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www.ri.ng.mil

Rhode Island National Guard

The Ocean State Guardian

Words of farewell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Spring 2012

Future Force Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Back to basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Brig. Gen. Brian Goodwin set to retire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RINGRA completes Guard memorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

The Governor of Rhode Island and the Captain General of the Rhode Island National Guard

Drill Sergeant Barbeiro – Rhode Island’s first . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

The Honorable Lincoln D. Chafee The Adjutant General of the State of Rhode Island and Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard

Maj. Gen. Kevin McBride Assistant Adjutant General for Army and Deputy Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard

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Brig. Gen. Brian W. Goodwin

Four Rhode Island Air National Guard members to receive awards for heroism, meritorious service in Afghanistan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Commander, Joint Force Headquarters, Rhode Island National Guard

182nd deployed to Afghanistan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Brig. Gen. Marcus Jannitto

Strength at Home: programs fact sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Assistant Adjutant General for Air Rhode Island National Guard

Accomplishing the mission through versatility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Brig. Gen. Paul L. Ayers Managing Editor State Public Affairs Officer

Lt. Col. Denis Riel

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Hero 2 Hired helps job hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE • (401) 275-4038 • ngristaffpao@ng.army.mil

Public Affairs Specialists

Sgt. Megan Burmeister Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

ON THE COVER

Public Affairs Office (401) 275-4038

Drill Sergeant Barbeiro Cover photo by Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

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The Ocean State Guardian is published by AQP Publishing, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the Rhode Island National Guard, under written contract with the Rhode Island National Guard. This Rhode Island National Guard magazine is an authorized publication for employees and military members of the Rhode Island National Guard. Contents of this publication are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the state of Rhode Island, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or the Rhode Island National Guard. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the state of Rhode

Island, DoD, the Rhode Island National Guard, or AQP Publishing, Inc. of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. Editorial content is edited, prepared, and provided by the Office of Public Affairs, Joint Forces Headquarters – RING. All photographs and graphic devices are copyrighted to the Rhode Island National Guard unless otherwise indicated.

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Words of farewell As I write this, it is extremely difficult for me to put into words the feelings and respect that I have for the men and women of the Rhode Island National Guard, Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency, state employees, and Rhode Island’s Historic Militia. As I reflect back on my 40-year career in the Rhode Island National Guard, I have witnessed a tremendous transformation that has seen the Guard grow into a highly professional, proficient, relevant and reliable force. When I joined the Rhode Island National Guard in 1972, some personnel wore wigs to hide their long hair; weekend drills were mostly card games, soccer or baseball; and annual training periods were 15 days of work during the day and parties at night. As we moved from a strategic reserve to an operational force, the changes were dramatic and challenging. The equipment we were operating was antiquated and not operationally sound, creating a huge void between the active component and the Guard. These discrepancies became extremely evident during deployments in support of Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Following these deployments, it was recognized that the Guard needed to modernize if it was expected to support its active counterparts in future conflicts. We have moved into a joint environment further ensuring our relevancy in operational planning and support. The education and training of our personnel has increased tremendously, ensuring that everyone is well prepared to handle any and all contingencies that may arise. On Sept. 11, 2001, our world changed forever. The Rhode Island National Guard and the Emergency Management Agency found themselves facing new and difficult challenges, but all were handled professionally and proficiently. We immediately mobilized Soldiers and Airmen in support of contingency operations and prepared units for deployment in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. The OPTEMPO of the National Guard was at an all-time high. The Rhode Island National Guard has deployed more than 5,500 Soldiers and Airmen, and all have performed magnificently, conducting themselves with honor, courage and integrity, and exhibiting the Army and Air Force Values daily. The Rhode Island National Guard has also paid a very dear price during these conflicts: Staff Sgt. Christopher Potts, Staff Sgt. Joseph Camera, Sgt. Charles Caldwell and Spc. Michael Andrade paid the ultimate sacrifice in support of their country. Please, let’s never forget them and always keep them and their families in our thoughts and prayers. While all this is going on, let us not forget the home front. The Rhode Island National Guard and the Emergency Management Agency have handled numerous state emergencies—major snow storms, hurricanes, level orange 2

