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SELECTED GERRIT RIETVELD ACADEMIE AWARDS SHOW 2013 AT INTELLECTUAL PLAYGROUND CASTRUM PEREGRINI NOVEMBER 20–DECEMBER 15

CATALOGUE


ENCOUNTERS AT CASTRUM PEREGRINI For the second time now, SELECTED presents exceptionally talented alumni in the Castrum Peregrini exhibition space. This group exhibition in the heart of Amsterdam serves as a first step for these budding independent artists. The ‘intellectual playground’ Castrum Peregrini started out as a hiding place during World War II. Under the guidance of the artist Gisèle van Waterschoot van der Gracht and the poet Wolfgang Frommel, young people could preserve their mental freedom by engaging with art and literature in an intensive way. From that time to the present day the building has been a place for encounters with and between writers, artists, philosophers, academics and critics. The central theme of the interdisciplinary programme is “freedom, friendship and culture”, values that enable (mental) survival, important

both then and now in our own society. It is in this historical and present-day context that this selection of artists is being displayed as part of the GRA Awards. During the Sunday Salons and the Amsterdam Art Weekend, visitors can meet this new crop of artists and designers in person.

GRA AWARDS With the GRA Awards, the Gerrit Rietveld Academie wants to draw attention to talented young artists and provide them with a degree of financial support to help them establish themselves as professional artists. In addition to inclusion in SELECTED and a modest cash prize of 1500€, the winners are also given a four months residency at 2de Nassaustraat studios in Amsterdam.


GENERAL IMPRESSIONS THESIS

This year the jury of the Thesis Award, consisting of Renée Kool (visual artist), Wieteke van Zeil (art critic de Volkskrant) and Jeroen Boomgaard (lector at Rietveld), was impressed by the diversity of the subjects the students have chosen as a topic for their thesis. The jury would like to note that they were equally impressed by the energy and enthusiasm of the theory teachers that have been supervising these theses. Theory and research were used in a clever way to make broad and rich associations. Most of the texts have a logical structure and a clear outline, but the students are not afraid to deviate from rational and logical thinking, which at times results in surprising and exciting writing. The jury has discovered a lot of talented writers at the Rietveld and had a difficult task in choosing the winner. To decide the winner of the Thesis Award the jury has

looked at the content, the language and the presentation of the theses. Specifically the jury has judged on the way a student was able to engage the reader in the subject and not only follow her or his own fascinations. —Renée Kool, Wieteke van Zeil and Jeroen Boomgaard (Chairman) FINE ARTS AND DESIGN

The jurors of the GRA Awards 2013 for Fine Arts and Design—curator Sue-an van der Zijpp and exhibition designer and stylist Maarten Spruyt for Design, and artists Renzo Martens and Rob Johannesma for Fine Arts— were impressed by the diversity of the work and the attention that students had given to their research. They also noted that many students chose to work with performance, and the numerous works incorporating audiovisual and audio media.


Further, the jury observed that, rather than performing themselves, many students used others in their performances, as instruments or media. Rhythms also featured prominently in a number of performances; the exploration of rhythms and traces through movement, dance, or in the natural world. In some instances, walks were literally visualized and documented.

in the execution of the work, and caused more of a sensation more often!

The jury also commented on the recurrence of particular themes, such as the aesthetic of the everyday. Students also frequently chose to work from the here and now, the startingpoint of what exists. Drawing on everything available to them now—technology and materials—they recorded experiences and Another trend, also often developments. The jury saw found in museums, is the use this as a positive and hopeful of found footage. As a device, development; concepts don’t this can be put to powerful always need to focus on more, effect although the members and different—they can also of the panel felt that some pay tribute to what already students used it without suffi- exists. cient thought. In various cases, students had not fully motivated their reasons for Jury members: using found footage or what Sue-an van der Zijpp, they were trying to say with Maarten Spruyt, it; as a result, the work lacked Renzo Martens and conviction. Rob Johannesma. Although the preliminary research was thorough, the end result did not always live up to expectations. Students could have taken greater care


