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spring 2010

continuing education classes for adults

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to reach us

Please feel free to contact us for more information, for advising about RISD | CE programs, or simply to tell us what you think of our offerings. Rhode island School of Design Continuing Education office mail

20 Washington Place Providence RISD Continuing Education Two College Street Providence, RI 02903-2787

phone

401 454-6200 Outside local calling area: 800 364-7473, ext. 2

fax

401 454-6218

e-mail

cemail@risd.edu

web

www.risd.edu/ce

ADMINISTRATION John Maeda President, Rhode Island School of Design Jessie Shefrin Provost, Rhode Island School of Design RISD CONTINUING EDUCATION Brian K. Smith Dean, Continuing Education Maria Silva Senior Secretary COURSE PROGRAMMING

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

BUSINESS OFFICE

Rebecca King Associate Director for Programs

Susan Bellaire Associate Director for Student Support Services

Dennis Fiore Business Manager

Marisa Gutmacher Program Coordinator, Design + Artful Living

Kathleen Kelly Academic Advisor

Francoise McAree Program Coordinator, Fine + Applied Art

Cindy Mellor-Neale Registration Assistant

Ty Varszegi Program Manager, Computer-Based Design

Judi Sheldon Registration Assistant

Catherine Davis-Hayes Coordinator, Young Artist Program Tiffany Bowman Programs Assistant Beth Mitchell Logistics Coordinator Marc Torick Assistant Director, Special Programs

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Alyssa Short Registration Assistant Karen Smith Registration Assistant/Evening Secretary

Rose Marie Rogers Accounts Assistant Tracy Voccio Accounts Receivable Administrator MARKETING Wayne Wilkins Marketing/Publications Manager Andrea Rathje Marketing/Publications Coordinator RiSD MEDiA + PARTNERS

TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT Dean Abanilla Technology Specialist

DESiGN: MORRIS DE LUZIO DESIGN PRoDuCTioN: CATHERINE McGUINNESS PHoToGRAPHy: DAVID O’CONNOR unless otherwise noted PRiNTiNG: MERIDIAN PRINTING | 12.09 | 20,000

Justin Bazar Computer Support Specialist

12/7/09 1:50:58 PM


welcome to

RISD | CE

Out with the drab of winter, and in with the new! The rebirth of spring is a natural time for exploration. RISD | CE ’s spring courses in art and design help you to scratch the surface of new mediums (Scratchboard Illustration Workshop, page 20), or get back to basics (Watercolor Fundamentals, page 21). Learn computer applications that can streamline your photographic workflow (From Dark to Lightroom, page 26), or challenge yourself by painting in a new setting (Wetlands, Woods, Meadow + Marsh: Plein Air Workshop, page 21). In addition, our Art in Context and Artful Living courses offer plenty of opportunities for springtime exploration. Prepare festive Brazilian cuisine (Cooking Carioca Style: The Foods of Brazil, page 10), visit architecturally-rich Beacon Hill (Resources for Appraisers: Beacon Hill, Boston, page 15), or even learn new ways to refresh your home (The Wonderful World of Window Couture, page 11). With more than 125 courses for adults offered this spring – from jewelry design and handloom weaving, to web design and videography – discoveries await you when you indulge your spring fever at RISD | CE !

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connect with

critical thinking– critical making With courses for everyone – from absolute beginners to seasoned artists – RISD | CE is your connection to the world of art and design, and to the vibrant RISD experience. Our foundation-level courses in Drawing, 2D Design and Color Theory help students learn the basics, and are taught by expert and nurturing instructors eager to help you get started on your adventures in thinking about, making and looking at art. A hallmark of the RISD learning experience is the process of applying critical thinking to actually making tangible objects in the studio. RISD | CE students benefit from embracing this approach in our CE studios. In Idea Lab: Moving from Concept into Form (page 19), for example, students learn to effectively express their ideas and solve design problems by allowing their minds and hands to work together – through thoughtful, hands-on investigations of various media and materials. Students also find that one of the most important parts of our studio process is the critique, or “crit.” By learning to articulate the thought process used to develop their art and to apply aesthetic, conceptual and formal criteria in assessing their own work along with that of their peers, they come to understand the real value of critical feedback to their growth as artists. Students in non-studio courses also benefit from the critical thinking– critical making approach. In RISD | CE ’s Art in Context courses, students use critical observation skills to gain an appreciation for artistic traditions that have influenced fine art and design. This spring, they explore the themes and styles associated with the Bauhaus school and movement in Bauhaus: 90 Years (page 15), while in Collecting Art: Gallery Guide (page 13), the second course in a series focused on what it takes to be an astute art collector, students are introduced to different ways of thinking about and looking at art, all within a gallery context.

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connect with

tillinghast farm

This spring, connect with others who share your interests as you enjoy the warmth of

Have you tried a class at “The Farm” yet? That’s Tillinghast Farm, RISD | CE ’s satellite campus in Barrington, RI, which provides a picturesque

The Farm during these courses: Drawing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

natural environment for artmaking. With

Two-Dimensional Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

convenient parking and daytime classes, The

Color Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Farm’s soothing natural landscape makes it the ideal place for escaping the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Taking classes at The Farm is a wonderful way to connect with the tranquility found in a timeless, rural waterfront setting.

Drawing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Painting with Oils + Acrylics . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Essentials of Interior Decoration . . . . . . . 30 Stone Wall Design + Construction . . . . . 33 Paving with Brick + Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

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CE/Museum Workshop DRAwING AT THE RISD MuSEuM:

connect with

working from the Drawings of Pat Steir Saturday, April 10, 10am – 3pm Students in this RISD | CE workshop deepen their engagement with the

RISD

museum of art

art of Pat Steir as they draw from the artist’s actual work. They are encouraged to discover how certain effects were achieved, and to then experiment with their own interpretations. Students begin with sketches and work to more developed pieces, acquiring new skills and techniques

One of the many unique RISD resources

to expand their drawing repertoire

available to the RISD | CE community is the

and experience.

RISD Museum, the region’s leading museum

of fine and decorative art. A vital cultural resource, the RISD Museum educates and

For more details and registration information, see page 19.

inspires a wide variety of audiences – families and individuals, scholars and researchers, artists and designers, and students of all ages.

Current exhibitions and programs of interest include:

Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line Exhibition: February 20 through July 3 Pat Steir has been a major figure in American art since the 1970s, having created some of the most ambitious and challenging drawings of the late 20th century. Organized by Jan Howard, the RISD Museum’s curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, along with independent curator Susan Harris, Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line presents a 40-year survey of Steir’s exploration of the vocabulary of drawing. The exhibition is introduced with a recreation of her wall drawing Self-Portrait: An Installation, first created in 1987 for the New Museum in New York. In the RISD Museum’s Special Exhibitions Galleries in the Chace Center, Steir’s drawings on paper, dramatically varied in scale, are presented and set in relationship to her paintings and prints.

For more information about the RISD Museum, visit www.risdmuseum.org

Pat Steir, Untitled, 2008. © Pat Steir, Courtesy of the artist.

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John Tschirch Teacher of excellence

architectural historian John Tschirch is committed to popularizing history, architecture and design, and making them accessible. as an instructor for rISD | ce ’s Interior Design and historic Preservation programs, he regularly incorporates field visits in Providence and newport. as John says, “Studying buildings, interiors and furniture in a classroom is great for understanding basics, but

connect with

you have to encounter the object in real life, in three dimensions. nothing helps someone remember like making a visit to a site.” having first become interested in architecture and preservation while observing his parents as they

the language of design

restored an old Shingle-style summer house, John now is architectural historian and Director of academic Programs for the Preservation Society of newport county. In this role, he is responsible for interpreting newport’s great historic buildings and their socio-cultural history.

His broad knowledge of architecture, furniture, style and design are remarkable. He seems to know it all! He makes what could be a very dry subject come alive with wit and wisdom.

When discussing an artistic period and style, John uses several media (e.g., a building, vase and chair) to help students make the connection between designed objects of an era, focusing first on form and then shared ornamentation. Says John, “The students really light up when they see these connections. It’s as if a whole

Student in John Tschirch’s

new language has opened up for them . . . and it has;

Styles in the Decorative Arts II class

it’s the language of design.” It is because of his ability to convey to students the language of design and its underlying historic social context that rISD | ce is proud to honor John Tschirch as a Teacher of excellence.

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connect with

art + design

for kids + teens R I S D | C E Y o u n g A R t I S t P R o g R A m + FA m I lY W o R k S h o P S rISD|ce’s Young artist Program is a great way to

our full-day, week-long april vacation camps keep

introduce your child to the world of art and design.

kids active while they journey into the artistic process.

We offer courses, camps and family workshops for

Drawn from Time (ages 6-11) takes kids on a trip

children and young adults ages 5-17, plus seven

through history – from cave drawings to renaissance

certificate programs for young adults ages 12-17.

perspective drawing to map-makers – to answer not

This spring, kids and teens can develop basic skills with returning favorites like Artstart (ages 5-6) and Fundamentals of Drawing (ages 12-17), or explore visual storytelling methods with The Art of Picture Books (ages 12-17).

only the mysteries of how we draw, but why we draw. In Cartoon Carousel: Computer Animation Camp (ages 9-13), young animators journey into the world of movie production as they collaborate on an original, short animation film. In addition, we offer several new programs for teens. In Deck Bender: Skateboard Workshop, teens learn how to build a board from the plywood up in an intensive, two-day DIY workshop. and in Splash Page: Computer Color for Comics, teen comic artists use Photoshop to add color to their hand-drawn pages. for more details and registration information, visit www.risd.edu/ce or request one of our Young artist Program brochures.

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NEW ART + DESIGN CO U R S E S T H I S S P R I N G : Drawing at the RISD Museum: Working from the Drawings of Pat Steir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Idea Lab: Moving from Concept into Form . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Watercolor Fundamentals . . . . . 21

connect with

Wetlands, Woods, Meadow + Marsh: Plein Air Workshop . . . 21 From Dark to Lightroom . . . . . . . 26 Drawing with Clay: Introduction to Figurative Sculpture . . . . . . . . . 28

what’s new To help you keep up with the latest developments in art and design, RISD | CE offers a number of new courses relevant to artists and

One Book, Two Ways: Sewn Book Structures . . . . . . . . . 28 Home Furnishing Design + Fabrication Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Print Design Studio: Digital Typeface Design . . . . . . . . 36

and other Spring 2010 courses begins January 11 – see page 44 for

Writing for the Screen (Online Course). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

registration information.

ABC’s of ZBrush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Be sure to visit Artful Living, Art in Context and The Business of

Privacy in an Age of Data Plunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

designers of all skill levels (see list at right). Registration for these

Art + Design to check out new courses in these areas as well.

Introduction to iPhone App Development. . . . . . . . . . . . .40

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Artful Living 10 – 12

CONTENTS

Culinary Arts + Entertaining

10

Home + Garden Design

11

Floral Artistry Institute

12

Art in Context 13 – 15 Art History + Appreciation

13

Art and Antiques Appraisal + Connoisseurship

14

Historic Preservation

15

Art, Mind + Spirit

15

The Business of Art + Design 16 Art + Design 17 – 21, 24 – 33 Foundation

17

Fine Arts

18

Drawing + Illustration | Painting + Printmaking Photography | Ceramics + Glass | Jewelry + Metal Arts Sculpture + Woodworking | Book + Paper Arts Decorative Arts + Design

29

Apparel + Textile Design | Interior Design Architecture + Landscape Design

Certificate Programs 22 – 23 Computer-Based Design 34 – 40 Digital Foundations

34

Print Design

35

Advertising Design

36

Computer Animation + Video

37

3D Computer-Generated Imaging

38

Design For The Web

38

K Special Formats

Online Courses

Looking for classes for children and teens? RISD|CE’s Young Artist Program offers courses, camps and family workshops for children and young adults ages 5-17, plus seven certificate programs for young adults ages 12-17. See page 7 for more information, or visit www.risd.edu/ce to browse through the options or to request a Young Artist Program brochure. Faculty biographies may be found in the Faculty section of www.risd.edu/ce.

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37 – 38

Daytime Design Intensives

38, 40

Daytime + Weekend Workshops

18 – 21

Webinars

16

Courses at Tillinghast Farm

4

CE/Museum Workshop

19

General Information 41 – 44 Campus Map + Directions

41

Academic Policies

42

Financial Information

43

Calendar

44

Registration

44

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Artful Living

m Preparing

Great Seafood: Mystery to Mastery

Artful Living

Creating a Satisfying Environment There is an art to living, just as there is to creating a fine painting or sculpture. It is a state of mind, a joie de vivre, encompassing not only everything around us – our home, our landscape, our food, our wardrobe – but how we actually live. Indeed, artful living is less about wealth or material resources than it is about attitude. This semester, take a few of our courses, and enjoy the satisfaction of embracing a truly creative approach to life.

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CULIN-3317 | Steve Long

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There are many preparation methods for great seafood, but only a master chef can show you which unforgettable combinations are surprisingly easy to cook. Whether you prefer to broil, bake or grill, we’ll show you the best of each method, plus the sauces that make your dishes special. Steve Long, executive chef at Providence’s renowned Hemenway’s Restaurant, focuses this class on salmon, swordfish and tuna, taking you from appetizers through main course. For example, the choices for salmon are numerous: wild or farm raised; organic or conventional; poached, seared or grilled; classic French- or Asian-style. Fear not! Your expert instructor stands ready to demystify seafood preparation before your eyes, giving you a taste of the sea so authentic that mouths will water at the mere mention of fish.

A s d s d l g s t c h a fl a a a e g

Thursday, April 8 6:30 – 8:30pm

Culinary Arts + Entertaining m Cooking

Carioca Style: The Foods of Brazil CULIN-2300 | Lydia Walshin

Cariocas are natives or residents of Rio de Janeiro, and carioca style is exuberant, friendly and fun loving. Join food writer Lydia Walshin for a carioca style celebration of Brazilian cooking, featuring recipes brought back from her recent travels in Rio de Janeiro and Brazil’s farmland of Minas Gerais. Brazilian cuisine combines the influences of many cultures: the Portuguese, of course, but also French, Italian, Indian and Japanese. In this hands-on cooking class, we sample ingredients available at Providence-area markets, and recreate some favorite Brazilian dishes featuring fish and shellfish, tropical fruits, cassava and more. At the end of the class, make yourself a caipirinha, the national cocktail of Brazil, listen to Brazilian music, and taste all of the dishes we prepare. Dancing in the kitchen is optional, but encouraged! Note: Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants.

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on Reds: A Wine Exploration

In this introductory class, students take a guided tasting tour through the world’s most important viticultural regions and grape varietals, learning to taste and describe wines using the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) method. We analyze reds from the US, Australia, South America and Europe to see how the differences in climate and grape type affect color, aroma and flavor. Grape types include the familiar – Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Zinfandel and Shiraz (Syrah) – along with the less well-known Malbec, Carménère and Cabernet Franc. Appropriate food pairings for each wine are discussed. The class is appropriate for both beginners and more advanced students of wine. Note: Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants. Tuesday, May 4 6:30 – 8:30pm 1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee: $35

risd continuing education

1 session tuition: $60 | lab fee: $30

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CULIN-2366 | Steve Krohn

Saturday, April 24 10am – 1pm

10

1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee: $35

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Veggie Cuisine Made Simple

CULIN-2396 | Robin Brandes

An amazingly delicious and healthful meal without meat or processed foods is within reach – there’s no need to limit yourself to steamed broccoli and salad! In this class, Certified Health Counselor Robin Brandes broadens your repertoire of super veggies and veggie meals. Learn to identify, select and mix a variety of succulent vegetables like kale, broccoli rabe, fennel, leeks, asparagus, Swiss chard, cauliflower, cabbage and more. We concentrate on seasonal varieties and the nutritional value they provide your body (not to mention the fact that they are gluten-, allergen- and grain-free). After exploring simple and delicious ways to prepare these vegetables, your family will enjoy how you incorporate them into main dishes for one-pot meals and side dishes. You can even confidently experiment with frozen vegetables for quick, last-minute meals. To help put all this new knowledge to best use, participants return home with recipes and nutrition handouts. Thursday, May 6 6:30 – 8:30pm 1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee: $10

Spring Registration begins January 11

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in Bloom: Decorating with Sugar Flowers CULIN-3315 | Evelyn Herman

Saturday, April 3 10am – 1pm 1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee:$35 m The

Art of Cupcakes

CULIN-4351 | Julie Zito, Lisa Constantino

Cupcakes are no longer pastry’s poor cousin, relegated to convenience store and supermarket shelves. Indeed, decorated cupcakes are all the rage these days. Fans of TV’s Sex and the City can extol the virtues of Magnolia Bakery, but here in Rhode Island we have The Pastry Gourmet, well known for the wedding and special-occasion cakes it creates for the region’s most elegant events. Learn the baker’s secrets of creating the perfectly decorated cupcake. Of course, there are the fun, fashionable and whimsical designs for children’s parties, too. By learning the basic skills in this handson course, participants are able to create their own artistic expressions on the miniature canvases that cupcakes provide. Note: Participants take home their beautiful creations on a charming wire display stand. Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants. Tuesday, April 27 6:30 – 8:30pm 1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee: $35

Home + Garden Design

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Wonderful World of Window Couture LIVE-3013 | Cathy Wilkerson

Your windows are your visual channels to the outside world. For this reason, window dressings and treatments, along with knowledgeable choices of fabrics and styles, can add immeasurably to the beauty and comfort of your home. In this class, we explore the range of styles, fabrics and hardware available. We discuss the differences between draperies and curtains, the aesthetic value vs. the practicality of using decorative hardware, as well as the implications of using sheers vs. blinds. Whether you are decorating a home, an apartment or a converted loft space, and whether you have tall, small or bay windows to transform, this class provides stimulating and practical solutions to your design challenges.

