Issuu on Google+

OFFICE OF THE STAFF JUDGE ADVOCATE UNITED STATES DIVISION - CENTER

ıron advocate MARCH 2010

Th e sta ff judg e advocate LTC IAN COREY  Dear family and friends,     What a month!  We have literally had front row seats to a major event in the history of Iraq: the 2010 national  elections.  While many were on pins and needles in the days leading up to and during the election itself, the  consensus is that election day was very successful – LTC Wells discusses this in greater detail.  People were  again apprehensive about what might happen in response to the release of the election results.  Officials re­ cently released those results.  We learned that former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi’s Iraqiya bloc of parties  narrowly edged out Prime Minister Maliki’s State of Law bloc in terms of number of seats won in the Council  of Representatives (parliament).  So far so good, however.  While Maliki and his supporters are seeking a  recount, Iraq has been quite peaceful.  Hopefully that will continue to be the case.    March also brought the rotation of our higher headquarters.  We said good­bye to COL Jeff McKitrick and his  I Corps team as they headed back to Fort Lewis, WA, and welcomed COL Stu Risch and the III Corps OSJA  from Fort Hood, TX.  Both are great organizations.  We appreciate all the support from I Corps and look forward to working with III Corps.     I’m proud to report that the Division Special Troops Battalion selected yet another of our outstanding paralegals, PFC Tamika Tutt, as hero of the  week for the fantastic work she has done in the military justice section.  In that vein, your Soldiers continue to receive kudos for their tremendous  legal support, from outstanding legal assistance to Soldiers in remote locations, to quick processing of disciplinary actions, to thorough reviews of  fund expenditures, to responsive advice to investigating officers, to insightful input on operational legal matters.    MSG Chouinard and I were finally able to visit the 1/3 Falcon legal team on the south side of Baghdad, led by MAJ Steve Ranieri and SFC Keisha  Alvarenga.  They are highly motivated and doing a great job.  Over the next few weeks we will bid farewell to the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade team as  they end their year in Iraq and return to Fort Hood.  It has been a real pleasure to work with CPT Josh Smith and SFC Gina Onesto­Person, and  their terrific organization.  Thanks for all your hard work and support.      Your Soldiers work hard, but we also make time to have some fun.  This month the Contract and Fiscal Law section planned a barbecue and volley­ ball tournament—on the one day it rained.  We still had fun with a movie night instead.    We miss you but the days continue to pass quickly—it’s hard to believe we are already closing in on 90 days.  Some Soldiers will also start taking  rest and recuperation (R&R) leave in the coming weeks for some well­deserved time off.  As always, thank you for your continued support and  encouragement.    Iron Soldiers – Army Strong!   

Next Month 

Birthdays—March 

More Articles 

 

More Photos 

SSG Danielle Lagano—21 March (Military Justice) 

Another SSG Christy      Article?  

MAJ Kevin McCarthy—27 March (Rear­D OIC) 

Desk Surfing w/ eye­pro 


MARCH 2010

PAGE 2

F ro m t h e C o m m a n d Pa r a l e g a l N C O MSG CHRISTOPHER CHOUINARD      Okay, so I have been a bit wordy for the past two articles.  But,  there is quite a bit to say.  So much information is out there that needs  to be shared with the families back home.   In a promise to the human  eating machine at the bottom of the page, I’ll keep it brief this month  so he can talk more about the food at the dining facility.   

take place in the next few  months.  Don’t be surprised if  your loved ones return a few  pounds lighter and in a bit bet­ ter shape.  There are also  plenty of educational opportu­ nities and professional devel­ opment courses that your para­ legals can take.  So, they do  keep quite busy. 

You ask, what is there to do in our down time.  Nearly all of us would  say, “What down time?”  If there is any time to ourselves most of us  focus on reading, watching movies, going to the gym or running.   Given any amount of time the MWR gives us plenty of avenues of  escape from the reality that is Iraq.  Earlier this month, LTC Corey was  able to unwind to the soothing sounds of Five Finger Death Punch.  I  Thanks again for the continued  can see you all shrugging your shoulders and furrowing your brow in a  support.   You are always in  quizzical look.  But, if it helps our fearless leader unwind, I’m all for it.    our thoughts and prayers.  There are many 5k, 10k and 20k races that have taken place and will  Iron Soldiers.  Army Strong.

