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www.ri.ng.mil

Rhode Island National Guard

The Ocean State Guardian Summer 2013

Adjutant General of the State of Rhode Island. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Stand-down aims at eliminating sexual assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A culture free of the scourage of sexual assault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NCO leadership – the backbone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Combined ceremonies celebrate change of command and new chiefs. . . . . . . . . 8 169th MP Company comes home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

The Governor of Rhode Island and the Captain General of the Rhode Island National Guard

Beyond the Horizon Panama 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

The Honorable Lincoln D. Chafee The Adjutant General of the State of Rhode Island and Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard

MG Kevin R. McBride Director of the Joint Staff Rhode Island National Guard

BG Charles Petrarca Deputy Adjutant General, Rhode Island National Guard

Brig. Gen. Marcus Jannitto Assistant Adjutant General for Air Rhode Island National Guard

Brig. Gen. Matthew Dzialo Managing Editor State Public Affairs Officer

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Pg. 12

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C-130J Super Hercules reaches millionth flight hour milestone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Engineers and their new excavator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Veteran Guardsmen raise $6,300 for Wounded Warrior Project at marathon. . . 18 Rhode Island National Guard ‘General’s Cup’ Hockey Tournament. . . . . . . . . . . 20 Students participate in Veterans Appreciation Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

LTC Peter Parente

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE (401) 275-4038 ngristaffpao@ng.army.mil

Public Affairs Specialists

2LT Megan Burmeister SGT Peter Ramaglia Public Affairs Office (401) 275-4038

ON THE COVER

Feedback on The OSG content, please email:

ngristaffpao@ng.army.mil

169th Military Police Company return from Afghanistan. Cover composed by Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

The Ocean State Guardian is published by MARCOA Publishing, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Rhode Island National Guard, under written contract with the Rhode Island National Guard. This Rhode Island National Guard magazine is an authorized publication for employees and military members of the Rhode Island National Guard. Contents of this publication are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the state of Rhode Island, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or the Rhode Island National Guard. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the state of Rhode

Island, DoD, the Rhode Island National Guard, or MARCOA Publishing, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. Editorial content is edited, prepared, and provided by the Office of Public Affairs, Joint Forces Headquarters – RING. All photographs and graphic devices are copyrighted to the Rhode Island National Guard unless otherwise indicated.

Summer 2013 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Adjutant General of the State of Rhode Island MG Kevin R. McBride, Adjutant General, Commanding General, Rhode Island National Guard

The Rhode Island National Guard is creating a roadmap utilizing the strategic planning process that maximizes readiness, strengthens our relationship with our strategic partners, and creates an inclusive environment for all our valued stakeholders, including our National Guard family members. In addition to strengthening external relationships, our organization continues to promote an atmosphere of well-being internally for all our service members by promoting the values of dignity, respect and honor throughout the force. The leadership of the Rhode Island National Guard recently conducted a strategic planning conference and created a plan to achieve eight primary goals utilizing specific action plans. The common thread to successfully achieving each of these goals is enhancing internal and external communication. In the near future, our organization will develop a platform through our home and Facebook pages to achieve this goal. Our major stakeholders and family members will be notified by mail and electronically, offering a line of communication designed to answer specific questions or reply to comments. In the long term, effective external communication is dependent upon effective internal communication, ensuring our service members are aware of our organization’s focus and priorities. Both forms of communication are essential and must continuously

evolve to match the increasing speed of social media. The key to any successful organization is effective communication and timely information promoted by leadership at all levels. We owe our service members and their families, who have sacrificed and served for more than 10 years of continuous war, the opportunity to excel within our organization by effectively communicating the wide variety of available tools and timely information. In the coming weeks, the leadership will begin to refine the objectives of each strategic goal. Each objective will result in an action plan that will be measureable. Some results will be immediate while others by their nature will take time, such as enhancing our external relationships. I am extremely pleased by the products and the hard work that resulted from the strategic planning process and look forward to the positive changes within our organization. Enhancing relationships and communication will lead to a better working environment for our service members. True change, however, and a healthy environment can be accomplished only if all our service members embrace the values of dignity, respect and honor. Assisting a battle buddy during a time of crisis demonstrates respect for an individual and our organization. Caring for our service members upholds our collective values and is the responsibility of everyone who wears the uniform.

on your iPad, smart phone or computer. AQP has the link that gives the user an easy to use and intuitive interface for viewing our online publications, which mirror the printed versions. They are complete with realistic page turning technology, table of contents, search capabilities, clickable links, print commands, downloadable PDFs, article/picture clipping and zoom capabilities.

