Page 1

American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment


Table of Contents Acknowledgements

2

Introduction

3

ACUPCC Two-Month Reporting Form

4

Carbon Audits

5

GHG Mitigation

8

• Current measures

8

• Future strategies

11

Educational, Research and Community Outreach Efforts

12

Financing

15

Tracking Progress

16

Climate Neutrality

17

Appendix 1: Inside Rio, Volume 10 No.1 2008 Appendix 2: ACUPCC Two-Month Reporting Form Appendix 3: ACUPCC Reporting System Information Appendix 4: Leadership Council Membership


Acknowledgements Rio Salado College is totally committed to the triple bottom line (3BL) of sustainability: socially just and equitable, economically robust and environmentally viable. This is demonstrated in the fact that sustainability is one of the College’s core values; is Goal 8 of the Strategic Plan, Rio 2012; and is supported by employees through volunteer programs, such as Pay 30 Forward. The Climate Action Plan, though, focuses mainly on the environmental piece of sustainability through efforts to reduce the College’s carbon footprint. While all employees support sustainability, it would not have been possible to produce the Rio Salado College 2009 Climate Action Plan without the contributions of the following individuals:

2009 Climate Action Plan Contributors The Office of the President

Dr. Linda Thor, President

Administration * Todd Simmons, Vice President, Business and Employee Services * Vernon Smith, Vice President, Teaching and Learning Leadership Council (see Appendix 4 for membership listing)

Faculty * Shannon Corona, Physical Sciences Beatriz Cohen, Counseling

College Staff Alan Torvie, Architect and Sustainability Consultant Danielle Tomerlin, Sustainability Consultant Genevieve Winters, Director, Research, Planning and Development Christy Flora, Institutional Research Analyst * Elizabeth Cole-Fay, Project Coordinator * Richard Espinoza, Director, Facilities * Dorothy Strait, Director, Site Operations Linda Bird, Executive Assistant Kevin Bilder, Director, Marketing and Public Relations Matthew Freed, Graphic Designer II * Sharon Koberna, Dean, Administrative and Employee Services

Introduction Rio Salado College (Rio Salado) is one of the 10 colleges in the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD), which is the largest community college district in the nation. Rio Salado has the unique distinction of being “the Maricopa College without walls.” Most of the instruction is conducted on-line (distance learning), within businesses or public institutions, or in various community centers. Rio Salado is one of five colleges in the MCCCD that were Charter Signatories to the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) in 2007. This commitment to reduce the carbon footprints of the member institutions and to seek climate neutrality mandated certain requirements and strategies leading to submittal and execution of a Climate Action Plan. The Rio Salado carbon footprint is the sum of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions generated by the students

and staff of the institution. These emissions include six designated gases and refrigerants, but are primarily carbon based – fuels and electricity generated from fossil fuels, and primarily carbon dioxide. The measure of greenhouse gases is expressed as CO2 equivalents (CO2e) and measured in metric tons. In order to quantify and compare GHG emissions for colleges, the ACUPCC reports tons of CO2e per full-time equivalent student (FTE). The ACUPCC requirements included: • Within two months of the Implementation Start Date, establish an institutional structure to guide the development and implementation of the Climate Action Plan. • Within two months of the Implementation Start Date, select 2 or more Tangible Actions, selected from a list of 7 options, to be initiated and completed while the long term Climate Action Plan was being developed.

• Within one year of the Implementation Start Date, and annually thereafter, complete an inventory and public report on greenhouse gas emissions (Carbon Audit). • Within two years of the Implementation Start Date, develop a Climate Action Plan that includes a target date and interim milestones for achieving climate neutrality. • On an ongoing basis, make publicly available the institutional structure, greenhouse gas inventory, Climate Action Plan, and progress reports, by providing them to AASHE (Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) for posting and dissemination This Climate Action Plan includes a summary of the findings of the Rio Salado carbon audit of fiscal year 2007/2008 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the current measures and proposed strategies to reduce the Rio Salado carbon footprint.

* Designates a member of the Rio Salado College Sustainability Steering Committee

Page 2– Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Page 3 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


“The unique educational delivery method provided by Rio Salado results in one of the smallest carbon footprints...”

