chef Picu also introduces five new dishes to his special blackboard menu at Jamun every five days. He thrives on experimentation and enjoys coming up with new recipes and trying them out with his team, to present to his diners with finesse, every now and then. Now

you know how his infamous chorizo crepes, poha bhaji and jamun kulfi came around! In case you didn’t know it, Chef Picu has often been listed across multiple notable platforms as one among the Top 10 Young Chefs of India. He even represented the country at the World Skills Leipzig fest, an international culinary competition that took place in Germany, when he was only 20 years old. It is this indomitable spirit and quest for perfection in all that he does, both of which are reflections of Diageo’s own beliefs, that makes Chef Picu the perfect choice for the prestigious title of ‘Diageo Chef of the Year’.

Variations of the promotional page

44


FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD A celebration of cuisines with Chef Picu Meet Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira, fondly known as Chef Picu. He’s a dyed-in-the-wool Goan, with a penchant for quirky crocs and regional Indian cuisine. And he’s had quite the journey! From having studied at the Institute of Hotel Management Mumbai to having worked in top kitchens across the country, Chef Picu has come a long way. Back in 2016, Chef Picu became the Executive Chef of À Ta Maison (ATM), New Delhi, where he won multiple awards for bringing the best European fare to the capital. In 2017, he brought his culinary prowess over to Jamun, New Delhi, an exquisite regional Indian eatery and bar that celebrates the regional diversity and rich heritage of Indian cuisine. Drawing from his roots, Chef Picu successfully managed to provide diners here with a wonderful taste of Goan food. Think soft, housebaked poi, flavourful chicken Xacuti and pork vindaloo. If that wasn’t all, he

Final promotional page

45

was also instrumental in establishing signature properties by Pass Code Hospitality such as Saz and Ping’s in Kolkata and Ping’s Bia Hoi in Goa. It’s pretty evident then why Chef Picu is the deserving winner of the ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’ award, which he received at the third edition of Condé Nast Traveller and Himalayan India’s Top Restaurant Awards 2019 (TRA). In fact, Chef Picu is a perfect representation of what Diageo and Singleton both stand for—the pursuit of the finest taste

and providing immense pleasure from the very first sip—in this case, the very first bite! Global beverage leader Diageo, has always supported and encouraged creative minds such as these. And when asked how it felt to be the ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’ at the prestigious Top Restaurant Awards this time, Chef Picu said, “I’m elated and humbled, just to be a part of such a great company. The awards are highly motivating for young chefs like myself to push ourselves, to improve and move forward.”


GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

Jamun, one of the chef’s most successful stints yet, is a reflection of all that he believes in. As he sipped on Singleton’s signature cocktails, he reflects, “Jamun is an ingredient that is found across the country and brings back fond memories of my childhood. The colour is something that we all personally love, for our own reasons. What better way to celebrate Indian food?” Brought to you by the creators of PCO, ATM, Ping’s Cafe Orient and PDA, Jamun’s food and beverage menu are steeped in authenticity and honesty, with a splash of style—a true celebration of the diversity of India. Its menu boasts dishes from across

the sub-continent that represent the varied flavours of pan-Indian fare, from subtle to sour to spicy. With an established presence in New Delhi and Goa, Jamun’s expertly curated mix of forgotten recipes and popular dishes from the heart of India are sure to warm your heart, fill your belly and keep you coming back for more. For instance, at Jamun, patrons can enjoy an unconventional farm-to-table experience, with everything from mutton ghee roast to an aromatic fish curry, some of which are recipes from the chef’s own personal collection. Chef Picu also introduces five new dishes to his special blackboard menu at Jamun every week. He thrives on

experimentation and enjoys coming up with new recipes to present to his diners. Now you know how his infamous chorizo crepes, poha bhaji and jamun kulfi came to life! The multi-talented chef even represented the country at the World Skills Leipzig fest, an international culinary competition that took place in Germany, when he was only 20 years old. It is this indomitable spirit and quest for perfection in all that he does, both of which are reflections of Diageo’s own beliefs, that makes Chef Picu the perfect choice for the prestigious title of ‘Singleton Unconventional Chef of the Year’.

46


OTHER PROJECTS

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

During the period of my graduation project, I also worked on a few other projects other than the Top Restaurant Awards 2019 booklet such as the sourcing of props for Masaba Gupta’s SS’20 collection and designing an e-invite for an celebration event of Top Restaurant Awards at EDO Restaurant & Bar. And the work does not limit to the organization of Condé Nast Traveller but instead is a part of the freelance project under my industry mentor Ms. Nikita Rao.