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Revamp: Staging Your

Home LIVE-4322 | Chris Eramo, Paul Santos

Do you watch home makeover shows and wish your home could be transformed in a weekend? Well, we have the next best thing: the ins and outs of the latest home decorating phenomenon – staging. Boston Staging and Design’s Chris Eramo and Paul Santos show you how to redecorate your home using your existing furnishings. You learn how to make your rooms look larger while emphasizing their architectural strengths, and how to “shop” in other rooms to make the most of every space. The class is excellent for those who want a fresh new look on a budget, as well as those seeking to sell their homes. Note: Class meets at a private home in the Providence area; directions are sent to registered participants. Saturday, April 17 10am – 12pm 1 session tuition: $65

Monday, April 12 6:30 – 8:30pm 1 session tuition: $55 | lab fee: $10 m Inspiration

+ Innovations: Tour Boston’s Design District LIVE-2393 | Chris Eramo, Paul Santos

Gain inspiration for the design of your own home by joining us for an interactive walking tour of Boston’s design district. Two leading interior designers explain what makes Boston’s world-class resources such a special, hidden treasure, taking you on a guided tour of the fabulous showrooms featured in leading design publications. Expect to preview the latest trends in design for home furnishings, lighting and accessories, and draw inspiration for your next design project with fresh ideas for every budget, along with innovations from today’s top designers. Participants have a chance to interact with personnel at leading venues. Note: Class meets in Boston; directions are sent to registered participants. Saturday, May 22 10am – 1pm 1 session tuition: $65

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Gift Certificates risd continuing education

RISD|CE gift certificates are available in any denomination, and make thoughtful presents. Please call 401 454-6200 for more information or to purchase a gift certificate.

www.risd.edu/ce

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Artful Living

A cake is just a cake. In truth, however, some cakes sparkle and some cakes don’t. What makes an ordinary cake look spectacular? Flowers, of course! Students in this hands-on beginner class learn how to design elegant blooms using gum paste (a pliable “sugar dough”) and specialized gum paste tools. Various techniques for crafting realistic botanicals are introduced, including how to handle and store the gum paste dough, as well as cutting, forming and coloring flowers and leaves in a variety of shapes and sizes. Your guests will hesitate, admire and finally bite into the edible, artistic floral creations that might even evoke comparisons with their own living gardens!

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Floral Artistry Institute

Artful Living

m Tablescape

Design: Where Florals, Linens + Light Converge LIVE-0148 | Dennis DelSignore, John Orton

Join Stoneblossom’s internationallyrenowned designers Dennis DelSignore and John Orton to learn the art of the tablescape – the convergence of florals, linens, china, stationery and lighting into a creatively designed table arrangement. They discuss how to conceptualize and implement a variety of events, as well as how to assess the venue and understand the client in order to ensure that the end result exceeds expectations. Students learn to use valuable trade resources and vendors and contract with support services, as well as develop and work within budgets. Note: This is the third course in the Floral Artistry Institute sequence. Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants.

Prerequisites: Begin to Bloom: Introduction to Floral Artistry and Wonderful Wedding Florals or equivalent experience section 01 Wednesdays, March 3 – 17 10am – 1pm 3 sessions tuition: $135 | lab fee: $50

m Advanced

Floral Artistry: Mastering Complexity + Detail LIVE-3029 | John Orton

Take your love of flowers and design to the next level! In this course, complex floral designs – from cutting edge to country garden – are explored in detail. We discuss color palettes, trends and the newest looks, and how to make them your own. You become familiar with the cost of flowers and hard goods, and learn the tricks of the trade for big show – while staying within a budget. Students benefit from ample hands-on time and one-on-one expert critique. For the final class, you are asked to preselect a container and create a recipe for your design, culminating in a spectacular final piece, to be judged by your classmates and instructors. Note: This is the fourth course in the Floral Artistry Institute sequence. Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants.

Prerequisites: Begin to Bloom: Introduction to Floral Artistry, Wonderful Wedding Florals and Tablescape Design section 01 Tuesdays, March 2 – 23 6:30 – 9pm section 02 Tuesdays, March 30 – April 20 6:30 – 9pm section 03 Wednesdays, March 24 – April 14 10am – 12:30pm 4 sessions tuition: $165 | lab fee: $150

m Floristry:

The Biz

LIVE-3030 | Joyce Holland

In this intensive workshop, learn from a super-successful floral design business owner whose business savvy and creative solutions have earned accolades from the industry and clients alike. Joyce Holland, owner of Stoneblossom Floral & Event Design, covers such topics as the initial client meeting, proposal development, making the sale, pricing and budget considerations, marketing, customer service, managing day-to-day business, staying within budget, and how to combine these practices with unique floral design for greater profitability. During the final session, we visit a major floral wholesaler for an exclusive tour of its hard goods, fresh flowers and lush greenhouses, where we also learn about importing, how to buy and place orders, and have our questions answered by a wholesale expert. Participants are eligible for a one-time wholesale-rate purchase at the end of the tour. Note: This is the fifth course in the Floral Artistry Institute sequence. Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants.

Prerequisites: Begin to Bloom: Introduction to Floral Artistry, Wonderful Wedding Florals, Tablescape Design and Advanced Floral Artistry section 01 Wednesdays, April 7 + 14 6:30 – 8:30pm

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Saturday, April 17 10am – 12pm

T a d f a d T R e i a b w a t i k g i a s t

section 02 Wednesdays, April 21 + 28 6:30 – 8:30pm Saturday, April 24 10am – 12pm section 03 Tuesdays, April 20 + 27 10am – 12pm Saturday, May 1 10am – 12pm 3 sessions tuition: $135 | lab fee: $40

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Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:24:59 PM


Art in Context

m John Singer Sargent

ARTA-0990 | Robin Wiseman

Exploring Art + Culture Art is an integral part of our culture, evoking emotional, intellectual and spiritual responses, whether to the sleek lines of a well-designed car or the intricacies of a beautiful easy to overlook the extraordinary impact art has on our lives. With the following courses, RISD|CE aims to place art into a clearer context. Using the world as our classroom, we explore the broad and varied influences of both historical and contemporary fine art and design of all types to arrive at a deeper understanding of the world around us.

Applies to the following certificate program (2 contact hours): AS-E

Art in Context

antique rug. But with our fast-paced lifestyles, it is all too

An American expatriate who worked primarily in England and France, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) was possibly the preeminent portrait artist of his time. His virtuoso technique produced spirited images of Edwardian clientele and patrons, including Isabella Stewart Gardner. Sargent enjoyed widespread recognition and success early in his career, but popular and critical taste shifted at the turn of the 20th Century and his reputation declined. We take a fresh look at Sargent, comparing the portraits he produced with those of Eakins, Van Dyck, Boldini, Warhol and others. The ways in which popular taste and cultural mores contribute to an artist’s marketability are also discussed.

Sunday, March 21 2 - 4pm 1 session tuition: $25 m Winslow Homer

Art History + Appreciation m Collecting

Art: Gallery Guide

ARTA-0158 | Greg Cook

The Boston gallery scene is big, diverse and geographically spread-out – even deciding where and how to start is a formidable task. Greg Cook – writer and art critic for the Boston and Providence Phoenix newspapers and author of The New England Journal of Aesthetic Research blog– eliminates the trial and error aspect of gallery-hopping with an insider’s guide to galleries and to looking at, and possibly collecting, art. Inevitably, many questions surface, including: what makes a show worthy of critical attention, how the medium is integral to the work’s message, and what the artist’s intentions were. Participants gain knowledge and confidence, and find that going to galleries is much less intimidating – and a lot more fun – when done in a group, under the guidance of a professional. Note: Class meets in Boston; directions are sent to registered participants.

Applies to the following certificate programs (3 contact hours): AS-E, CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Saturday, March 20 11am – 2pm

Each semester, RISD|CE turns its attention to artists culled from the pantheon of great masters. Join Robin Wiseman as he investigates in depth the lives and works of these extraordinary artists. m Mary Cassatt

ARTA-0988 | Robin Wiseman

Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) was one of the great American painters of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. Degas was such an admirer of Cassatt’s work that he invited her to show her work with those of the Impressionists. Best known for her tender but unaffected portraits of women with their infant children, Cassatt chose to forego marriage and children in order to pursue painting. We examine the remarkable life and art of Mary Cassatt, giving special consideration to her brilliant use of color, technique and light, all of which characterize the revolt of the Impressionists against the conventions of academic painting.

ARTA-0989 | Robin Wiseman

Known for his beautiful oil paintings, watercolors and drawings, Winslow Homer (1836-1910) achieved considerable fame for his early illustrations for Harper’s Weekly of the everyday life of Civil War soldiers. At the age of 37 he abandoned a flourishing commercial career to spend more of the remainder of his life in Grout’s Neck, Maine, devoting himself to painting. Homer’s work, like that of his contemporary Edgar Degas, is remarkable for its highly original sense of design and sensitivity to the poetic possibilities inherent in ordinary situations.

Applies to the following certificate program (2 contact hours): AS-E Sunday, April 11 2 - 4pm 1 session tuition: $25

Applies to the following certificate program (2 contact hours): AS-E Sunday, February 28 2 – 4pm 1 session tuition: $25

See also Drawing at the RISD Museum: Working from the Drawings of Pat Steir, page 19.

risd continuing education

1 session tuition: $30

Extraordinary Artists Series

www.risd.edu/ce

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Art and Antiques Appraisal + Connoisseurship m Appraisal

Studies: Legal + Commercial Environment

Art in Context

APRL-3204 | Sandra Tropper

This course provides students with insights into ethical and professional standards, with a focus on contracts and operating costs as they relate to managing an appraisal practice. Through the study of precedent-establishing cases, participants learn about insurance, tax law and court vocabulary. In addition, students learn how to be expert witnesses, which includes issues of courtroom demeanor, and pre-trial activity and preparation. Note: Seats are limited for this intensive course, so please register early. A list of advance required reading is provided after registration. Lodging information is also provided for out-of-town students. A onehour break is taken each day.

Applies to the following certificate program: AS-R Prerequisite: Appraisal Studies: Report Writing Thursday – Sunday, March 11 – 14 CLASS: March 11 – 13 8:30am – 6:30pm EXAM: March 14 9am – 12pm

m Uniform

Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice for Personal Property APRL-3211 | Sandra Tropper

The Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) course, designed specifically for personal property appraisers, explores the unique relationship of personal property to USPAP. The entire USPAP document is covered, with an emphasis on both the general rules and standard rules, delineating standards that identify issues of public trust, ethics, competency, jurisdictional exceptions as well as supplemental standards required for written appraisal documents. All candidates for and designated members of the American Society of Appraisers (ASA) personal property discipline are required to successfully complete the USPAP course on a regular basis (within one year of candidacy, then once every five years), demonstrating tested knowledge of this document, which is promulgated by the Appraisal Standards Board of the Appraisal Foundation. Note: A student manual is provided at course time.

Applies to the following certificate program: AS-R Monday + Tuesday, March 15 + 16 8:30 – 5:30pm 2 sessions tuition: $395

risd continuing education

4 sessions tuition: $725

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m Introduction

to Appraising Antiques + the Decorative Arts APRL-3210 | Louise T. Hall

This elementary-level course provides a general introduction to the connoisseurship and appraisal of furniture, ceramics, silver and glass. The course surveys the evolution of form and style, including relevant visual images and appropriate terminology and criteria for making value judgments. Students apply the 14 Points of Connoisseurship as developed at the Winterthur Museum and are expected to be familiar with the Getty ID system of identification and documentation of art objects. They also review basic examination techniques and apply critical appraisal skills, such as determining qualitative ranking and classification and writing object descriptions. Lastly, students use fundamental appraisal theory and techniques. Some assignments are based on independent observation of specific objects at The RISD Museum. Note: A list of required textbooks is mailed to registered students; call 401 454-6499 to obtain it earlier.

Applies to the following certificate program: AS-R Recommended: Appraisal Studies: Report Writing Thursday – Sunday, April 29 – May 2 CLASS: April 29 – May 1 8:30am – 6:30pm

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12/7/09 12:25:33 PM


m Introduction

to Appraising Fine Art

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Bauhaus: 90 Years

APRL-0315 | Gideon Loewenstein

This course introduces potential fine art appraisers to painting, sculpture and works on paper as the primary categories encountered in the appraisal of fine art. Such issues as the differentiation between originals, multiples, reproductions and copies are covered, along with practical aspects of correct identification, handling, categorization, description and documentation of works of art. After broad explorations of style, facture, qualitative analysis and connoisseurship, we review, and ultimately put into practice, concepts learned in Introduction to Personal Property Valuation with an emphasis on the Getty ID system and recognition of value characteristics specific to the individual artwork. Additionally, hands-on examination exercises and written assignments enable participants to acquire the basic art vocabulary and skills necessary to fully, accurately and efficiently document works of fine art. Note: A list of advance required reading is provided to registered students. Appraisal Studies certificate students planning to appraise fine art should take this course in lieu of Introduction to Appraising Antiques + the Decorative Arts.

This two-day seminar highlights the history and legacy of the Bauhaus, a school founded in 1919 in Weimar, Germany, and a preeminent creative cultural institution, influencing much of 20th-century architecture, furniture and interior design. Its philosophy promoted the use of mass production to achieve designs that were functional, aesthetic and economical. Day one of this course focuses on the history and philosophy of the Bauhaus, illuminating the conditions that contributed both to its successes and to its demise in 1933, as well as 21stcentury interpretations and criticisms of the Bauhaus. On day two, identification of Bauhaus objects, particularly furniture, is discussed, as well as how to recognize imitations and fakes. On both days, themes and styles associated with Bauhaus are covered, and examples of the Bauhaus aesthetic and movement are reviewed.

Applies to the following certificate program: AS-R Thursday – Sunday, June 3 – 6 CLASS: June 3 – 5 8:30am – 6:30pm EXAM: June 6 9am – 12pm 4 sessions tuition: $725

Applies to the following certificate program (16 contact hours): AS-E Friday + Saturday, April 9 + 10 9am – 5pm 2 sessions tuition: $395 m Resources

for Appraisers: Beacon Hill, Boston APRL-0321 | Louise T. Hall, Brian Tierney

The Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston is one of the most architecturally significant neighborhoods in the US. In this program, we stroll through the Beacon Hill area, visiting some of Charles Street’s legendary antiques shops, featuring American, European and Asian furniture and decorative arts. Additionally, students visit the Louisburg Square section of the Hill, the historic Church of the Advent, the Boston Athenaeum and the Shaw Memorial – sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ 19th-century masterpiece – located on the Boston Common, facing the Bullfinch-designed Statehouse. Also planned is a visit to a nearby well-known regional auction house. Note: Class meets in Boston; directions are sent to registered participants. Lunch is not covered by tuition. Limited enrollment.

Applies to the following certificate program (8 contact hours): AS-E Friday, May 21 9am – 5pm

Historic Preservation m Historic

Building Interiors: Furniture + Decorative Arts in Context PRES-3918 | Sarah Vukovich

Preservation efforts are typically most visible on the exterior of historic buildings, yet preservation of historic interiors and the objects filling those spaces reveal more intimate details about the building. This one-day course focuses on historic American interiors and their affiliated material culture (furniture, decorative arts, textiles, wall coverings, etc.), and is designed as a survey of interior decoration in historic buildings, the philosophies influencing the built environment and the uses of American interior spaces from the 17th to the 21st Centuries. The lecture is followed by a visit to The RISD Museum to view its Decorative Arts collection.

Art in Context

APRL-3126 | Judith Vance

Applies to the following certificate programs (8 contact hours): HP-E, ID-E Saturday, March 6 9am – 5pm 1 session tuition: $295

Art, Mind + Spirit m Exploring

Your Creative Spirit

AMS-2321 | Susan Fox

All human progress stems from a flight of the imagination. Our creativity is limited merely by our perspective; any subject, event or favorite place can feed the fire of invention, and our passions can be fuel for the creative spirit. Participants in this course learn methods to activate this immense resource through art and image making. Through drawing, sculpture and creative writing exercises, we uncover blocks and liberate the creative force within, working with techniques for self-expression that are designed to foster our inner vision and draw out our personal stories. Ultimately, we are guided to mentor, to wisely coach, and to awaken the voice of our inner spirit. Note: A background in art is not necessary. Saturday, March 13 10am – 4pm 1 session tuition: $95

1 session tuition: $295

risd continuing education

www.risd.edu/ce

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The Business of Art + Design

m Search

It’s a jungle out there, with more competitors than you can imagine, which is why having an effective web presence is much more complicated than simply registering a domain name. You simply must have strategies to make your site stand out among the millions of other dot-coms. Search engines are the means by which Internet addresses are delivered to inquiring web browsers, and once you understand how they work, you can use this knowledge to give your site a distinct advantage. A sound search engine strategy based on tested optimization techniques makes your design and copywriting decisions that much clearer. The web has undoubtedly become an increasingly dense jungle, but this course provides you with compass and machete to hack your way past the competition.

Reaching for Success In the hype and glitz that sometimes accompany the visual arts, the simple fact that artists and designers have to make a living is often overlooked. But artists have to pay their bills like everyone else, so they also benefit from taking a practical approach to the subject of career

The Business of Art + Design

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Engine Optimization

WEB-3530 | Matthew Service

enhancement. The following short courses are designed by RISD|CE for veteran practitioners, for those just starting out, and for the community at large.

PRAC-3514 | Julie Ruditzky

In the creative field, the ability to sell an idea is as important as the idea itself. Oftentimes, the most successful people in advertising, photography, graphic design and filmmaking are the ones who know how to “pitch” a proposal. In this class, students find the key to making a successful presentation. What are the essential steps to take prior to a meeting? What is the secret to delivering a persuasive presentation? How do you handle tough client questions? How do you keep an idea simmering after a meeting? Note that personal skills, not computer skills, are the focus here. Employing examples from the world of advertising, this course can help anyone in a creative field hit a home run with his or her next pitch.

Applies to the following certificate programs (2 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, PD-E, VE-E, WE-E Friday, March 12 7 – 9pm 1 session tuition: $30

Marketing is never static. This course concentrates on the transition from the traditional model of marketing to the cutting-edge electronic marketing model. We discuss in detail the significance of the “old” one-message-to-themany concept vs. the “new” concept of targeted messages to individuals. In the process, we explore the basic principles of E-commerce and E-business promotion, management and strategy. Specific topics covered include the website as “place holder” vs. profit center; benchmarking using web analytics; the AIDA Model of generating Attention, Interest, Desire, Action; geo-targeting; website improvement; the top ten websites of 2009; best prospects and customers; and e-mail list-building. We also focus on several case studies of major web-based marketing disasters, exploring how to avoid repeating such mistakes.