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threats, and severe floods. We also deployed Soldiers and Airmen in support of Hurricane Katrina, the Southwest Border and numerous other contingencies throughout the world. Through it all, the performance and dedication of the men and women of both agencies never wavered. Each was handled exceptionally, ensuring that the citizens of this great state were protected, and minimal property loss was experienced. There will always be challenges and developments to test the intestinal fortitude of all who serve. I know that these challenges will be met head on and successfully dealt with, further ensuring that the Rhode Island National Guard and the Emergency Management Agency will remain a well-led, well-trained and well-equipped force ready to answer the nation’s and state’s calls to duty. As I come to a close on my career, there are several people I would like to thank for taking the time to mentor me, ensuring that I had the tools necessary to succeed. As I grew in the engineers, officers such as Brig. Gen. Jim Dunn, Col. Bill Tuttle and Col. Norm Lamothe played an extremely key role in my development as an officer. They taught me that the Soldier and their family were paramount—without them, no mission could be accomplished. NCOs such as Command Sgt. Maj. Jean Vanti and Command Sgt. Maj. Steve Topp, Sgt. Maj. Ray Laprad, Master Sgt. Jack McCoy and numerous others made sure I did not forget who I was, where I came from, and that officers were not always right. As I progressed through the ranks, individuals such as retired Lt. Gen. (RI) Reginald Centracchio, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, Col. Ray Donnelly, Col. Steve Kelley, and Col. Terry Parker mentored me, again ensuring that I stayed on the path required to succeed in an organization experiencing tremendous growth and changes. I have had the privilege to work with and alongside some of the best and brightest Soldiers and Airmen ever to have served. Key staff officers such as Col. Charlie Walsh, Col. Ginny Barham, Col. Don Lagor, Col. Mark Habershaw, Col. Joe Rooney, Col. Paul Leveillee, Col. Lynn Hague, Col. Denise Rooney, Col. Marty Lafferty, Col. Chris Callahan, Col. John Packhem, Lt. Col. Denis Riel, Lt. Col. Vivian Caruolo, Command Sgt. Maj. John McDonough, Ms Tonia Kaplan and numerous others made my life and job an exceptional joy. Their dedication, devotion, knowledge and care for the Soldiers and Airmen is unsurpassed. I want to thank each of you for your hard work, support and friendship. I would also like to thank Maj. Gen. Robert Bray and his wife Donna. You gave me the opportunity to serve at the


highest level, trusting me to manage the finest organization in the world. You stuck by my side through the good and the bad and never once wavered in your support for me and my family. Your mentorship of me proved to be invaluable, and I will be forever grateful for your support and friendship. Finally, to my family—your support for me throughout these past 40 years has been tremendous. To my wife Cheryl, sons Jonathan and his wife Jen, and Brian Jr. (currently deployed to Afghanistan), my love for you is

unwavering, and I appreciate all that you have sacrificed over the years. I am very proud of all of you, and I look forward to spending more time with each of you. Thank you all, Soldiers, Airmen, family and supporters. It has been my honor and privilege to serve with and alongside each and every one of you throughout the years. My memories of the Rhode Island National Guard will

be extremely fond, and I will cherish them for the rest of my life. Cheryl and I will always have you in our thoughts and prayers. I want to wish everyone God speed. God bless the United States of America, the state of Rhode Island and the members of the Rhode Island National Guard, Emergency Management Agency, and the Historic Militia.

Brig. Gen. Brian Goodwin Assistant Adjutant General for Army and Deputy Commanding General, Rhode Island National Guard

Future Force Development Brig. Gen. Donald Lagor, Assistant Adjutant General for Air

Future Force Development is something that should be considered at all levels of military life, particularly in light of the recent national defense strategy announcement and pending force structure changes that will impact all the service components as we reshape and retool for future threats to our national security. Are we, as a National Guard, doing everything possible to shape our Soldiers and Airmen to meet future challenges and to produce military leaders who will be adaptive and responsive to our nation’s needs? The best possible course of action to prepare our junior personnel for an uncertain future is to develop a solid mentorship program to groom up-and-coming Soldiers and Airmen deemed to have the potential to move up into leadership roles. We do this by pairing the Soldier/Airman protégé with a senior level leader (or leaders) for a series of career-coaching interactions. Another method of high-potential mentoring is to place the Soldier/ Airman in a series of jobs in disparate areas of the organization, all for small periods of time, in anticipation of learning the organization’s structure, culture, and methods. For the mentor, it