F RO M T H E D E P U T Y S TA F F J U D G E A DVO C AT E LTC WARREN WELLS  March has  been a busy  month for  the USD­C  Office of the  Staff Judge  Advocate.    We began  with final  preparations  for the sec­ ond­ever  Iraqi national elections.  Election day morn­ ing dawned with the sound of explosions.   The booms woke many of us and worried us.   So many good people, Iraqi and American,  had done so much to make this event a safe 

and secure one.  Many of you watched the  reports on television.  We were all relieved  to learn that most of the explosions were  plastic bottle explosives – lots of bark, but  little bite – and their morning ignitions failed  to intimidate the people from pouring into  the polling places that afternoon.  As we  gathered for a final daily update briefing, it  was evident that the elections were a success  despite the efforts of freedom­despising  terrorists.  Everyone here knew that we had  helped Iraq at a historic moment.  Since that  time, Oplaw has been helping draft plans for  future operations designed to stabilize the  country and draw down the force; Military  Justice has been helping commanders en­ force discipline and preparing for several 

trials; Client Services has been figuring out  ways to help settle claims and traveling to  small outposts to counsel Soldiers with legal  problems; Adlaw has been helping investi­ gating officers find facts that will improve  Army and unit performance; and Contract/ Fiscal Law has been reviewing lots of con­ tracts aimed at helping the Iraqi government  provide services to its people.  Everyone is  working hard.  Every member of our team is  important.  Everyone knows that if we can  leave Iraq better than we found it, we can  leave with a legitimate hope that this nation  can flourish some day.  We appreciate your  support and prayers for us as we serve the  men and women of our Army and of Iraq.  

F ro m T h e L e g a l A d m i n i s t r ato r CW2 CRAIG PEEL      This month I would like to update you on something  but rather an article to inform the folks at home that we  that plagues us all – Coffee Snobs.  When we first ar­ rived in Iraq, the 1st Cavalry folks left us a pink coffee  pot to help us out.  The pink coffee pot was very appre­ ciated even with the many questions directed our way,  producing the standard response of “Yes, it’s pink.”  A  few weeks into the deployment however, the love for  the pink coffee pot depreciated due to the arrival of a  French Press.  The coffee pot was still used on occasion  but its usefulness was on the decline.  Then a New  Yorker (Long Islander?) showed up with a Tassimo and  the coffee pot is now collecting dust.  Sorry I digress,  this is not a tear jerking story of a forgotten coffee pot 

are caffeinated and awake enough to get the job done.   Yes, we have evolved to drinking some caffeinated  brews from the best fresh ground beans.         We continue to work long hours and remain busy.   Rest assured that we do so with a refined palate and our  pinky fingers raised.  Take pride in the fact that regard­ less of how long and lonely our days down range are  we still maintain standards at all times.  Thanks again  for all your love and support and sleep well knowing  that we won’t fall asleep on our watch. 


MARCH 2010

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF...

PAGE 3

Life on the doc floor By spc maili fuller

When you think of a deployed Army paralegal,  what comes to your mind?  A happy Soldier  typing away, enjoying the morning sun in their  quiet, clean, organized office while sipping on a  White Chocolate Mocha Double Latte from  Green Beans Coffee Shop?  Snap out of it!   Welcome to reality, the truth, the REAL Army.   This is your introduction to a paralegal’s life on  the Division Operation Center (DOC) floor.  First, enjoying the morning sun is a relative  concept.  Whether you work day shift or night  shift, your glimpse of the sun only lasts a few  precious moments, if any.  You either come to  work before sunrise or just at sunset.    Second, the DOC floor is all but a quiet, com­ fortable, easy work space.  Whether it’s the  multiple ringing of phones, the hundred individ­ ual conversations, or the dissonant keyboard  pecking, the room is constantly filled with  noise.  And there is always someone trying to  talk over the whole room.  No one however  beats what’s­his­face, the proud overhang of the  DOC floor.  With coffee cup in hand, he’s con­ stantly yelling, “What’s the status on this?!!”     Additionally, my office is no way near clean or  organized.  Imagine if you can the room I’m  about to describe.  As you walk through a set of  double doors, you are greeted by a BIG white  room.  To your right, there are three enormous  TV screens with live video feed of surrounding  areas.  The screens provide around the clock 