Frustrated by the lack of response when you apply to Internet job board postings? It’s because the best career opportunities aren’t found that way. In this lunchtime webinar, recruiting industry master cybersleuth Glenn Gutmacher shows job seekers – focusing on, but not limited to, artists and designers – how to uncover hidden opportunities in the job market, and how to reach recruiters and direct hiring managers using completely free methods available in the world of Web 2.0. Learn how to craft online searches that reveal extremely targeted results, and continue to generate new ones automatically; tap professionally-geared social networks like LinkedIn, XING and Facebook; perform targeted research to identify the best companies for you; obtain hiring decision-makers’ contact info to run effective e-mail/phone campaigns; and more! The webinar format offers students the convenience of participating from their home or work computer. Note: Log-in instructions are sent to registered participants. Wednesday, April 7 12 – 1:30pm

risd continuing education

1 session tuition: $25

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3 sessions tuition: $90

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PRAC-2348 | Philip Keith

Fridays, April 30 – May 14 6:30 – 9:30pm

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1 session tuition: $85

Beyond Job Boards: Build Your Career with Social Networking + Other Free Web 2.0 Methods

m Introduction

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Art of the Pitch

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12/7/09 12:28:11 PM


Art + Design

Foundation

Thriving in a Visual World Images flicker from televisions, movie screens, computer monitors, billboards, shops... Given such clutter, how do visual artists and designers get their work noticed? Our curriculum addresses this question through its studio courses, lectures and seminars in many disciplines. Courses from introductory to advanced levels accommodate students with varying degrees of

Drawing I FOUND-2214 | Robin Wiseman, Marc Torick

For amateur and professional alike, drawing skills are fundamental to the artist’s visual education. Through guided practice, beginning students sharpen their powers of observation as they learn to translate what they see into drawings. Using basic tools and materials, students develop their drawing skills by exploring concepts such as line, form, value, proportion, perspective and composition. Through a series of graduated exercises, students learn to draw the figure, still lifes and the environment with confidence and prepare for further work in a variety of art media.

and media. In all cases, the artist or designer strips away

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, CB-R, DS-R, NS-R, PD-E, SA-R

layers of tradition and trendiness to arrive at a deeper

section 01 | Robin Wiseman PROviDeNCe LOCATiON:

understanding of the world of visual communication.

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19 section 02 | Robin Wiseman TiLLiNGHAST LOCATiON:

Art + Design

experience, often highlighting specific tools, techniques

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Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20 section 03 | Robin Wiseman PROviDeNCe LOCATiON:

to Strategic Electronic Marketing

Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20

PRAC-3418 | Amy Leidtke

PRAC-2348 | Philip Keith

Today’s designers are strategic thinkers and knowledge producers, valued by business leaders, academics and entrepreneurs alike. Advanced design programs have shifted in focus, with the emphasis moved from what designers do to how they do it. The process of designing and the design knowledge that results from the application of creative problem solving skills is being applied to business world challenges, which in turn rewards designers with expanded roles. Come learn how design thinking methods – critique, creative thinking exercises, managing complexity, synthesizing information, visualizing knowledge and collaboration – can be applied to business needs. This interactive workshop examines professional designer case studies and gets you to think and work like a designer, exploring how to look at “problems” as “projects”, iterating ideas quickly and tangibly, and communicating solutions effectively.

Marketing is never static. This course concentrates on the transition from the traditional model of marketing to the cutting-edge electronic marketing model. We discuss in detail the significance of the “old” one-message-to-themany concept vs. the “new” concept of targeted messages to individuals. In the process, we explore the basic principles of E-commerce and E-business promotion, management and strategy. Specific topics covered include the website as “place holder” vs. profit center; benchmarking using web analytics; the AIDA Model of generating Attention, Interest, Desire, Action; geo-targeting; website improvement; the top ten websites of 2008; best prospects and customers; and e-mail list-building. We also focus on several case studies of major web-based marketing disasters, exploring how to avoid repeating such mistakes.

12 sessions tuition: $425 | model fee: $30

Tuesdays, September 15 – October 20 6:30 – 9:30pm

3 sessions tuition: $90

m Solve

Business Challenges with Design Thinking

m Introduction

Thursdays, October 1 – 15 6:30 – 9:30pm

risd continuing education

6 sessions tuition: $285

www.risd.edu/ce

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m Two-Dimensional

Design

FOUND-1815 | Carlotta Danzante Miller, Jackie Hoving, Marianne Migliori

Art + Design

Design is the discipline underlying all forms of visual expression, and an understanding of two-dimensional design principles is the basis for all 2D art forms. This course introduces students to the formal elements of design: line, shape, pattern, value, texture, color and space. Working through a variety of challenging exercises, students use these elements to solve problems of visual organization. The placement of visual elements into an organized whole is the basis of composition, and skills acquired in this class have direct applications to anyone working in two-dimensional media, from advertising art directors to illustrators, interior designers and painters.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, CB-R, DI-E, DS-R, ID-R, NS-R, SA-R section 01 | Carlotta Danzante Miller PROviDeNCe LOCATiON: Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 section 02 | Jackie Hoving PROviDeNCe LOCATiON: Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22

m Color

Theory

FOUND-2215 | Karen Triedman, Deborah Forman

Van Gogh, Matisse, Titian and even Warhol were masterful colorists who used color quite consciously to create powerful drama in their work. Indeed, the dynamics of color are fundamental to virtually all design, illustration and painting. In this course, students explore how the concepts of value, hue and intensity relate to design and how the use of color is integral to a piece’s effect and ultimate success. As students explore the specific applications of color used by professionals in advertising, illustration and twoand three-dimensional design, they come to understand the integration of art and science we call color theory.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, CB-R, DI-E, DS-R, ID-E, NS-R, PD-E, SA-E section 01 | Karen Triedman TiLLiNGHAST LOCATiON: Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 section 02 | Deborah Forman PROviDeNCe LOCATiON: Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $15

section 03 | Marianne Migliori TiLLiNGHAST LOCATiON: Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $15

Fine Arts

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Drawing + Illustration K WEEKEND WORKSHOP Anatomy for Portraiture DWG-2230 | Amy Wynne-Derry

Throughout history, artists have studied the anatomy of the face to enhance the accuracy and volume of their drawings. This workshop is of interest to fine artists, illustrators and anyone interested in drawing the face. We focus on understanding facial and skull proportions, action and use of specific muscles, and how musculature lying close to the surface lends form and beauty to the face. Sensitivity to line quality and capturing expression are also emphasized. Students use calipers, pencil and paper to draw from skulls, flayed plaster models and a live model. Experimentation with Renaissance drawing techniques enhances students’ ability to define three-dimensional space in portraiture. Note: Previous drawing experience is helpful but not required, as varying skill levels are accommodated.

Applies to the following certificate programs (12 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E, SA-E Saturday + Sunday, May 1 + 2 10am – 4pm

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Drawing

DWG-2238 | Robin Wiseman

The human figure has inspired artists through the centuries to create works of transcendent beauty. In this course, students develop their drawing abilities, whether they already have experience or are just beginning to explore their creative potential as figurative artists. Concentrating on composition, line quality, tonality and gesture, students use studies of the human figure to improve their technical skills. The course incorporates some study of anatomy and portraiture and includes the use of various drawing media. The skills developed in class are transferable to a wide range of subject matter.

12 sessions tuition: $425 | model fee: $50

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2 sessions tuition: $210 | model fee: $15

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, CB-E, DS-E, SA-E

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m Drawing

II

DWG-2260 | Jackie Hoving

This next-step course is a continuation of Drawing I and is designed to further strengthen and refine drawing and compositional abilities. Students explore the descriptive and expressive manipulation of materials such as charcoal, graphite pencil, pen and ink, Conté crayon, and colored media, while learning to create more volumetric and spatial drawings through the use of value and composition. In the process, students work from still lifes, interiors and models as they consider gesture and contour, planar analysis, foreshortening, proportion, and volumetric rendering of forms. Ultimately students develop confidence approaching a wide variety of subject matter as part of a well-composed drawing.

Prerequisite: Drawing I or equivalent experience TILLINGHAST LOCATION:

Lab: Moving from Concept into Form DWG-0222 | Susannah Strong

Some artists begin with ideas, then move on to materials; some work viscerally and decipher their ideas and content later; and some do both. No matter which way you work, this course facilitates your creative process and helps you gain insight into other strategies along the way. The focus is on the relationship between ideas and materials and learning to translate ideas into a tangible process. By “looking under the hood” to assess what makes one able to produce consistently, this course ultimately helps students find the most appropriate and successful medium for expressing ideas. Through exercises, group discussions and independent research, students experiment with their own choice of materials and processes. Building on work completed in Idea Lab (though not a prerequisite), the course further illuminates the structure, play and complexity of the creative process, building strong studio habits along the way.

Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 1 – 4pm | NO CLASS 4/22

Applies to the following certificate programs (24 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E

12 sessions tuition: $425 | model fee: $25

Tuesdays, March 2 – April 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20

K WEEKEND WORKSHOP Pastels Workshop NATUR-2280 | Jeanne Sturim

Notable illustrator and pastel artist Jeanne Sturim shares her knowledge, technique and expertise in this two-day intensive workshop on both drawing and the use of pastels. Jeanne helps students to sharpen their observational skills, develop their own approach to design and build a drawing with pastels. Demonstrations are given on how to begin the drawing with charcoal, followed by a watercolor underpainting to establish light and dark values, and finally on ways of applying pastels. Cross-hatching and layering are discussed in terms of color mixing to achieve a desired luminous effect. Students work from still-life setups with the complex combination of subject and medium providing a challenging, exciting and ultimately, rewarding experience. All levels of students are welcome, as participants work at their own speed.

Applies to the following certificate programs (12 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E

8 sessions tuition: $295 | lab fee: $10 m Greeting

Card Illustration

ILUS-0902 | Lori Surdut-Weinberg

Today’s greeting card industry embraces a range of styles, from the elegant to the absurd, and affords the opportunity for artists of many types to supplement their incomes. This course teaches not only how to design greeting cards but how to introduce them into the marketplace. We begin by examining hundreds of current cards of varying quality and approach in order to gain an overview of today’s market. Concepts, formats, development of personal style, and various art media are explored as students develop a portfolio of greeting cards through assignments and in-class work. Emphasis is placed on visual expression as a means of communicating ideas in card form, and weekly individual and group critiques help guide participants’ progress. Previous art experience in drawing, painting, graphic design or photography is recommended.

Applies to the following certificate program (36 contact hours): CB-E Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22

2 sessions tuition: $210 | lab fee: $10

12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $15

Drawing at the RISD Museum: Working from the Drawings of Pat Steir DWG-0215 | Amanda Lebel

Drawing from an actual work of art can deepen one’s engagement with it. The exhibition of the drawings of Pat Steir at the RISD Museum provides a unique opportunity to do just this, as students experience many examples of the artist’s work through drawing. As master of many styles and techniques, Steir uses drawing to experiment and diagram her ideas. This exhibition presents a visual dictionary of Steir’s drawing languages and strategies, including mark-making, mediums (pencil, charcoal, colored pencil) and compositional (grids, alphabets, words). Students are encouraged to discover how certain effects were achieved, and to then experiment with their own interpretations. As they begin with sketches and work to more developed pieces, students acquire new skills and techniques to expand their drawing repertoire and experience.

Applies to the following certificate programs (5 contact hours): DS-E Saturday, April 10 10am – 3pm 1 session tuition: $100 m Writing

for Children’s Books

ILUS-0967 | Marlo Garnsworthy

Writing for children provides the ideal opportunity for fresh storytelling talent and is the perfect vehicle for unlocking one’s creative potential. Focusing on writing for picture-book readers, this class explores how to use writing techniques to capture sensory impressions, setting, dialogue, character and plot in order to achieve clarity and emotional impact. Through a mixture of lectures, discussion, in-class exercises, booksharing, and home assignments, students learn about picture book structure, language, style and timing. Important attention is paid to character development and narrative structure, fully defining point of view and the interdependent relationship between images and words. Finally, the need for aspiring authors to build their resumes with magazine credits is discussed, along with ways to get one’s work “out there.”

Applies to the following certificate program (24 contact hours): CB-E Tuesdays, March 2 – April 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 8 sessions tuition: $295

www.risd.edu/ce

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risd continuing education

Saturday + Sunday, April 17 + 18 10am – 4pm

K CE/MUSEUM WORKSHOP

Art + Design

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): CB-R, DS-R, NS-R, SA-E

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Art + Design

K WEEKEND WORKSHOP Scratchboard Illustration Workshop

Projects Studio: Children’s Book Illustration

NATUR-0958 | Trudy Nicholson

CBK-0946 | Judith Moffatt

ILUS-2436 | Steve Ahlquist

Trudy Nicholson, award-winning illustrator and master of the scratchboard technique, introduces students to the visually powerful medium in this two-day workshop. Clear, crisp images, dramatic lighting and exquisite detail are among the striking effects that can be achieved on scratchboard. Through demonstration and practice, students are introduced to methods for creating line and texture on scratchboard, planning a composition, transferring a sketch, balancing lights and darks, making corrections, and adding color. Students bring to class simple subjects such as shells, feathers, fruits and pinecones, from which they sketch a composition. They then transfer these sketches to scratchboard and begin a pencil or pen-and-ink illustration. Participants who wish to add color should bring watercolors. This unique illustration medium can be used by a variety of illustrators for highly representational, eye-catching and powerful images.

This course offers students who wish to enter the field of children’s book illustration the opportunity to synthesize a wide variety of approaches, tools and concepts related to the discipline. Under the guidance of an experienced illustrator, students develop two or three finished pieces, working from book dummies produced in a previous course. They also create other finished illustrations for their portfolios, targeting various age levels. Whether refining an existing piece of work or creating something new, students are assisted in identifying their strongest creative and visual solutions, and in compiling a quality portfolio that best represents them and their work. Students learn to prepare an illustration for their own promotional piece. Note: Students should bring at least 10 examples of illustration work (completed or in progress) to the first class.

Words plus pictures equals story, but the resulting narrative is far more than just the sum of its parts. Comics today are both art form and commodity; a commodity that is increasingly visible as grist for the media mill that includes animation, television productions, feature films and even children’s toys. But before any notable success visits, you must first complete a compelling work of sequential art that embodies your skills and ideas. Hone your skills and add value to your training in comic art by understanding marketplace realities and the venues through which your work can be purchased, published and distributed. This final studio course combines generous advice and rigorous critiques from a practicing comics professional that will enhance your powers and prepare you to take the next bounding leap.

Applies to the following certificate programs (12 contact hours): CB-E, NS-E, SA-E

Prerequisite: Children’s Book Illustration III

Saturday + Sunday, March 20 + 21 10am – 4pm 2 sessions tuition: $210

m Final

Applies to the following certificate program: CB-R

Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $425 m Writing

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Book Illustration II

CBK-0947 | Cheryl Kirk Noll

risd continuing education

Good children’s book illustration is immediate in its effect, almost magically capturing a child’s imagination. This intermediate course gives students the opportunity to investigate how illustration interacts with story and character development to create a product worthy of publication. Techniques for working in various media are emphasized, along with color, composition and page design. Students learn to think of the book as a whole while they explore concept development, characterization, timing, pacing, and the integration of text and images. Research and reference materials strengthen student work, and participants gain sensitivity to age levels and age-appropriate formats. Assignments and class critiques throughout guide students in refining their work.

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Projects Studio: Comic + Sequential Art

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Applies to the following certificate program: SA-R SPECIAL SCHEDULE: Thursdays, March 4 + 18, April 1, 15 + 29, May 13 6:30 – 9:30pm 6 sessions tuition: $425

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Comics are no longer just for kids. Indeed, the medium can be used for almost any type of story, from humorous fables and genre fiction to biography and dream narratives. But how does a comic story – with all those panels of images and speech balloons – progress from concept to finished inks? Whether you are a visual artist with a tale to tell or a journalist who fills margins with doodles, this course offers the essentials of writing and drawing comics. Classes include a survey of selected comics, in-class demonstrations of scriptwriting and drawing techniques, individual guidance and group critiques, and homework assignments that encourage participants to develop original comic stories at their own pace. Note: Basic drawing experience is helpful, but not required.

Prerequisite: Children’s Book Illustration I or permission of the instructor

Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19

12 sessions tuition: $425

W s i p t c t g d i e i ( c d e l i s c v s w a e

M 7

ILUS-0924 | Ryder Windham

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, CB-E, SA-R, VE-E

P

A (

+ Drawing Comics I

Applies to the following certificate program: CB-R

P

12 sessions tuition: $425 | model fee: $30

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:29:15 PM


Painting + Printmaking m Watercolor

Fundamentals

K WEEKEND WORKSHOP Wetlands, Woods, Meadow + Marsh: Plein Air Workshop NATUR-0231 | Amy Bartlett Wright

Watercolor can be a daunting and elusive medium, but this step-by-step introductory class breaks down the process and helps students develop the skills and expertise to paint with confidence. Emphasis is on learning technique through demonstrations of glazing, masking, lifting, toning and detailing, toward an ultimate goal of individual experimentation and discovery of approaches. Methods for achieving different effects – brush handling (including dry brush and wet into wet), color mixing, and experimentation with different papers – are covered. The essential issue of composition is tackled through small black and white studies to understand value structure, with students then progressing toward larger color pieces. The instructor initially provides subject material to work from, but students are eventually encouraged to work from subject matter of their choice and, ultimately, toward their individual expression and style.

The wetlands, woods, meadows and marshes of the Claire D. McIntosh Wildlife Refuge in Bristol – home to the Audubon Society of Rhode Island’s award-winning Environmental Education Center – are the backdrop and visual resource for this intensive plein air weekend workshop, led by noted painter and illustrator Amy Bartlett Wright. Class begins with a lecture 0n eleven ways to convey depth in the landscape, followed by a demonstration on specific techniques and procedures for working outside. Working en plein air (outdoors) presents many challenges, including fast-moving and sometimes dramatic changes in light, weather and potential animal activity, which only add to the excitement and give energy to the work. The instructor demonstrates methods of working quickly, efficiently and effectively to capture the essence of a scene – valuable tools and lessons for any studio painter. Note: Students may choose to work in graphite, colored pencil, pastel, watercolor or acrylic, alone or in combination. Class meets at an off-campus location; directions are sent to registered participants.

Applies to the following certificate programs (24 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Mondays, March 1 – April 26 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19 8 sessions tuition: $295

Applies to the following certificate programs (12 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Saturday + Sunday, May 1 + 2 10am – 4pm 2 sessions tuition: $210 | lab fee: $10

Encaustic PNT-1598 | Taleen Batalian

Encaustic, an ancient technique used to create commemorative wax portraits in Roman and Egyptian art, is once again becoming a popular medium for artists. Also called hot wax painting, encaustic is the process of creating an image from molten beeswax colored with pigments and then applied to a surface – either wood, masonite or canvas. The wax cools in minutes, enabling the application of many successive coats. Smoothing and scraping the wax, painting between each layer, and using heat to bind the layers creates a finish with a lustrous enamellike appearance. By working from both invented imagery and direct observation, students of all skill levels are encouraged to experiment and allow their paintings to evolve as they reheat and rework surfaces until the desired effect is achieved.