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Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

LINK

online version

The well-being of our force has been challenged through many years of war, resulting in a significant rise in the suicide rate. Although the month of September has been designated as suicide awareness month, suicide prevention and awareness is a daily priority for each of us. It is everyone’s responsibility to communicate, understand the early warning signs and take action when necessary. Our Soldiers and Airmen are our most valuable resource. Our most valuable resources also deserve the respect, dignity and honor that come from their service and sacrifice. Recently in the news, however, there have been numerous articles citing acts of sexual assault within the military, calling into question ethics and leadership. LTG David Morrison, a senior officer in the Australian Army recently spoke on the issue of sexual assault and said, “The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.” Let me be extremely clear, “There is zero tolerance for sexual assault and the climate which may lead to an occurrence in the Rhode Island National Guard. Everyone that wears the uniform is responsible for our culture and climate.” Sexual assault prevention training was recently conducted throughout the state, and each level of command understands that even one incident is unacceptable. Our service members must become experts in the signs and behaviors that lead to either the tragedy of suicide or the crime of sexual assault. It is the responsibility of all of us to act without hesitation in either case. We owe it to those who continue to sacrifice, their families, and the proud citizens of our nation and state. Standards and Discipline!


Stand-down aims at eliminating sexual assault Brig. Gen. Matthew Dzialo, Assistant Adjutant General for Air, Rhode Island National Guard

On Sunday, Aug. 4, Airmen from the Rhode Island Air National Guard took a break from normal operations to focus on a very critical issue – sexual assault. The 2013 Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Stand-down was directed by the chief of the National Guard Bureau to afford commanders the opportunity to put their supporting stamp on eliminating sexual assault and to encourage new effective approaches to combating sexual assault. More than 800 Airmen gathered at the Community College of Rhode Island Hackett Theatre for an afternoon of education and dialogue. In an effort to bolster learning, Catharsis Productions, a civilian group of actors, were brought in to encourage dialogue using humor, audience interaction and dynamic theatrical media to overcome traditional defensiveness and preconception about sexual assault issues. The audience was fully engaged throughout the presentation as a new perspective challenged everyone’s thought process. Not only did I appreciate different perspectives, I caught myself laughing out loud a few times. Sexual assault is a crime of betrayal against fellow Airmen and negatively impacts both unit readiness and cohesion. Our men and women put their lives on the line every day to keep our communities and nation safe; therefore, it is our obligation to keep them safe from those who choose to attack their dignity and their honor. Let me be clear: sexual assault will not be tolerated within our ranks, and I, as the Assistant Adjutant General for Air, will do everything in my power to eliminate it from our Air Guard. All unrestricted reports of sexual assault will receive the highest levels of visibility, will be fully investigated and adjudicated with firmness. Offenders will be held appropriately accountable. Should an Airman choose to file a

restricted report, our dedicated SAPR team will spring into action to assist that Airman with making the transition from “victim” to “survivor.” Regardless of the unrestricted or restricted reporting option, reports will be treated with the utmost seriousness, and privacy will be protected by every level of leadership within our organization. Every member of the Rhode Island Air National Guard must understand that you are accountable for fostering a climate where sexist behaviors, sexual harassment and sexual assault are not tolerated, condoned or ignored. We must embrace a climate where dignity, trust and respect are cornerstones of our behavior, both on and off duty, and define how we treat one another. Each Airman must be motivated to intervene as a bystander knowing that offensive or criminal conduct is neither tolerated or condoned. We have made significant progress since 2005 when the SAPR program came into existence, but we have more work to do. In FY12, there were 3,374 reports of sexual assault within the Department of Defense involving service members. This represents a 6 percent increase over the 3,192 reports of sexual assaults received in FY11. The increased reporting does give the DoD greater opportunity to provide victim care and to ensure appropriate offender accountability. The rise in reports supports the increased confidence victims are having with unit leadership and the SAPR program. Nevertheless, any number of sexual assaults is too high. A number of resources are available to our Airmen to assist in their recovery. As mentioned, our seven-member SAPR team stands at the ready to assist when called upon. In FY12, the DoD Safe Helpline, the Department’s confidential 24/7 hotline resource for sexual assault victims, received more than 49,000

unique visitors to its website, and more than 4,600 individuals received specialized care through its online chat, telephone helpline and texting referral services. Locally, Day-One, a sexual assault and trauma resource center, provides services to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, and other violent crimes to educate the public throughout the state of Rhode Island. After more than 10 years of war, I’m extremely proud of your devotion to duty and accomplishments. I will not stand idly by to watch those great accomplishments diminished by the scourge of sexual assault. I’m honored to be your Rhode Island Assistant Adjutant General for Air and am confident that, together, we will rid our military of sexual assault while providing the necessary victim care to those affected.

