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MODUS JULY/AUGUST 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE HOME ISSUE

#RICSmodus JULY/AUGUST 2015 rics.org/modus

®

@ RICSnews

THE HOME ISSUE LOCKED OUT

How to combat the global housing crisis / 16

OPEN SEASON

Are flexible offices really more productive? / 26

AN OLD AGE PROBLEM

Defusing the retirement homes timebomb / 36

IT’S A SMALL WORLD Micro-homes: the next big thing / 32

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Contents MODUS JULY/AUGUST 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS

“The economy of industrialised countries rests on the success of knowledge-based industries in our cities, and this requires people to live and work in close proximity so they can share their knowledge”

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06 DIFFERENCE OF OPINION Is flexible working actually any good for your office’s productivity? We hear two points of view 07-15 NEWS IN BRIEF Essential industry news, advice and information for RICS members 08 THINKING: EVE SALOMON Outgoing Chair of RICS’ Regulatory Board on winning the battle for hearts and minds over regulation 13 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Martin J Brühl FRICS reflects on the 30-year journey that has brought him to the presidency of the Institution

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36

16 HOUSES UNFIT FOR PURPOSE Confronting our affordable living crisis 24 HOME BUYERS REPORT Global housing market in numbers 26 DESKTOP CLEAN UP Modern ways of working force offices to adapt … for the better? 32 COVER STORY Smart, flexible, compact homes here to stay 36 SEARCH FOR A SILVER LINING How will we accommodate the world’s rapidly ageing population? 42 NEW DAWN IN VIETNAM Rule change on inward investment could spark real estate resurgence 44 NO WALK IN THE PARK Sheffield learns to love Park Hill again

Foundations

06

Features

Intelligence

BEN DERBYSHIRE, HTA DESIGN COVER STORY, P32

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48

51

46-47 CAREERS Getting the most out of LinkedIn; and Savills Vietnam’s Neil MacGregor FRICS 48 BUSINESS The delicate art of delegation 49 LEGAL 101 Keeping your data secure in an age of information sharing 51 BRAIN GAIN Managing assets in the public sector 66 MIND MAP Fast Future Research’s Rohit Talwar on how hotels can adapt for the future PLUS 52 Benefits 53 Events 54 Obituaries + Conduct 56 Recruitment

Views expressed in Modus are those of the named author and are not necessarily those of RICS or the publisher. The contents of this magazine are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without the prior permission of the publisher. All information correct at time of going to press. All rights reserved. The publisher cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. RICS does not accept responsibility for loss, injury or damage or costs that result from, or are connected in any way to, the use of products or services advertised. All editions of Modus are printed on paper sourced from sustainable, properly managed forests. This magazine can be recycled for use in newspapers and packaging. Please dispose of it at your local collection point. The polywrap is made from biodegradable material and can be recycled.

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RETROFIT GREEN ROOFS & MAINTENANCE

04

WATERPROOFING SYSTEMS

PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY

RICS.ORG/MODUS

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USEFUL RICS NUMBERS CONTACT CENTRE +44 (0)24 7686 8555 Enquiries / APC guidance / Subscriptions / Passwords / Library / Bookshop REGULATION HELPLINE +44 (0)20 7695 1670 CONFIDENTIAL HELPLINE +44 (0)20 7334 3867 DISPUTE RESOLUTION SERVICES +44 (0)20 7334 3806 SWITCHBOARD +44 (0)20 7222 7000 LIONHEART +44 (0)24 7646 6696

Feedback

Join the debate REACTIONS AND RESPONSES FROM PREVIOUS ISSUES

Do you have a comment about this issue of Modus? Email editor@ricsmodus.com, or tweet us using #RICSmodus RIDING TO THE RESCUE Sir, Nick Hanson wrote to express his concern, and that of his peers, on the “significant lack of information relevant to the quantity surveying profession” in Modus (Feedback, February). May I respectfully suggest to Mr Hanson and his peers that they consider generating such articles themselves, by bringing matters of interest in the quantity surveying profession to the attention of the Modus editorial team. Modus is one of the few magazines that I always read as I enjoy the diversity of its content. I have, in the last year or so, initiated articles on heritage conservation and property asset health management. It is our magazine and it’s up to all of us to contribute to sharing matters of interest. Michael J Moir FRICS, director of property, Hong Kong Jockey Club LOFTY AMBITION Sir, As a reader of Modus and an APC assessor, I am often reminded about the importance of the professionalism of RICS members. I was therefore rather surprised recently to be on the other side of the fence. As a homeowner balancing a residential sale and purchase, I arranged a mortgage survey with a large surveying firm, who agreed to call beforehand to ensure that I was available. After the allotted time slot had lapsed, the surveyor arrived, conceding that he should have rung, but it was OK, as I was in. I was then asked to supply a ladder, as he couldn’t get into the loft. I was a little surprised he didn’t have the necessary equipment to carry out the job, and that he hadn’t even noticed there was a ladder in place. It’s all very well talking about professionalism – but let’s see it being put into practice. Name and address supplied