Applies to the following certificate programs (12 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Saturday + Sunday, April 24 + 25 10am – 4pm 2 sessions tuition: $210 | lab fee: $20 m Painting

Art + Design

PNT-0235 | Cindy Baron

K WEEKEND WORKSHOP

with Oils + Acrylics

PNT-1536 | Susan Fossati

What elevates a painting from mere exercise to work of art? Join us to develop a range of techniques for using oil and acrylic paints as you learn basic painting skills. Through class assignments, students investigate the properties of oils and acrylics; the expressive qualities of compositional elements; how to work with brushes, palette knives, paints and media; and techniques for paint application, from underpainting and glazing to impasto. Students work from many sources, including direct observation, drawings and reference material. Throughout the course, group and individual critiques enable students to develop their personal strengths as they cultivate individual styles. Note: This course is appropriate for beginning to advanced students.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, SA-E TILLINGHAST LOCATION: Fridays, March 5 – May 28 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/23 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $15

www.risd.edu/ce

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Certificate Programs Although any course in this publication may be taken for personal or professional enrichment, many may also be taken as part of a certificate program. Most RISD|CE certificate programs encompass a specific body of knowledge and practice that prepares candidates for rewarding positions in art and design fields. A background

Certificate Programs

A t b v n W d w d i c d f s c

AD

Advertising Design

AS

Appraisal Studies in Art + Antiques Children’s Book Illustration Comic + Sequential Art

AN

Computer Animation

DI

Digital Photography

VE

Digital Video Production

policies may be found in the Certificate Programs

DS

Drawing + Painting Studies

section of www.risd.edu/ce.

HP

Historic Preservation*

ID

Interior Design

NS

Natural Science Illustration

PD

Print Design Process + Production

WE

Web Design + Development

curriculum charts, advisor biographies, forms and

Who May Enroll

Academic Advising

Courses are open to anyone interested in pursuing certificate subject matter for professional or personal growth. Certificate programs address specific professional training needs of adult students, many of whom have college and professional experience but want to upgrade their skills or make a career change. Certificate program courses prepare students for work in their chosen fields, and part-time evening study allows people with career or family commitments to come back to school. Non-certificate students may take certificate courses provided they meet applicable prerequisites.

Should you have questions not answered in the Certificate Program Guides, please request an academic advisement appointment at 401 4546200. Students interested in our certificate programs for young adults should visit www.risd.edu/ce or call 401 4546200 to request a Young Artist Program brochure.

How to Enroll

A Note about Electives

Read the Certificate Program Guide for the specific program(s) of interest to learn about program objectives, requirements and prerequisites, and then submit the Application for Candidacy at any time during the academic year. Courses taken prior to declaration may be applied toward a certificate within a one-year grace period, provided retroactive payment of applicable fees is made upon application.

Courses other than those listed here or in the Certificate Program Guides may qualify as electives with the permission of the certificate advisor. Students who have very specific professional needs should also discuss their requirements with the relevant advisor.

!

risd continuing education

Courses that apply to one or more of RISD|CE’s certificate programs are noted with the following codes. Please consult the Certificate Program Guides for each program’s prerequisites. Note: The codes below may differ from those used with the RISD degree programs. Contact hours are given for elective courses only.

SA

these programs. Complete program information,

291923.P09_44.indd 22

C C

CB

in art and design is helpful but not necessary for any of

22

Programs

Graduation Candidates expecting to graduate in June 2010 should have already petitioned to graduate. If not, they must call 401 454-6200 to request a Petition to Graduate form.

INFO SESSION for all RISD/CE courses and certificate programs Friday, January 15 | 5:30 – 7pm RISD Continuing Education offices 20 Washington Place, Providence Meet program planners and certificate advisors, and get information about our diverse Adult and Young Artist Program offerings.

* Temporarily not accepting new certificate candidates. -R

Required Course

-E

Elective

C R

T t s p p l c g c a s y a b t

Advertising Design (AD) Gale Litchfield, Advisor

C B

Students are introduced to the creative, conceptual and technical skills necessary to enter or advance in the field of advertising with a focus on messages deliverable through print, broadcast or digital media. By developing skills in marketing, production planning and critical thinking, students learn to design effective advertising campaigns. This focused study results in a portfolio that demonstrates innovative approaches to market minded communications and greater sensitivity to the practical considerations driving both consumers and businesses.

B f p n a a a b l r g a c i

Appraisal Studies in Art + Antiques (AS) Louise T. Hall, Advisor

D L

RISD|CE and the American Society of Appraisers combine their resources to provide students with the theoretical skills needed to build a career in the appraisal of personal property and to develop a more thorough appreciation of collecting fine art, decorative art and antiques. Through lecture, demonstration and the study of art objects, students learn the history, theory, and practical skills necessary to collect and/ or appraise a wide range of items with assurance and competence.

RSVP at 401 454-6200 or e-mail cemail@risd.edu.

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 1:37:20 PM

P r s f t r f b t w a n d s a c


f d t h s e e

Natural Science Illustration (NS) Amy Bartlett Wright, Advisor

Aspiring illustrators are introduced to the multi-faceted world of children’s book design and illustration while surveying the creative, technical and business aspects of the illustration field. With an emphasis on process, students develop the skills in drawing, painting, writing, digital design, research and development they need to embark on an illustration career. Creating pictures that capture ideas is the central focus, as students become familiar with the unique formats and protocols of this highly specialized field while building an eyecatching portfolio.

This program provides students with a fast-paced curriculum designed to allow novices entry into the digital video production field, as well as further study for forward-thinking digital video professionals who want to keep pace with the business’s dynamic technological advances. The program emphasizes both technical proficiency and aesthetic sensibility as students learn while working on motion graphic and film production exercises that lead to the construction of complete and original short form projects. Students gain the skill set needed to communicate visually and the show reel needed to pursue careers in movie production, broadcasting and web-delivered entertainment.

From Lady’s Slipper Orchids to Eastern Painted Turtles to Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, scientific illustrators must communicate accurate natural science information while applying artistic skills of design, drawing and painting. In this program, students develop the observational skills necessary for realistic depiction while they hone their artistic abilities to create visually powerful illustrations. Students work from nature at all times and render in a variety of media and techniques to find their chosen medium. The program uses unique RISD facilities, such as the Edna Lawrence Nature Laboratory, and local resources, including the Roger Williams Park Museum of Natural History, Zoo and Greenhouse, to aid students in the process of observing and depicting the natural world. Students create portfolios of their strongest work, demonstrating competency in traditional and digital rendering of Natural Science subjects for the purpose of professional marketing and potential publication.

Comic + Sequential Art (SA) Ryder Windham, Advisor

This program provides students with the opportunity to explore the history, scholarship and assembly of words and pictures that combine to become compelling visual narratives. With core lessons in drawing, story-telling and computer-based workflow, the program allows for the creation of an eyecatching portfolio that will entice editors and publishers. Whether you call them strips, comic books or graphic novels, you will learn the creative and technical aspects of this unique art form that has become an undeniable presence in contemporary popular culture. Computer Animation (AN) Blue Wade, Advisor

Building an animated movie frame by frame takes a specific skill set. In this program, students gain the expertise needed to create original 2D and 3D animated stories as they practice their abilities in concept design, character animation and the use of computerbased tools, and complete projects that lead to the assembly of a portfolio show reel. Whether they plan to animate graphics, characters or games, students acquire the confidence vital to pursue careers in this evolving and expanding industry. Digital Photography (DI) Lindsay Elgin, Advisor

Photography is both an art and a science, requiring both aesthetic and technical skills. This program addresses the need for photographers of all levels to stay technologically current and creatively relevant. With its broad instructional focus, the program is appropriate for both beginning and experienced photographers and equally pertinent to those who want to provide images in service of advertising, documentary or expressive needs. Students learn in the field, the digital processing lab and the lighting studio as they study camera techniques and the modification, exhibition and circulation of their portfolio of images.

Drawing + Painting Studies (DS) Michael Peery, Advisor

Within the context of a structured studio environment, students develop critical skills in drawing and painting while exploring the intimate relationship between the two. The curriculum provides a solid foundation in depicting the subject and its setting, while providing tools for experimentation and self-expression. Participants develop confidence and competency with diverse techniques, and learn how to link them to conceptual concerns. The result is the ability to successfully represent any subject, to develop one’s own personal visual language and to become self-directed to work independently as an artist. Historic Preservation (HP)

Temporarily not accepting new certificate candidates. Interior Design (ID) David Paolino, Advisor

The Interior Design Certificate Program equips students with the skills and knowledge needed to create and implement all phases of an interior design. Courses address the creative aspects of the field as students develop the discipline and organizational skills that are the foundation of a successful business. Color, texture, light and the inherent characteristics of materials interact to convey the language of design together with such functional concerns as structural and space planning. Upon completion, students will be prepared to pursue a variety of careers in interior design. Please note: This non-credit program does not satisfy NCIDQ or ASID eligibility requirements.

Print Design Process + Production (PD) Dina Zaccagnini Vincent, Advisor

To effectively develop a printed piece from concept to fruition, one must understand the principles and conventions of the visual language of graphic design, the design process, and the technology used to produce a finished product. This certificate program focuses on pragmatic problem-solving through an emphasis on the conceptual design process. Students explore structures and systems in relationship to typography and image, as well as semiotics, in a project based learning environment through the creation of posters, brochures, books, publications and identity systems. Throughout the program, students continually develop and refine their portfolios in preparation for careers as professional graphic designers, project managers and art directors. Web Design + Development (WE) Eric Paul Meier, Advisor

This certificate program prepares students to enter, or stay current with, a complex and continually evolving field. Its programmatic objectives address technical functionality and design topics while acknowledging the electronic media professional’s responsibilities to organize information, communicate clearly and consider and incorporate the user’s needs. From the initial creative concept through website development and management, students assemble a web portfolio while practicing the strategies for meeting a client’s expectations for timely project delivery.

www.risd.edu/ce

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risd continuing education

f s n d t , d / h

Digital Video Production (VE) Albert Ibbotson, Advisor

Certificate Programs

, y l l d t r s

Children’s Book Illustration (CB) Cheryl Kirk Noll, Advisor

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Art + Design

m Oil

Painting Fundamentals

m Painting

from Nature: Color + Light

m Experimental

Relief Printmaking

NATUR-2286 | Amy Bartlett Wright

PRINT-4398 | Patrick Egger

P

Taking advantage of both the subtlety and richness of color that can be achieved with oil paints, this course provides an opportunity to explore how one’s inner vision can be expressed in pigment. Becoming acquainted with a range of oilpainting techniques, participants paint from direct observation of still life, landscape and figurative subject matter. Concepts of color and composition are also explored. Classes are structured around hands-on demonstrations and students receive group and individual critiques in the studio. Homework assignments allow students to put acquired knowledge and skill into practice. Note: Basic drawing experience is helpful but not required.

How does one choose, mix and apply color to depict a natural object’s form, structure, texture and pattern? This course helps students develop the means to achieve these and other representational goals. Through demonstrations and hands-on exercises, students explore the principles of color while learning rendering techniques for colored pencil, watercolor and acrylic. Lighting is emphasized as a means of heightening the realistic qualities of a specimen. Plants, birds, insects and other animals are the subjects, but the objectives may include creating visuals for children’s books and commissioned paintings, as well as publication in scientific journals.

Relief printmaking is a method that was used by artists – including Albrecht Durer, Edvard Munch and Leonard Baskin – to make multiple images from a single matrix. The process involves carving a material or block plate and then coating it with ink and stamping it onto paper – leaving a graphic impression that can be layered upon or printed as a single color. Images are created by variations in line quality and line density with distinct carving materials or “plates” used to establish a variety of textures, including: wood, linoleum and polystyrene. The course begins with making small, single-color relief prints and expands into larger-scale, multicolor techniques. Demonstrations include line carving, pressless printing and multi-plate registration techniques. Please note that all inks used are water-based and nontoxic.

V a W w d i p ( n p p a c m n T a a i t p w e

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, SA-E

Applies to the following certificate program: NS-R

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19

Prerequisite: Drawing from Nature: Form + Structure

12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $10 model fee: $40

Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/21

II: Techniques + Expression

12 sessions tuition: $425

m Painting

PNT-1509 | Anna Mogilevsky

This course consolidates concepts and methods acquired in previous coursework. Participants learn to combine rendering skills, color relationships and compositional elements to create a complete, unified painting. Projects may include still life, landscape and the figure, as well as abstraction. There is an ongoing concentration on painting materials and techniques, as both direct and indirect methods of painting are explored. Equally importantly, students begin to think about, develop and implement their own personal visual language. To support this process, students become highly involved in the world of paint, focusing on markmaking, layering, scraping and glazing to create meaning in the surface texture of their painting.

Applies to the following certificate program: DS-R Prerequisite: Painting I: The Transition from Drawing to Painting Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $425 | model fee: $30

m Final

Projects Studio: Drawing + Painting

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Tuesdays, March 2 – April 6 7 – 10pm

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A g N

T 7

6 sessions tuition: $285 | lab fee: $30

6 t

PNT-2627 | Michael Peery

While still working within the framework of a classroom context and under the guidance of an instructor, this unique final studio allows students to pursue and develop independent projects in drawing and painting. Students receive the necessary feedback and critique to help them more fully develop their craft, and learn to work independently. The ultimate goal is to create and complete a body of work – working in a series or sequentially – that speaks to the objectives and content of the individual’s personal visual language and ideas. Choice of subject matter and medium are decided by the student. The class meets seven times – during the first meeting, students formulate the direction of their work; the next five sessions are for individual and group critiques, and the final meeting is a group presentation and critique. The shift in responsibility from instructor to student prepares the student to become selfdirected and work independently on his/ her own as an artist.

Applies to the following certificate program: DS-R Prerequisite: Successful completion of all DS Required Level Two courses Meeting times are individually scheduled.

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m J

PNT-1502 | Michael Peery

tuition: $425 | Lab fee: $10

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:30:08 PM


m Japanese

Woodblock Printmaking

Photography

PRINT-4403 | Amanda Lebel

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E Tuesdays, April 13 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 6 sessions tuition: $285 | lab fee: $10

m Photography:

An Introduction

PHO-1647 | John Hames

This course for new and amateur photographers introduces ways of seeing through the lens and makes plain the underlying two-dimensional design issues and visual concepts hidden within the photographic image. Through weekly assignments and critiques, students explore ways to use photography and photographic conventions for their own unique personal expression. Classroom discussions cover everything from portraiture and landscape to abstract work, and introduce methods for students to expand their personal creativity and increase their self-confidence behind the camera. Whether you are interested in black-and-white, color or digital photography, this course provides a strong foundation for any subsequent photographic pursuit.

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): AD-E, CB-E, DI-R, DS-E, NS-E, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E section 01 Wednesdays, March 3 – April 7 6:30 – 9:30pm section 02 Saturdays, March 6 – April 17 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/3 6 sessions tuition: $285

Photography I

PHO-1658 | Lindsay Elgin, David Fleurant

With the digital revolution in full swing, the challenge in digital photography is to manage this burgeoning technology. Through lecture, demonstration and hands-on practice, students in this course learn to operate digital cameras and to utilize them as precise tools for image capture. Discussions include the many camera, lens and equipment options available to digital photographers and how to establish a digital workflow. As students develop technical and aesthetic skills, they explore shooting techniques, composition and framing, as well as the basics of light control. Other topics covered include image management, adjustment and editing in Photoshop, and printing and archiving digital images. Whether the student’s interest is in fine art, portraiture, event photography or product advertising, or simply in making the move from film to digital, this course provides a solid foundation for future work.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, CB-E, DI-R, DS-E, NS-E, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E

Art + Design

Van Gogh, Monet and countless other artists have been influenced by Japanese Woodblock prints, a printmaking method which, distinct from Western techniques, doesn’t require a press or use oil-based inks. This traditional thousand-year-old process combines ink or paint and nori (rice paste) with hand-pressing techniques to create prints. Students begin by practicing both carving techniques and printing with sumi ink. More advanced applications of color follow, including color gradation (bokashi) and making multiple block prints. Registration and numbering the prints are also discussed. To be true to the classic art form, design and composition are integral considerations in the development of individual imagery. An overview and brief history of the ancient craft, combined with actual practice, ultimately provide students with rare insight into this timeless and elegant tradition.

m Digital

Prerequisites: Photography: An Introduction and Digital Tools for Print Design or Digital Design for the Screen section 01 | Lindsay Elgin Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 section 02 | David Fleurant Fridays, March 5 – May 28 3 – 6pm | NO CLASS 4/23 12 sessions tuition: $675

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m Photographic

Lighting I

PHO-1630 | Roland Gutierrez

Art + Design

Discover how photographers manipulate natural and artificial light sources to achieve a painterly color palette and the illusion of sculptural form, not to mention sharp detail, in their work. This course covers controlling and combining light situations, as well as using the creative potential of light to interpret and define. A variety of lighting conditions and tools are explored both on location and in the studio. Lighting set-ups, the use of available light, and metering techniques are all covered. Students learn about the creative use of lenses, blackand-white and color film, and other materials to yield a wide range of special effects. Still life, commercial illustration, portraiture and industrial applications are also discussed.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, DI-R, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E Prerequisite: Digital Photography I Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $675 | lab fee: $25

m Documentary

Photography: The World as Context

Lighting II

PHO-1670 | Roland Gutierrez

Building on the techniques learned in Photographic Lighting I, this course further explores the art of using artificial light to transform the mundane into the magnificent. Using lighting as a form of expression, we experiment with complex lighting schemes in an effort to create more visually stimulating images. Emphasis is placed on controlling direction, quality and quantity of light as we investigate the impact of light, color and composition on the subject. Intended for photographers seeking to broaden their knowledge of artificial lighting, this course is primarily studio based and focuses on still life, architectural and portrait lighting, including a look into product photography and photographing the nude. We also learn techniques for utilizing available light, as well as oncamera flashes.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, DI-R, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E

Pinhole Photography Workshop

m C

PHO-1671 | John Hames

PHO-1646 | John Hames

Much of what we know about the world has come to us through the work of documentary photographers, whose curiosity and sensitivity have alerted us to a tremendous range of subject matter. Students in this course learn how to explore the world with their camera, shooting in either digital or traditional, or color or black-and-white, and bringing their work to a local lab for processing. Additionally, informal but comprehensive discussions of student work, as well as an historical overview of documentary photography, round out the course. The course is perfect for anyone who wishes to apply photography in a meaningful way to the world around them.

At its core, photography is a simple process: light is reflected from an object, directed and then recorded onto a photosensitive material. This is the pinhole camera just as it has been used for hundreds of years. Technology marches on, and digital concepts have complicated photography with JPEGs, pixels and light metering, which often obscure the art of photography. Join us to find the middle ground in this workshop that introduces the concepts and practices of digital pinhole photography on the very day when people around the world celebrate Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. Open to absolute beginners and seasoned photographers alike, this course asks only that participants bring a sense of discovery to class as they revisit photography’s history through the eyepiece of its future.