(24­hours) surveillance. It’s like watching a  really bad episode of the “World’s Worst Police  Car Chases” on repeat.  To your left are rows  and rows of staggered wooded workstations  filled with Soldiers working away on multiple  computers.  The staggered rows remind you of  those old bleachers from high school, except  here each level is staggered so high you cannot  see below or behind you.  Of course it’s works  perfectly for viewing the screens.  No one’s big  head in is your way.    Working on the DOC floor is not an easy job.   Professionalism is a must, and the work itself is  very tedious and involved.  It is a multi­task job  where you are the “voice” of your section.   Completing daily tasks in a timely order and  manner is challenging with constant research  projects, reports, and briefs.  While the DOC  floor is not a perfect dreamy place to work, it’s  not that bad either. Don’t get me wrong.  There  are many annoying things from the constant  ringing of phones, smell of coffee and energy  drinks, or mixed personalities of the many Sol­ diers.  But overall, working on the DOC floor is  great.  It ensures you will never have a dull day.   Working close together in one big room allows  you to meet new people and form great rela­ tionships.  It also provides a great audience for  amateur standup comics.  Being able to make  the whole room laugh is not an easy task, but  somehow someone everyday pulls it off and  keeps morale high.  I must admit, some of the 

SPC Maili Fuller  laughter is caused by OSJA.  Between SPC  Waybright’s quick­witted responses and my  now famous Star Wars Storm Trooper helmet,  every day we contribute to the smiles.   The old saying that “Your day is what you  make of it,” really sticks here.  You must come  in every day knowing that it’s going to be a  good day.  You never know what is going to  happen, from the time you arrive until seconds  before you leave.  It truly makes you think  about life and want to live it to the fullest love  your brothers and sisters in arms, and laugh  every chance you get.  Otherwise, life would be  just miserable.    And who wants that?   

AL ASAD, Paradise of iraq By SGT Geoffrey teza

they’re a rip off ($5/movie).  We  also have the usual AAFES ex­ change, carpet and jewelry shops,  and a food court, complete with  Cinnabon, Pizza Hut, Burger King,  and KFC.  These  are not what  makes Al Asad paradise though.   This base which is known for its  historic references to Abraham stop­ ping at an oasis here (a natural       Since I’ve arrived here, a lot of my time has been spent getting the  spring), is also where the Baath  word of my existence spread out around the base, and doing everything  Party tried to establish a “super”  airbase and stocked it up with a  I could to establish a base legal office in a new location months after  outdoor stadium and an indoor  the Marines’ legal office closed its doors.  With the help of CPT Sud­ deth (Chief of Client Services), the Navy Judge Advocates at the Base  Olympic­size swimming pool, all of  Command Group, and the rest of the 1AD Soldiers already on Al Asad,  which are still being used by the  I was able to get everything I needed, which then gave me the opportu­ occupants of Al Asad.  Combine all  of that with the Wi­fi and free AFN  nity to enjoy all the amenities that my new home had to offer.  in the rooms, and this is by far the       Like other bases throughout Iraq, I have a vast variety of Iraqi and  best deployment experience I’ve had to  Turkish shops, although I don’t suggest the movies to anyone since  date.         Although the title of this article may sound fairly sarcastic, it is actu­ ally not what it seems.  As this is my third deployment, and my first  with 1st AD, I’ve seen my fair share of the bases in Iraq, from large  bases such as Speicher or Victory Base Complex, to the smaller FOBs,  Patrol Bases, and safe houses, some of which were so small that that  the entire compound was within a single building.  Now, 6 years after  my first deployment, and thanks to the mission requirements of setting  up a new client services office in Al Asad, I’ve had the fortune  (although some would call it misfortune), to be stationed at Al Asad. 