@RICSnews // #RICSmodus @jakesoden Bit of reading in the garden while the suns out. @RICSnews @RICSCPD @RICSNorth #modus #buildingsurveying @theagentsdiary In ‘Conflict’ issue of

#RICSmodus magazine,#surveyors on the front line. A few I’d like on the front line..#ukhousing @RajSurveyor Loving the new #glossy

feel #RICSmodus magazine @Watts_Group Well done to Robert

Burke, one of our London Directors, who managed to get his opinion published in Modus magazine @BrosQS Interesting article on #BIM in this months @RICSnews #modus magazine. Take up appears to be slow in the #UK

COUNTING THE COST Sir, Modus continues to include fascinating global statistics presented in imaginative graphical form. But as a quantity surveyor I am frustrated by the almost total absence of construction cost data. By which I mean single projects and their costs or cost data by building type. You only have to look at Architects’ Journal to see how this is done. Greg Franklin MRICS, Stockdale Partners

CLIENT IS KING Sir, As Charles Brien reported, (Legal 101, page 45, June), the CDM coordinator is going the same way as the planning supervisor before him – confined to history. Back in 1995 I argued that the then-new CDM (construction, design and management) regulations should not be seen as a cash cow, and that experienced building surveyors were likely to be among those best equipped to discuss safety in design, maintenance and demolition with other members of the design team. It seems a long time for the regulations to come to the logical conclusion that the client is the one who funds the project and, if he doesn’t put the resources in, should be the one to take the heat in the event of an accident. Equally, the designers must take the responsibility for health and safety upon themselves, instead of producing obscure risk assessments for the blindingly obvious and missing the subtle nuances of their designs in terms of how to build, maintain and remove their creations. CDM has finally recognised that the client is master. Designers might tell contractors what to do, but they are never the employer and apart from being diligent in advising the client on safety, have no power to enhance resources that the client is unwilling to provide. Equally, a diligent client and design team cannot be expected to foresee a contractor simply taking the money and providing no safety on site. As long as adequate supervision is maintained, a contractor won’t get away with it – or if he does it will be him, not the client, in the dock. Adrian J Singleton MRICS, Essex

90,122 average net circulation 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015

FOR SUNDAY Editor Oliver Parsons / Art Director Christie Ferdinando / Contributing Editor Brendon Hooper / Production Editor Andy Plowman / Senior Designer Isabella Fernandes / Creative Director Matt Beaven / Account Director Karen Jenner / Advertisement Sales Director Emma Kennedy / Advertisement Manager Karren Cook / Sales Manager Angus Sharpe / Sales Executive Nick Webb / Production Manager Michael Wood / Managing Director Toby Smeeton / Repro F1 Colour / Printers Wyndeham Group / Cover Image Hattie Newman; Ania Wawrzkowicz / Published by Sunday, 207 Union Street, London SE1 0LN wearesunday.com / For RICS James Murphy and Kate Symons, RICS, Parliament Square, London SW1P 3AD

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Intelligence

News / Reviews / Opinions / Reactions

DIFFERENCE OF OPINION

Does flexible working help or hinder productivity? Discuss.

MY BUSINESS IS NOT A WELL-KNOWN BRAND NAME SO, IN ORDER TO ATTRACT really good talent, we offer flexible working. Our staff want to work hard, but they also want to have some balance in their lives. I employ 12 full-time staff, but there are days when only two or three people are in the office. Our office is a meeting place – our staff work from home or are on site with clients. Because they don’t need to be at our Oxford office every day, they can live much further away, so I can access a greater pool of talent. My staff are highly qualified and experienced people, even though the business is still very much an SME (small LOUIS BARNETT ENTREPRENEUR AND FOUNDER, or medium-sized enterprise). LOUIS BARNETT CHOCOLATES, WEST MIDLANDS, UK My business has cloud-based systems in place that measure project profitability and so, if someone isn’t I FIND THAT WORKING FROM HOME JUST COMES WITH TOO delivering, it will soon be picked up. Staff are accountable for many distractions. You get up, have some breakfast and turn the work they do. We also meet with clients to ensure they on the laptop, but then the postman calls, or there’s a job you need to do in are happy with the work being done. The company also has the house. The home is full of distractions and, before too long, you’re a fortnightly conference call to exchange ideas and support moving from one thing to another without getting anything done. one another. However, I might only see some of my staff An essential thing I’ve learned in business is the importance of structure. once a quarter. We may be a small company, but we behave like a large corporation in terms Some businesses create working environments where of the structure and processes we use. Everything is logged on our cloudstaff burn out. But if you do not provide autonomy to your based systems. In our industry, everything needs to be traceable, so if employees, you end up with a different set of behaviours there was ever an issue with a product, or we had to do a recall, we could and this will be reflected in the result. Employers should find out exactly where the problem appeared. Our systems also allow me create businesses in which staff play to their strengths, want to see what all my staff are doing at any point in the day and then I can to work and, as a result, will want to deliver. My employees respond if something is taking too long, or is costing us too much money. often do work beyond their contracted hours, but they do it People have come to work for us from places that operate a flexible because they want to, not because I ask them to. working policy and it’s been a shock for them. In some cases, they’ve had to go. Our staff can’t just do what they like when they want to. Flexible working: straightforward or round the One of the other problems with flexible working is that people never bend? What’s your view? Join the discussion on switch off. You can get an email at 8 pm or even a call on a Sunday and spend the RICS LinkedIn group at rics.org/linkedin, hours dealing with it. Now we turn our phones off at the weekend, as you or tweet using #RICSmodus have to have time for yourself. Working all the time doesn’t make you more productive, it just tires you out, and it’s a mistake that many people make. Flexible working is reshaping Sometimes you have to train people in how you work. We can’t always be the way we use offices, p26 available. Time really is our most precious commodity. 06