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A culture free of the scourage of sexual assault BG Charles E. Petrarca Jr., Assistant Adjutant General for Army, Rhode Island National Guard

The summer’s weather has been great; I hope you and your families are enjoying a safe and happy season. Each year the end of the summer season begins a period of transition for our military families and our organization. It is a time when individuals, families and organizations reflect on goals and objectives, as we spend time away from the daily stresses of work and day-today activities. The Rhode Island National Guard and our military have also established a set of goals and priorities to ensure we remain the world’s premier fighting force, by caring for our most valuable resource – our service members. To achieve this goal, I would like to take this moment to address what has been termed, “the priority” for our nation’s military: dealing with sexual assault. Sexual assault within the military has grabbed the headlines on a weekly basis this summer, attacking our core “Sexual assault is a crime ... a persistent problem that violates everything we stand for. We must do everything we can do to protect our men and women from sexual assault, and those who would attack their dignity and their honor.”

– GEN Frank J. Grass, National Guard Bureau

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principles and values. The earned trust built through sacrifice and service since the formation of our nation between our military and its citizens has now been called into question. It is an issue that must be dealt with at all levels and by everyone who wears the uniform. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel recently said, “We own it ... we’ll solve it ... together. Creating a culture free of the scourge of sexual assault requires establishing an ­environment where dignity and respect is afforded to all, and where diversity is celebrated as one of the greatest assets of our force.” To highlight the critical nature of this issue, the Rhode Island National Guard recently trained our leaders responsible for sexual assault prevention and response, as well as the 3,000 members of our organization. Our organization is committed to our service members and their families, to eliminate the crime of sexual assault, to support victims, and to intervene when appropriate to help stop unsafe behavior. Command climate is the key to eradicating the roots of behavior that may lead to sexual assault. Every day our service members, regardless of status or duty station, must work in an environment that does not tolerate or ignore sexist behavior, sexual

Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

harassment, or sexual assault. These have no place in the United States military and violate everything we stand for and the values we defend. GEN Frank J. Grass, chief, National Guard Bureau, said, “Sexual assault is a crime ... a persistent problem that violates everything we stand for. We must do everything we can do to protect our men and women from sexual assault, and those who would attack their dignity and their honor.” Our nation and state know all too well from 12 years of war, that our men and women put their lives on the line every day to try to keep their communities and our nation safe. Collectively, we have a moral obligation to keep them safe from those who would attack their dignity, honor and well-being. It is every supervisor’s responsibility in the chain of command to ensure that all Soldiers, Airmen and civilians in our organization feel safe, supported and nurtured where they work. They also must feel comfortable with the process should an issue ever arise. All service members must be confident that their leadership, victim advocates and peers will treat any incident of sexual assault as a violation not only of the victim, but the entire organization. In the event of an assault, each service member must feel confident that the leadership will take all appropriate measures and maintain the level of confidentiality agreed upon. Every person associated with the Rhode Island National Guard should feel that they are treated with dignity and respect; anything less is unacceptable. Enjoy the remainder of the summer, take a moment to reflect on our core values, and let us keep our deployed service members and their families in our thoughts.


NCO leadership – the backbone CSM Michael Lewis and CCMSgt Michael Brady, Rhode Island National Guard

The backbone of the United States Military is the noncommissioned officer. We trace our lineage back to the Continental Army in 1775. (http://www. armystudyguide.com/imagesvr_ce/1203/ a-short-history-of-the-us.pdf). One hallmark of the noncommissioned officer in both the Army and Air National Guard is the ability to focus simultaneously on mission accomplishment and the welfare of our Soldiers and Airmen. Two years ago, the Army National Guard incorporated the National Guard Automated Board System into the Enlisted Promotion System. This transition caused some confusion, the biggest misconception being that we evaluate our Soldiers using a new process. The way in which Soldiers are evaluated for promotion has not changed, only the tool used to do so. We continue to evaluate our Soldiers using the Whole Soldier concept, taking into consideration Job Performance, Experience, Dedication, Leadership, Professional Development, Physical Fitness, Assignment History and Potential. The NGABS tool is described in the Guide to NCO Promotion Board Voting, which can be found on the RING Portal, J1 Personnel, Enlisted Personnel Management Page. Leaders at all levels must familiarize themselves with the program and educate our force to ensure a better understanding of the process. Of significant import, and effective with the FY14 promotion cycle, is the inclusion of Structured Self-Develop­ment as a requirement for consideration and/ or selection for promotion. Soldiers must complete the required SSD Training commensurate with their grade or rank. The Air National Guard this year has implemented the use of the Enlisted Performance Reports for all Airmen. This is similar to the Army’s NGABS as

CSM Michael Lewis

it allows supervisors to rate their Airmen and most importantly provide formal feedback to our Airmen that will assist them in their continued deliberate ­development as professional Airmen. The ANG needs to look to their Force Support Squadron for support and training as needed. As Army and Air NCOs, our responsibilities are clear and well defined. It is our duty to take care of our Airmen and Soldiers and to complete the missions. The NGABS and EPR are just two tools that help us accomplish both these tasks. From the Army NCO Creed: Competence is my watchword. My two basic responsibilities will always be

CCMSgt Michael Brady

uppermost in my mind – accomplishment of my mission and the welfare of my Soldiers. From the Airman’s Creed: I am an American Airman. Wingman, Leader, Warrior. I will never leave an Airman behind; I will never falter; and I will not fail. The Rhode Island Army and Air National Guard are amazing organizations. Every day our Soldiers and Airmen are doing great deeds in our state, nation, and across the globe. We are a world-class organization. We are proud to serve with each of you.