SGT Geoffrey Teza 


MARCH 2010

THE “TO DO” LIST

PAGE 4

Fitness opportunities in iraq By msg Christopher chouinard

ter and 20 kilometer races.  The runs are a great  way to stay in top cardio­respiratory shape as  well as a way to pad the wardrobe with race T­ shirts.    Our fearless leader, LTC Corey, moti­ vates us all to get out and participate.   Many of our SJA fitness fanatics take advan­ tage of a “Rocky Balboa” type gym which we  call “The Iron Gym.”  The gym is stocked with  free­weights, Nautilus machines, treadmills,  stair­climbers and stationary bikes.  A cardio  room offers the opportunity to participate in  CPT Kevin “Do I look Huge?” Ley  Cross­Fit and boxing classes.  It is not uncom­ mon to find our attorneys and paralegals taking       In this little corner of the world, the primary  advantage of these facilities to “pump” them­ focus of the 1ST Armored Division Office of the  selves up, Arnold style!    CPT Ley has been  Staff Judge Advocate is to assist the Iraqi peo­ down to the supply room begging for bigger  ple to take the reins of a brand new democracy.   uniforms and pleading with the supply sergeant  With little time for anything outside of our  primary mission, it can be difficult to set aside  that the only size he can fit into is “Double  Extra­Huge.”   time to maintain our physical fitness.  Even  though most of our OSJA staff is working 12 to  18 hour days, opportunities to maintain fitness       Routinely throughout the course of this past  month, the Iron Gym conducted contests to test  present themselves on a daily basis.    the strength and endurance of anyone that was       Since our arrival in January, the Morale,  willing to answer the challenge.  Males and  Welfare and Recreation office at Camp Liberty  females alike had the opportunity to participate  has played a vital role in providing outlets for  in a bench press competition.  The males were  maintaining our fighting edge.  Throughout the  challenged to lift a collective 10,000 pounds in  course of the last three months our office has  as little time as possible and the females were  actively participated in 5 kilometer, 10 kilome­

challenged to lift a collective 5,000 pounds.         We didn’t have anyone from the office par­ ticipate, but look at the amazing improvements  that CW2 Peel has made in the past month!   Just to think, a couple months ago he would  have crumbled under this weight.       There are many different opportunities that  give each of us unique ways of getting into the  best shape of our lives.  As long as we have the  desire and initiative to meet our goals, the pro­ grams offered will provide the way.  Now get  out there and RUN!!  

CW2 Craig “The Grinch” Peel 

Education opportunities by spc Daniel waybright

      While being deployed doesn’t necessarily equate to a reduced work­ load, there still is ample time to further one’s education.   GoArmyEd  offers numerous opportunities for deployed legal folk, both Enlisted  and Officer, to advance their education via online courses.   Based on  your current level of education, however, some restrictions may apply.   One restriction to note is that Officers must incur a two year Active­ Duty Service Obligation (ADSO) after the completion of a Tuition  Assistance funded course. 

most military MOSs, and it is all online.   Not only will it increase  your base knowledge, but you can walk away with a greater under­ standing of what your fellow Soldiers are doing!    The completion of 1000 credit hours will max promotion points in the  Military Education category.  For Enlisted starting out, be aware that  completion of an entire module may soon be required before those  hours count toward promotion points.  Me 

As for me, I am taking advantage of both.  I have been racking up  correspondence course hours at an abnormal rate for promotion points,  and recently signed up for two courses (part of a five course series)  In addition to obtaining a degree, Soldiers can also become licensed.   that offer Microsoft System Administrator Certifications.   A bonus  that comes with the college courses is an iTouch  GoArmyEd offers courses that provide state education credentialing  (such as teaching, administration and supervision, or support services)  that is yours to keep after successfully complet­ to teach in the US public school system.   Best part of all – it’s open to  ing them.  With a free iTouch in the air, there  everyone.  So, for any and all aspiring to teach the Nation’s youth, here  were multiple inquiries into the certification  is your chance to get a “leg up” and start the ball rolling!  courses and restrictions on enrolling.   And the  answer:  it is open to all OSJA members!   So  Professional  what are you waiting for?  Sign up today!   Correspondence courses are a great way to expand your military  knowledge and skill set.   GoArmyEd offers various coursework for 


MARCH 2010

PAGE 5

WHAT’S NEW? LAO on the go By cpt will suddeth

Greetings from the travelers of the OSJA!  The legal assistance office  is getting in the frequent flyer miles.  A combat brigade stuck out away  from the division has many hats to wear: military justice, administra­ tive law, operational law, contract and fiscal law, and legal assistance.  Because some of the units do not have enough attorneys to meet their  mission, we at 1st Armored Division are helping fill the gaps.  

know when we might be camp­ ing out in the passenger termi­ nal, such as it is!  We have all  gotten in day trips recently or  even overnight trips (some of  them unplanned!).  One recent  Everyone in the office has gotten a chance to get away from Camp  sandstorm out west was like  Liberty and see new some places. Although a lot of the places look the  something from a movie –  same, many FOBs have their unique quality that makes them very  trees bent by the blowing  different.   wind, sand so thick you could­ Travelling can be difficult at times due to frequent sandstorms that  n’t see twenty feet in front of  blow in and shut down visibility for hours or days.  It only takes a  you, and a few moments out in  small sandstorm to slow the traveling down for a bit, so we all try to  the weather left uniform and  pack snacks, toiletries and clean clothes even for day trips. You never  face covered in reddish dust. 