INTERVIEWS JON CARD ILLUSTRATION TOMI UM

GRAHAM CLARKSON FOUNDER OF CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANCY THE CLARKSON ALLIANCE, OXFORD, UK

RICS.ORG/MODUS

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UAE

Saudi Arabia

Qatar

Intelligence

5,365

2,305m

361m

2,167

The kingdom was the fastest growing source of outbound Middle Eastern capital in 2014 Source: CBRE, Real Capital Analytics

3,785m 4,327

2,167m

RISE OF SAUDI ARABIAN OUTBOUND CAPITAL

Kuwait 5,365m

4,327m

1,800m 3,785 615m

2,305

1,800 615

361

2013 2014

Qatar

2013 2014

Kuwait

UAE

Saudi Arabia

UAE

Saudi Arabia

Qatar

Kuwait

RETAIL

NEWS IN BRIEF

5,365m

4,327m

®

FRENCH TOAST AS RUSSIA RULES THE MALL

ESTATE AGENTS’ 2,167m FEES

rics.org/modus

STAMP

3,785m

2,305mCONVEYANCING COSTS 1,800m

£5,214 +61%

Degree apprenticeships offerDUTY accessible path to MRICS £3,620

REMOVALS 615m £1,419 £1,034 activity in central +37% development +21% and eastern Europe (CEE) surged

SURVEYORS’ 361m FEES

£607

+51% in the second half of 2014. The RICS is to start providing degree+87% 2.2m m2 (23.68m apprenticeships for trainee 2013 2014 UAE latter deliveredKuwait Qatar Saudi Arabia surveyors that will lead to ft2) to the market, compared with chartered status (MRICS). the former’s 981,000 m2 (10.56m The first chartered surveying ft2) over the same period. degree apprenticeships will Cushman reported a rise in ESTATE be open to entrants from extensions and refurbishments in AGENTS’ September 2015 in England. western Europe, as developers seek CONVEYANCING FEES OECD* Other Europe & Middle East & Sub-Saharan Latin America East Asia & South Asia Apprentices will undertake a countries to “futureproof” small or outdated COSTS Central Asia £5,214 North America Africa & Caribbean Pacific REMOVALS STAMP SURVEYORS’ £1,419 part-time undergraduate degree centres. However, the CEE region Russia has broken France’s 43-year MOSCOW COOL +61% DUTY £1,034 FEES Aviapark, which +37% and gain in-work experience isDAYS largely developing reign as Europe’s largest shopping DAYS DAYS DAYS DAYS DAYS DAYS new-build, £3,620 +21% £607 is claimed to and training over a period of dominant regional centres that centre market, research from +87% be the biggest +51% four to five years. serve a wide catchment area. Cushman & Wakefield has revealed. shopping mall Applications to enrol can be Justin Taylor MRICS, Cushman’s Russia accounted for more than in Europe, opened in made any time of year through head of EMEA retail, commented: half of all shopping centre space Moscow last the Chartered Surveyors “Many developers have opted to added to the market in the second November Training Trust (CSTT). build increasingly large-scale half of 2014. The country’s total Trained CSTT counsellors schemes with significant leisure stock rose to more than 17.7m m2 provide pastoral support and offerings and an increasing share (190.5m ft2) by the end of the year counselling to apprentices, of food and beverage operators to – just overtaking France’s 17.66m OECD* Other Europe & Middle East & Sub-Saharan Latin America East Asia & South Asia countries Central Asiam2 (190m North America Africa & Caribbean give centres Pacific a unique identification. while every trainee also has ft2) gross lettable area. a personal tutor. Subject to With the rise of online sales, the The UK was Europe’s third largest €40.3 DAYS 2 DAYS DAYS €37.4 funds, a range of bursaries customersDAYS to interact market DAYS with€34.6 17.1m mDAYS (184m ft2).DAYS ability for €31.4 €28.3favourite brands in a welland other financial support Total floor space across Europe€29.8 with their €22.3 may be available for those designed, exciting and culturally increased 3.3% year-on-year, and experiencing severe financial rich environment has never been although western Europe accounts €24.6 hardship. Find out more at so important.” for 69% of total built space, rics.org/apprenticeships.