The final works of the three winners and eight nominees of the annual GRA awards —the Gerrit Rietveld Academie prizes, with an external jury—are on display in the Castrum Peregrini cultural centre in Amsterdam from 20 November through 15 December 2013. In addition to the winners all nominees are given the opportunity to present their final projects. “The final year students are using all the technical possibilities and materials now available to them to record experiences and developments. The jury sees this as an excellent and hopeful development. Everything does not always have to be more and different. What already exists also deserves to be honoured.” (From the GRA Awards jury report)


KARIN BARTELS JEWELLERY DOVILE BERNADISIUTE JEWELLERY ANITA BURATO TXT (TEXTILE) ROSAN DEKKER GRAPHIC DESIGN EAMONN HARNETT—WINNER FINE ARTS JOHANNA KOTLARIS—WINNER GRAPHIC DESIGN CÉLINE MANZ PHOTOGRAPHY SILVIA MARTES VAV ANTON STUCKARDT—WINNER GRAPHIC DESIGN INGE THOES DOGTIME FINE ARTS


KARIN BARTELS JEWELLERY DEPARTMENT THESIS NOMINEE ARTIST’S STATEMENT

There is no meaning if meaning is not shared, and not because there would be an ultimate or first signification that all beings have in common, but because meaning is itself the sharing of Being. —Jean-Luc Nancy In my practice I’m dealing with a work in progress. Central to the development of my practice are the results coming from my micro research as a part of the expanded field of contemporary jewellery. By mapping my chance encounters, I investigate the role of public space, social interaction with strangers, the element of chance, and the gift. With the collected and archived materials of my research I create digital atlases guided by the use of my imagination. In my practice I try to achieve a certain level of immateriality and aspire to offer an experience by creating a condensed life within a piece.

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CHANCE ENCOUNTERS | A GESTURE, AN OBJECT, A DÉCOR — THESIS

The thesis starts with the introduction how the mapping of my chance encounters in public space slowly develops into a micro research on the expanded field of contemporary jewellery. In the thesis I focus on the conceptual questions and ideas that have arisen from this practice. JURY REPORT

The jury found that Karin Bartels is a good storyteller. She starts off her research on the micro level of a hatpin and manages to translate that towards the macro level of social interaction. Bartel’s thesis is original in that she shows the interest of seeing jewelry as something else than merely a gem. Through the chance encounters she has had and archived, she reflects on what a jewel could be. Working with complex theories Bartel manages to develop her practice in an exciting direction.

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DOVILE BERNADISIUTE JEWELLERY DEPARTMENT DESIGN NOMINEE

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

As you all know there are many big things in the world. But there is one thing that crowns all of them, and that’s jewellery. And when people started to make jewelry they started to think about appropriating the beauty and high quality of the world, they wanted to keep it close. So do I. What is closest to my body is the space around me, the built environment and jewelry. These must be related to each other. I think about jewelry and this space as a condition of the city, as its marginal spaces. Remnants of the intimate and domestic, such as old furniture in my current apartment, walls and floors. The patina of the materials that bound everyday interiors expresses a temporality that contrasts sharply with that of our bod-

ies. Even though I am not interested in the materiality of the human body as such, I am intrigued by the tense resistance between the physical and the spiritual. Jewelry is about intimacy and, while everyone wants spectacular pieces, adornments and diamonds, jewels need to speak about the spaces we are in.  I call for attention for the daily, most arbitrary details in architecture that people tend to overlook. I try to invert jewelry’s function as decoration of the body and, instead, show how the body must enliven the material.