Applies to the following certificate program (36 contact hours): DI-E Prerequisite: Photography: An Introduction or Digital Photography I Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 12 sessions tuition: $675 m From

m Photographic

C

m Digital

Dark to Lightroom

PHO-1639 | Rob Colclaser

The popularity of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom continues to grow among photographers who want to quickly organize, process and output their images, enabling them to spend more time taking photographs and less time in front of their computers. This course introduces you to Lightroom (LR), and demonstrates how you can streamline your digital workflow when working with large volumes of digital photographs. Course topics include importing, RAW developing, and global and local adjustments that lead to output options, including printing and upload to web galleries. By the end of the course, you will have learned techniques that can improve your productivity, while at the same time more effectively representing yourself as a modern digital photographer.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, DI-E, PD-E, VE-E Prerequisite: Digital Photography I

Prerequisite: Photographic Lighting I

Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20

Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22

12 sessions tuition: $675

Applies to the following certificate program (6 contact hours): DI-E Sunday, April 25 10am – 4pm

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1 t

m I

1 session tuition: $100

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m Final

Projects Studio: Digital Photography PHO-1665 | Lindsay Elgin

The goal of this course is to create a body of work that can serve as a central portfolio piece. As we follow the development of this work through its evolution from concept to finished piece, we discuss factors relating to the photographer’s workplace. We deal with preparing work for digital, slide and print portfolios; marketing work for the web, galleries and other clients; and preparing work for exhibition and presentation. Storage concerns such as archiving and preserving digital prints are discussed, as is the digital photography marketplace in relation to event, wedding, portrait, commercial and fine art photography.

Applies to the following certificate program: DI-R Prerequisite: Photoshop: Navigating the Digital Darkroom Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $675

12 sessions tuition: $675

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Ceramics + Glass

m Advanced

Hot Glass

Jewelry + Metal Arts

GLAS-0608 | Bill Riker m Ceramics:

Dishware + Functional Vessels

12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $35

Prerequisite: Introduction to Hot Glass or equivalent experience

CERAM-0322 | Sharon Pollock

This course familiarizes students with a variety of techniques for creating functional ceramics. Explore your personal style while learning how to alter form in wheel-thrown vessels and making carved press molds and stamps to create unique hand-built pieces. Demonstrations, slide lectures and class assignments guide students to learn each specific technique. Student work, developed with the aid of drawings, emphasizes form and surface. Glazes and colorants are also explored as a means of enhancing a piece’s design elements or formal qualities. Note: A materials list is sent to registered students.

m Introduction

to Hot Glass

GLAS-0602 | Bill Riker

The art of glass blowing is enjoying a lively revival in specialized facilities throughout the country. Join us at a professional glassblower’s studio to learn the basics of working molten glass, and see how this transparent medium both accommodates and challenges the imagination. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students explore contemporary glass-working techniques under the guidance of a skilled artisan, with historic and modern examples of glass works providing inspiration and perspective. As the course progresses, students are encouraged to experiment as far as their newly acquired skills take them. Note: Space is limited in this course, which meets at an off-campus studio, so early registration is encouraged. Directions are sent to registered participants. section 01 Tuesdays, March 2 – April 27 6 – 9pm | NO CLASS 4/20 section 02 Wednesdays, March 3 – April 28 6 – 9pm | NO CLASS 4/21 8 sessions tuition: $495 | lab fee: $50

Thursdays, March 4 – April 29 6 – 9pm | NO CLASS 4/22 8 sessions tuition: $495 | lab fee: $50

m Advanced

Jewelry Techniques: Wax Carving + Casting JEWEL-1129 | Islay Taylor

This comprehensive introduction to the process of wax carving and casting focuses on the design and creation of unique metal works of art. Wax’s malleability provides the designer with a way to create rich textures and fine details. In addition, working with wax permits experimentation, as it is disposable and allows for mistakes. Class begins by exploring methods of working with wax in both additive and subtractive processes. Throughout the course, students strengthen their designs through research and sketches and are encouraged to challenge themselves by casting small-scale found objects, plastics and organics, as well as to make a mold for the production of multiples. All castings are sent to a professional caster for casting into metal (white bronze, silver, etc.). Ultimately, pieces are finished by sanding and filing, resulting in fine works of art. Thursdays, March 4 – April 29 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22

Art + Design

Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 9am – 12pm | NO CLASS 4/24

A master glassblower takes years to perfect his or her craft. Therefore, we have designed this new course for those ready to further develop and refine their glass blowing skills. Here, students are guided to move beyond the beginning level to include exploration of complex multipart forms and shapes. With the fundamentals fully digested, students can concentrate on defining their individual viewpoint and conceptual thinking skills, and start to work in teams on group projects. Please note that the course takes place at a professional glassblower’s studio with demonstrations and techniques tailored to each student’s needs and interests. In all cases, however, experimentation is highly encouraged. Note: Space is limited in this course, which meets at an off-campus studio, so early registration is encouraged. Directions are sent to registered participants.

8 sessions tuition: $295 | lab fee: $35 m Jewelry

+ Light Metals: The Basics

JEWEL-1132 | Yong Joo Kim

An intriguing piece of jewelry not only attracts the eye, but complements its wearer or tells a story. In this course, we move beyond appreciation to creation by learning the fundamentals of jewelrymaking techniques, design and fabrication. A range of hand-tool processes is covered through practical exercises and imaginative concept-based projects. The non-technical side of the class focuses on idea development and the critical-thinking skills needed to realize a vision. On the technical front, we cover sawing, filing, hard soldering, scoring/ bending, linkages, hollow construction, wire construction and more. In addition, discussion of design, materials, jewelry history and alternative techniques is part of every class. Note: Students may purchase tool kits from the RISD Store 3D on the first day of class for approximately $130. Students are expected to purchase metals for their projects, the nature and scope of which determine costs. Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 9am – 12pm | NO CLASS 4/24 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $50

risd continuing education

www.risd.edu/ce

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m Jewelry

+ Light Metals: Intermediate

Art + Design

JEWEL-1109 | Jennaca Davies

Working in precious and non-precious metals, students in this course refine and combine a variety of jewelry construction methods. Using the basic techniques of jewelry making – such as scoring, bending and hollow construction – students are encouraged to explore designs in making jewelry that is large but light, as well as small-scale containers and lockets. Additionally, basic hinge making and texturing are introduced. Slide lectures of historical and contemporary jewelry and metals are presented to inspire students with new design possibilities and to help articulate more involved ideas and concepts in their work. By the end of the course, students should find themselves able not only to create more intricate pieces but to approach jewelry design from a decidedly more sophisticated vantage point. Note: Students should be comfortable with basic sawing and soldering prior to taking this class. Students may purchase tool kits from the RISD Store 3D on the first day of class for approximately $130. Students are expected to purchase metals for their projects, the nature and scope of which determine costs.

Prerequisite: Jewelry + Light Metals: The Basics or equivalent experience Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $50

Sculpture + Woodworking m Drawing

with Clay: Introduction to Figurative Sculpture

Book + Paper Arts m One

Book, Two Ways: Sewn Book Structures

SCLP-0308 | Izzi Galindo

BOOK-0159 | Bryson Dean

The art of drawing and the art of sculpting constantly inform each other, in both expressive content and conception of the human form. In this course, students learn the basic techniques of figurative sculpture: how to build an armature and, using the same principles of observation as figure drawing, how to construct a figure on top of it in clay. The hand-eye coordination of drawing using clay gives an immediate physical understanding of the body as an interconnected system of layered forms. The basic steps are taught in unison; however, toward the end of each project, students are encouraged to branch out and explore what makes their sculptures unique as works of art. Students are also introduced to the various ways the human figure has been used in art, and are encouraged to begin thinking critically about what it means to represent the human body in their art.

Originating centuries ago in India, sewn books were made for religious texts, the words written on palm leaves held together with threaded twine. The craft and materials have since evolved, but the original techniques and structure have remained remarkably consistent. Sewn books are basically signatures (groups of stacked and folded pages), compiled and then connected, as the name suggests, through sewing. In this course, two styles are introduced: in the first, stitching is hidden inside the cover; in the second, rows of exposed chain stitches hold the book together, creating visual interest and embellishment. Ultimately, thick, many-paged books are possible, as students experiment with different papers and formats to relate the form to the intended function of the book. Whether it’s a notebook for ideas, an album of illustrations or a unique journal, the uses for these books are endless, and the structurally sound binding technique is right for almost any book project.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, CB-E, DS-E, NS-E, SA-E Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $50 m Woodworking

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WOOD-0811 | Kelly Goff

T

Mondays, March 1 – April 5 7 – 10pm

T 7

6 sessions tuition: $285 | lab fee: $15

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Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $35

risd continuing education

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Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): CB-E, DS-E, NS-E

Applies to the following certificate program (36 contact hours): ID-E

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G p t c o d o m f d T o r s l a t r b g c s w v l

The safe, efficient techniques and basic principles taught in this course are essential to achieving desired results with woodworking tools. Students first develop an understanding of wood and how to select and shape it. They then learn how to minimize waste while saving time with power tools, machines and woodworking equipment. Lastly, students work with lathes, table saws, radial arm saws, band saws, joiners, planers and sanders as they practice on projects in the wood shop. Demonstrations and slide-illustrated presentations serve to clarify instruction.

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Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:31:08 PM


Decorative Arts + Design Apparel + Textile Design m Green

Textiles for Home + Apparel

TEXT-1961 | Dawn Oliveira

Thursdays, March 4 – April 8 7 – 10pm 6 sessions tuition: $285

Knitting + Knitting Design

m Surface

Design: Digital Tools

TEXT-1920 | Anne Emlein

TEXT-2685 | Adrian Burke Zeller

As a basis for understanding the craft, this course begins with an overview of the history of hand knitting and an introduction to basic knit structures. Starting with simple stitches and cast-on/castoff techniques, we progress to stripes, surface pattern through knit structures, manipulation of stitches (i.e., cables), and pattern through color. Students learn how to work from patterns developed for knitting, as well as how to draft their own patterns. Special emphasis is placed on the qualities of different yarns and fibers, and how to make appropriate material, color and stitch choices. Additionally, students build a working sampler notebook in which they document the planning and execution of small projects. Note: Students should be prepared to work between classes and should expect to purchase a range of knitting supplies.

The computer allows for great time savings in surface design but, even more importantly, it facilitates the more creative aspects of this artistic process, such as experimentation with color and pattern. This course introduces students to the process of developing decorative surface designs using digital tools. Participants learn how to search for design inspiration, scan images, create repeats, develop collections, and wrap or clone concepts onto basic three-dimensional products. Using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, students focus on creating imaginative patterns, stripes, plaids and textures for a wide range of product categories that could include home, apparel, stationery, industrial design, interior design and even sports equipment. Come with your original art or create new digital designs, and be prepared to add to both your skill set and your portfolio.

Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $25 m Handloom

Weaving: The Inspired Rug TEXT-1899 | Susan Sklarek

Rugs and floor coverings from different countries and cultures, both historical and contemporary, provide us with wonderful examples of how materials and design are developed within a specific cultural and functional context. The examples presented and studied in class serve as a foundation for students to develop their own vision and sources of inspiration. Each student designs and executes a woven rug intended for a specific use or space. Students learn to set up the loom and experiment with a variety of rug making techniques including weft-faced twills, tapestry and pile. Exploration with a wide range of materials is encouraged, including yarns, cords, trims, cloth strips and recycled clothing and linens. The looms used in class, with a maximum weaving width of 20 inches, present fascinating design possibilities for larger pieced rugs comprised of multiple patterns. Students should expect to work at home between classes; looms are foldable for transport. Note: The lab fee covers warp and weft yarns for samples and warp for projects. Students purchase their own weft yarns for projects.

Applies to the following certificate program (36 contact hours): ID-E Prerequisite: Digital Tools for Print Design or some familiarity with Photoshop and Illustrator. Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19

Art + Design

Green design means something very particular to the textile designer, with today’s textile industry facing critical choices about how to manufacture and/ or specify products. For fashion, residential or commercial contract fabrics, one must consider sourcing environmentally considered fibers and dyes from GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standards) certified mills around the world. These standards aim to ensure textiles’ organic status – from harvesting of the raw materials to environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing, to labeling – in order to provide credible assurance to the end-user. Students in this course engage in design with environmental concerns at the forefront, by incorporating green imperatives in global fabric sourcing and printing. With careful consideration of trends, each student conceptualizes and produces a well-considered storyboard presenting a vision of a small, sustainable textile collection for summer 2010.

m Hand

12 sessions tuition: $675

Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/21

risd continuing education

12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $50 loom deposit: $100 ($75 is refunded upon return of loom)

www.risd.edu/ce

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Interior Design m Essentials

of Interior Decoration

INDES-1008 | Marcia Connors

This introductory course teaches students how to blend elements such as color, pattern and furniture styles to achieve seamless decorative effects. Explore the myriad possibilities available to the interior designer through the use of fabrics, lighting, and wall and floor coverings. Learn to use accessories, art and personal treasures to give a room unique character. Classroom discussions and critiques offer insights into the design process as students complete projects in decorating and room arrangement.

Art + Design

Applies to the following certificate program (18 contact hours): ID-E TILLINGHAST LOCATION: Thursdays, March 4 – April 8 6:30 – 9:30pm 6 sessions tuition: $285 m The

Boston Design Center

INDES-1042 | Marcia Connors

Join us for a guided tour of the Boston Design Center, New England’s only total resource for the interior design industry. The Boston Design Center houses 87 showrooms carrying more than 1,200 international lines of exquisite home and workplace furnishings and accessories. In showrooms of firms the likes of Brunschwig & Fils, Kravet, Robert Allen | Beacon Hill and F. Schumacher & Co., one can find beautiful, unique fabrics, wall and floor coverings, furniture, fixtures, accessories, antiques, lighting, kitchens and much more. Rub elbows with professional designers, get inspired and gain inside knowledge as you explore this treasure trove of interior design. Note: Class meets at the Boston Design Center; directions are sent to registered participants. Participants should plan to buy lunch in Boston. Friday, March 12 10am – 4pm 1 session tuition: $95

m Home

Furnishing Design + Fabrication Tour INDES-1078 | Cathy Wilkerson

Join a professional home furnishing textiles designer for this two-part workshop – an inside look at the construction of upholstered furniture and custom draperies. In the first meeting, Upholstery Tour, students learn how form and function impact the purchasing of sofas, chairs and other covered seating, and learn to evaluate comfort and quality for style and details of fabrics or leathers, as well as the frame, springs and padding. In the second meeting, Workroom Tour, students get a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of window treatments that are appropriate, beautiful, well-constructed, and suited to the customer’s needs, with such considerations as fabric pattern repeats, serged seams, hems, linings, and choice of heavy, midweight and sheer fabrics. The workshop offers students insights into the design process of the home furnishings business that will make them sharper consumers or design professionals. Note: This class meets on-site at a local workroom and upholsterer; directions are sent to registered participants. Mondays, May 10 + 17 6:30 – 9:30pm

of Interior Design

INDES-1049 | David Paolino

This introductory course focuses on the process of design as it applies to the formation of interior space. Students build an acute awareness of core elements – scale, proportion, light, circulation and progression – and the interdependence of space and form. Functional, utilitarian, economic and safety requirements of interior spaces in an architectural framework are examined. Armed with a visual lexicon to define interior space and explore its characteristics, students begin to integrate color, materials and texture as a means to convey their original intent. Through project assignments, students learn to apply the basic principles of visual design to interiors, and how functional, aesthetic and expressive needs can be translated into design decisions to develop 3D space.

Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/21

risd continuing education

12 sessions tuition: $425

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1

The successful interior designer relies on graphic skills to conceptualize and communicate a wide range of interior design ideas and solutions. This studio course introduces students to architectural drafting and its tools and standards. We cover topics and techniques that apply to most projects, such as construction drawings and layouts with dimensions and notations. Also introduced are orthographic drawing (used in custom furniture work), bubble diagrams, and layout sketches that begin the design process. Assignments focus on developing drawing skills as problem-solving tools so that students can turn freehand sketches into scaled dimensional drawings. We also discuss the use of traditional drafting tools and conventions, including architectural lettering, scale, proper line weight, dimensioning, perspective, detailing and elevation.

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Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22

T h e t m d t a a a M D t c a h S m c r w o w C

A p H

12 sessions tuition: $425

+ Rendering Interiors

INDES-1081 | David Paolino

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R

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for Interior Design

INDES-1082 | Shane Wood

m Drawing

2 sessions tuition: $95 m Principles

m Drafting

Strong drawing skills enable designers to communicate effectively and sell interior design concepts. Indeed, the better a designer’s drawings are, the better a client – or potential client – can comprehend and visualize the designer’s ideas. This course assists students in expanding their skills beyond the fundamentals of drafting floor plans and interior wall elevations. Students use 2D and 3D drawings and then apply color, light, pattern and entourage to expand their line drawings into a professional presentation. Demonstrations show how the creative use of tools and materials such as pens, drawing leads, watercolors, colored markers and pencils, as well as the inventive use of printed, copied and computer-generated materials, can help visual presentations transcend the ordinary. Upon completion of the course, students will have improved their ability to attract and satisfy clients using presentation drawings that bring their ideas to life!

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R Prerequisite: Drafting for Interior Design Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $5

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:31:47 PM

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m Styles

in the Decorative Arts II: 1800 to the Present

m Building

Materials, Systems + Methods of Construction INDES-1039 | David Paolino

This course continues the overview of historical trends that have shaped both exterior and interior Western architecture. It covers major figures and movements in architectural and interior design from the early 19th Century to the present. Slide-illustrated lectures and discussions explore the aesthetic and ideological concerns of the Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, Art Nouveau and Modern movements. As in Styles in the Decorative Arts I: Ancient Egypt to 1800, the influence of cultural and sociological factors on architecture and design is addressed throughout, as is the impact of historic styles on contemporary design. Students use this knowledge to identify major historical styles, theorize about current and future design trends, and research a specific theory or style. A written report is required. Note: Portions of this course are offered in collaboration with the Preservation Society of Newport County, Newport, RI.