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Record-breaking start to RICS Awards 2015 season

INFOGRAPHIC IAN DUTNALL

INTERVIEWS JON CARD ILLUSTRATION TOMI UM

2013 2014

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2010

25,000 22,500

MODUS_July/Aug15_P06-15_Intel_v6_FROM F1.indd 7

33

24

27

Denmark

Sweden

33

65

59

France

€15.6

€40.3

Spain

59

Germany

99

81

Ireland

Italy

99

EU average

UK

VARYING LABOUR COSTS ACROSS IN 2014 (€/HOUR) €13.1EUROPE€8.4

€14.6

€7.3

€3.8

Source: Eurostat

€37.4

Slovenia

81

65

THE DATA

€21.3

A record number of guests attended the regional heats of the 2015 RICS Awards across the 12 UK regions. Included in the Project of the Year winners are Advocate’s Close in Edinburgh, All Souls in Bolton, Terminal 2, The Queen’s Terminal at Heathrow Airport, Clare Priory in Suffolk and Ty Admiral in Cardiff. 25,000 The winners of the first five 22,500 categories will go forward to the 20,000 RICS Awards Grand Final on 16 17,500 October 15,000 at the Dorchester hotel, London. 12,500 For a full winners’ list, 10,000 visit rics.org/awards. 7,500 5,000 2,500

27

€34.6

Greece

€31.4

Portugal

€29.8

Poland

€28.3

Hungary

€22.3 Bulgaria

€24.6

Denmark

Sweden

€21.3

Spain

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2011

France

€15.6

Slovenia

€14.6

Greece

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2012

Germany

Ireland

€13.1

€8.4

Luxury High-end Mid-end Affordable

Portugal

Italy

Poland

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2013

Luxury High-end

EU average

€7.3

Hungary

UK

€3.8

Bulgaria

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS 2014

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24/06/2015 14:36


“What sets RICS members apart is that they must meet professional entry standards and maintain those standards throughout their working careers”

A

s you read this, I’ll be coming to the end of my term as Chair of RICS’ Regulatory Board. What a period of change! When I started, regulation was still treated by some as “the enemy within” – a necessary but barely tolerated part of what sometimes felt like the RICS club. What I’ve seen is a welcome end to that mentality and a realisation that it is RICS’ professional standards, underpinned by effective regulation, that makes membership desirable and members’professional status valuable. The last six years has seen the introduction of firms regulation, the implementation of Valuer Registration in response to demand from the profession, the development and rollout of ethical standards, and the successful implementation of our new CPD policy and online recording – all accompanied by greater efficiency and improved performance within the department and ever-increasing ratings on the value of regulation from our regular member surveys. We’ve also seen the international expansion of regulation. We started as a UK-centric operation focused on consumer protection. Now, through a governance structure that supports the global reach of regulation, we can ensure locally relevant application of global principles designed to provide appropriate protection for all market sectors: consumers, business and the public sector. And we are the first (and only) regulator in our sector to do so. But there is still the challenge of bringing all of RICS’ membership along for the journey. Although most members outside the UK see the regulation of standards as a key benefit, there are some who still see it as an unwanted burden. We have a responsibility to demonstrate

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the value that regulation provides to all members. RICS regulation is based on the contract between an individual member or regulated firm and his or her professional body: we are regulating the standards that a member undertakes to maintain as a condition of membership. So, regulation can only work if we bring members along with us to commit to uphold those standards. And this can only happen if we are able to articulate and communicate the benefits of regulation to members. I have no doubt those benefits are there. Through regulation, RICS can assure the quality, expertise and integrity of its members. And those standards to which members are committed are profession-led, rather than imposed by law. Most RICS members see that, but there is a small, vocal section that do not, and cause damage. They run the risk of upsetting the status quo, and of RICS losing its self-regulatory status. In the UK, the hole would be filled by statutory regulation. Outside the UK, RICS would become just another trade body. The key word here is trade. The fundamental aspect that sets RICS members apart is that they are professionals, who must meet entry standards and maintain those standards throughout their working careers. RICS Regulation confirms to the world that those standards are met. So what next? We are working increasingly closely with professional groups, ensuring that any further requirements are based on a rigorous risk assessment, with minimum disruption to working practices, and are introduced at the behest of the members. Personally, I don’t envisage many new rules, and any that are introduced will be based on international standards, such as those in measurement and ethics being developed by the entire sector – with RICS’ endorsement. I see new challenges and opportunities as a result of consolidation within the profession and the growth of multidisciplinary companies. I’d like to see firms stepping up to the plate and taking primary responsibility for compliance with RICS’standards. We could work with firms to provide assurance that quality and compliance is at the heart of everything they do, just as we have embedded regulation at the heart of RICS’ vision. But fundamentally, I see growth in a profession marked by the seriousness with which it is prepared to stand out from the crowd, by both creating challenging standards and committing to them.