means some personal involvement and sacrifice of time because this process always involves communication and must be relationship-based in order to be effective. Mentoring is a process for the informal transmission of knowledge, social capital, and the psychological support perceived by the mentee as relevant to their career field or professional development. The Air National Guard’s Strategic Planning System, in particular, has begun the process of codifying all of the requirements for the development of our future leaders. Without adapting to this model, which includes higher education, joint service, deployment credit, and professional military education, the ANG officer corps will not advance or compete for senior officer corps positions in the very near future. Our enlisted force will need to adapt as well so that we remain and retain the best NCO corps in the world. Collectively, we need to seek out our future leaders and begin the long and arduous path of future force development through a solid mentorship program. We need to start now so that we can develop the bench for the future!

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Back to Basics By Command Sgt. Maj. John J. McDonough IV, 5th State Command Sergeant Major, RIARNG

Over the last several months I have witnessed trends that have become a concern to me as your senior noncommissioned officer. Some very basic skills we, as Soldiers, should know and live by, are ignored and not enforced. I continue to witness flaws in military bearing. I see enlisted Soldiers not rendering hand salutes to officers. I see junior officers not saluting senior officers. I listen to Soldiers refer to each other by first name regardless of grade. I watch leaders witness the same and not take corrective action. There are protocols established within the military to ensure that all we do is based on professionalism. Physical appearance and military bearing is a category by which we are measured each rating period on our noncommissioned officer evaluation

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report. There are prescribed standards regarding both, which every Soldier learns at the lowest military education level—basic combat training. Physical appearance and military bearing is representative of an organization’s discipline. Professionalism permeates units that are well disciplined. Leaders will promote good discipline by enforcing standards, making on-thespot corrections and holding Soldiers accountable. We are in the “profession of arms.” Our customs and courtesies are rich in history and what separates us from every other profession. As we continue the drawdown of our forces in Southwest Asia, we, the leadership, will ensure that units transition from combat area policies to the proper protocol of the garrison environment. In garrison, uniform standards are dictated

by Army Regulation 670-1. There is no authority designating “no-hat areas while outside” or “no-salute zones.” These are examples of exceptions to policy necessitated by combat operations, but which do not transfer to garrison life. We, the leaders, will re-engage with basic Soldier responsibilities. We will vigorously enforce proper protocol. Field Manual 7-21.13, “The Soldier’s Guide,” outlines customs and courtesies, the traditions and history behind them, and why they remain vitally important to unit discipline. Customs and courtesies will be addressed as part of the unit’s noncommissioned officer development program. It is time to get “back to basics.”


Brig. Gen. Brian Goodwin set to retire Story and photo by Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

After nearly 40 years of dedicated service to the Rhode Island Army National Guard, Brigadier General Brian Goodwin is retiring. Goodwin enlisted in the Rhode Island

Army National Guard in May 1972 where he served in the 1118th Engineer Company as a Dump Truck Operator. In April 1978, Goodwin attended the Officer Candidate School at the Rhode

Brig. Gen. Brian Goodwin, Assistant Adjutant General for Army and Deputy Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard, speaks at a 9/11 memorial ceremony at the Bristol Fire Department Sept. 11, 2011.

Island Military Academy where he graduated with honors and received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant. “Graduating OCS had to be one of my greatest accomplishments,” said Goodwin. “It set my path in becoming a general officer.” Following graduation from OCS, Goodwin’s first assignment was with the 861st Engineer Company as a Heavy Equipment Platoon Leader. During his time with the 861st he remembers a number of rewarding experiences when he and his unit would help complete community projects such as baseball fields and sports complexes. Goodwin later transferred to the 243rd Engineer Battalion where he served in numerous staff positions culminating as the Battalion Executive Officer. Following his assignment within the 243rd, Goodwin served in numerous staff positions within the Rhode Island Army National Guard culminating as the Chief of Staff for the Rhode Island Army National Guard Some of Goodwin’s shining moments in the Rhode Island National Guard were his hand in the establishment of various programs that continue on strong today such as the Family Assistance Program, Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve and the Counter Drug Program. Goodwin said that he was proud of these programs and proud to have a helping hand in establishing programs such as these that were never available to service members years ago. Brigadier General Goodwin may be retiring from the Rhode Island National Guard, but his presence will always be felt, through the relationships he forged, Soldiers he mentored; programs he helped develop, and leadership he displayed. There is no doubt that Brigadier General Goodwin is leaving the Rhode Island National Guard a better place than when he joined.