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MASABA GUPTA - SS ‘20

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

ABOUT THE PROJECT: The project brief was source props as per the mood-board provided by the client within the specified budget, 5 days prior to the shoot. I went around various markets for different props such as Dadar flower-market as early as 4 in the morning, Mangaldas market for the backdrop and stores such as Fab-India and Jaipur Rugs for carpets. I also tried going around finding ceramic vases but was unable to find the common market for it.

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STACKS OF HAY - IVORY TALL HAY PLANTERS

BROWN/RUST BACKDROP WHERE FABRIC DRAPES TIGHTLY GO

36” AND TALLER

• 36 INCHES TALL CLAY POTS FILLED WITH ONE COLOUR FLOWER - PURPLE OR PINK • TALLER THAN 36 INCHES CLAY POTS TO BE KEPT WITHOUT FLOWERS

Mood board for the props

IVORY JUTE COLOUR CONCRETE TEXTURED BACKDROP

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

BROWN STORY

OING CRISS CROSS FROM SIDE TO SIDE AND SOME LEFT LOOSE

MAROON/BROWN/RUST CARPETS

IVORY JUTE STORY

IVORY/WHITE CARPETS

WITH LEAVES CASTING A SHADOW ON THE BACKDROP

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Behind the scenes

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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Final outcome of the shoot

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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E-INVITE - CNT X EDO RESTAURANT

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

ABOUT THE PROJECT: The project brief given was to use images of EDO Restaurant & Bar on the drive - attached, keep space for pouring partner logo - attached, add TRA 2019 logo attached, Date: (leave empty space), Time: Cocktails - 8pm, Dinner - 9pm, Location: EDO Restaurant & Bar, ITC Gardenia, Bengaluru Copy for the e-invite: Please join us for a celebration of India’s finest ingredients and flavours at EDO Restaurant & Bar - Himalayan Raw & Fine Restaurant of the Year (in pink colour). At the extreme bottom add: RSVP - cnt.marketing@condenast.in and Drink responsibly.

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References for the e-invite

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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Variations of the e-invite

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

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CONCLUSION

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

CHALLENGES: Though I completed my graduation project successfully, the journey to this destination wasn’t surely and easy one. During the period of internship, I faced challenges that I had never imagined I would be facing. And getting past those challenges today, I have had to learn a lot to stand where I am today. Below listed are the challenges that I went through: • At the start of the internship, my mentor did not guide me in terms of the design language of the magazine, and hence I faced a lot of difficulties in creating layouts apt for the issue. • Although I was receiving feedback on my work, I wasn’t told where I made mistakes and I had a hard time figuring out where and how I went wrong. • After completing the TRA 2019 booklet, while working on the following issue of the magazine, the Asst. Art Director helped me by guiding with the design language but since I was receiving the guidelines as I experimented with layouts, I felt restricted while exploring layouts. • It also took me a while to understand the image language of the magazine, the usage, selection and cropping of images. • Since Condé Nast Traveller is a bi-monthly magazine, the team was a small group and worked at a slow pace where on days there wasn’t anything to do and I had to make peace with the idea of working-chill.

LEARNINGS: The graduation project gave me a new perspective in terms of editorial publishing since I had already worked in an advertorial setting. It helped me in a lot of ways that may not be restricted to work but also in terms of personal development. Being my first time in an editorial setting, I was able to differentiate how editorial and advertorial work and their similarities and differences. The experience of four months in the industry helped me make a better employee in terms of work-timings, co-ordination with teams and meeting deadlines without compromising the quality of the work while also learning the possibilities and opportunities that come along working with an employer. This graduation project helped me realize what I actually wanted to pursue by making me sure of my choice. Being sure of my choice of career field, I will be able to work on my skills and improve upon where needed, while understanding the complexities of an office setting and the industry itself. It was overall an amazing learning experience with amazing sunsets on the Marine Drive.

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REFERENCES

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GRADUATION PROJECT 2020 / RISHIKA KASHYAP / NIFT

• https://www.cntraveller.in/about-us/ • https://reader.magzter.com/preview/ v0umfx92rufbe24qnsbvbw4746170/474617#page/2 • https://www.condenast.com/about • https://biography.yourdictionary.com/conde-nast • https://www.condenast.ru/en/about/history/ • https://www.condenast.com/about# • https://newrelic.com/case-studies/condenast • https://in.pinterest.com/pin/857513585282808509/

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Copyright © Image and Layout Rights Reserved to Condé Nast Traveller, India