ACUPCC Two-Month Reporting Form Institutional Structure

ACUPCC Tangible Actions

When the College submitted its two-month reporting form it designated the Leadership Council, which includes the President and Vice Presidents, Deans, Associate Deans, Faculty Chairs, and staff and student representation as the institutional structure with the responsibility for implementation of the Climate Action Plan. The Leadership Council is also charged with advancing all forms of sustainability within the college.

Rio Salado submitted the ACUPCC Two-Month Reporting Form on November 15, 2007, which indicated three (3) of the options to be accomplished by the College. The TwoMonth Reporting Form included the following Tangible Actions: Action #2: Adopt energy efficient appliance purchasing policy Rio Salado immediately instituted a policy requiring that all new appliance purchases be Energy Star rated. Action #4: Encourage use of and provide access to public transportation for all staff, students, and visitors This Action required either free or subsidized transit passes or free campus shuttles. Through the MCCCD, Rio Salado provides subsidized transit passes. Action #5: Purchase or produce 15% of electricity from renewable resources Both utility companies that provide service to Rio Salado facilities generate/purchase percentages of their electricity from renewable sources. Salt River Project (SRP) currently incorporates 5% and will increase that percentage to 15% by 2020; and Arizona Public Service (APS) incorporates 2% and will achieve 15% by 2025. Rio Salado anticipates reaching 15% by 2020. In addition to purchasing renewable power, Rio Salado is investigating solar and other strategies for on-site renewable power generation.

Page 4– Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Carbon Audits 2007-2008 The Carbon Audit for fiscal year 2007/2008 was completed and the report submitted to the ACUPCC in September 2008. A Carbon Audit for fiscal year 2008/2009 is being completed, and will be submitted to ACUPCC in September 2009. The Carbon Audit will be repeated and submitted each year. The unique educational delivery method provided by Rio Salado results in one of the smallest carbon footprints (GHG emission levels per student & staff population) of all the colleges and universities that have reported to

date. The GHG emission level of .9 metric tons of CO2e is approximately 24% of the national average for community colleges. The only other institutions reporting to AASHE that have similar carbon footprints also provide only or predominantly on-line distance learning. The majority of institutions, including Rio Salado College, used the Clean Air/Cool Planet (CACP) Campus Carbon Calculator to determine the GHG emissions created by their physical plant, students, and staff.

Page 5 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


Online Distance Learning: The GHG emissions are calculated by three sources (scopes): Scope 1 Emissions

TOTAL EMISSIONS - 2008

Defined - direct emissions occurring from sources owned or controlled by the institution, including stationary and mobile combustion and fugitive and process emissions.

Online distance learning is a very sustainable delivery modality. There are two main factors for this: the need for facilities is minimized and commuting is negligible. • Facilities - Because the majority of Rio Salado’s students are online learners, the need for classrooms and other instructional space is eliminated. Rio Salado’s buildings consist primarily of administration, faculty offices, information technology facilities, and other support staff spaces.

53.0%

Many colleges or universities own central power, steam, chilled water, or co-generation plants (fixed combustion), but Rio Salado’s primary Scope 1 emissions are those generated by the college’s vehicle fleet (mobile combustion). There are no process emissions (laboratory). Fugitive emissions – leakage of refrigerant, are not measured, but are assumed to be insignificant. The Rio Salado 2007/2008 annual Scope 1 emissions totaled an estimated 72 metric tons of CO2e.

32.6%

Scope 2 Emissions

9.1%

Defined - indirect emissions occurring from purchased electricity, heating, cooling, or steam.

6,585

• Air Travel

594

• Solid Waste

1,125

Total GHG emissions for the 2007-2008 fiscal year were 12,422 metric tons of CO2e. The average GHG emissions of 28 community colleges nationwide that reported GHG inventory results were 22,842 tons. With a FTE student population of 13,709, and GHG emissions totaling 12,422 tons, the Rio Salado footprint is .91 tons per student per year. This ratio is approximately 24% of the national community college average of 3.84 tons per student per year.

Page 6 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Solid waste

Air travel

Commuting

• Commuting

Purchased electricity

Rio Salado’s Scope 3 emissions totaled 8,304 tons, as follows:

Fleet emissions

Defined - indirect emissions occurring from purchased sources not owned or controlled by the institution, including student and staff commuting, airline travel, and solid waste.