ILLUSTRATIONS ANDREA MANZATI

EVE SALOMON CHAIR, RICS REGULATORY BOARD

RICS.ORG/MODUS

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Qatar

Saudi Arabia

ESTATE AGENTS’ FEES

COST OF MOVING HOME IN THE UK In 2014 it cost the average person just under £12,000 to move home – a rise of 59% in the past decade

£5,214 +61%

STAMP DUTY

£3,620 +87%

SURVEYORS’ FEES

£607 +51%

Kuwait

UAE

CONVEYANCING COSTS

£1,419 +37%

Intelligence REMOVALS

£1,034 +21%

Source: Post Office Money, CEBR

NEWS IN BRIEF rics.org/modus

WE LIKE

®

OECD* countries

Other Europe & Central Asia

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Valuer Registration is now mandatory in Vietnam. The Vietnamese real estate market is recovering from a long period of stagnation, therefore minimising the risks associated with property valuations is essential if foreign investors are to feel confident (Briefing, page 42). Already implemented in Hong Kong in 2014, Valuer Registration is an individual monitoring scheme aimed at creating a single regulatory framework for all the RICS valuers globally, by promoting compliance with the RICS Red Book and embedding use of the International Valuation Standards (IVS). Francis Chiu FRICS, general manager, finance, of Sino Land Company, and member of RICS’ Asia Commercial Property Professional Group Board and Hong Kong Valuation Professional Group, said: “RICS Registered Valuers add credit to published valuation reports in terms of communicating international valuation standards, prudency of the methodologies, and reliability 25,000 of the valuation profession to 22,500 stakeholders around the globe.” 20,000 For more information, visit 17,500 15,000 rics.org/valuerregistration.

Middle East & North America

27 DAYS

Valuer Registration launches DAYS in south-east Asia

INFOGRAPHIC IAN DUTNALL IMAGE KLEINEOLIVE

ILLUSTRATIONS ANDREA MANZATI

2013 2014

33 DAYS

Sub-Saharan Africa

59 DAYS

Latin America & Caribbean

65 DAYS

East Asia & Pacific

South Asia

81 DAYS

99 DAYS

COUNTING CARBON The Chinese government has used the tool to inform how it reduces carbon emissions in the country

€40.3

The Global Calculator €37.4 €34.6 €31.4

€29.8

What’s that? It is the biggest open-source€28.3 model of the€22.3 world’s energy system ever built. Available as an online interactive tool, the calculator models global energy, land and food systems up to 2050 in order to €24.6 It then predicts explore and cost our options for tackling climate change. what the consequences of these decisions might be as far ahead as 2100. Who is it aimed at? Anyone who is interested in exploring what a low-carbon Ireland Denmark Sweden world France Italy EU average could lookGermany like in the near future. Businesses could find itUKparticularly useful for understanding how their sector will evolve at a global level as the €21.3 €15.6 €14.6 €13.1 economy €8.4– the markets world moves to a low-carbon €7.3 that will grow and what €3.8 opportunities may arise. For example, food producers could use it to ask what might be the global demand for food in 2050 depending on population growth or dietary preferences. Or bioenergy producers could use it to speculate on how production could be affected by future yield rates. Who’s using it?Portugal OrganisationsPoland such as Mott MacDonald, Shell, the World Spain Slovenia Greece Hungary Bulgaria Energy Council and the Chinese government have used the tool to inform their views of how the world should reduce carbon emissions. The calculator also allows you to design your own vision of the future energy, land and food system to 2050 by combining choices of 40 levers to create “pathways”. tool.globalcalculator.org Luxury High-end Mid-end Affordable

ONE THING I KNOW

12,500 10,000 7,500 in continental Europe? Based 5,000 Keep reading … 2,500

To reflect changes in reading Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Ho Chi Minh 2010 2011 patterns and to promote greater sustainability in our communications, from 1 September, members in continental Europe who want to continue receiving a hard copy of Modus must opt-in by emailing moduseurope@rics.org with your name and membership number.

Hanoi

“Securing the But I think “agency is next instruction thoroughness” would is as important as be more appropriate. In a strengthening the deal Ho Chi Minh Hanoiin hand” Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Ho Chi Minh

“in the market” and liaising with solicitors to push deals over the line not only results in Hanoi 2012 2013 market with limited2014 successful deals, but also secures a pipeline supply, any agent Tim Gilbertson MRICS, of new instructions. knows the deal in hand director, FHP Companies who are is key, but securing the Property Consultants, possible purchasers next new instruction Nottingham or tenants today, is just as important. “Agency is urgency” through thoroughness Therefore, a thorough is a quote used to and regular contact, approach to chasing pinpoint the key to can become your enquiries, keeping in success in commercial clients tomorrow. touch with parties property marketing. JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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SECRET SURVEYOR

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rics.org/modus

“Should the profession be doing more to market the specialist expertise of its members to the hotel industry?”