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JURY REPORT

Dovile made wearable architecture. She glued rubber to floors, walls and other architectonic elements; the architecture functioned as a mould. Next, using the rubber, she created wearable objects sucwh as a sash that can be draped around the shoulders. The objects also bear traces of the environmental surfaces to which the rubber was glued. Cracks in the floor are accentuated; dirt, stains, dust mites and footprints travel with the wearer like a second skin. The intriguing jewellery immediately raises questions: what is this mysterious rub-

ber coat actually made from? Even if you are slathered in mud, the jacket will give you an air of grandeur. A fascinating contradiction. The jury not only praised the concept, but also the presentation. They felt that the work was executed to a high standard and were impressed by it, saying it was an excellent start. The jury said it was the promise of far more to come—ideas that could of benefit to the world.

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DOVILE BERNADISIUTE In my work, architectural details of different places function as moulds. Later I transform them into garments and jewellery. My work is about the surfaces of buildings, proportions of the body and the built environment, the remnants of our existence embedded in the environment, reflections of buildings within ourselves. Pieces that are created appear on the body like second skin and suggest wearability. All the pieces are made out of rubber, cheesecloth and silver. The titles refer to the places the mould was taken from.

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WEARABLE ARCHITECTURE

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ANITA BURATO TEXTILE DEPARTMENT THESIS AND DESIGN NOMINEE

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

The present context of the art and design bubble—the frustration of which was one of the main triggers for my theoretical and practical research—is the context by excellence that demands for definitions and representations. So I here present my work as an attempt at surviving in the blurry area of undefined, undetermined, unfinished being. An area being undermined, among other (f)actors, by the white all-inclusiveness. UNTITLED — GRADUATION WORK

As the nature of making works presupposes leaving behind a finished work, for my “final” project I preferred to work on the working. I tried to do so by sharing the approach to knowledge at the basis of my theory and practice. The non-productoriented approach that lead to some of the artifacts-in-the-making showed during my graduation, is now shared with a book instead. This compilation of sketches and indexing attempts shows my projects as systems rather

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than as objects, focusing on detours and motifs. The book itself is an attempt at mapping without  flattening, at showing the complexity of thought in its dynamic complexity rather than in its instrumental systematization. It is a collaboration with my friend Lieselot, in which we investigate methods for representing multiple dimensions in the two-dimensional paper and try to overcome the linearity, finitude and staticness of the book format. 

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ANITA BURATO JURY REPORT DESIGN

Anita used old looms and exploring topics such as craft, and the throwaway specific themes central to Anita’s work, she does offer an alternative. We consider the technology of old-fashioned looms and knitting machines as obsolete, but by adding to them a new technique Anita increases their functionality and range. She does not reject new technology but uses it to enhance older processes, giving them a new lease of life. In this way, a knitting machine becomes connected to a computer which enables it to perform new applications. Her approach also reveals the working of the old, analogue system through the use of new, digital technology. How did an old-fashioned knitting machine actually work, then? The jury thought that her concept was original—she intervenes in the world and presents us with otherapproaches, other ways. Anita

offers an alternative to our traditional perception of modern and ‘antiquated’ technology. The execution could be stronger and more precise. Both jurors are curious to see the next phase in her development as a young designer. They hope she will be able to give recalcitrant concepts a more convincing form.

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SOLVE ET COAGULA — THESIS

About closing and opening processes, about finished and unfinished artifacts, about potentiality and actualization, about specific and generic, about programs and antiprograms, about designing and undesigning, about exposing and hiding, about subjectivation and desubjectivation, about instrumentality and play, about consumers and prosumers, about objects and systems, about means and ends, about being and becoming and about the gaps in between. An attempt at mapping some of the tangles of the sociotechnical apparatus. An attempt at talking about things that are not defined yet, without defining them myself. JURY REPORT THESIS

Anita Burato has done research into a problem that she encountered in her practice: how could she present the tools or systems that are used to make something rather than just the product? How could she show the possibilities implied in something and not just the final thing? In her attempt to answer this question she has written a very clear and logical thesis. She has found a way to internalize the difficult theoreti-

cal material and write about it in a fluent manner, but surprisingly Burato also writes with a lot of wit. Underlying the whole thesis is a very strong sense of urgency: this is not just a topic, but also a serious attempt to handle the world in a better way. And although you sometimes hear the voice of the activist in the thesis, in the end it is the voice of smart thinker/maker that has convinced the jury.