CPT Will Suddeth 

Al faw palace By ssg daniele lagano

When you think of Camp Victory, the first picture that comes to  for hundreds of years.               mind for most people is the Al Faw Palace, which serves as the  Once you enter the palace, there is a huge rotunda.  The chandelier  headquarters for United States Forces­Iraq (USF­I).  On 28 February  is the focal point of the rotunda.  Being in a palace, you would expect  2010, 8 members of the legal team went on a tour of the Al Faw Palace.    that the chandelier is made of crystal, but it is actually just plastic and  We arrived at the palace and met up with our tour guide, SSG Grant,  glass.  Also in the rotunda is a chair that was given to Saddam Hussein  from Camp Victory MWR.  by Yasser Arafat.   This chair is one almost every visitor to the palace  The palace sits in the middle of one of the large lakes on Camp  has their picture taken in, and we were no exception.    Victory.  To fill this lake Saddam turned off the water to the city of  Baghdad for three days.  Once the lakes were filled, the water was  turned back on.  The water level is now maintained by a pipeline off the  Tigris River.  The first thing we got to see on our tour was the huge fish in the  lake that surrounds the palace.  The lake is filled with Tigris Salmon  and carp.   The fish swim right to the wall of the walkway, and it seems  all visitors to the palace stop to feed them, which accounts for their  From Left—Rubble behind the marble tiles in the palace, the  size.  The photo below was provided by our tour guide, it was of a  chandelier, the author and her husband in the Arafat chair  Tigris Salmon pulled from one of the lakes here on the Victory  Complex.    During the tour we learned the very interesting history of the palace  told to us by SSG Grant.  The Al Faw Palace is one of 89 palaces that  Saddam Hussein had, and is one of 8 presidential palaces used for  hunting and recreation.  Saddam visited this palace only about 6 to 8  times.  The Al Faw palace was built to commemorate the sacrifices  made by the Iraqi Army during the Iran­Iraq War in regaining the Al  Faw peninsula located in Southern Iraq.  Thousands of Iraqi soldiers  From Left—Al Faw Palace, Fish in the water, a Tigris Salmon   would die in the Al Faw Peninsula campaign.  As a result of that  victory, Saddam built this palace to honor them.  The building and  caught from the lake next to the palace  construction of the Al­Faw complex was started in 1989 and completed  Although the palace looks beautiful from a distance, when you look  just prior to Desert Storm, with much of the labor coming from the  closely, all that is fake, and the construction is definitely not solid.  The  local prisons.   Because it took only 2 years to build this palace, there  marble that you see all throughout the palace is really just a thin layer  were many shortcuts taken.  One of the shortcuts was that there was  over crumbling concrete.  When mixing concrete you need to have a  little attention paid to the proper placement of the steps.  As a result the  binding agent, that binding agent is usually sand, and here in Iraq there  steps vary in height and depth, which we all noticed as we tripped up  is no shortage of sand.  The problem with the concrete here was that  and then back down them.  there was salt in the sand that was used.  Over the past 18 years that salt  has eaten away at the reinforcing bars holding the palace up and    The tour was a great opportunity for us to learn some of the  deteriorated the concrete holding it together.  It was such a contrast to  history of this area.       see this palace falling apart after only about 18 years compared to the  palaces we have been able to see in Germany that have been standing 


BCT/REAR D SPOTLIGHT

MARCH 2010

PAGE 6

1st Air Cavalry Brigade By CPT Joshua Smith

1ST AIR CAVALRY BRIGADE LEGAL TEAM. (Left to Right) SPC Chowning, PFC Coates, SPC Edmonds, CPT Inkenbrandt, CPT  Smith, SFC Onestoperson, SPC Coleman, SPC Lee.       The Legal Section from the 1st Air Cav­ have  taken  that  concept  and  applied  it  to 

alry  Brigade  bids  all  farewell,  but  never  goodbye.    After  12  months  in  Kuwait‐Iraq  everyone  is  anxious  for  the  new  prospects  ahead  (which  hopefully  includes  a  short  respite).  Each can hold their heads up high  with the knowledge that their professional­ ism  and  dedication  resulted  in  top  quality  work.         The  Air  Cav  plans  its  missions  around  supporting the ground Soldier. If they suc­ ceed, the Air Cav succeeds. These Soldiers  (SFC  OP,  SSG  Taylor,  SPC  Lee,  SPC  Ed­ monds,  SPC  Chowning,  and  PFC  Coates) 

CPT Smith, CPT Inkenbrandt,  and SPC Edmonds 

their legal duties the entire deployment.         We  came  in  under  the  motto,  “First  Team,  Team  First”  and  have  not  shied  away from its standard.  Working diligently  to facilitate the Commander’s intent – Stan­ dards  and  Discipline  –  the  report  card  has  all  high  marks.  While  maintaining  this  motto,  these  last  few  months  of  the  fourth  quarter,  we  strive  to  remain  “Iron  Strong”  as  we  exit  leaving  this  field  of  play  in  the  capable  hands  of  the  1st  Infantry  Division  Combat Aviation Brigade. 