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Combined ceremonies celebrate

CHANGE OF COMMAND AND NEW CHIEFS By MSgt. Janeen Miller, 143rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Col Arthur Floru, 143rd Airlift Wing commander, addresses the Airmen of the 143rd AW during a combined ceremony celebrating a change of command for the 143rd Mission Support Group, an assumption of command for the 143rd Communications Flight and the promotion of four chief master sergeants. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

Col John Reed, outgoing commander of the 143rd Mission Support Group, relinquishes command to Col Floru. Lt Col Anthony Hamel will assume command of the group. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

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Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

Members of the 143rd Airlift Wing, family and friends gathered in the maintenance hangar at Quonset Air National Guard Base on June 29 to witness three important ceremonies: A change of command of the Mission Support Group, the largest group in the 143rd Airlift Wing, an assumption of command of the Communications Flight, and the induction of four new chief master sergeants, the highest achievable enlisted rank in the Air Force. The first of the three ceremonies was the change of command of the 143rd Mission Support Group. Lt Col Anthony Hamel, formerly the commander of the 143rd Security Forces Squadron, assumed command from Col John

Lt Col Anthony Hamel, incoming commander of the 143rd Mission Support Group addresses the troops following his change of command ceremony. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long


Reed. Hamel challenged the men and women of the Mission Support Group to be better than they already are and to continuously strive for excellence in all they do. He went on to thank his wife and children who just made it to the ceremony due to a delayed flight! During a second ceremony, Capt Charlene Marshall, formerly of the 102nd Network Warfare Squadron, assumed command of the 143rd Communications Flight. Marshall thanked Wing Commander Col Arthur Floru for the opportunity to lead the Communications Flight. She gave a short address to her Airmen about core values and the team approach. “As the leader of this fine organization, I am driven by the Air Force Core Values of Integrity, Service and Excellence. These core values are the cornerstone of our great Air Force, the Air National Guard and our flight. We will always conduct ourselves as professional warriors ready to answer the call of duty to support our great nation. We will do what it takes to ensure that we maintain our edge in overall readiness and training, and we will never compromise our integrity,� Marshall said.

Capt Charlene Marshall, incoming commander of the 143rd Communications Flight addresses her troops following her assumption of command ceremony. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

Capt Charlene Marshall assumes command of the 143rd Communications Flight by accepting the guidon from Lt Col Anthony Hamel, commander, 143rd Mission Support Group. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

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CMSgt Jose Baltazar, command chief of the 143rd Airlift Wing, administers the chief’s oath to incoming chief master sergeants (L-R) Daniel Mucci, 143rd Civil Engineering Squadron; Sean Ballard, 143rd Airlift Squadron; Richard Ball, 143rd Logistics Readiness Squadron; and Patrick Cavanaugh, 143rd Logistics Readiness Squadron. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Richard Ball walks through the “gauntlet” of chiefs after being pinned chief. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Sean Ballard walks through the “gauntlet” of chiefs after being pinned chief. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Patrick Cavanaugh walks through the “gauntlet” of Chiefs after being pinned Chief. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Daniel Mucci walks through the “gauntlet” of chiefs after being pinned chief. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

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Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

The final ceremony celebrated the promotion of four Airmen in the 143rd Airlift Wing to the rank of chief master sergeant. Promoted were Chief Master Sergeants Patrick Cavanaugh of the 143rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, Richard Ball of the 143rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, Sean Ballard of the 143rd Airlift Squadron and Daniel Mucci of the 143rd Civil Engineering Squadron. Chief promotion ceremonies are a time-honored military tradition. The ceremony stresses the importance of the enlisted leader. We deem it appropriate to give special recognition to these individuals selected to the highest enlisted grade. From the beginning of organized military life, certain men and women, because of their leadership, dedication to duty, professionalism and other qualities, were selected to be noncommissioned officer leaders. Those in the forefront became the senior NCOs of today. Two percent of these hold the highest enlisted grade. Their achievements have been identified, their strengths tested, and they have proved themselves capable of carrying the banner for the enlisted force. These NCOs have earned the right to join the chief master sergeant corps. This promotion is not a gift; it is the result of hard work, loyal service to our state and country, enormous sacrifice from them and their families, and of course, distinctive accomplishments. Our Air National Guard is a young service, but the responsibility of the chief master sergeant is clearly defined and dignified by those who have discharged it with honor since the first chief chevron was sewn on the uniform in 1959. This places the Air Guard chief in the unique position of inheriting a tradition while setting new ones. The ceremony clearly demonstrates a commonality of purpose among enlisted leadership and demonstrates that chiefs will work together to achieve common goals: protecting our nation and way of life – taking care of our people – and fully supporting and enhancing our proven tradition of personal dedication and unified achievement.