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ROSAN DEKKER GRAPHIC DESIGN DEPARTMENT THESIS NOMINEE

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Rosan Dekker is a graphic designer and artist who lives and works in Amsterdam. In her work, she investigates the difference between privacy and publicity. Found footage often serves as the basis for her projects. A newspaper ad posted by someone looking to hitch a ride through the Sahara desert, or a fully written postcard found on the street—it’s traces like these that show us a glimpse into the private world of a stranger. Dekker investigates this footage using text and photography. By collecting, selecting, examining and, in the end, publishing the results of her research, she invites the spectator to observe the material and to fantasize about the lives of these strangers. Dekker’s work is

characterized by a simple and clear aesthetic. The design is subordinate to the content, allowing the public to form an opinion about the found footage themselves.

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OVER DE KUNSTENAAR DIE EEN DETECTIVE WILDE ZIJN — THESIS

In L’Hotel (1981) artist Sophie Calle takes a job as a chambermaid in a Venetian hotel. During her work she photographs the beds, open suitcases and she reads personal letters. She documents everything the guests leave behind. She publishes her discoveries in L’Hotel. The artists that are described in this thesis behave just like Calle. They investigate life just like voyeurs. They gather information, examine this carefully and publish their findings. On the basis of Douglas Huebler, Arjan de Nooy and Hans Aarsman, the similarities and differences between the artist and the detective are discussed in this thesis. JURY REPORT

The jury found the carefully designed thesis of Rosan Dekker, which looks like a poetry booklet from the early twentieth century, very charming. But the jury was also impressed by the content of the thesis. In her thesis Rosan investigates what we can learn from the artist in the role of detective. Rosan shows in a well-written nar-

rative that the artist should be a detective that asks the wrong questions and takes up the false leads to get the best results. The jury has found that Rosan is the only thesis that shows good art criticism in that she is not afraid to take in a position and defend it.

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EAMONN HARNETT FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT FINE ARTS WINNER

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Through my work I aim to process my own insecurities, intuitively creating objects, forms and symbols; forming a small mimesis of personal importance. In the objects I make a reverence to other symbolic structures, like the healing ceremonies of the Navajo. These revolve around the creation of a sand drawing and the healing effect it will have on the injured, who sit on the sand painting, the drawn cosmology sending energy into the body. In such a case, communal unity is also an important factor in the structure of its ritual, and together with the intense involvement of family and other onlookers the ceremony will hopefully achieve its desired results. Such communal dedication is needed for these gestures and sym-

bols to be believed and sustained. If they are questioned, primitive societies with the least capability to reconstruct a new fantasy will perish, dying because of their inability to deal with other notions of their bodies, the land and their given environment.

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JURY REPORT

The jury was extremely impressed by the work of Eamonn. It expressed clarity, vision and an extraordinary talent. The visitor steps into a circular hut; the air is scented with baby oil. Eamonn gives performances at different times, but the work also functions without. A video of what previously occurred in the space is constantly playing. It is a work that perpetually changes; with every performance, the hut is also transformed by the touch of the performer. According to the jury, it actually presents the obverse of an artwork: the elements that are needed to create a work.Eamonn uses elements and objects from a plethora of different worlds and inspirations: fetish culture, tribal art, pop art, and so on. The members of the

jury experienced the result as a personal mini-mythology. The props Eamonn uses during his performance are made by hand, by the artist. The delicacy with which he makes his work is also a testament to courage. The jury felt that, in finally arriving at this point, Eamonn must have gone through quite a struggle during his time at art school. His graduation project is restrained, slow and silent, but beneath that vulnerability lies a gruesome undercurrent; a contrast between fetish and torture, and tender rituals. The jury looks forward to seeing the work presented in a larger institution or in a museum. They went on to say, even if it proves painful, they are convinced he will remain authentic and true to himself.