An extensive knowledge of building materials and their use in the construction of interior spaces is a prerequisite for the interior designer. In this course, we survey the impact of design on construction methods and choices, from fundamental necessities to ornamental trim. We also investigate the main concepts and vocabulary underlying interior systems and materials, and the effect of mechanical systems (plumbing, heating, etc.) on interior design. We further examine the many functional, physical and visual variables of designing floor and wall surfaces and discuss how to select the right products from the wide range available today. Students learn to write specifications for a variety of materials and interpret manufacturers’ specifications as well. Other topics include: building codes, energy conservation, indoor pollution and the use of “green” products.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AS-E, HP-E, ID-R

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): HP-E, ID-R Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses

Prerequisite: Styles in the Decorative Arts I: Ancient Egypt to 1800

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/19

12 sessions tuition: $425

12 sessions tuition: $425

m Materials

for Interior Design I

INDES-1056 | Nancy Laurienzo

The materials that engage our senses play an integral role in defining our interior spaces. Indeed, understanding the unique characteristics of various materials is an important aspect of selecting and designing with them. This survey course explores a variety of materials used in interior design, including fabrics, wall coverings, paints, wood, stone, metal, glass, laminates, solid surfacing, tile, carpet, resilient flooring and more. The course covers appropriate and creative uses of these materials in commercial and residential applications, in addition to code considerations, specification writing and identification of sources.

for Interior Design

INDES-1015 | Barbara Capalbo

Lighting can be used to define architectural space, enhance texture in surface materials, and reveal form in furnishings, making it an essential component of any interior design. This course introduces students to the equipment, techniques and concepts of lighting design and to the use of angle, intensity, color and pattern in establishing the function and atmosphere of interior spaces. Students learn about a variety of lamps and fixtures as they develop creative, functional lighting plans.

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses Tuesdays, March 2 – April 16 7 – 10pm 6 sessions tuition: $285 m Applied

Color for Interior Design

INDES-1053 | Karen Triedman

This mid-level course explores color relationships and interactions with space and light as a basis for creating design solutions for both commercial and residential settings. Students work in teams, building structural models to develop comprehensive color schemes and designs that include wall and floor coverings, textiles, accessories and accents. Coursework includes three projects and two consulting assignments. Slide-illustrated lectures address a wide range of psychological, cultural and historical aspects of the use of color in interior design.

Art + Design

INDES-1058 | John Tschirch

m Lighting

Applies to the following certificate program (18 contact hours): ID-E Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses Mondays, March 1 – April 5 6:30 – 9:30pm 6 sessions tuition: $285

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): HP-E, ID-R Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses Wednesdays, April 14 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 6 sessions tuition: $285

risd continuing education

www.risd.edu/ce

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Interiors I: Living Spaces

Art + Design

m Residential

m Residential

Interiors II: Kitchens + Baths

m Commercial

Interiors II: Hospitality Design

m I

I

INDES-1050 | Reece Tormos

INDES-1044 | Prudence Stoddard

INDES-1043 | Libby Slader

Using residential living spaces such as apartments, condominiums, houses, single-family housing developments and assisted living centers as context, this studio course gives students a basic understanding of how to design interior spaces. Classwork and outside assignments address the elements, principles and procedures of interior design while emphasizing the methods used to develop and assess ideas. Identifying client goals, outlining intended space functions and sketching schematic design ideas are all highlighted. Students examine the standard dimensions of interior spaces and utilize guidelines for circulation as they develop the graphic skills necessary to communicate information and present drawings. Note: Kitchens, baths and specific mechanical spaces are covered in Residential Interiors II.

Today’s multiple-use kitchens and baths celebrate color, pattern and texture, providing the interior designer with endless possibilities for invention. Students in this course focus on traffic and usage patterns, identify lighting needs, and find solutions to ventilation and storage problems. Furthermore, the course covers materials available to the modern designer, from fixtures and appliances to wall and floor coverings, and participants evaluate the relative merits of custom versus modular, mass-produced cabinetry. Participants also learn to design for human requirements, taking into consideration standard measurements, ergonomics and psychological factors as they develop original ideas and designs and execute presentation drawings. Topics and assignments include multi-story space design and the incorporation of construction systems into layouts, but are more complex than those featured in Residential Interiors I: Living Spaces.

The ever-growing hospitality industry gives interior designers many opportunities to create imaginative, inviting and well-functioning spaces. Designers must determine the identity of the establishment and create aesthetically pleasing and comfortable relationships within the key spaces of a facility, while providing a practical and non-intrusive work environment for the staff. This intensive studio course focuses on hotel and restaurant design. Topics and assignments are complex and include multistory space design and the incorporation of construction systems into layouts. Participants develop skills in space programming/planning, the various phases of design, detailing, visual and verbal communication of ideas, as well as in creating floor plans, elevations and finish boards. Coursework culminates with a final project in hotel design.

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R

Prerequisite: Commercial Interiors I

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $425 m Commercial

Prerequisite: Residential Interiors I: Living Spaces Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22

Interiors I

INDES-0812 | Marla Whitford

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $10

12 sessions tuition: $425

Successful design goes far beyond creativity, aesthetics and a passion for details. It also involves communication, logistics and economics. In this course, students are guided through the steps professional designers take in developing and designing nonresidential spaces. We deal with volume and scale in larger spaces, and ADA and local health and safety codes are covered as we address functional concerns such as choosing fire-resistant materials and incorporating handicapped access into our designs. As students work on assignments including office designs, retail designs and healthcare facilities, they learn to understand technical criteria, establish a design philosophy, and prepare concept drawings from initial space planning to presentation drawings. Working with new or existing spaces, students select furnishings, materials, finishes, colors and lighting, while gaining the skills to develop attractive and functional configurations.

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R

risd continuing education

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all ID Required Foundation Level courses

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Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $425 | lab fee: $10

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:32:16 PM

I s c i i p p t r i e fi s o a b a

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m Interior

Design Final Studio

INDES-1060 | David Paolino

In this final studio course, interior design students put it all together, undertaking complex projects that require research into historical styles and/or cultural influences, and that include specialpurpose spaces and areas for public and private use. A final project demonstrates the student’s familiarity with major interior design components, including lighting design, detailing of one or more key elements, and a knowledge of millwork, finishes, building codes and material standards. Business practices and methods for presenting design solutions are also covered for those who are about to begin, or who have already commenced, a career in interior design.

Applies to the following certificate program: ID-R

Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $425

m Stone

Wall Design + Construction

ARC-0228 | Kevin Baker

“Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,” said Robert Frost. Once used to mark boundaries, pen animals and put unwanted fieldstones to use, stone walls have experienced a revival as a component in home landscaping. This workshop gives students a solid grounding in the history, planning and construction of New England dry stone walls through slide-illustrated lectures and hands-on participation. Students learn about planning new walls, including the pros and cons of do-it-yourself versus contractor-built walls, pricing, project feasibility and size, and sources for materials, as they develop a greater appreciation for New England’s historic landscape. TILLINGHAST LOCATION: Saturday, May 8 9am – 12pm 1 session tuition: $50 m Paving

m Identifying

Trees + Shrubs

ARC-0245 | Michael Veracka

Trees and shrubs create a palpable presence and give character and beauty to the landscape. They also provide vital clues that inform gardeners’ and designers’ planting strategies. Students in this course enjoy the opportunity to learn about and gain appreciation for plants as special entities in themselves, and also as integral devices for enhancing meaning, form and function in architectural spaces of all sorts. Students learn to identify trees and shrubs accurately, and thus gain an understanding of suitable growing conditions. The basics of plant classification, morphology (study of form and structure), and how to use a tree identification key are all covered. In addition, we examine how shape, height, color and texture vary with each species, and how they give a sense of scale and architectural massing to the landscape. Saturday, March 6 11am – 1pm 1 session tuition: $35

with Brick + Stone

Art + Design

Prerequisite: ID Required Level Three or permission of the instructor

Architecture + Landscape Design

ARC-0233 | Michael Veracka

Brick, stone and cobblestone date back centuries and have been used as paving materials everywhere from the Appian Way to the streets of Nantucket. Learn the basic techniques for creating beautiful (and relatively inexpensive) dry-laid patios, terraces, driveways and walkways, using salvaged or “found” brick and stone. Topics covered include project design, preparing and leveling foundations, locating materials, combining them creatively, and building for the long term. For this reason, the class is sure to interest homeowners and doit-yourselfers, not to mention landscape professionals. TILLINGHAST LOCATION: Saturday, May 1 1 – 4pm 1 session tuition: $50

risd continuing education

www.risd.edu/ce

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Computer-Based Design Harnessing Technology The computer has changed the very nature of art and design, and has spawned new, more complex jobs much faster than ever before in history. The following courses and programs enable students to combine artmaking with technology as they utilize an assortment of cutting-edge software both in class and during open hours in our up-todate computer labs. Whether to learn basic computer skills or enter highly specialized fields, students are invited to take courses for personal or professional enrichment, or as part of any of our diverse certificate programs (see pages 22 – 23). Individuals on the go can boost their skills, while business and community organizations can

Computer-Based Design

take advantage of various customized training options

risd continuing education 291923.P09_44.indd 34

m Digital

Tools for Print Design

DFOU-3543 | Bryan Rodrigues

This course helps novice users become more confident – and intermediate students more competent – with computer-based design. We introduce the Apple computer and its operating system along with Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, and discuss the capture, transfer, manipulation and delivery of images. Proper digital workflow is revealed through class exercises and lecture, as students learn to output content for the printed page. Completion of this course provides you with valuable skill sets relied upon by all productive graphic designers, illustrators and draftsmen.

Applies to the following certificate programs: AD-R, CB-R, DI-R, NS-R, PD-R, SA-R section 01 Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20

(call the RISD|CE Associate Director for Programs, Rebecca King, at 401 454-6214 or e-mail rking@risd.edu

12 sessions tuition: $675

for details).

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section 02 Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 2 – 5pm | NO CLASS 4/22 section 03 Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 9am – 12pm | NO CLASS 4/24

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Design for the Screen

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Important! It is critical for the success of each student and for the proper running

DFOU-3542 | Bryan Rodrigues

of each class that all applicable prerequisites are met. If you have any questions

The screen is the entryway through which we view our digital world. This introductory but fast-paced course begins with the real hardware assets (processors, monitors, memory) needed for digital design work, and from there moves on to the software tools and protocols that impact what can be viewed on the screen – QuickTime, HTML and the components of Adobe’s Creative Suite of software tools. All the elements can be daunting, but once explained, we’re well on the way to digital fluency which, in turn, leads to original and unexpected visual solutions. This course enables students to better understand computer aided design and digital workflow, as we gather, preserve, modify and combine images, text and information until they comprise examples of well considered design.

A a t i i d w p p a l f o d a a s

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-R, AN-R, CB-E, VE-R, WE-R

P D

about prerequisites, contact the Program Manager, Ty Varszegi, at 401 454-6212 or tvarszeg@risd.edu.

!

PC to Mac? Mac to PC? Cross-platform computing is a reality in today’s flexible work environment. That is why CE’s technology-based classes use computers that run both the Macintosh and Windows operating systems. Your course may use one or the other. While some students have concerns about making the transition from one computing platform to another, the differences are truly minimal. Nevertheless, to provide the best experience possible, CE offers its students a free, short (30 – 40 minutes) and painless tutoring session in PC to Mac or Mac to PC computing. Tutorials can be scheduled Monday through Friday from 9am – 5:30pm. Contact Dean Abanilla at 401 454-6727, or dabanill@risd.edu to make an appointment.

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Digital Foundations

Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21

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12 sessions tuition: $675

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Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:32:58 PM


m Adobe

Photoshop I

m Adobe

InDesign

DFOU-2533 | Eric Emerson, David Fleurant

DFOU-3536 | Erik Klaver, Bryan Rodrigues

Whether images are scanned, photographed or digitally drawn, Adobe Photoshop is the industry-standard program for manipulating them. This introduction to Photoshop focuses on combining, retouching and modifying images through class exercises and projects in which students work with Photoshop tools like the airbrush, paintbrush, cloning and pattern stamps, eraser and crop tool. By the end of the course, students understand Photoshop’s capabilities and are able to handle basic file formats and layers, combine images, and create effects using grayscale, color and filters.

As the new industry standard for graphic design, Adobe InDesign integrates effortlessly with the Adobe software suite (Photoshop, Illustrator) to give graphic artists superior control over every element of their page layouts. Designers can use it to combine text and illustrations for single- or multi-page documents and to prepare them digitally for output to press, printer or PDF (portable document format). Students in this course gain technical know-how of the application’s basic tool layout, image manipulation, and vector integration tools. All the while, concepts of visual communication and design are reinforced through hands-on exercises and practical assignments. By the end of the course, students should exhibit great confidence with the type and compositional commands that are the foundation of this exceptional graphic design application.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-R, CB-R, DI-R, DS-E, NS-R, PD-R, SA-R, VE-R, WE-E Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen, Digital Tools for Print Design or equivalent experience section 01 | Eric Emerson Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 section 02 | David Fleurant Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 1 – 4pm | NO CLASS 4/24

m Adobe

Illustrator I

DFOU-2532 | Mary Beth Cryan, Bryson Dean

Adobe Illustrator, a popular computer application used by designers and illustrators to produce print or web designs, is particularly helpful in creating unique images and graphics that require a high degree of precision and can be resized without loss of quality. Because the program is vector based, curves do not pixelate as they do in other graphics applications. In this course, students learn to create illustrations and freeform sketches, explore how this program of choice for professional artists and designers makes it possible to trace and alter scanned images in order to create a variety of special effects, and learn to save their files in PostScript format.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, CB-E, NS-E, PD-R, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E

Prerequisite: Digital Tools for Print Design or equivalent experience section 01 | Erik Klaver Mondays, March 1 – May 24 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 section 02 | Bryan Rodrigues Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $675

m Introduction

to Graphic Form

PRNT-0714 | Marianne Migliori

This course introduces the principles of two-dimensional design in the context of graphic design. Students explore and develop an understanding of visual relationships through the use of such elements and principles as line, shape, value, texture, rhythm, form, counterform, contrast, juxtaposition, progression and sequence. As they review the basic concepts and vocabulary of design, students learn how to critique and discuss visual work. The emphasis throughout is on exploring design through the dynamics of form, letterform and typographic elements. Note: This is not a computer-based course.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-R, DI-E, PD-R, SA-E, WE-E Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $425 m Graphic

Structures + Systems

PRNT-2531 | Derek Schusterbauer

Graphic designers must have a fundamental understanding of the basic structures and organizing systems that lie beneath all examples of the print designer’s craft. Grids and modules are discussed as the primary device for originating compelling design solutions that acknowledge the core rules of proportion, rhythm, pacing and sequence. Adobe Illustrator and InDesign are among the digital tools used to define these unifying structures that are often (but not always) invisible. The class builds upon a foundation of weekly exercises as students develop a solid understanding of the practical considerations involved in the planning and delivery of a conclusive graphic design project.

Computer-Based Design

12 sessions tuition: $675

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, CB-E, PD-R, SA-E, WE-E

Print Design

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, PD-R, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E Prerequisite: Adobe InDesign Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $675

Prerequisite: Digital Tools for Print Design or Digital Design for the Screen section 01 | Mary Beth Cryan Mondays, March 1 – May 24 2 – 5pm | NO CLASS 4/19

risd continuing education

section 02 | Bryson Dean Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 9am – 12pm | NO CLASS 4/24 12 sessions tuition: $675

www.risd.edu/ce

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m Typographics

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PRNT-2598 | Dina Zaccagnini Vincent

Design Studio: Digital Typeface Design

Created for designers who work primarily on the computer, this course introduces the fundamentals of typography – theory, practice, technology and history – so that students can use it to their advantage. Making crucial design decisions on a Macintosh operating system platform, students explore designing with type as they gain experience in composing a single- or multi-page document, laying out page systems effectively, and using type styles to influence expression and communication. Topics include conceptual development, reinforcement of meaning, analysis of letterforms, typographic measurement, typeface classification, typesetting, using grid systems, establishing hierarchies for organizational clarity, and assessing document legibility. Hands-on class and homework assignments provide students with the skills and conceptual understanding that serve as a foundation to most digital design undertakings.

PRNT-2837 | Jeremy Mickel

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, DI-E, PD-R, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E

Prerequisite: Typographics I

Prerequisite: Adobe InDesign

Thursdays, March 11 + 25, April 8 + 29, May 13 + 27 6:30 – 9:30pm

Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20

Computer-Based Design

m Print

12 sessions tuition: $675 m Print

Design Studio: Environmental Graphics PRNT-3575 | Derek Schusterbauer

Print design is no longer confined to newspapers, magazines and brochures. Instead, graphic design is all around us and populates our environment with all sorts of banners, boards, signs and symbols. The best of these environmental graphics get us to our destinations quickly and safely, and on occasion, may even cause us to linger and admire their sublime beauty. Unfortunately, we all know of examples that do not. In this advanced studio course, we take note of both the good and the bad in order to understand how to create graphic identifiers in an increasingly competitive visual environment. Lessons of scale and materials are addressed as students undertake a typical real-world graphic design assignment.

Our visual world surrounds us with letters, numbers, signs and symbols that would spin out of control, if not for the guiding hand of the graphic designer. More specifically, it is the typeface designer who uses the most sophisticated digital tools to give stylistic unity to the modern alphabet. In this advanced studio course, students have an opportunity to develop their obsession with typography into an informed practice. We approach typeface design through the filters of past and present: in the discussion of letterform evolution throughout history, and in the contemporary practice of computer digitization. Through the use of TypeTool software tutorials, in-class exercises and group critiques, students learn how to bring their concepts to life as they generate OpenType files that can be installed on any computer.

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): AD-E, PD-R SPECIAL SCHEDULE:

6 sessions tuition: $435 m Final

Projects Studio: Print Design

PRNT-2589 | Dina Zaccagnini Vincent

This final projects studio is for certificate students who have successfully completed all previous levels of study for the Print Design Process + Production Certificate Program. Certificate students needing more information should check the CE website or contact the CE office at cemail@risd.edu. tuition: $675

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): AD-E, PD-R Prerequisite: Typographics I

Advertising Design

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Visually

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DSN-0776 | Mitch Goldstein

T t c t g i o e

m Thinking

What is the perfect recipe for a persuasive graphic design solution and how do you combine those ingredients for the best effect? Each variable is subject to choice and, whether shrewdly or poorly made, those choices cannot help but change the overall impact of the project. Students in this course are introduced to image making methods that are determined by underlying graphic and typographic messages. Assignments are devised to reinforce conceptual thinking and to foster understanding and evaluation of source information. The aim is to empower the graphic artist/advertising designer with a full visual literacy that best serves the project’s needs.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-R, DI-E, PD-R, SA-E Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 12 sessions tuition: $675 m Designing

an Ad Campaign

COMAD-0703 | Philip Keith

An ad campaign is a planned, coordinated sales effort that runs over a period of time and usually involves a variety of media. Many inventive and effective campaigns have not only made products recognizable and profitable for the seller, but have also won awards for their creators. What qualities do these memorable ads have in common? That question is explored in this course through case studies, class exercises and a final project. By analyzing examples of successful campaigns, students are immersed in the process professional marketers use to produce results. Students then apply this knowledge to develop a multimedia campaign that solves a particular marketing problem. From creative strategy to research to developing the final presentation, this course simulates an authentic ad agency experience and provides students with an impressive ad campaign for inclusion in their professional portfolios.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-R, PD-E, VE-E, WE-E Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $675

SPECIAL SCHEDULE:

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Thursdays, March 4 +18, April 1 + 15, May 6 + 20 7 – 10pm 6 sessions tuition: $435

Spring Registration begins January 11

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Projects Studio: Advertising Design

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Effects with Adobe After Effects

COMAD-0774 | Gale Litchfield

DVID-2503 | Fred Spencer

This final projects studio is for certificate students who have successfully completed all previous levels of study for the Advertising Design Certificate Program. Certificate students needing more information should check the CE website or contact the CE office at cemail@risd. edu.