• Commuting - Commuting miles and the resultant fuel consumption are minimal. Commuting to attend classroom sessions is eliminated, and even commuting for advising, registration, to buy and sell books at the bookstore, to pay tuition at the cashiers’ office and other central office functions is optional. All student-related services are available online. Commuting is only required for mid-term and final examinations at convenient college locations for most courses.

ESP 29.8%

Another large segment of Rio Salado’s teaching is done off-site for employees of corporate and governmental partners, and dual enrolled high school students. These delivery modalities eliminate the need for College-owned facilities.

0.6%

Scope 3 Emissions

Distance (online) 33.9%

Off-Site Teaching:

4.8%

Rio Salado’s 2007/2008 Scope 2 emissions consisted of purchased electricity only, and totaled 4,046 tons.

TOTAL ENROLLMENTS - 2008

In summary, the exceptionally small carbon footprint generated by Rio Salado’s facilities, staff, and students is the result of Rio Salado’s educational delivery modalities and teaching methods.

Dual Enrolled 13.6%

• Education Service Partners (ESP) - The instruction occurs during working hours and, therefore, the commuting mileage for these students is not reportable for carbon footprint purposes by Rio Salado. It is charged to the employer since the instruction occurs as a result of the students’ employment. Rio provides learning opportunities for over 50 major corporations, military bases and governmental agencies. • Dual enrollment sites (high schools) – Rio Salado has dual enrollment programs county-wide at 53 high schools. The instruct ertified high school teachers. Students earn both high school and college credit. As a result, commuting mileage is eliminated for this instructional delivery modality. • Incarcerated re-entry – Rio Salado operates an occupational training program through the Arizona Department of Corrections for inmates. The training consists of workforce-based education (WBE) and life-skills instruction. These students do not create any commuting emissions.

In-person 11.1%

ABE 7.9% Incarcerated 3.6%

As can be seen by the above chart, only 19.0% of Rio Salado enrollments generate any significant commuting emissions (In-person – 11.1% and Adult Basic Education (ABE) – 7.9%). 2008-2009 The 2008-2009 fiscal year carbon audit is under development and will be published in October 2009.

Page 7 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


GHG Mitigation Current Measures Prior to signing the ACUPCC, Rio Salado and MCCCD both had instituted a number of practices focused on reducing energy use, reducing GHG emissions, and advancing other sustainability measures, all focused on the sustainability triple bottom line aspects: environmental, economic, and social. These include conservation of natural resources, education of and outreach to the community, research and operating continuity. The Climate Action Plan will address primarily the environmental component, but the results will also benefit the other two aspects. Current measures focused on GHG emission reduction include: Scope 1 Emissions Since Rio Salado does not operate on-site power, steam, or chilled water central plants, and carefully monitors fugitive refrigerant emissions, the primary Scope 1 emissions (72 tons in 2008) are those generated by Rio Salado’s service and carpool fleet. Since the ACUPCC Implementation Date, in September, 2007, Rio Salado has replaced older vehicles with new high efficiency hybrid automobiles, including several Toyota Prius hybrids and bi-fuel (ethanol / gasoline) Chevrolet Impalas. Rio Salado also utilizes low or non-VOC emitting paints, coatings, and cleaning supplies, and inspects HVAC units regularly to avoid refrigerant leakage.

Page 8– Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Scope 2 Emissions Since 2007, Rio Salado has adopted a number of policies aimed at reducing kilowatt usage, including: • Reduced lighting levels. During daylight hours, most perimeter offices and workspaces operate with either lights off or with only half the fluorescent lamps on. Interior spaces that are lightly occupied maintain low light levels

Scope 3 Emissions Rio Salado has implemented multiple initiatives to reduce commuting mileage, including: • Maricopa County Trip Reduction Program: »» Carpooling program: ›› Registered carpoolers: Provides access to carpool benefits

• Adjusted set levels for air conditioning. Summer and late spring/early fall air conditioning levels are set higher than in previous years. Winter temperature settings are lower, to reduce heating costs

›› Guaranteed rides home: assures registered carpoolers will get home if the driver isn’t available

• Replaced magnetic ballasts with electronic ballasts and re-lamped fluorescent fixtures with energy efficient lamps. In addition, Rio Salado has replaced a number of fluorescent ballast lamp units with LED lamps, for further reduction in heat generation and energy usage.