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EAMONN HARNETT

UNTITLED, 2012, Performance (50-90 min), various materials

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On the first floor of Castrum Peregrini a large circular space has been constructed, its entrance facing south. Dim, subdued lighting permeates through a ceiling of unbleached cotton fabric. Purpose-built for a ritual, its function is open to new possibilities and gestures. It is a space which may relive the past in correlation with the future, merging as one, following its own evolutionary path. A ritual will take place several times during the period of the exhibition; during this ritual performance something will be made or done: a washing ritual, a drawing made of washing powder on the floor, a large vase or maybe nothing. The audience will sit in a circle around me while I perform;Â relaxing, falling into a trance or walking away. Meanwhile the air is tinged just slightly with the smell of baby oil.


JOHANNA KOTLARIS GRAPHIC DESIGN DEPARTMENT DESIGN WINNER

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

As a designer it is almost inevitable for me to question function. Throughout my work in the past years I have often been confronted with the need to give myself rules, follow guidelines or develop systems upon which I could build up a work process. By observing this pattern of a continuous searching for justification, I lately find myself investigating this topic more deeply. I am trying to understand what is personal, impersonal, judgment, choice, right, wrong, restriction, freedom, the individual, the general, opposites. This interest is not limited to the area of design; it spills over into more aspects of life. I try to clarify my questions through the act of testing things on myself, using my life as a platform of experimentation and reflection on society and the individual within it. And rather than being bound by a technique, I approach each of my quests though their own media. What remains of the process is a document which can take any kind of shape.

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JURY REPORT

Johanna’s work consists of a video with herself as the subject. In writing about her work, she says: ‘It’s about the paradox of maximised freedom in a world where we have so many choices; if we are unhappy with the product we are unhappy with ourselves. I believe this overflow of choices has something to do with my search of rules in design.’ Johanna’s video explores the stress she experiences when having to make choices; she finds choosing very difficult. In her graduation project, she decided to leave certain choices to others. The waitress decides what she will eat; Johanna selects the colour of her clothes based on the colours of the rainbow. She took a very stylish approach to the subject. The photographs (taken by Johanna)— and edited into her video work—are beautiful and reveal her photographic talent. The subject could easily have ended up being irritating

but, because of her personal and humorous style, the piece is sympathetic and engaging. She creates a world of her own and invites the viewer to join her in her navel-gazing. The video has a very strong aesthetic sense, combined with a convincing tension in style and tone: sometimes in your face, sometimes muted, sometimes self-mocking. It’s a theme that’s very relevant right now–also to Johanna’s generation. Perhaps, on the quiet, it’s an annoying luxury problem but presented in a pleasantly luxurious way by Johanna Kotlaris.

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JOHANNA KOTLARIS

The official dogma of western industrial societies is that welfare is maximized along with freedom. Our identity is a matter of choice, we can reinvent it every day: we are the designers of our own selves. The decisions which we constantly take range from rather simple ones like ‘what should I wear or eat today’ to more significant ones such as ‘should I get married’, ‘should I live in one country rather than in another’, ‘should I spend my holidays in the snow or at the beach’. I believe this overflow of choices has something to do

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IN THE SNOW OR AT THE BEACH (ONE MONTH EXCERPT), Video stills

with my search for rules in design. To understand this need, I am taking this inquiry and applying it to my daily life: I observe my visual judgement, try to pass my decisions into the hands of somebody else, of a crowd or a machine. I give myself frames to play with and collect unexpected choices by others. IN THE SNOW OR AT THE BEACH is an oscillation between security and serendipity.