Each promotion within the enlisted grades is a significant step in a Guard career. With advancement up the

pyramid, each promotion becomes more difficult, but also more rewarding. With fewer than 2 percent in the top

CMSgt Richard Ball poses with his family following his promotion to chief master sergeant. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

enlisted grade in the Guard, these new chiefs can be justifiably proud of their achievement.

CMSgt Sean Ballard poses with his family following his promotion to chief master sergeant. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Daniel Mucci poses with his family following his promotion to chief master sergeant. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

CMSgt Patrick Cavanaugh thanks his family following his promotion to chief master sergeant. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

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169th

MP Company comes home Story and photos by Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

The 169th Military Police Company of the Rhode Island Nation Guard, Warren, R.I., returned June 15 to the Quonset Air National Guard Base after a 10-month ­deployment. Waiting for the MPs’ arrival, just off the flight line, were friends and family that gathered by the hundreds. With arms waving, home-made banners flying and flag bearers lining both sides of a red carpet, the plane carrying the 169th touched down to a massive outburst of cheers.

Spc. Brandon O’Sullivan hugs friends and family who gathered to welcome him home on June 15.

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Sgt. Joseph Felix celebrates his return to Rhode Island on June 15 after a 10-month deployment to Afghanistan.

A Soldier hugs a loved one upon arriving at Quonset Air National Guard Base after serving in Afghanistan for a 10-month deployment.


It had been 10 months since these Soldiers had last seen their loved ones, and the wait was finally over. On Aug. 10, 2012, Soldiers from the 169th MP Company deployed to conduct missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and were responsible for the force protection of mission-critical personnel, equipment and facilities in support of a joint task force in several locations throughout the theater of operations. After completing their initial individual and unit training at Camp Shelby, Miss., the 169th deployed to Afghanistan on Sept. 18, 2012. During the 10-month deployment, 140 unit members were assigned to the unit Headquarters in Kandahar and to the Regional Commands Central, East and South. At each location, the unit was responsible for the plans, design and oversight of building up the infrastructure of assigned locations in order to reinforce defenses of enduring bases. On Dec. 2, 2012, one of the forward operating bases was the target of an enemy complex attack involving two vehicleborne improvised explosive devices and insurgent forces armed with rocket-propelled grenades and small arms. Members of our unit helped to successfully repel the attack. SGT Quinn Rogan, SSG Michael Church, SSG Steven Moretti and SGT Carlos Zapata received recognition for their actions during the attack. The 169th MP Company performed exceptionally well, and the higher command commended the company at all three locations for its service, professionalism and for consistently exceeding expectations.

Spc. Zachary Mason poses with his father and fellow Rhode Island Guardsman, Staff Sgt. William Mason, upon returning from Afghanistan.

Jack greets his owner, Spc. Dave Schecher, at Quonset after Schecher returned from deployment to Afghanistan.

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Beyond the Horizon

Panama 2013 Story and photos by Air Force Master Sgt. John V. ­McDonald, 143rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs

“Jump back, what’s that sound? Panama, Panama!” may be the words you’d hum if you’re over 30 years of age. Van Halen’s hit song from the eighties, the Panama Canal and malaria may come to mind when you mention Panama, but Operation Beyond the Horizon 2013 in the Republic of Panama gives new meaning to the name. BTH is a chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff-directed, U.S. Southern Command-sponsored joint and combined field training/humanitarian exercise in which troops specializing in engineering, construction and health care provide much-needed services to communities in need while receiving valuable deployment training and building important relationships between partner nations. The Rhode Island Army and Air National Guard sent individuals on three of four two-week rotations to Panama during this joint venture from April 17 to June 22. A collection 14

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of Soldiers and Airmen during their annual training provided altruistic services. Construction and civic action programs were designed to assist in providing local communities with a wide range of construction projects. U.S. Army Engineering Company troops and U.S. Air Force Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational Repair Squadron Engineers – RED HORSE – operate as a joint task force working in the new “Purple” synergy. Purple symbolizes “joint.” If you combine Army green, Air Force blue, Marine red, and Navy blue, you get purple or “All Services.” In a special message to Congress in 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower said, “Separate ground, sea and air warfare is gone forever. If ever again we should be involved in war, we will fight it in all elements, with all services, as one single concentrated effort.”