›› Carpool coordination: college assists formation of pools

• Replaced the cooling tower in the largest building, with new equipment, including Variable Speed Drives on large motors. • Installed direct digital control (DDC) energy management systems in most buildings. • Replaced water source heat pump units with newer higher efficiency energy saving units, and established progressive maintenance policies. • Employed many power saving and green technology programs to manage and administer the technology environment of the college; from Energy-star compliant LCD monitors, to the virtualization of the server environment.

›› Dedicated preferential carpool parking places: encourages car pools

›› Public awareness: promotes the benefits of carpooling • Work Week Reduction Program: »» 4 day summer workweeks: reduces staff commuting by 20% »» Alternate 4 day fall, winter, spring workweeks: reduces staff commuting by 10% • Alternative Work Schedule Program: »» Telecommuting: substantially reduces commuting »» Staggered hours / flex time • Public Transit Assistance: »» Subsidized Bus Passes: Encourages use of public transit

• Solid Waste (recycling): In order to reduce the impact of solid waste on landfills, Rio Salado College operates an extensive recycling program with a wide range of areas, including: »» Paper and cardboard: Rio contracts with a commercial vendor to accept paper materials for recycling. Each employee is furnished with a blue paper recycling container at their office or workstation, and the contents are collected and sold to the commercial vendor. »» Scrap Metal: Aluminum, steel, and copper are collected and sold to a local scrap metal vendor, to be recycled and re-used. »» Plastic and Glass: All plastic and glass containers are sorted and given to the City of Tempe for their recycling program. »» Hazardous materials: Items containing hazardous materials or integrated re-usable metals are recycled through programs dedicated to proper re-use or disposal. These items include batteries, ink cartridges, light fixtures and computer equipment. »» Carpet: Used carpet is recycled through a number of commercial suppliers. »» Furniture and equipment: Rio both donates to and receives furniture and equipment from a District wide pool for distribution of used items to avoid discarding unneeded, but still serviceable items.

»» Public transit database to assist staff and students in utilizing public transit: allows students and staff to easily determine routes and schedules

Page 9 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


Future Strategies Scope 1 Emissions Rio Salado will continue to replace older gasoline-only vehicles with fuel efficient hybrids or allelectric vehicles. Scope 2 Emissions Because all of Rio Salado’s buildings are all-electric, there is a large degree of possible improvement in Scope 2 emissions. Further planned strategies include: • Replace fluorescent lamps with LED lamps • Re-commission all buildings on a regular basis to ensure optimum performance. • Improve efficiency of HVAC systems by adding Variable Speed Drives on all appropriate motors. • Add or replace obsolete motion sensors to turn lights off in under used areas. The serving utilities will help analyze and re-commission building systems in order to identify energy reduction strategies. • Implement alternative renewable energy production measures, such as photovoltaic solar systems incorporated into covered parking structures. • Implement new and improved information technologies to support energy and resource conservation throughout the College’s computing environment. • Rio Salado has developed the concept of a “Communiversity,”

wherein Rio partners with universities, other Maricopa community colleges, and a vocational training high school district to provide “one-stop” educational opportunities. This concept allows sharing of facilities and extended hours of operation, to optimize the use of the shared spaces; thus, reducing energy, maintenance, and commuting costs. • Rio Salado is partnering with Brighten A Life, a charitable non-profit, Cause and Effect Evolutions, a marketing firm and the City of Phoenix to construct and operate a green charter high school. The total cost of constructing, furnishing and equipping the buildings is being donated by local contractors, engineers and suppliers. The charter high school will focus on “green collar” job training. The buildings are being designed to be LEED platinum. Scope 3 Emissions Rio Salado’s Scope 3 emissions are primarily those generated by student and staff commuting. While the College has no control over either, Rio Salado has taken many steps to encourage both groups to use alternatives to commuting in single occupant vehicles (SOV). • Carpooling: Future measures would include increasing efforts to establish more carpooling opportunities, such as coordinating park and ride locations for long-distance commuters or

Page 10 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

providing financial compensation to carpoolers. • Public Transit: Provide free shuttles from the Rio Salado / MCCCD administrative complex to the new Metro Light Rail stations. This effort can be undertaken in conjunction with the MCCCD and Maricopa College Foundation buildings which share the same block as Rio Salado’s Tempe site. A large private employer occupies the adjacent block and is another potential shuttle partner. These organizations could all work together to support the shuttles. Rio Salado is currently in negotiation with the City of Tempe to provide an “Orbiter” municipal bus route between the Rio Salado / MCCCD offices and several light rail stations. • Alternative commuting modes: Federal law now requires employers to provide added compensation to employees who ride their bicycles to work. Rio Salado is working with MCCCD to develop procedures to provide this when requested. Rio Salado also plans to provide recharge outlets in parking lots for staff and students who drive rechargeable electric vehicles. • Solid Waste: Rio Salado will expand its recycling efforts. This includes adopting new technologies as they are developed. During the 2007/2008 academic year,