Coalition homes in on IPMS for residential property

O

ver the last several years, I have stayed at a number of four- and five-star hotels. When viewed in terms of guest satisfaction, without exception, all have been excellent. What I have also observed, however, is: trees growing out of chimneys and being fertilised by bird droppings; broken downpipes and blocked gutters with rainwater spilling over, staining the masonry, splashing on the ground and spattering mud on painted walls; windows jammed shut from painting in overheated bedrooms; poorly fitting external doors and windows, with the consequential continuous loss of heat; woodland planted when the hotel was built about 25 years ago that has never been maintained – which is now an eyesore littered with broken tree supports and plastic tubes; and paved areas that have been laid on an inadequate base, resulting in slabs that present a hazard to pedestrians and the potential for personal injury claims. I know that, in the short term, these defects have little or no

As the next step in developing a consistent set of international property measurement standards (IPMS), the IPMS Coalition (IPMSC) has launched a consultation on a new standard: IPMS: Residential Buildings. The IPMSC, which consists of more than 60 professional bodies and standard-setting organisations, is developing the standard to establish a common, global methodology for measuring residential property. It seeks to address existing inconsistencies in measurement practices between and within markets. The lack of a uniform approach can lead to confusion and the inability to compare property on a like-for-like basis. IPMS: Residential Buildings is the second in the suite of standards and follows the November 2014 launch of IPMS: Office Buildings. Once published, coalition organisations have committed to implementing the new standard. Further standards will be developed in other classes, such as industrial, retail and mixeduse property. The consultation will run until 30 September 2015. Visit ipmsc.org/consultation.

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INDUSTRIAL

DEMAND FOR SPACE IN EUROPE TO TREBLE

New guidance on valuation of intellectual property rights RICS recently announced publication of the global guidance note: Valuation of intellectual property rights, 1st edition. This guidance note covers the valuation of intellectual property (IP), a subset of intangible assets. Its purpose is to expand on the International Valuation Standards 2013 and the Red Book to clarify the legal, functional and economic characteristics of IP that valuers should consider and report on in an IP valuation. You can find the guidance note at rics.org/ valuationintellectualproperty.

effect on guest satisfaction and could appear trivial but, in the longer term, the consequences could be dire. Is money spent on maintenance perceived as reducing profits on a yearly basis? It should be remembered that many of the hotels are part of international groups, whose policies are decided outside the UK and therefore may not necessarily be compatible with local conditions. The managers I talked to did not appear to focus on such matters as maintenance and energy conservation. Should the profession be doing more to market the specialist expertise of its members to the hotel industry, particularly in relation to maintenance and energy efficiency? Do our members have any input to hotel management courses in the universities? I have no doubt their expertise would be beneficial to the long-term sustainability and viability of hotels.

LIFT OFF Explosion in online retail is driving exponential market growth

Demand for logistics space across Europe is expected to soar, predicts Savills, as the continent’s online retail market more than doubles from €112bn (£82.45bn) to

€234bn (£172bn) over the next three years. With high levels of demand coming from the explosion of online shopping, retail consolidation and the changing strategies of leading food retailers, it is predicted around 94m ft2 (8.7m m2) of logistics property will be needed across Europe by 2020. “Although the assumption might be that occupiers would concentrate on large units in centres of countries and continents, we

are experiencing a surge in demand from parcel delivery companies looking for smaller units on the edge of conurbations as they struggle to get to grips with urban logistics,” commented Richard Sullivan MRICS, national head of industrial and logistics at Savills. “Additionally, with reports suggesting up to 40% of goods ordered online are returned, a whole new asset class is emerging in the form of the returns centre.”

IMAGE © 2015 JOHANNES ARLT

NEWS IN BRIEF

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Savills also reports that logistics investment volumes in Europe rose

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Intelligence

HIGH CULTURE WITH A VERY HIGH PRICE TAG

IMAGE © 2015 JOHANNES ARLT

Strange things happen when you build a concert hall on top of a 1960s warehouse. On the positive side, the Elbphilarmonie Hamburg, designed by architect Herzog & de Meuron, looks like no other concert hall yet built and is likely to drastically boost the tourist appeal of Germany’s second city. On the negative side, with a final price tag of €789m (£580m), the project will have cost more than double the original budget, and even when completed in January 2017, it will have taken a decade to be constructed. Whether it will all have been worth it in the end is a question that the city’s inhabitants will only know when it all is finished.

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OECD* countries

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24 DAYS

Other Europe & Central Asia

27 DAYS

Middle East & North America

33 DAYS

Sub-Saharan Africa

59 DAYS

Slow registration of land perpetuates informal use and blocks sales and development

Latin America & Caribbean

65 DAYS

East Asia & Pacific

81 DAYS

South Asia

99 DAYS

Intelligence

*Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Source: McKinsey Global Institute