Adobe After Effects is to video and film what Adobe Photoshop is to photography. Students in this course learn to master this powerful software tool used by professionals in the film and video industries for generating visual effects and motion graphics. In the process of creating video shorts, students are afforded the opportunity to composite multiple layers, animate an unlimited number of elements and apply visual effects to video. Students can then apply these skills to both professional and personal projects.

tuition: $675

Computer Animation + Video m Computer

Animation Studio

ANIM-2506 | Blue Wade

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-R, CB-E, NS-E, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen or equivalent experience Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $675

Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19 12 sessions tuition: $675 m Digital

Video Production Studio

COM-2827 | Evan Villari

This studio course covers all aspects of video production. With only a hint of the final product in mind, students begin with creative ideas that lead to script formats, storyboards, location scouting, auditions, production scheduling and defined budgets. The class then breaks into discrete production teams, each shooting and editing a short video project using digital cameras and Final Cut Pro. Camera operation, lighting concepts and audio are all covered as footage is gathered and postproduction begins. In this phase, raw footage is screened, logged, and digitized before editing, which gives the project its final shape. Ultimately, students discover that digital video is no longer just for amateurs, with many filmmakers using these techniques to produce independent films that they submit to film festivals.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, SA-E, VE-R Prerequisite: Final Cut Pro Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $675

+ Cutting Screen Sound

DVID-3529 | Brian Knoth

Which is more important – picture or sound? Would the sight of the shark’s fin carving through the water in Jaws be nearly as terrifying without John Williams’ theme? In this video production class, sound plays the lead role as students become acquainted with SoundTrack Pro, an integrated software package that is part of the Final Cut Pro suite. In addition to its waveform editing capabilities, this application expands upon sound-design possibilities with Logic Pro’s effect plug-ins and library of sound effects. With these tools at hand, students quickly develop a renewed appreciation of sound as a subtle means to deliver content and create mood. Note: This course satisfies the requirement for Final Cut Pro III.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, VE-R, WE-E Prerequisite: Final Cut Pro Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $675

K ONLINE COURSE Writing for the Screen DVID-2572 | Jenn Dlugos

Applies to the following certificate programs (18 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, VE-R, WE-E March 1 – May 28 tuition: $350 Online Course

www.risd.edu/ce

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risd continuing education

Movies are built on the foundation of a screenplay shaped by a screenwriter. This online course provides students with an overview of the process of writing for the screen by focusing on the fundamentals – from character development and dialogue to the structural expectations particular to film. While screenwriting skills are essential to any aspiring filmmaker, the course also entertains and informs the more casual film lover. Using handouts, writing exercises, web-based forums and film clips, your instructor leads the class from a virtual classroom, while students practice the screenwriter’s craft on a more flexible schedule. They mine their own experience for characters, conflicts and stories that are the first step in planning a project delivered as a moving image – be it an animation, music video or feature film. Note: This course satisfies the Screenwriting requirement for the certificate program in Digital Video Production. Students should have Internet access and understand basic web browsing. Course material is posted weekly throughout the term, and students are expected to participate in online discussions. Students are contacted via e-mail by the instructor prior to the start date of class with detailed information.

Computer-Based Design

What makes an animation compelling? Strength of storytelling, character design and development, quality of motion, and the ability to work with animation software are all key factors that make one animation stand out from others. In this course, students use Flash to perform basic exercises in animation and then go on to explore a variety of more sophisticated techniques. They also learn how to plan and create storyboards so as to better organize their animation ideas. By the end of the course, students produce short animation projects that match their unique ideas to the most appropriate methods of production.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-R, DI-E, PD-E, VE-R, WE-E

m Creating

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m Final

Projects Studio: Computer Animation ANIM-2593 | Blue Wade

This final projects studio is for certificate students who have successfully completed all previous levels of study for the Computer Animation Certificate Program. Certificate students needing more information should check the CE website or contact the CE office at cemail@risd. edu. tuition: $675 m Final

Projects: Digital Video Production DVID-2577 | Blue Wade

This final projects studio is for certificate students who have successfully completed all previous levels of study for the Digital Video Production Certificate Program. Certificate students needing more information should check the CE website or contact the CE office at cemail@risd. edu. tuition: $675

Computer-Based Design

3D ComputerGenerated Imaging m AutoCAD

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INDES-2513 | David Paolino

Autodesk’s AutoCAD, a powerful computer-aided drafting (CAD) program, is the industry standard for architecture and design professionals. Through lectures, demonstrations and hands-on experience, students learn to use this visualization and productivity software to take a project from the initial design stages to a finished two-dimensional plot. Students create templates with layer, color, linetype, line weight and layouts that aid productivity as they familiarize themselves with drawing, editing, text, dimensioning, modifying, solid modeling, 3D design, and perspective and rendering tools. Additionally, students use blocks with AutoCAD’s design centers, built-in and online, and generate scale plots in model and paper space using native templates for borders and title blocks.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, HP-E, ID-R section 01 | TBA Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 9:30am – 12:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20

risd continuing education

section 02 | David Paolino Saturdays, March 6 – May 29 1 – 4pm | NO CLASS 4/24

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m Beginning

3D Modeling with Rhino

K DAYTIME DESIGN INTENSIVE

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PROD-2516 | Douglas Stern

Introduction to Revit Architecture

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Rhino is an affordable modeling application that is easy to learn and an industry standard. Its files can be exported into any program that supports surfaces or solids, or into CAD/CAM and other prototyping applications used by product designers, as well as those used for architectural design and rendering, computer animation, filmmaking and web design. Realistic renderings are generated by outputting to programs such as Maya, Flash, Photoshop and other popular software. In this course, students construct realistic models of actual objects, learning the communication language unique to 3D modeling applications as they produce the illusion of three dimensions in digital form. Note: Prior 3D modeling experience is not required. This course is taught on a Windows platform

COM-2562 | Walter Zesk

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This intensive workshop provides an opportunity for architects, engineers and contractors to stay current with advances in construction visualization technology. The latest innovation is Building Information Modeling, or BIM, a system that allows for parametric, object-based design with full reference for dynamic data change and update. Building on their existing knowledge of CAD, participants examine BIM through the lens of Autodesk’s Revit Architecture. They gain familiarity with the Revit interface while participating in a practical series of increasingly complex design exercises and leave with an appreciation for how Revit can help to increase accuracy, bolster collaboration and efficiently generate documentation.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, VE-E, WE-E

Applies to the following certificate programs (14 contact hours): AN-E, ID-E

D u T e m m w t u i a t i a s o w c i e

Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen or equivalent experience Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21 12 sessions tuition: $675 m The

ABC’s of ZBrush

ANIM-2561 | Jane Kernan

Are you a sculptor frustrated by the clumsy (virtual) reality of 3D modeling applications? For too long, the practice of digital sculpting has required the artist to wear the equivalent of boxing gloves, as he or she fought past adversarial interfaces and tightly regulated protocols. Pixologic’s ZBrush frees your hands and brings you closer to your model as you work organically with their proprietary tool, the pixol, effectively a digital ball of clay. The pixol includes dimension, lighting and color data, and allows for a computer-based model that embodies the traditional artistic values of gesture, form and proportion. Animators, illustrators and game designers stand to benefit from this gentle introduction to ZBrush as a unique sculpting tool for character creation and the construction of game assets.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-E Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 7 – 10pm | NO CLASS 4/20 12 sessions tuition: $675

12 sessions tuition: $675

Prerequisite: Experience with CAD Wednesday + Thursday, March 31 + April 1 9:30am – 4:30pm

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2 sessions tuition: $385

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Design for the Web

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K ONLINE COURSE HTML I: The Language of the Web WEB-1251 | Bruce Campbell

Understanding hypertext markup language (HTML) is essential for designers who wish to implement their creative visions online, and it is also surprisingly easy to learn. Students in this course learn the HTML attributes and commands used to create web pages, link to other files or pages, format text, integrate graphics and manage page layout. After creating their projects in HTML, students learn to upload them to a web server using file transfer protocol (FTP) software. Topics of discussion include meta-information (for helping search engines find your web site), crossplatform issues and browser compatibility. Note: Students should have Internet access and understand basic web browsing. Course material is posted weekly throughout the term, and students are expected to participate in online discussions. Students are contacted via e-mail by the instructor prior to the start date of class with detailed information.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, DI-E, PD-E, WE-R Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen March 1 – May 24 tuition: $450 Online Course

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:33:50 PM

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Design Studio with Dreamweaver

m Flash

I: Web Animation + Interactivity

WEB-2511 | Fred Spencer

WEB-2582 | Fred Spencer

Dreamweaver is one of the most widely used programs for web page creation. This powerful application allows designers to assemble graphics, text and other media in a visually friendly environment, while retaining the ability to work directly with the HTML code. Participants in this course create a web site using Dreamweaver to organize files, import elements, create layouts and edit and link pages in a number of ways. In the process, they explore methods for incorporating interactivity, animation and sound. Students discover timesaving features for reusing elements or styles and learn to integrate Dreamweaver with other web applications. The class also reviews methods for uploading and managing a site from within one easy-to-use environment.

Flash injects excitement and dynamism into a website by moving beyond the ordinary. It incorporates interactivity and sound into web pages, whether using scanned images or its extensive palette of vector drawing tools. Its animation capabilities, features for minimizing and monitoring file size, and use of streaming technology have revolutionized web design. In this course, students learn to develop an animated, interactive website with objects or text, including complex buttons, menus and special effects. Participants also become familiar with control buttons and movie clips, and are introduced to the basic elements of ActionScripting. The course concludes with discussion of distribution options for the web and CD.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, DI-E, PD-E, WE-R Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen or equivalent experience section 01 Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/21

12 sessions tuition: $675

Prerequisite: Digital Design for the Screen or equivalent experience section 01 | Fred Spencer Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 2 – 5pm | NO CLASS 4/20 section 02 | TBA Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $675

II: ActionScripting

WEB-2522 | Fred Spencer

ActionScript is the language that Flash designers use to make their Flash files more interactive, scalable and productive. In this course, students take their Flash skills to the next level by gaining a deeper understanding of ActionScript and by working with advanced features of Flash. Students learn skills specific to Flash, such as how to control the variables and properties of objects, how to create effects like looping and randomizing through ActionScript, and how to work user-interactive elements into their projects. Through hands-on assignments and demonstrations, students work with advanced animation techniques and learn database integration and multiple delivery methods for their Flash projects. Because of the advanced nature of the course, familiarity with Flash’s tools, working environment and basic actions is necessary.

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AN-R, PD-E, VE-E, WE-R Prerequisite: Flash I: Web Animation + Interactivity Thursdays, March 4 – May 27 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/22 12 sessions tuition: $675 m Cascading

Style Sheets

WEB-3528 | Fred Spencer

It has become all too easy to drown in the alphabet soup of new web authoring tools and protocols that seem to appear almost out of nowhere. Luckily, cascading style sheets (CSS) are there to save the day. As a stylistic language, CSS currently serves as an enhancement to the structural code inherent to HTML (hypertext mark-up language). But CSS is poised to become increasingly more important as HTML is replaced by the newest web option, extensible markup language (XML). This course prepares students for the forthcoming reality of working within a web environment built on an XML foundation. Participants can expect their resulting web pages to be more structurally sound even as they demonstrate the qualities that have long been associated with inspired design.

Computer-Based Design

section 02 Wednesdays, March 3 – May 26 2 – 5pm | NO CLASS 4/21

Applies to the following certificate programs (36 contact hours): AD-E, AN-R, CB-E, DI-E, NS-E, PD-E, SA-E, VE-E, WE-R

m Flash

Applies to the following certificate program: WE-R Prerequisite: Web Design Studio with Dreamweaver Tuesdays, March 2 – May 25 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/20

www.risd.edu/ce

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risd continuing education

12 sessions tuition: $675

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m XML

m Privacy

WEB-1245 | Dean Abanilla

XML – Extensible Markup Language – is currently one of the most popular industry formats for document publishing and web application development. It is an extensible and elegant solution that is being rapidly incorporated in nextgeneration document, web and eBusiness application strategies. Moreover, XML fluency is a requirement among progressive web masters, programmers, technical writers, and progressive print publishers. This class begins with the essential characteristics of an XML document and continues with students creating valid XML publications with an XML editor. Ultimately, students become acquainted with Document Type Definitions (DTDs) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Equally important, they come to understand their relevance and application to anticipated guidelines for publishing XML authored documents on the world wide web.

This seminar investigates the nature and meaning of personal privacy in our rapidly changing digital society. Through readings and class discussions, we explore the history of privacy, and the current influences that are shifting its definition. As we look at the infrastructure of the World Wide Web, we learn how our online activities are captured, logged and preserved as valuable data. Students learn to think critically about how browsing and social networking behaviors, as well as TOS (or Terms of Service), may affect ownership of personal data and other aspects of our lives – both online and off.

Applies to the following certificate program (36 contact hours): WE-E Prerequisite: HTML I: The Language of the Web

Computer-Based Design

in an Age of Data Plunder

WEB-3532 | Bruce Campbell

This final projects studio is for certificate students who have successfully completed all previous levels of study for the Web Design + Development Certificate Program. Certificate students needing more information should check the CE website or contact the CE office at cemail@risd.edu. tuition: $675

Monday + Tuesday, April 19 + 20 9:30am – 4:30pm

risd continuing education

2 sessions tuition: $385

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Prerequisites: HTML I: The Language of the Web and Cascading Style Sheets or equivalent experience with HTML and CSS

WEB-1249 | Fred Spencer

Applies to the following certificate programs (14 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, VE-E, WE-E

40

Applies to the following certificate programs (14 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, VE-E, WE-E

K DAYTIME DESIGN INTENSIVE

We have embraced the handheld; it’s undeniable that there is an eager new audience waiting for multimedia experiences that open first on their handheld device. From Blackberrys to iPhones, mobile devices are the newest blank canvas for the development of rich content. But this burgeoning platform has unique design requirements and considerations. In this course, web designers discover the key components of modern, mobile device design that include targeted, standards-based web development, and Flash Lite, which uses Adobe’s Device Central as a workflow hub and test bed. Students go on to practice published distribution methods following a model established by real-world mobile device businesses. The workshop concludes with a peek into the current marketplace and the future of ‘next-gen’ development.

WEB-2594 | Eric Paul Meier

With a mobile browser market share of more than 60 percent, and more than one billion downloaded applications, the iPhone is the hottest platform for mobile device development. This fast-moving course introduces you to the Apple iPhone, Mobile Safari and the iPhone Software Development Kit (SDK). Building on their knowledge base of objectoriented programming models, students examine and complete a Web App (HTML 5 / CSS 3 / JavaScript / touch behaviors) and build a simple, native application, using Xcode and the Cocoa Touch API. Finally, your instructor presents strategies for App Store approval, which are essential to getting your product off your screen and into the pockets of this expanding customer base. Note: While not required, Design for Mobile Devices is recommended.

3 sessions tuition: $75

12 sessions tuition: $675

Introduction to iPhone App Development WEB-1246 | Fred Spencer

Monday, Wednesday + Friday, April 19, 21 + 23 7 – 9pm

Design for Mobile Devices

Projects Studio: Web Design

Applies to the following certificate programs (6 contact hours): AD-E, AN-E, DI-E, VE-E, PD-E, WE-E

Mondays, March 1 – May 24 6:30 – 9:30pm | NO CLASS 4/19

m Final

K DAYTIME DESIGN INTENSIVE

Wednesday + Thursday, April 21 + 22 9am – 4pm 2 sessions tuition: $385

K DAYTIME DESIGN INTENSIVE

Teaching with the Web: How to Build a Learning Community COM-2823 | Bruce Campbell

Whether teaching preschoolers or adults, or any age in between, you can easily develop a whole new conceptual framework for creating vital educational activities and experiences for students by exploring the possibilities of online media. Bring to class some lessons, exercises, digital images or website addresses you love and, using Macromedia Flash, turn that “content” into interactive multimedia that will truly engage your students, enhancing both their level of interest and their level of comprehension. Participants are shown little-known sources for templates, free tools and online learning support documents. The workshop also introduces interactive applications for facilitating student-to-student and student-toteacher communication, as well as for conducting class forums. Finally, each participant leaves the workshop with an invaluable packet of information for future reference.

Applies to the following certificate programs (14 contact hours): AN-E, WE-E Thursday + Friday, April 22 + 23 10am – 5pm 2 sessions tuition: $385

Spring Registration begins January 11

12/7/09 12:34:16 PM

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garage for downtown evening parking (and daytime discounts)

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Campus Information Continuing Education Office

RISD Store 3D

20 Washington Place, Providence, RI 401 454-6200, fax: 401 454-6218

401 454-6354

The CE office is located on the first floor of 20 Washington Place (#1 on map). Hours: Monday – Thursday, 8:30am – 7:30pm (when classes are in session), 8:30am – 4:30pm (between semesters); Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm; Saturday, 8:30am – 12:30pm (when classes are in session). Student Services

Building permit cards are distributed in class and serve to identify RISD|CE students for a varity of services and discounts. Upon presentation of the card, RISD|CE students may visit The RISD Museum free of charge, apply for a discounted Library membership, make taxexempt purchases at the RISD Store and RISD Store 3D and use the RISD Rides shuttle bus. RISD Store 401 454-6464

The RISD Store is located on the main floor of the Design Center (#3 on map). Special orders, MasterCard and VISA are accepted. Call for hours.