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CÉLINE MANZ PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT FINE ARTS NOMINEE

ARTIST STATEMENT

I am interested in sociopolitical questions. Art for me is a way of reacting to things that surround me. I find the most inspiring elements in everyday items; things I walk past, hear on the radio, read and see in the newspapers, on TV, in the Internet. I like to take those elements out of their context and put them in a new perspective, creating a mirror effect. For instance, one topic that I am dealing with is the question of perception. The way we perceive the world and ourselves is greatly influenced by the media we consume every day. Photography, the medium I work with the most, is a very subjective medium; highly constructed, manipulative and used aggressively as a selling tool in the mass media. Whether I am work-

ing with analogue or digital photography, I like to emphasize the constructed aspect of the medium, to reveal intentions through postproduction. Even though my main focus lies in digital and analogue photography I also like to use other media like text, film or objects.

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JURY REPORT

On entering, the walls are covered with posters—each of which is extremely powerful. At first, they appear to be ‘eye candy’, slick images that easily slot into a popular culture, yet border on pornography. But when you take a closer look, the artist’s true theme emerges. For Céline, her thesis and work are one and the same. In both, she explored the boundaries of the legal representation of sexism. She researched advertising and fashion photography: when is an image acceptable, and when does it cross the line? She put her research into practice by borrowing or distorting images, is erasing elements of them. The dual lines of her work are presented with great conviction:

her almost legally—based research in tandem with its seductive visual expression. The jury would be delighted to see Céline’s work published in a fashion magazine, in dialogue and confrontation with standard fashion photography. With her analytical approach and excellent personal preasentation she has the ability to infiltrate into fashion, probably to startling effect.

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CÉLINE MANZ

A1, Photoshop collages on ColorWave Poster Prints, 100 gr

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A1 consists of images I appropriated from the internet from photographer Terry Richardson. My interpretations of his work are caricatures. Using Richardson in an iconic way, I aimed to create a new, less serious discourse around the subject of mainstream sexism. Another part of this work is the aspect of copyright. In my thesis ‘What do you know about art, you’re not a lawyer’ I investigated the legal boundaries and frictions caused by appropriative practice in art. Part of this investigation was a publication called ‘The Appropriator’s User Guide’.


SILVIA MARTES VAV DEPARTMENT FINE ARTS NOMINEE

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

My artworks deal with the personal dilemmas and experiences of the female being, connected to investigations of the interior and exterior in the broadest sense, shown in a created setting or as a depiction of actual surroundings. Mostly based on autobiographical experiences, I use myself or actors to play out scripts, mainly in the medium of photography and short films. As I want to be in full control of what lies within the audio-visual frame, my work also consists of set building and stage design. I create installations for my films and within my films I create installations. Even though my colorful work can at times be highly staged, my goal is to achieve an honest, moving connection with the viewer at all times.

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JURY REPORT

Silvia Martes display an unmistakable and original drive and seems to have an inexhaustible source of narrative material. The jury enjoyed her previous works, but advised her to immerse herself more deeply in fine art as a while, see work by a lot of other artists and, most of all, to continue studying. One of her graduation pieces was extraordinarily powerful, the short film ‘She that comes from the green forest, on a Tuesday’. The work has an urgency and great emotion, and exhibits a skilful abstraction of text. The film also includes interesting images of, among other things, houses on Curacao, and flat-bed trailers transporting construction cabins in the Netherlands. There were doubts about the cohe-

sion between the various works. In some works her use of images is virtuoso, while others are less carefully crafted and the approach risks becoming clichéd. Silvia demonstrates her mastery of the craft in ‘She that comes from the green forest, on a Tuesday’.

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SILVIA MARTES

‘She that comes from the green forest, on a Tuesday’ is an audio-visual triptych installation which reflects the literal translation of the name Silvia Martes. Autobiographical memories, rituals and objects within the domestic space are connected to exterior spaces, while being continually inspected, ordered and rearranged.