Page 11 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


Educational, Research, Community Outreach Efforts Rio Salado launched a major initiative in support of the global sustainability movement. Rio Salado is unalterably committed to disseminating its sustainability efforts throughout the educational and business communities with which it interacts. These efforts include:

Publications In 2008, the Rio Salado Leadership team overseeing the sustainability focus conducted a panel discussion to present more in-depth information about college-wide goals and efforts toward implementing a positive plan of action. The discussion included the President and a Vice President of Rio Salado, Deans, Associate Deans and Faculty Chairperson. The discussion addressed environmental, social, and economic sustainability and Rio’s efforts to address this triple bottom line. The text of the discussion was included in an 8-page publication and posted on the Rio Salado website. It is included herewith as Appendix 1.

Sustainable Foods Programs Rio Salado offers both Occupational Certificate and Associates Degrees in sustainable foods systems. This includes “seeds to supper” philosophies, cooking and hospitality education, nutritional education, utilization of local resources to reduce transportation, and other sustainable approaches to the foods and hospitality industries. As part of this sustainable food system program Rio Salado is assuming operational control of its food service, which consists of the Café@Rio. The operation will focus on local sustainable food production, reduction of energy use, composting, and waste reduction.

Page 12 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Sustainability and Ecological Literacy Programs

Maricopa Sustainability Networking Group

Rio Salado College Online Sustainability Website

Rio Salado offers an Academic Certificate program in Sustainability and Ecological literacy. This program teaches sustainable living practices, skills necessary to become ecologically and environmentally aware, addresses environmental ethics, environmental biology, and carbon footprint reduction strategies.

The Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction (MCLI) supports “Dialogue Days,” an intercollegiate conference call that supports system-wide efforts to infuse sustainability into the curriculum.

As part of Rio Salado’s website, www.riosalado.edu, the College has included a section on Sustainability that includes:

“Pay 30 Forward”

• “Thinking Green” and Beyond – a position statement regarding Rio Salado’s approach to sustainability

Green Industry Partnering

In celebration of Rio Salado’s 30th anniversary, the Pay 30 Forward program focuses on social sustainability by promoting 30, 60, and 90 hour levels of public volunteer service.

• Rio Salado’s Green Commitment – a summary of Rio Salado sustainability actions and the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment

Rio Salado is working with recognized local green industry organizations to conduct non-credit workshops, seminars, and other activities to increase public awareness of sustainability concepts. Examples are “Green on the Weekend” – seminars focused on carbon footprint reduction, home retrofitting to reduce energy consumption, use of sustainable building materials, and other strategies.

Infusing Sustainability into Academic Programs Rio Salado is actively weaving sustainability threads into many of their existing academic and occupational classes. Foreign language programs, for example, have incorporated sustainability concepts and terms into the content of the classes. Culinary, horticulture, business, leadership, and myriad other programs have included “green” concepts in the curriculum.

America’s Greenest Campus Project Rio Salado participates in the America’s Greenest Campus competition which focuses on re-cycling, waste reduction, energy and carbon footprint reduction, and other environmental sustainability efforts.

• Participation in Sustainability – A listing of national sustainability initiatives • “Green” in Action – a discussion of the benefits of on-line learning, and actions that students and staff can take to be sustainable – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. • Living Green – a listing of partnerships with local clear Channel radio stations and sustainability tips • Sustainability Resources – A listing of over 25 websites and other resources to make a difference in sustainability. Directions to the Metro Bus Trip Planner. • “Rethink Your Rubbish” Activity: - A list of 10 actions to reduce and recycle trash. Reduce, Recycle, and Re-Use. • Focus the Nation, National Teach-In: Rio Salado’s participation in national webcasts supporting sustainability.