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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RINGRA completes Guard memorial The Rhode Island National Guard Retirees Association has completed the only memorial to the National Guard in the state of Rhode Island. The seven-person committee contains males and females, enlisted and commissioned, Army and Air Guard former members. Started in February, 2008, the memorial was completed with the installation of the bronze statue on Aug. 28, 2011, only 42 months since the committee first toured the empty site at the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Exeter, R.I. The committee was chaired by retired Lt. Col. Bob Urquhart. The former Adjutant General, retired Lt. Gen. Reginald Centracchio, served as honorary chair. The memorial consists of three large granite slabs containing text for the R.I. Army Guard, the R.I. Air Guard

and portions of the “I am The Guard” poem. In addition, the center pedestal holds the 6-foot, 4-inch statue of the Guard’s Minuteman. The granite, including six benches, weighs more than 30 tons. More than 600 of the 2,400 bricks that form the “floor” of the site are engraved with unit and individual texts and images. There is still plenty of space for more engraved bricks, which will be added in the fall of each year. In all, the living memorial represents a quarter of a million dollars in purchases and donated labor and materials. Photos of the construction, dedication and installation, as well as details of how to order bricks, can be found on the association’s website at: http://ringretirees.homestead.com.

February 2009 • A sign goes up at the site explaining to the public what we’re doing.

Real-world OJT for the 861st Engineer Company (RIARNG) begins the fill process to bring the final grade up to the tops of the concrete slabs. Another weekend drill in June will finish the fill.

May 2009 • U.S. Senator Jack Reed opens the speaking program with remarks on the importance of the National Guard to the nation’s security.

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Drill Sergeant Barbeiro—

Rhode Island’s first By Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

Early mornings and long days are the story of every drill sergeant candidate’s life during their nine weeks at the United States Army Drill Sergeant School. It was no different for Sgt. Carlos Barbeiro, recruiter for the Rhode Island National Guard Recruiting and Retention Battalion, and now drill sergeant for the Recruit Sustainment Program where he prepares civilian recruits for basic combat training. Graduating from the United States Army Drill Sergeant School in Fort Jackson, S.C., in November 2011, Barbeiro is the first Rhode Island Army National Guardsmen ever to become a certified drill sergeant. Becoming a drill sergeant has always been something Barbeiro aspired to since he joined the active duty Army in 1996, but failed to achieve then. After his initial enlistment, and a two-year break in service, Barbeiro joined the Rhode Island National guard in 2006. A few short years later while assigned to the Recruit Sustainment Program, Barbeiro had his chance to become something he’d always wanted. “In the back of my head, I’ve always wanted to become a drill sergeant,” Barbeiro said. “When this opportunity presented itself, I had to take advantage of it.” Rhode Island has had a number of certified drill sergeants over the years who’ve graduated from Drill Sergeant School while on active duty, but what makes Barbeiro significant is that he is the first National Guardsman to be sent to the school from Rhode Island. “I felt a lot of pressure being the

first from Rhode Island to attend the school,” Barbeiro said. “I didn’t want to let anyone down.” Of the 89 drill sergeant candidates in Barbeiro’s class, approximately 46 went on to graduate, Barbeiro among them. Barbeiro said that one of the more challenging aspects of the school was its training modules. “You needed to be able to recite a lot of things word for word,” Barbeiro said. “You also needed to find the correct way to do things—by the book.” To know the right way to do things, candidates went by the motto, “If it’s in black and white, then it’s right!” One of Barbeiro’s personal accomplishments was to graduate from the school with a 299 PT score. Maj. Dennis Pineault, commander of the RSP, said that candidates are prescreened thoroughly by the National

Guard Bureau before a Soldier is sent to the school. Therefore, Rhode Island is very selective about who they send to drill sergeant school, said Pineault. “Sgt. Barbeiro fit the bill for this school,” he said. “He is physically fit, tactically proficient and passionate about training Soldiers.” From the commander’s perspective, Barbeiro is an important asset to the RSP, Pineault said. Having graduated from the school and needing to recertify each year, Barbeiro keeps the RSP up to date regularly with the best practices to better help new recruits succeed when they ship off to basic combat training. “My job is not to yell at you 24/7, but to transform you,” said Barbeiro. “A drill sergeant’s mission is to transform civilians into Soldiers.”