INVESTMENT

REPUTATIONAL RISK RISING UP AGENDA

€40.3

€37.4

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€31.4 €29.8 €28.3 €22.3 Seven out of 10 institutional investors would turn down a co-investment opportunity if the social or environmental risks were too €24.6 high, research carried out by PwC has found. The firm’s Bridging the Gap survey explored the views of 60 limited partners France Germany Ireland Sweden Italy EU average UK around the world and their attitudes to Denmark environmental, social and governance €21.3 €15.6 €14.6 €13.1 €8.4 €7.3 (ESG) investment issues. While 71% said €3.8 their fund allocation was now linked to achieving responsible ESG conditions, 97% expected responsible investment to increase in importance over the next two years. Fiduciary duty, reputational risk andSpain Slovenia Greece Portugal Poland Hungary Bulgaria corporate values ranked as the top three MARTIN J BRÜHL FRICS RICS PRESIDENT reasons for responsible investment. Three decades ago, when my father thrust into my hand a copy of the INAUGURAL Those surveyed included institutional ADDRESS investors – pension funds, investment Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, little did he know it would lead me to the Martin J Brühl managers – and sovereign or government presidency of this wonderful professional body. There, in the corner of the became RICS controlled funds, such as the California President business section was a short, barely noticeable paragraph extolling the RICS. 25,000 Luxury State Teachers Retirement System and the on 29 June. To a young student in Germany, 22,500 High-end the concept of a royal institution was exotic. To read his UK 20,000 Universities Superannuation Scheme. The title “chartered surveyor” Mid-end was totally alien and impossible to translate. full inaugural “Since 17,500 the financial crisis, investors are Affordable address, go But my natural curiosity had been ignited and soon my mind was made up: under ever-greater scrutiny regarding their 15,000 to rics.org/ I was going to be a chartered surveyor. 12,500 wider environmental and social impact martinbruehl Thus began an amazing career that has taken me around the world. I have and10,000 purpose,” said Phil Case, director at met many excellent colleagues, some of whom are active on RICS committees PwC.7,500 “The expectations of regulators, 5,000 and working groups. But my principal engagement was as a professional policymakers, NGOs [non-governmental 2,500 organisations] and the public for investors benefitting from the assurance of Ho the RICS brand, access to high-quality Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hanoi Chi Minh Hanoi and their advisers2010 to behave responsibly2011 guidance, and the status my route to the presidency has 2012 2013that goes with it. So2014 and deliver more than simply financial been unusual. Although I have served for three years on Governing Council, return are much higher than before.” I have not been steeped in committee machinations. I will, therefore, look Responsible investment acknowledges to others to guide me on processes and procedures. My own contributions the relevance of ESG factors alongside will bear the hallmark of personal experience gained across five continents. traditional financial metrics, and can help With that experience in mind, I am convinced we must redouble our protect value and enhance returns. PwC’s efforts to attract the best talent, to place ethics at the heart of all we do, to survey reflects recent controversies around create successful and sustainable future cities, to embrace technology and institutional investment. For example, big data, to take new opportunities, and to lead. campaigners have called for the withdrawal I shall focus on three key themes over the coming year. First, sustainable or scaling back of investments with potentially negative environmental impacts, investment. As head of global transactions for a fund manager, I have a duty such as fossil-fuel-related activities. to my clients to invest their savings sustainably and responsibly. For our “We need to see more active integration profession, that means appropriate standards, analytical tools, training and and interrogation of ESG matters in private education. It also means a collaborative approach across our professional equity investment,” said Case. “It could shift groups, and between RICS and our many stakeholders. Second, as President the power of institutional funding from being I shall emphasise the fiduciary duty of fund managers. RICS can lead thinking a threat of withdrawal, to a force to embed in this area. For example, how can we behave rationally and responsibly in an a transition to a low-carbon economy, environment of historically low interest rates engineered by central banks? not only setting the timeline for change, Third, standards, diversity and inclusion. These were all central themes for but securing vital funding for it, too.” my predecessor, requiring sustained effort over many years, and I intend to READ THE REPORT at bit.ly/pwc_bridging_gap do all I can to take them even further.

INFOGRAPHIC IAN DUTNALL ILLUSTRATION BERND SCHIFFERDECKER

“My curiosity was ignited: I was going to be a chartered surveyor”

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Intelligence

NEWS IN BRIEF

INFRASTRUCTURE

CBRE: LET TRAIN TAKE THE STRAIN IN OVERCROWDED CITIES

®

rics.org/modus

UN and RICS unite to promote responsible business In a series of events in New York to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the United Nations Global Compact, Sean Tompkins, RICS CEO, launched in June a resource for the property, construction and land sectors that centres on advancing responsible business. This is one of the Compact’s first initiatives to promote responsible business that focuses exclusively on one specific economic sector. “There is a tremendous opportunity for real estate to become a driving force for a more sustainable financial, economic, social and environmental system, through collaboration and collective action,” said Georg Kell, executive director of the UN Global Compact. “Advancing Responsible Business in Land, Construction, Real Estate Use and Investment” is the result of a two-year collaboration between the UN Global Compact and RICS, which brought together industry participants and RICS members who all contributed research and expertise. The resource provides decision-making guidance on issues such as human rights, labour standards and anticorruption practices throughout the real estate life-cycle. It identifies 15 key issues and 15 actions that translate the 10 principles of the Global Compact in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption, into a responsible business road map for the sector. Tompkins added: “Responsible action needs to become ‘business as usual’ within global real estate markets, driving prosperity, innovation and investment, and helping to secure vibrant and transparent markets, thriving economies, inclusive communities and a greener, healthier planet.” Download the resource at rics.org/responsiblebusiness.