Page 13 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


Financing Achieving climate neutrality is a very expensive goal. Even though it will not be accomplished for decades, the total cost will be millions of dollars. It will be necessary to identify multiple sources of funding both within and outside Rio Salado and the MCCCD. There are four major funding sources: • College operational budgets • College capital budgets and/or 2004 General Obligation Bonds allocation • Utility companies’ rebate programs • Donations from contractors, engineers and suppliers

College Operational Budgets Funding for many of the smaller GHG reduction strategies will come directly from normal college operating budgets. These strategies include: • Replacing fluorescent lamps with LED lamps. • Adding or replacing obsolete motion sensors to turn lights off in under used areas. • Purchasing Energy-star appliances. • Complying with the College’s progressive maintenance program for all HVAC equipment to ensure optimum operating efficiency. • Re-commissioning all buildings on a regular basis to ensure optimum performance of all building systems. • Subsidizing bus passes. • Maintaining and expanding the current recycling program.

ficient hybrids • Major HVAC upgrades, such as wholesale replacement of individual units or replacement of major equipment items. • Massive replacement of fluorescent light fixture ballasts and lamps with LED lamps. • Photovoltaic active solar installations.

Utility Company Rebates Several types of rebates from local utility companies exist in Maricopa County. The two electric utility companies serving Rio Salado are Salt River Project (SRP) and Arizona Public Service (APS). Each company has the following rebates: • Energy efficiency »» APS Green Choice »» SRP PowerWise • Renewable energy projects »» APS Green Choice »» SRP EarthWise Solar Energy These rebate programs could provide some funding for the College’s future strategies to become climate neutral. In addition, each company has a program where customers can pay a little extra to contribute to a renewable energy fund in order to demonstrate that their energy is being provided from a “green” source. These are basically renewable energy credits (RECs). As a last resort, buying RECs would allow the College to achieve its commitment to purchase 15% of its power from renewable energy sources.

College Capital Budgets

Donations

Certain capital improvements would require funding from Rio Salado’s capital budgets or 2004 General Obligation bonds allocation. These capital improvements would include:

Much like the proven Cause and Effect Evolutions’ method, Rio Salado will be actively seeking contributions from contractors, engineers and suppliers. Contributions may consist of donated time and/or materials or discounted pricing in exchange for the media exposure from solar projects to help Rio Salado become one of the first higher education institutions to achieve climate neutrality.

• College vehicular fleet improvements: replacement of older, less efficient vehicles with newer more ef-

Page 14 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Tracking Progress Rio Salado is implementing methods to track all aspects of GHG emissions on an ongoing basis, in order to measure progress toward climate neutrality. Because the accounting for the college is handled by the MCCCD, the tracking methods will benefit all 10 of the MCCCD community colleges. GHG emission generators to be tracked are: Scope 1 Emissions Rio Salado has and will continue to track total annual consumption of gasoline for the fleet. Scope 2 Emissions Rio Salado will continue to track power consumption, and will institute a plan to track each building separately, in order to measure progress by facility. Scope 3 Emissions Rio Salado will increase efforts to accurately determine actual student and staff commuting miles, trip frequency, and fuel efficiency. GHG Audit Updating The GHG Audit completed in September 2008, which tracked emissions for fiscal year 2007/2008 will be updated for fiscal year 2008/2009, and annually thereafter. The annual results will be tracked and compared to establish trends for all emissions, and provide a guideline toward climate neutrality.

Page 15 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


2030

39% Renewable Energy

2028

2026

• Commuting mileage

2024

YEAR

RENEWABLE ENERGY

2030

2028

2026

YEAR

Based on the above assumptions, Rio Salado will achieve its “two-month reporting form” Action #5 goal of using 15% renewable energy by the year 2020.

Page 16 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

200 2024

2010

400

2022

2012

600

2020

»» Total percentage of kWh from renewable energy sources will increase by 12%. This increase may come from actual power generated by the College or through RECs purchased from the local utility providers.

2014

800

2018

»» Total purchased kWh will increase at a rate of 2%.

2016

1000

2016

• Purchased electricity

2018

1200

2014

The mileage driven by the College’s fleet will not change appreciably. Therefore, CO2e will not change.

15% Renewable Energy

2012

• Mobile Emissions

2020

»» Total employee commuting mileage will decrease by 4%.

2010

In order for Rio Salado to calculate its projected progress toward climate neutrality, several assumptions must be made. The annual assumptions are:

2022

COMMUTING MILEAGE per FTE

Climate Neutrality

»» Total student commuting mileage will increase by 3%.