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Lt. Col. Thomas Hannon • The Bronze Star Medal

Senior Airman Yanick Koenig • The Air Force Achievement Medal

Four Rhode Island Air National Guard members to receive awards for heroism, meritorious service in Afghanistan Four Air National Guard members from the 143rd Security Forces Squadron who were deployed as part of the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, from March through October 2010, were presented with awards for their service. Senior Airman Yanick Koenig received the Air Force Achievement Medal with “V” device for valor Jan. 7, 2012, for his heroic actions credited in saving the life of a fellow Airman. As a member of Quick Reaction Force, 455th Expeditionary Security Forces, Koenig, a heavy machine-gun operator, was part of a mission sent to investigate insurgent activity in the Bagram area when a fellow team member triggered an antipersonnel mine. Koenig, without hesitation or regard for his personal safety, entered the mine field and initiated life-saving casualty care before determining an egress route and quickly evacuating the wounded Airman. His heroic and selfless actions played a pivotal role in the 10

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extraction and survival of his teammate. Senior Airman Eric Fontes received the Purple Heart award Jan. 7, 2012, for injuries sustained from a rocket attack on Sept. 10, 2010, while manning an entry control point outside of Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. The attack claimed the lives of two Afghan National Army comrades and injured another Air Force Security Forces member. Fontes received concussive and shrapnel wounds but was eventually returned to duty and finished his tour. Lt. Col. Thomas Hannon, operations officer of the 143rd Security Forces Squadron, will receive the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious service as operations officer of the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron in Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. Master Sgt. Steven Croce will receive the Meritorious Service Medal for his role as the first sergeant of the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron while deployed to Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.


Master Sgt. Steven Croce • Meritorious Service Medal

Senior Airman Eric Fontes • Purple Heart Award

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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to Afghanistan Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Programs Fact Sheet www.StrengthAtHome.com

12 Session Strength at Home Men’s Program 1) Who the group is for: Veterans (of any era) struggling with anger, who have used aggression against their intimate partner within the past year. 2) What we do in the group: This is a 12 session intervention to stop intimate partner aggression. Group material focuses on developing a better understanding of problems with anger, learning to de-escalate situations that may lead to arguments and conflict, learning to manage anger and stress more effectively, and learning to communicate in more assertive ways. 3) Other key points: A. Our groups are confidential. B. We offer $300 compensation per person to cover costs of gas and child care. C. Groups are offered on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. D. We would like all participants to sign releases of information if they are seeing other providers to help coordinate care. 4) For more information or to make a referral: Call 857-364-4173 or email strengthathomeoutreah@gmail.com. Our staff will talk to the veteran in more detail about the group and schedule their first appointment to come in.

10 Session Strength At Home Couple’s Program 1) Who the group is for: Couples in a committed relationship where the male partner is an OEF/OIF veteran. 2) What we do in the group: This is a 10 session relationship strengthening couples group. The goals are to help couples transition from deployment to civilian life, increase feelings of closeness and happiness, and to prevent arguments, aggression, and conflict in the relationship. Group material focuses on developing a better understanding of deployment stress and its impact on the relationship, learning to de-escalate situations that may lead to arguments and conflict, and learning to communicate in more positive and effective ways. 3) Other key points: a. Our groups are confidential. b. We offer $300 compensation per person ($600 per couple) to cover costs of gas and child care. c. Groups are offered on Monday and Wednesday evenings. d. We would like all participants to sign releases of information if they are seeing other providers to help coordinate care. 4) For more information or to make a referral: Call 857-364-4173 or email strengthathomeoutreah@gmail. com. Our staff will talk to the veteran or partner in more detail about the group and schedule their first appointment to come in. Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Accomplishing the mission through versatility: The 88th Army Band has a mission to provide music that promotes troop morale and unit esprit de corps, and supports civil and military operations and ceremonies. The problem is that many events request support from the band on a monthly basis, but not every event requires the whole band. The solution to this is the band’s modular structure. The unit is organized into music performance teams. Versatile and capable, MPTs can operate and perform independently for specified periods. There are generally five different MPTs. Each focuses on a specific form of music such as popular music, brass chamber music, ceremonial, and woodwind chamber music. With this structure, the band is able to cover multiple events at the same time and tailor their music to match each event’s theme. This allows for a wider impact on both civilian and military audiences.