Construction projects included building repairs and improvements, utility system repairs, additions and technical assistance. Jacinta Vargas, local resident in Escobol, Panama, who volunteered her cooking services for a nominal charge to Soldiers and Airmen, stands with her daughter Maria Ceden, near the Escobar Middle School where the 409th and 244th U.S. Army Engineering Company built an enclosed basketball court. “It’s a good thing for the kids, so they can play,” said Vargas. The Soldiers were so appreciative for the home meals, they repaired Vargas’ concrete floor with leftover materials. The Soldiers refused to take any free meals for their services. U.S. military health care professionals conducted multiple Medical Readiness Training Exercises – MEDRETEs – in various parts of the country, working with host nation medical personnel to provide general and specialized medical/dental services to thousands of locals requiring care. These services included public health and preventive medicine, dental care, adult and pediatric medicine, medical education, ­immunizations and nutritional counseling. The exercises also included veterinary care, a vital service that ensures the health of valuable food sources and prevention of diseases that could be passed from animals and livestock to the population. “Literally life-changing and in some cases life-saving services to the people of Panama,” said MG David

J. Conboy, command general of the 416th, Theater Engineer Command, during his visit in Yaviza, Provincia De Darien, Panama. The training events enhance the medical readiness training of U.S. forces as well as provide sustained health benefits to the population. Additionally, the relationships forged during these exercises can be called upon in the event of a regional situation that requires a cooperative response. Operation Beyond The Horizon 2013 Panama was a three-month-long undertaking from April 17 to June 22 in which U.S. Soldiers and Airmen trained in a broad range of specialties while part of the U.S. Southern Command’s largest annual humanitarian/civic assistance mission in Latin America. Army South has planned and conducted BTHs since 2008 in multiple countries such as the Dominican Republic, Guatemala and Honduras. The next exercise is ­scheduled in the Dominican Republic and Guatemala in 2014. Each BTH typically involves and trains about 1,400 U.S. service members and 150 host-nation personnel.

U.S. Army Engineers work to repair a damaged soccer field and basketball court in Panama during Beyond the Horizon 2013 – Panama.

A U.S. Army Medical Soldier observes a Panamanian national receiving dental care during Beyond the Horizon 2013 – Panama.

U.S. Army Medical Soldiers speak with a local Panamanian mother about the care received in Panama during Beyond the Horizon 2013 – Panama.

A U.S. Army Soldier tends to a wounded Panamanian dog during Beyond the Horizon 2013 – Panama.

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C-130J Super Hercules reaches millionth flight hour ­milestone – 143rd Airlift Wing recognized for contribution By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Arthur DesLauriers, 143rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Members of the 143rd Airlift Wing along with U.S. Sen. Jack Reed; Maj Gen Kevin McBride, Adjutant General, Rhode Island National Guard; Col Arthur Floru, commander, 143rd Airlift Wing; former wing commander, retired Col Larry Gallogly and several distinguished retirees celebrated the one million flight hour milestone of the C-130J Super Hercules in a ceremony June 28 at Quonset Air National Guard Base, North Kingston, R.I. The C-130J is the standard by which all other airlift is measured in terms of availability, flexibility and reliability. C-130Js currently are deployed in two combat theaters and are operating at a very high tempo efficiently and reliably. In noncombat – but equally harsh environments – C-130Js are often the first to support humanitarian missions such as search and rescue, aerial

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Ray Fayjay, Lockheed Martin director of U.S. government air mobility business development, presents Col Arthur Floru, commander, 143rd Airlift Wing, with a limited edition coin commemorating the 143rd’s contribution to the C-130J Super Hercules’ first million hours of flight. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason Long

firefighting in the U.S., and delivering relief supplies after earthquakes, hurricanes, typhoons and tsunamis around the world. “This is another great day; it’s another validation ceremony at home to show and represent true champions and 20 years of the full evolution cycle,” said Floru, referring to the 20 years it has been since the 143rd first decided to pursue the next generation of the C-130 Hercules, the C-130J. Upon presenting Floru with the first million mile coin, from the limited edition production, Ray Fayjay, Lockheed Martin’s director of U.S. government air mobility business development, said that presenting the 143rd with the first coin was by design, because there were several notable firsts for the C-130J model which were completed by the 143rd. He listed some of those firsts: First USAF C-130J Cargo Mission to Europe, First USAF Stretch Assault Qualifications C-130J, First AMC Stretch C-130J Dirt Landing and most notably the First USAF/ANG Deployment of the C-130J to Southwest Asia and First C-130J Combat Mission and Combat Air Drop.