Based on the above assumptions, Rio Salado will reduce its average commuting mileage per FTE by nearly 65% to 420 miles.

Page 17 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


YEAR 2030

Based on the above enumerated assumptions, Rio Salado will have reduced its carbon footprint by 67% by 2030. The following chart projects Rio Salado’s progress toward the goal of climate neutrality.

• Air Travel Most instruction occurs online or off-site through the use of adjunct faculty. Air travel will not change appreciably as enrollments grow. Therefore, CO2e will not change. • Solid Waste As recycling technologies improve and Rio Salado adopts these new technologies, the CO2e per FTE will actually decrease slightly.

2028

2026

2024

2022

• Total projected enrollments will increase as detailed below. 2020

60K 2018

50K

2016

30K

2014

20K 2012

10K

Currently, Rio Salado’s 10-year average annual growth is 7.6%. This enrollment growth projection is based on an average annual growth rate of 7%.

Page 18 – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

0.90

0.80

0.70

0.60

0.50

0.30

0.20

0.10

YEAR 0.00

2030

2028

2026

2024

2022

2020

2018

2016

2014

2012

2010

2010

FTE

40K

CO2e / FTE

Page 19 – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


Appendix 1: Inside Rio, Volume 10 No.1 2008


Appendix 2: ACUPCC Two Month Reporting Form


Page X – Rio Salado College Carbon Footprint Action Plan

Page X – ACUPCC Carbon Footprint Action Plan


2008 GHG Report for Rio Salado College HOME / GHG REPORT

Submitted on September 15, 2008; last updated on November 26, 2008

Summary Statistics Making fair comparisons between higher education institutions is always challenging due to the rich diversity of higher education. The unverified nature of the information in this database and unavailability of unbiased normalization metrics means such comparisons are even more difficult. Users should therefore approach direct institution to institution comparisons with caution and recognize that all comparisons between institutions are inherently biased.

Appendix 3: ACUPCC Reporting System Information

Total

Per FullTime Enrollment

Per 1000 Square Feet

% Offset

Gross emissions (Scopes 1 + 2)

4,118 metric tons of CO2e

0.1 metric tons of CO2e

16.8 metric tons of CO2e

0%

Gross emissions (Scopes 1 + 2 + 3)

12,422 metric tons of CO2e

0.2 metric tons of CO2e

50.7 metric tons of CO2e

0%

Net emissions

12,422 metric tons of CO2e

0.2 metric tons of CO2e

50.7 metric tons of CO2e

N/A

Emissions Inventory Methodology and Boundaries Start date of the 12-month period covered in this report

July 1, 2007

Consolidation methodology used to determine organizational boundaries

Operational control approach

If any institution-owned, leased, or operated buildings or other holdings that should fall within the organizational boundaries are omitted, briefly explain why. N/A Emissions calculation tool used

Clean Air-Cool Planet

Please describe why this tool was selected. Recommended by PCC Please describe the source(s) of the emissions coefficients used. CA-CP automatic calculations Which version of IPCC's list of global warming potentials did you use?

No information provided.

Who primarily conducted this emissions inventory?

Sustainability office staff

Please describe the process of conducting the inventory. Collection from many departments to gather consumption patterns, commuter


Stationary Combustion

Which version of IPCC's list of global warming potentials did you use?

No information provided.

Who primarily conducted this emissions inventory?

Sustainability office staff

Please describe the process of conducting the inventory. Collection from many departments to gather consumption patterns, commuter habits, population statistics, etc. Please describe any emissions sources that were classified as de minimis and explain how a determination of the significance of these emissions was made.

Biogenic Emissions from Mobile Combustion

No information provided. No information provided.

Mitigation Data Carbon Offsets Carbon offsets purchased

0 metric tons of CO2e

Offset verification program(s) No information provided. Description of offsets purchased (including vendor, project source, etc.) None

None Please describe any data limitations related to this submission and any major assumptions made in response to these limitations. None

Emissions Data Emissions from the following sources (in metric tons of CO2e) Scope 1 Emissions

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) Total RECs purchased

0 kWh

Percent of total electricity consumption mitigated through the purchase of RECs

No information provided.

Emissions reductions due to the purchase of RECs

No information provided.

REC verification program(s)

No information provided.