SPC Rachel Chowning hard at work 

SPC Chowning, SGT Squires, SFC  Onesto‐Person, SPC Edmonds,  SPC Lee, PFC Coates 

SPC Travis Lee looking up     “Re­deployment” in Webster’s 


BCT/REAR D SPOTLIGHT

MARCH 2010

PAGE 7

1/82 aab (ABN) By MAJ Steve berlin

Right—CPT  Kalin Boodman  swearing in  SGT William  Chibatto at his  reenlistment. 

SFC David Ventura, MAJ Steve Berlin, Hadaringay, CPT  Patrick Hopple, and CPT Kalin Boodman outside the  Camp Ramadi DFAC.  Hadaringay is a valued member  of the DFAC staff  

     The Devil Brigade had another exciting month.  As SFC Derrick Riley of 3/157th Field Artillery (Colorado National Guard)  finished  his  deployment,  we  began  running  a  Legal  Assistance  Office  at  Camp  Ramadi.    It  is  always  pleasure  to  help  our  Troopers.  Additionally, SGT William Chibatto chose to stay Army and reenlisted.  That leads us to our Legal Team profile.   SGT Chibatto is a native New Yorker who spent his career with 1st Brigade and has deployed twice with the Devil Team.  He  is the paralegal for the Brigade Special Troops Battalion.  He and his wife, Hannah, live in the greater Fort Bragg community.   SGT Chibatto is an avid Mets fan who also enjoys family time, jumping out of planes, weight training, Ninja Turtles and drink­ ing Yoo­Hoo.  

SGT Chibatto Choosing to Stay Army 

Studying Nomenclature in Hopes of Pursuing Jumpmaster  School 


MARCH 2010

PFC Tamika Tutt enjoying the view from the Balcony at  Al Faw palace in Baghdad, Iraq 

PHOTOS

PAGE 8

MAJ Steve Ranieri (1/3 BCT­A)(Left) re­enlists  SGT Spencer Brotherson 

OSJA Personnel take a photo with Judge Fa’eq (Center with suit and tie) , The Chief Investigative Judge for the Central  Criminal Court of Iraq  

Newly promoted SSG Lornce Applewhite ponders the  new Brigade Judge Advocate Activity Report 

SPC Elijah Willis, SPC Edward Shin, and PFC Antonio   Namwong attempt a “Wave gone wrong” 


MARCH 2010

PHOTOS

USD­C and 4/2 SBCT SJA Personnel gather for the 1AD Patching  ceremony in January 

Five Finger Death Punch performs at Camp Liberty,  Iraq as part of a USO tour 

SGT Maria��Risser assists SPC Kyle Scurlock during  simulated training in March 

PAGE 9

SFC Vernisha Mitchell working hard in the Military  Justice section at the Legal Center 

SPC Edward Shin and CW2 Craig Peel receive  packages from “Operation Grattitude” 

Justice League—Legal Center Style! 


MARCH 2010

PHOTOS

PAGE 10

From Left—MSG Christopher Chouinard, SFC Keisha Alvarenga, LTC  Ian Corey, MAJ Steve Ranieri, and SGT Spencer Brotherson at FOB  Falcon during a leadership visit to the 1/3 BCT Legal Team 

CPT Chad McFarland takes a break in a chair that  was gifted to Saddam Hussein by Yasser Arafat 

Left—SSG Lornce Applewhite promotes Sherri Walsh to  Specialist while MAJ Rob Samuelson (Center) looks on. 

LTC Lane Turner (left, DSTB Commander) presents PFC Tamika  Tutt a Certificate of Achievement for being selected as the DSTB  “Hero of The Week” as other OSJA personnel look on 

SPC Elijah Willis (left) and SGT Brad Romans at  the Legal Assistance Office 

Mr. Peel / Mr. Grinch  I don’t even know what to say about this one! 


Iron Advocate Newsletter