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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Rhode Island state delegates, Pearl Harbor survivors, current service members and various veteran organizations gathered on Dec. 7, 2011, at the Rhode Island State House on the 70th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Six native Rhode Islanders, who were stationed at Pearl Harbor during the attacks of Dec. 7, 1941, were honored guests during the remembrance ceremony. For actions during the attacks, one survivor was awarded the Rhode Island Cross; the others were awarded the Rhode Island Star Medal.

December 7, 1941 December 7, 2011

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Ocean State Guardian / Spring 2012 Photo: Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia


Pearl Harbor survivior Raymond J. Haerry Sr., of East Greenwich, R.I., was awarded the Rhode Island Cross for heroic action on Dec. 7, 1941, in the face of enemy action while assigned to the USS Arizona. Haerry was one of only 354 survivors of the USS Arizona. Photos: Army Sgt. Peter Ramaglia

By Sgt. Megan Burmeister

“Let them not be forgotten for they have shown the world that freedom is not free.” Members of the Rhode Island National Guard, military retiree organizations and state government gathered in the Rhode Island State House on Dec. 7, 2011, to honor the 70th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. As part of the ceremony, six native Rhode Islanders were given awards for their service during the attack. Bernard Creswick, retired, U.S. Army Air Corps; Ralph N. Churchwell, retired, U.S. Navy; Daniel Hunter, retired, U.S. Navy; Wilmer Stevens, retired, U.S. Army; Gilbert Hawkens, retired, U.S. Navy, and Raymond J. Haerry Sr., retired, U.S. Navy, shared their experiences of that day with the audience. Several family members recounted the service members’ experiences for those who could not tell it themselves. Following a reading of the top essays for a Rhode Island High School

Presented by Maj. Gen. Kevin McBride, Adjutant General of Rhode Island and Commanding General of the Rhode Island National Guard, Pearl Harbor survivor Bernard Creswick of Warwick, R.I., is awarded the Rhode Island Star Medal on Dec. 7, 2011, during the Pearl Harbor Remembrance Ceremony at the Rhode Island State House. Creswick was a member of the U.S. Army Air Corps stationed at Pearl Harbor during the attacks.

Pearl Harbor Essay Contest, the survivors were awarded state medals for their actions on that day. At Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941, the Japanese launched a surprise attack on U.S. military bases. More than 300 planes dropped the first bombs on Pearl Harbor in the morning of Dec. 7. In the harbor were eight American battleships and more than 90 other naval vessels. By the end of

the attack, 21 ships were destroyed or severely damaged, as were 300 planes. The battleship USS Arizona was the biggest loss, accounting for more than half the fatalities. By the end of the raid, more than 2,300 people had been killed and about half as many were wounded. The attack on Pearl Harbor caused the involvement of the United States of America in World War II.

Spring 2012 / Rhode Island National Guard

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HERO 2 HIRED

helps job hunt

ESGR was established in 1972 to promote cooperation and understanding between reserve component members and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts arising from an employee’s military commitment. However, lack of employment upon return from deployment also affects service members. The ESGR program teamed up with The Yellow Ribbon Program to introduce Hero 2 Hired, a job site created to make it easy for reserve component service members to connect to and find jobs with military-friendly companies who are looking for employees. Searching for a new job is a big undertaking. H2H was created to make it easy for the Guard and reserve component service members. The site offers several services to make the job hunt easier. Following are some job search tools that the website has to offer:

* Military Skills Translator — search for jobs based on your MOS/AFSC H2H.job s is * Mobile app – your cell phone will receive a message when you’re in the FREE fo r all job see vicinity of a job opening that matches your online profile kers! * Virtual career fairs * Hiring events * Social Media integration — market yourself with information about your abilities and experience, and letters of recommendation, laid out on an attractive interactive digital portfolio.

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Ocean State Guardian - Spring 2012  

Ocean State Guardian Spring 2012

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