Description of RECs purchased (including vendor, project source, etc.)

Stationary Combustion

0 metric tons of CO2e

Mobile Combustion

72 metric tons of CO2e

Process Emissions

0 metric tons of CO2e

Sequestration and Carbon Storage

Fugitive Emissions

0 metric tons of CO2e

Total Scope 1 emissions

72 metric tons of CO2e

Sequestration due to land owned by the institution

Scope 2 Emissions Purchased Electricity

4,046 metric tons of CO2e

Purchased Heating

0 metric tons of CO2e

Purchased Cooling

0 metric tons of CO2e

Purchased Steam

0 metric tons of CO2e

Total Scope 2 emissions

4,046 metric tons of CO2e

Scope 3 Emissions Commuting

6,585 metric tons of CO2e

Air Travel

594 metric tons of CO2e

Solid Waste

1,125 metric tons of CO2e

Total Scope 3 emissions

8,304 metric tons of CO2e

Biogenic Emissions Biogenic Emissions from Stationary Combustion

No information provided.

Biogenic Emissions from Mobile Combustion

No information provided.

Mitigation Data Carbon Offsets

None

0 metric tons of CO2e

Description of how sequestration was calculated N/A Carbon storage due to composting

No information provided.

Normalization and Contextual Data Building Space Gross square feet of building 244,831 sq ft space Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft laboratory space Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft health care space Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft residential space Population Total Student Enrollment (FTE)

60,346

Residential Students

0

Full-time Commuter Students

No information provided.


Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft laboratory space Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft health care space Net assignable square feet of 0 sq ft residential space Population Total Student Enrollment (FTE)

60,346

Residential Students

0

Full-time Commuter Students

No information provided.

Part-time Commuter Students

10,252

Non-Credit Students

No information provided.

Full-time Faculty

34

Part-time Faculty

1,100

Full-time Staff

452

Part-time Staff

0

Other Contextual Data Endowment Size

$29,804

Heating Degree Days

No information provided.

Cooling Degree Days

No information provided.

Appendix 4: Leadership Council Membership The Office of the President • Dr. Linda Thor, President

Administration

• Chris Bustamante, Vice President, Community Development & Student Services • Ed Kelty, Vice President, Information Services • Todd Simmons, Vice President, Business and Employee Services

Faculty Chairs

• Melanie Abts • Sue Adams • Janine Adkins • Nicole Albo • Angela Ambrosia • Kirk Bowden

Please describe any circumstances specific to your institution that provide context for understanding your greenhouse gas emissions this year.

• Dr. Vernon Smith, Vice President, Teaching and Learning

• Ron Burns

No information provided.

• Kishia Brock, Dean, Student Services

• Shannon Corona

• Dr. Jo Jorgenson, Dean, Community Development

• Hazel Davis

• Rick Kemp, Dean, Academic and Partnership Programs

• Angela Felix

• Sharon Koberna, Dean, Administrative and Employee Services

• Mary Hannaman

Supporting Documentation Completed inventory narrative

Rio Salado College Carbon Audit Results Download (PCC Audit Final.pdf)

Completed inventory calculator

Download (PCC Calculator 2008 Only.xls)

Auditing and Verification These emissions data have been audited, verified, or peer-reviewed. Please briefly describe this verification, if any. Report was prepared by the Sustainability Officer who was hired specifically for this audit.

• Blair Liddicoat, Dean, Adult Basic Education • Dr. James Paluzzi, Dean, KJZZ/KBAQ/Sun Sounds • Dana Reid, Dean, Course Production Support • Mary Rodes, Dean, Sales and Marketing • Rachelle Clark, Associate Dean, Student Services and Advisement, MAT Representative • Michael Cottam, Associate Dean, Instructional Design

• Pat Case

• Jennifer Freed • John Jensen • Janet Johnson • Liz Kaz • Tom Lombardo • Cynthia Maxson • Robert Semmler • Kerrie Specker

College Staff

• Earnestine Harrison, Associate Dean, Instruction

• Inhye Peterson, PSA President

• Ruby Miller, Associate Dean, Admissions and Records

• Victoria Rosales, PTK Student Representative


2323 West 14th Street Tempe, AZ 85281 www.riosalado.edu

Rio Salado Climate Action Plan  

Rio Salado College is totally committed to the triple bottom line (3BL) of sustainability: socially just and equitable, economically robust...