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Former wing commander Gallogly, Lockheed Martin’s director of USAF mobility program, said, “While managing units in the U.S., no doubt Rhode Island is leading the charge.” In closing, Fajay thanked the men and women of the 143rd for all they do saying,” the employees at Lockheed Martin salute you.” He further extended a personal thank you to the members of the 143rd Airlift Wing for their dedication and service. Fifteen countries have chosen the C-130J as their airlift of preference. The one million hours were an accumulation of hours logged through numerous combat, special operations and humanitarian missions. The first flight of a C-130J was on April 5, 1996, with the millionth flight hour logged at the end of April 2013. “Since 1975, the C-130 has been a Rhode Island Air National Guard staple, and along with our people, has established the 143rd as a C-130J center of excellence,” Floru said. Since 2001, the men and women of the 143rd Airlift Wing have contributed more than 28,000 flight hours toward this achievement.


Engineers and their new excavator By Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

The 861st Engineer Company has been completing their missions using a new excavator. The high mobility engineer excavator type I, HMEE-I, is a backhoe loader that can carry a two-man crew and was specifically developed to replace the small emplacement excavator, commonly known as the “SEE truck.” Fielded in 2011, six HMEE-Is came to the 861st who have used them in training as well as a couple of real-world events. The first real test of the HMEE-Is came in July 2012 during Vigilant Guard Rhode Island, a training exercise simulating a catastrophic category 5 hurricane directly impacting the Ocean State. The excavators were used at a rubble pile which simulated a building collapse. With the engineers moving large chunks of concrete, rescue crews could recover simulated casualties. Later in October, Hurricane Sandy ripped through the northeast, and the engineers training on the HMEE-Is were put to the test. While operating the HMEE-Is, members of the 861st cleared roadways to let emergency personnel reach all areas of the state. The engineers also assisted the national grid by clearing debris so crews could work to restore power to areas affected by the storm. In February 2013, the excavators played a major role in clearing snow from roadways in Rhode Island and Connecticut during Winter Storm Nemo. “We drove the HMEEs to Connecticut,” said CPT John Saporita, former commander of the 861st Engineer Company.

A high mobility engineer excavator type I (HMEE-I) being operated by a member of the 861st Engineer Company, Rhode Island National Guard, removes snow from a state building’s parking lot in the aftermath of Winter Storm Nemo in February 2013.

“The HMEE is versatile and can reach speeds of 56 mph on the highway, allowing us to respond anywhere in the tri-state area.” The HMEE-I has a heated and air conditioned cab so operators can complete their mission comfortably in various weather conditions. The excavator also has a chain saw attachment that was instrumental in the removal of fallen trees and telephone poles. “There is no doubt that the HMEE is built better than the SEE Truck,” said Saporita. “The HMEE makes the mission of the 861st a lot easier.”

Summer 2013 / Rhode Island National Guard

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From left, standing: SPC Alex Simmons, SSGT Lucas Simmons, SGT Justin Santoro, SGT Rob Johnson, SPC Nick Lapham. From left, kneeling: CPT Aaron Rozovsky, SGT Sterling Shearer, SPC John Montoya, SGT Josh Tisoskey pose for a photo before participating in the Boston Marathon.

Veteran Guardsmen raise $6,300 for Wounded Warrior Project at marathon By Sandy Phaneuf, Valley Breeze Staff Writer, www.valleybreeze.com

Like many who ran in the Boston Marathon April 15, brothers Lucas and Alex Simmons were using the annual 26.2 mile road race to raise money for a cause. The brothers were two of 11 Rhode Island National Guard veterans to complete the course while weighed down with 40-pound rucksacks and wearing combat gear. In just six weeks, the group had raised $6,300 for the Wounded Warrior Project in honor of Sgt. James Dube. The Wounded Warrior Project is a nonprofit organization founded a decade ago to help injured veterans. High school friends, Dube and Lucas Simmons grew up in North Smithfield just one street apart, joining the service together after graduation. They had served in Iraq together in 2005, and had been home safe for less than a year when tragedy struck. In 2006, at age 21, 18

Dube died in a car accident in front of the Simmons’ home. Through the ruck march, which the brothers completed along with other Soldiers who had served with Dube, the veteran team raised awareness about the Wounded Warrior Project and funding for others who have served in war. “They’re an organization that helps retired military, and they’re there for guys when they need them,” said 27-year-old Lucas. “It’s just the right thing to do to help them out.” While most participants in the Boston Marathon wear running shoes and lightweight gear, the group did a ruck march for the entire 26 miles in their fatigues, complete with military boots, holding an American flag. At the finish line, the flag was presented to Dube’s mother. Unfortunately, the marathon, a beloved Patriot’s Day tradition that draws

Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

hundreds of thousands of racers and spectators to Boston each year, ended in tragedy. At 2:50 p.m., just three hours after the winners had crossed the finish line, two bombs detonated on Boylston Street, killing three people and injuring 282 others. The Simmonses and their group had just left the scene, and were pulling out of a parking space just a block away, when they heard the explosion. “Right as we were pulling out of our spot was when the first one went off,” said Lucas. But unlike many of the thousands of onlookers and victims who were unsure what had caused the explosion, the 11 veterans had heard the sound before. “We recognized right away what it was,” Lucas said.