SHE THAT COMES FROM THE GREEN FOREST, ON A TUESDAY.

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1. She that comes from the green forest, on a Tuesday (video; 7min 07s)

2. The two views (print on Plexiglas; 80 cmĂ—40 cm) 3. The hanging gardens (video; 1min 59s, loop)


ANTON STUCKARDT GRAPHIC DESIGN DEPARTMENT THESIS WINNER

ORTHOGONAL ALLEGORY: THE REALITY OF ARCHITECTURAL PLAN DRAWING — THESIS

In the 20th century, a detachment of the architect’s work from the construction process facilitated a highly abstracted and theoretical development of architecture, right up to the point where building no longer necessarily forms the basis of architecture, and where a drawing is as equally considered a piece of architecture as a building. Architecture developed into something that is primarily a reflective practice and only secondarily the craft of construction. “In order to ARTIST’S STATEMENT execute it is necessary to conceive... It is Born 1989 in Berlin, this product of the mind, the process of lives and works creation, that constitutes architecture”. in Amsterdam. In this light it is not surprising how easily architectural and philosophical terminologies have become interchangeable and metaphorized between the two disciplines.

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JURY REPORT

Anton Stuckardt has tackled the difficult subject of how the three-dimensional form is two-dimensionally represented. Still Anton manages to make the subject understandable in a very intelligent way and the thesis shows that he is a sharp thinker. The jury also found it to Anton’s advantage that he took his own interest in architecture, and connected this to the field of graphic design. Overall the thesis was compact, powerful and well written with good illustrations.

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INGE THOES DOG TIME FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT THESIS NOMINEE

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

In my work I look for combinations of objects, materials and pictures that raise unexpected contradictions—the tension between the stupid on the one hand and the political on the other, for example. Or between magic and hard edge. Clichéd and iconic images form an important source for my art. I try to deconstruct the appeal of these pictures and investigate how their meaning can change depending on the context. JURY REPORT

In her thesis Inge Thoes thinks about the mind-boggling amount of images that are created in our society today and how she could relate to this as an art student. The jury thought that this thesis was one of the only theses that showed the students determination to develop their practice and she did this in a very creative manner. Inge takes up the media-

politics of Anders Breivik and, in doing that, introduces surprising new categories such as a ‘costume crime’. This gives her thesis great relevance according to the jury.

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ANDERS BREIVIK VERSUS RAT EN BEER; OORLOG EN KUNST IN HET NIEUWE WOTAN TIJDPERK — THESIS

Palm tree on a white sandy beach. Room with a dead end. Ping-pong table. Draughtsman Drawing a Recumbent Woman. Still life with fruit. Hardcore gabber music. Rocket ice lolly. The hooded man in Abu Graib. Call for revolution. Confetti bomb. Anders Breivik. Rat and Bear. If there are parallel worlds and we are able to switch between them, why do some people still prefer 'only' one world? With what symbols do they anchor themselves in their chosen semi-autonomous domain? And to what extend are we willing to question our own worldviews? These are questions that Inge Thoes raises in her thesis.

idea of freedom. On the other hand she presents us the mumbling universe of Rat and Bear who incessantly explore, interrogate and investigate the way they view the world—illogical but without prejudice. The archaic legacy of Jung is what holds the worlds discussed in this paper together.

On the one hand she shows us the frozen, immobile world of Anders Breivik, who freed himself from his teethgrinding universe and reinvented himself as a superman who fights for his own

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GRAPHIC DESIGN BY Maria Mitcheva Migle˙ Kazlauskaite˙ ARTISTS PHOTOGRAPHED BY Gert Jan van Rooij © Public Rietveld


Gerrit Rietveld Academie 2013

[S]elected catalogue  

Gerrit Rietveld Academie Awards Show 2013 At Intelectual Playground Castrum Peregrini November 20 - December 15

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