The RISD Store 3D (formerly The Metcalf Supply Store) is located in the Bank Building (#12 on map). Special orders, MasterCard and VISA are accepted. Call for hours. Directions to the RISD Campus

From Interstate 95 North or South to Providence, take Exit 22A to Memorial Boulevard. At the fourth light, turn left onto Washington Place (which becomes Waterman Street). From Interstate 195 westbound, take the South Main Street exit. Follow South Main Street for five blocks until it intersects with College Street. You are now entering the RISD campus. Use the detail map to locate the appropriate building and nearest parking lot. Parking

For parking procedures, please consult your course confirmation statement. Tillinghast Farm

231 Nayatt Road, Barrington, RI Directions to Tillinghast Farm are sent to registered students.

www.risd.edu/ce

291923.P09_44.indd 41

risd continuing education

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Washington Place (20WP) Continuing Education Office, 1st floor Illustration Studies Building (ISB) Design Center (DC) RISD Store, Watermark Café Auditorium (AUD) The Mandle Building (15 West) Fleet Library at RISD, Portfolio Café Center for Integrative Technologies (CIT) Mason Bldg./Fletcher Bldg. (FLET) [risd]prints Bayard Ewing Building (BEB) 161 South Main (161S) Market House (MKT) College Building (CB) Bank Building (BANK) RISD Store 3D The Chace Center (RISD Museum) Metcalf Auditorium Metcalf Building (METC) Waterman Building (WATM) Carr House (CARR) The RISD Museum of Art (MUS) Memorial Building (MEM) Benson Hall (BENS) Ewing House (EWING) Public Safety Refectory (REF) The Met Dining Hall 48 Waterman (48WA) Alumni House Woods-Gerry House 187 Benefit Street (187G) What Cheer Studio (WCS)

General Information

MAP KEY 1

Sq.

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Academic Policies Academic Advising

The RISD|CE academic advisor is available to assist you with registration. For information about CE programs and especially for advice about placement in an appropriate class, please call 401 454-6200, during business hours. Confirmation + Class Location

A confirmation statement, including class location, pin number (required for some building and classroom access) and a list of special materials needed for the first class (if any), is sent by e-mail prior to the first class. If you do not receive a confirmation or you register late or within two weeks of the first day of class, you must call the CE office during business hours for verbal confirmation of location and other relevant information.

General Information

Course Changes, Cancellations + Class Postponements

RISD|CE reserves the right to cancel, reschedule or alter fees for any course, or to change the instructor, when circumstances warrant. We make every effort to notify students of cancelled classes in a timely fashion. However, in rare cases, courses are cancelled as late as the day of the first class meeting. If you enroll in a course that is cancelled, you are notified and given the option of substituting another course or receiving a full refund. For this reason, it is extremely important that we have your correct telephone numbers and e-mail addresses. Additionally, in the case of these circumstances, please note that RISD|CE is not responsible for supplies purchased prior to the start of classes or other expenses (such as travel or lodging) that may be incurred in advance. Refunds of fees take up to six weeks to process and take the form of the original payment method for the cancelled course. Inclement Weather

Check for RISD|CE class cancellation messages on local media outlets. Cancellation notices will also be posted online at www.risd.edu or call the RISD|CE office at 401 454-6200. We make every reasonable effort to reschedule classes cancelled due to inclement weather or other emergencies.

risd continuing education

Requirements + Prerequisites

Many RISD|CE programs do not have formal entrance requirements, but some advanced courses require certain coursework or equivalent experience. See specific course descriptions for details. Certificate candidates must follow the prerequisites outlined in the Certificate Program Guides, found in the Certificate Programs section of www.risd.edu/ce. Call the RISD|CE office at 401 454-6200 for a copy.

Student Conduct

Members of the RISD community, including participants in the Young Artist Program, are expected to exhibit considerate and appropriate behavior. Examples of prohibited behavior are: • disruption of learning • threats to the safety of self or others • foul or obscene gestures or language • disrespect to others • destruction of property or theft Student status is a privilege subject to certain expectations. RISD reserves the right to suspend or dismiss students at any time for conduct that RISD deems to be detrimental to the RISD community or that violates laws of the State of Rhode Island or the United States. Students with Learning or Physical Disabilities

Please call CE’s Logistics Coordinator at 401 454-6213 whenever special assistance or services may be necessary for your full participation. Reasonable and appropriate accommodations will be provided to meet your needs. RISD Library

CE students may use the Library facilities, but do not have borrowing privileges. If they would like borrowing privileges, they must become a Library member, which they can do for the discounted rate of $25 a year. Student Project Pickup

Student work is held for three weeks; thereafter, projects are discarded, including projects left in the office and those remaining from student exhibits. RISD|CE is not responsible for unclaimed projects. Grades + Transcripts A

D+

1.3

A- 3.7

D

1.0

B+ 3.3

F

0.0

B

WD Withdrawal

4.0

3.0

B- 2.7

WV Waived

C+ 2.3

N

C

P

Pass

I

Incomplete

2.0

C- 1.7

No Pass

Incomplete (I): A grade of “I” is assigned only when coursework is not completed due to extenuating circumstances, and it is given only at the request of the student and the discretion of the instructor. The time allowed for completion of work may not exceed four weeks after the end of the semester in which the course was taken. Work not completed within this period receives a final grade of “F.”

RISD|CE office or by requesting a transcript in writing (also after six weeks). Grades and transcripts are not available by phone. To order transcripts, send a check or money order for $5 per transcript (we do not accept cash or credit card payments for this service), payable to RISD|CE, along with the following information: • Name at the time of enrollment • Year and semester you were enrolled • Phone number where you can be reached • Contact name and address where you want the transcript sent Mail to

Transcripts RISD|CE Two College Street Providence, RI 02903 – 2787

Please allow 2 – 3 weeks for processing. RI Department of Education Professional Development credits may be available for some courses. Teachers seeking such credits should contact the RI Department of Education’s Office of Teacher Certification at 401 222-4600, ext. 2251. Grade Review + Change

For guidelines regarding requests for an academic grade review, please contact RISD|CE at 401 454-6200. Please note that after one semester following the completion of the course in question, grades become part of the permanent academic record and cannot be changed. Changing Your Registration Status Adding a Course You may add a course before the second class meeting. This may be done in person using a drop/add form or by fax or phone with a credit card. Tuition is not prorated for any missed classes. Withdrawing from a Course Failure to withdraw properly from a course results in a permanent grade of “F” on your record and the loss of any potential refund. Withdrawals from courses must be received in writing at the CE office by the stated deadline. Withdrawals should be addressed to Associate Director for Student Support Services RISD|CE Two College Street Providence, RI 02903 – 2787

The refund policy is detailed on page 43.

Student grades are recorded for courses meeting 18 hours or more, but grades are mailed only to certificate candidates (six weeks after classes end). Other students may get their grades in person at the

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T

S R c b m r m f C R m c

S

S b u w c S l

F

T

T d i b

F

S A m c t f s

P S a f

T s s (

C C $ c

V

V e v e t b c r


Tuition Reimbursement

Financial Aid

Students who require a letter from RISD|CE confirming completion of a course or courses in order to receive reimbursement from their employers should mail or fax to the CE office their written request for an Employee Reimbursement Letter, indicating their employer’s full address, or they should come to the CE office and fill out a request in person. RISD|CE sends Employee Reimbursement Letters directly to employers; they cannot be issued to students.

Partial financial aid may be available to students in the Certificate and Young Artist programs who demonstrate significant financial need. Awards are limited and the amounts vary based on the quantity of qualified applications received. When granted, award amounts usually offset a portion of the tuition for one course only. Occasionally, awards are granted to qualified non-certificate applicants if funds remain available. To apply, obtain a financial aid form from the RISD|CE office and return it by January 29.

Supplies + Books

Students must purchase materials or books for some courses. Supply lists are usually distributed during the first class; when necessary, a supply list for the first class is printed on course confirmations. See “Campus Information” (page 41) for locations of supply stores on campus.

Financial Information Tuition

Tuition costs are listed with each course description. To determine if you qualify for a discount, see the information below. Fees

Phone Registration Fee Students registering by phone are assessed a phone registration fee, as follows:

• If any course meets for 18 hours or more, this fee is $15. • If all courses meet for less than 18 hours each, this fee is $5. This fee is assessed once per student per semester. There is no registration fee for students registering by any other method (i.e., online, in person, by mail or fax). Certificate Fee Certificate candidates pay an additional $25 certificate fee per semester (not per course). Veterans

Senior Citizens (Ages 65+) RISD Alumni RISD Matriculated Students RISD Museum Members

Registrants in RISD|CE classes from any of the four categories above may apply a 10% discount to their tuition (rounded to the nearest dollar) for courses that meet 18 hours or more, except those involving special costs such as transportation, admittance fees, and so forth. Discounts are not transferable to family members. Also, these discounts apply only once; that is, if a senior is also an alumnus, the discount is still 10%. These discounts apply to the current semester only and are not retroactive. The discount does not apply to registration or special fees. Refunds

To obtain a refund, submit written notification of withdrawal to the Associate Director for Student Support Services in the RISD|CE office in person or by mail or fax. Refunds are based on tuition only and are calculated according to the date the notification is received in the RISD|CE office or, if mailed, according to the date of the postmark. There is a $15 processing fee for all withdrawals. Special fees are not refundable after the first class. Failure to complete a course does not constitute official withdrawal; nor does notification of withdrawal to the instructor. In some cases, an instructor may determine that a student has not successfully met prerequisites and recommend an alternative course of study. If notice of this recommended withdrawal is provided to the student in writing on the date of the first class session, the student should immediately bring that notice to the CE office to receive a full refund. Processing refunds requires at least six weeks. Refunds of MasterCard or VISA charges are credited to the account that was charged. Tuition refunds are calculated according to the following scale, minus a $15 withdrawal processing fee.

Before the first class session 100% refund

Before the second class 80% refund

Before the third class 60% refund

Before the fourth class 40% refund

Before the fifth class 20% refund

After the fifth class No refund

Courses Meeting 18 – 35 Hours: Tuition Refunds

Withdrawal notification received in the RISD| CE office or postmarked as follows: Before the first class session 100% refund

Before the second class 80% refund

Before the third class 30% refund

After the third class No refund

Courses Meeting 17 Hours or Less: Tuition Refunds 1. Courses Including Travel

Withdrawal notification received in the RISD| CE office or postmarked as follows: 10 business days before the event 100% refund 9 or fewer business days before the event No refund

2. Courses Not Including Travel

Withdrawal notification received in the RISD| CE office or postmarked as follows: 5 business days before the event 100% refund 4 or fewer business days before the event No refund

Gift Certificates

RISD|CE gift certificates are available in any denomination. Please allow two business days for processing.

*All software excluded. In addition, risd|ce students, taking courses lasting 18 hrs. or more, do not pay RI sales tax on supply purchases at the risd:store. (Present your risd|ce building permit upon purchase.)

risd continuing education

Veterans should apply directly to the Veterans Administration Regional Office to verify that their programs of study are eligible for VA benefits. A letter from the VA confirming that benefits have been approved for the student’s chosen course(s) must accompany the student’s registration form.

Discounts

Withdrawal notification received in the RISD| CE office or postmarked as follows:

General Information

Special Fees Any lab (laboratory), model, studio, materials or bus fees appear with the course description and must be paid with tuition at registration. They are nonrefundable after the first class and are not subject to discount.

Ask your employer for support in your continuing education efforts. Loans may also be available from private sources.

Courses Meeting 36 Hours: Tuition Refunds

43

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Registration

calendar SPrInG 2010

Registration opens Monday, January, 11, 2010

January 11 Registration opens January 15 RISD|CE Info Session

In Person

January 29 Spring financial aid application deadline March 1 Classes begin

Online

March 6 Pre-College Pre-View

Visit www.risd.edu/apply_ce.cfm to register online with MasterCard or VISA.

April 19 – 24 RISD|CE spring break; no classes held; offices open

By Mail

Mail your completed registration form with check (payable to RISD|CE) or MasterCard/VISA number to

May 30 Classes end

RISD|CE Two College Street Providence, RI 02903 –2787

June 8 Certificate Programs Graduation

If you receive more than one publication, please give extras to friends and neighbors. If you didn’t receive this publication through the mail, call 401 454-6200 to be placed on the RISD|CE mailing list.

SUMMer 2010

By Fax

April 26 Registration opens

Fax your completed registration form with MasterCard/VISA number to 401 454-6218 (payment by MasterCard/VISA only).

June 8 Certificate Programs Graduation

By Phone

June 14 Classes begin

General Information

Register at the RISD|CE office in the Washington Place Building, 20 Washington Place, Providence, during office hours: Monday – Thursday, 8:30am to 7:30pm (when classes are in session), 8:30am – 4:30pm (between semesters); Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm; Saturday, 8:30am – 12:30pm (when classes are in session).

July 5 No RISD|CE classes held; offices closed July 26 Classes end

Registration phone lines are limited. You may have to wait or redial before getting through, so we encourage you to register by the methods listed above. If you do choose to register by phone, please fill out the registration form in advance and have your MasterCard/VISA number ready. Note: A registration fee is assessed for registrations made by phone. Call 401 454-6200 during office hours (see “In Person,” above).

Register Promptly!

July 30 RISD|CE Info Session

Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis, so prompt registration is encouraged. Notice to People with Disabilities

Rhode Island School of Design attempts to make its classes, programs, events and services accessible. Accommodations are made for people with special needs who request assistance. If you need assistance to participate in any class, program, event or service offered at RISD, please call 401 454-6213 and speak with CE’s Logistics Coordinator.

Late registration is permitted on a space-available basis.

Course details are subject to change without notice. Computer software may be upgraded after this publication goes to press; for more up-to-date information about which version is used in a given course, please e-mail dabanill@risd.edu or call 401 454-6727.

risd:store

44

291923.P09_44.indd 44

15% off EXPIRES MARCH

*

31, 2010

see reverse for details

30 north main st. providence, ri 02903

RISD Continuing Education USPS 019-622 Volume 10, Number 4, December 2009 Issues of RISD Continuing Education are published four times a year, in April, July, October and December, by the Continuing Education Office, Rhode Island School of Design, Two College Street, Providence, Rhode Island, 02903 – 2784. Periodicals postage paid at Providence, Rhode Island.

!

risd continuing education

for all your art + design supply needs

Postmaster: Please send address changes to the Continuing Education Office, Rhode Island School of Design, Two College Street, Providence, Rhode Island 02903 – 2784.

Please note: RISD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other protected characteristic as established by law.

12/7/09 12:35:16 PM


spring 2010

R EgI ST RAT I on FoRm Rhode Island School of Design Department of Continuing Education spring 2010

o f f ic ia l u se o n ly

telephone 401 454-6200 outside local area 800 364-7473, ext. 2 www.risd.edu/ce

PLEASE wRITE YOUR REGISTRATION CODE (LOCATED AbOvE YOUR

PLEASE PRINT FULL NAME (REGISTER ONLY ONE STUDENT PER FORM. COPY THIS FORM OR REQUEST ADDITIONAL FORMS IF NECESSARY.)

NAME ON THE bACk COvER) HERE

STUDENT’S LAST NAME

DATE OF bIRTH

m FIRST

MIDDLE

HOME ADDRESS

PLEASE CIRCLE

f

MALE/FEMALE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMbER

CITY

STATE

HOME PHONE

wORk PHONE

E-MAIL ADDRESS

zIP CODE

OCCUPATION

NAME OF PARENT/GUARDIAN IF STUDENT IS A MINOR

I PREFER NOT TO RECEIvE PROMOTIONAL E-MAILS

NAME OF EMERGENCY CONTACT FOR MINORS

PLEASE TELL US HOw YOU LEARNED AbOUT RISD CONTINUING EDUCATION

TELEPHONE + E-MAIL OF EMERGENCY CONTACT FOR MINORS

FOR STATISTICAL PURPOSES ONLY, PLEASE CHECk ONE (OPTIONAL): AFRICAN AMERICAN

ASIAN

CAUCASIAN

LATINO

NATIvE AMERICAN

MULTI-ETHNIC (PLEASE SPECIFY)

courses COURSE NUMbER | SECTION NUMbER

COURSE TITLE (FIRST FIvE wORDS)

COURSE NUMbER | SECTION NUMbER

COURSE TITLE (FIRST FIvE wORDS)

COURSE NUMbER | SECTION NUMbER

COURSE TITLE (FIRST FIvE wORDS)

special fees

subtotal

$

+$

=$

$

+$

=$

$

+$

=$

tuition Discount (see page 43 for details) $

Discounts senior citizen

tuition

RisD Matriculated student

RisD Alumna/us: Year Graduated

Phone Registration fee $15 for courses meeting 18 hours or more $ $5 for courses meeting less than 18 hours $

Major

RisD Museum Member: Membership #

Exp. Date

certificate fee $25 for declared certificate candidates only $ totAl DuE $

certificate student status PLEASE CHECk ALL THAT APPLY

I am enrolling as a certificate candidate for the first time this semester, and my certificate application is attached.

if applicable

CHECk THE APPROPRIATE PROGRAM

Advertising Design

Drawing + Painting Studies

Floral Artistry Institute

Appraisal Studies in Art + Antiques

Historic Preservation (temporarily not accepting new certificate candidates)

if applicable

Children’s book Illustration Comic + Sequential Art

I am currently enrolled as a certificate candidate.

I am currently enrolled in the Floral Artistry Institute.

Interior Design

Computer Animation

Natural Science Illustration

Digital Photography

Print Design Process + Production

Digital video Production

web Design + Development

payment PAYMENT IN FULL IS REQUIRED TO REGISTER. PLEASE INDICATE FORM OF PAYMENT.

Check made payable to RISD | CE

CHARGE TO

written evidence that tuition is paid by employer, scholarship or agency

ACCOUNT NUMbER

3-DIGIT SECURITY CODE (ON bACk OF CARD)

NAME ON CARD

ExPIRATION DATE

vISA

MASTERCARD

policy agreement By registering, I agree to abide by RISD | CE ’s academic, financial, disciplinary, and other policies referenced in this catalog and on the RISD | CE website.

STUDENT SIGNATURE (IF STUDENT IS A MINOR, PARENT OR GUARDIAN MUST SIGN)

Please cut above + fax to RISD | CE

401 454-6218, or call 401 454-6200 (option #0; fees apply)

or mail to: RISD | CE, Two College Street, Providence, RI 02903

291923.C.indd 4

DATE

spring 2010 12/7/09 12:52:14 PM


continuing education

Periodicals US Postage

USPS 019-622

PAID

Rhode Island School of Design

Providence RI

Two College Street Providence RI 02903 - 2787 USA www.risd.edu/ce

S P R I N G R E G I S T R AT I O N B E G I N S

January 11

Info Session

for all RISD | CE courses and certificate programs Friday, January 15 | 5:30 – 7pm RISD Continuing Education offices

20 Washington Place | Providence Meet program planners and certificate advisors, and get information about our diverse Adult and Young Artist Program offerings. RSVP at 401 454-6200 (option #5) or e-mail cemail@risd.edu.

c

LOOkING FOR cLASSES FOR chILDREN + TEENS? RISD | CE ’s Young Artist Program offers courses, camps and family

workshops for children and young adults ages 5-17, plus seven certificate programs for young adults ages 12-17. See page 7 for more information, or visit www.risd.edu/ce to browse through the options or to request a Young Artist Program brochure.

291923.C.indd 1

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RISD Continuing Education Spring 2010 Catalog