The group continued driving and was able to quickly make their way out of the city. “We all knew we were too far from the scene to help, and the best thing to do was get out of there and keep everyone safe,” Lucas said.

It was the first marathon for the veteran brothers and despite the hardships of the experience, Lucas said it won’t be his last. He hopes to take part in the Boston event next year, again in honor of his lost friend. This year, the crew exceeded their

fundraising goal of $5,000 in a short time with the help of social media, word of mouth and flyers. Next year, they hope to be even more successful. To learn more about the Wounded Warrior project visit www.wounded warriorproject.org.

With the American flag waving, five of the 11 Rhode Island National Guard Soldiers make their way down Boylston Street toward the finish line.

Five of the 11 Rhode Island National Guard Soldiers finish the Boston Marathon in honor of SGT James Dube.

Summer 2013 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Rhode Island National Guard

‘General’s Cup’ Hockey Tournament

Air takes Army 6-5 in double shootout!

Story and photos by Air Force Master Sgt. Janeen Miller, 143rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs

On a drizzly, unseasonably cold Saturday afternoon of Memorial Day weekend, members of the Rhode Island Army and Air National Guard suited up in their hockey gear for a riveting competition. The General’s Cup, a charity game played annually, this year via Homes for Our Troops was to benefit

United States Marine Corps CPL Kevin Dubois, a native of Lincoln, R.I., who was wounded in battle. The teams were composed of members of the Rhode Island Army and Air National Guard, ranging from members of the student flight to 30-year-plus veterans. Team members left their rank on the bench and took to the ice. Dubois dropped the puck at center ice, and the game was ON! The game was tight throughout all three periods. The Air Guard, trailing by one goal, tied it up minutes before the final buzzer of regulation play. Due to time constraints, the teams were forced to a shootout to determine the winner. However, at the end of the first five player shootouts, the game was still tied. Maj James Couture, a pilot from the 143rd Airlift Squadron and the Air Guard goaltender, stopped the last Army Guard team member from scoring, and the cup went back to the blue! Team members from both sides of the line were very grateful for the outstanding turnout of family and friends from both services. The stands were full, and at the end of the day the game was all about good, clean fun, charity and maybe a little bit of rivalry between Family and friends of the Rhode Island Air National Guard Game officials pose with United States Marine Corps Corporal Kevin Dubois the services. before the game.

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Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

hockey team.


The Air Guard Team poses for a championship photo after winning the Annual General’s Cup Hockey Tournament 6-5.

The Army National Guard team lines up for the playing of our national anthem prior to the game.

Summer 2013 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Students participate in Veterans Appreciation Day

Students from middle and high schools throughout Rhode Island gathered together for Veteran’s Appreciation Day in the 143rd Airlift Wing maintenance hangar at Quonset Air National Guard Base. Photo by Master Sgt. Janeen Miller

By Air Force Master Sgt. Janeen Miller, 143rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs

More than 650 middle school and high school students from across Rhode Island came to Quonset Air National Guard Base for Veterans Appreciation Day, May 23. The event, in the main­ tenance hangar and on a portion of the flight line, gave students an opportunity to speak with veterans of World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, Operation Desert Storm, the Cold War, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom, and learn about their experiences and sacrifices. The students also heard speeches from three veterans: a World War II Soldier who told of his experience on D-day, a Vietnam veteran, and a Special Forces Soldier wounded in Operation Iraqi Freedom. In addition to the opportunity to meet and speak to the veterans in the hangar, the students were treated to static displays and hands-on displays by members of the Rhode Island Air and Army National Guard. Soldiers and Airmen encouraged the students to see, learn about and touch some of the equipment used to perform the mission. The students in attendance were also participating in an essay contest. After 22

Ocean State Guardian / Summer 2013

Students interview veterans for an essay contest entitled, “What Military Service Means to Me” during Veteran’s Appreciation Day at Quonset Air National Guard Base. Photo by Master Sgt. Janeen Miller

conducting interviews with the veterans in attendance, the students were asked to write essays entitled “What Military Service Means to Me.” The schools with the best essays were to be awarded $1,500 from the Suzanne M. Henseler Foundation which they will then be able to donate to a veteran’s charitable organization of their choice. Winners were unknown at the time of publication. The men and women of the Rhode Island National Guard were grateful for this opportunity to open the gates to the students. With the absence of the Open House Air Show and Leapfest because of budget cuts, this event was a great opportunity to still be able to reach out to the public and our potential future Soldiers and Airmen.


Ocean State Guardian - Summer 2013  

Ocean State Guardian Summer 2013

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