STERLING WORK Argent’s regeneration of the King’s Cross goods yards in London is cited as an example of a successful transit-oriented development

Governments around the world should do more to support transitoriented developments (TODs) to help alleviate the pressures of urbanisation in cities, a new report from CBRE suggests. TODs are higher-density, mixeduse projects that are near to or integrated with public transport hubs. CBRE examined a range of successful TODs, such as Perth City Link in Western Australia; the King’s Cross regeneration project in London; the Hong Kong Station redevelopment; Transbay Transit Center in San Francisco and One North Precinct in Singapore, and found that these types of projects have the ability to revitalise

underused precincts and bring significant economic and social benefits to the wider community. “TOD projects have the capacity to address many of the challenges facing major cities in developed economies as a result of a rapid increase in urbanisation,” said Henry Chin, head of research, AsiaPacific at CBRE. “A successful TOD will achieve a substantial shift from private vehicles to public transport, while improving liveability and local employment opportunities.” Increasing rates of urbanisation, declining productivity linked to long travel times, a growing government focus on public transport, and changes in infrastructure funding are all combining to create greater opportunities to build TODs. However, government vision and sponsorship is crucial in facilitating such projects, given the role that public transport plays in addressing the long-term sustainability of cities – specifically issues such as traffic congestion, travel times, housing affordability and pollution. CBRE found government-backed incentives may also be required to attract business occupiers to TODs, as illustrated by the long-term tax breaks and rental subsidies offered in Singapore to facilitate the One North Precinct. DOWNLOAD the report at cbre.com/research

PAGETURNER CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER’S POCKET BOOK DUNCAN CARTLIDGE FRICS Authored by a former member of the RICS Quantity Surveying and Construction Professional Group Board, this compact guide provides a solid foundation for project managers or quantity surveyors, and covers: pre-construction

activities; design management and building information modelling (BIM); procurement; people skills; environmental management systems; feasibility studies; occupancy activities; and recommended document formats.

The book references the RIBA Plan of Work and OGC Gateway process, and discusses industry trends such as how BIM has changed the responsibilities and requirements of project managers. Routledge, £19.99 WHAT ARE YOU READING? Tweet us, using #RICSmodus JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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BY 2025, 1.6 BILLION PEOPLE WILL BE LIVING IN HOMES THAT ARE UNFIT FOR PURPOSE

...but how can you build sufficient housing on such a large scale, while keeping it affordable? Kate Murray investigates how three countries are attempting to meet that challenge

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Affordable housing

CHINA ORDERS FROM THE TOP

T

he sheer scale of the efforts China has made to tackle its affordable housing shortage is what makes it remarkable. Although a target of 36 million new social homes over five years might seem staggering, the People’s Republic is firmly on course to meet that goal. The social housing drive, spurred on by the ambitious target embedded in the 12th Five-Year plan in 2011, marks a big shift away from the marketisation of recent decades. A desire to head off unrest from the urban poor, who had been increasingly priced out of ownership after public housing was sold off, was partly responsible for the change of direction. But so, too, was an integrated view of housing, economic growth and urbanisation which means that, for China, building new, affordable housing is part of a bigger strategy for the country’s future. Firm direction from Beijing has been crucial, for although local government has been expected to deliver and manage the homes, there is a national commitment – and pressure – to build. As a report for RICS by the Centre for Housing Research at the University of St Andrews put it: “Strong, sustained public intervention is perhaps the most noticeable feature of China’s housing system … Policy, strong policy, matters in China.” Dr Albert Cao, a senior lecturer in the department of real estate and construction at Oxford Brookes University, says that, in reversing its withdrawal from housing provision, the Chinese government has succeeded in tackling what was becoming a huge political and social issue. “When there’s a major shortage, the market mechanism is unlikely to deliver enough to meet social needs,” he says.“If you look at the UK [private sector] housing industry, it has never built sufficient housing that can meet the needs of this country. From the 1950s to the 1970s, most new housing was built by councils. In China, the government made a decision to prioritise affordable and social housing. They set a very ambitious target but used the power of central government to push it through.” »

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Although China’s housebuilding drive has done “tremendous good” for the urban poor, Cao says problems remain. Funding, manpower and construction capacity have all been there but, as his study of the Chinese affordable and social housing sector for RICS last year pointed out, the rush to build big has meant some homes are poorly located or suffer from management problems. But, he adds, the Chinese have managed to deliver while they can. “In 10 years’ time they will have lost some of their capacity to deliver because wages will rise to the extent that it becomes expensive. They are making the best of a situation while labour costs are still low,” he says.“And it all links in to the overall economy. China produces half of the world’s steel, for example, and the housing sector is a big user of steel, so it’s been cleverly woven into a big system to boost economic growth.” China’s next challenge is to balance the capacity it has already created with any anticipated future demand. Cao says the government is now looking at a further housebuilding programme, targeting rural migrants who do not have the same residency rights in cities and therefore have not benefited in the same way as the urban poor. “The general direction is very clear – they want to extend affordable and social housing to include all people,” says Cao. “There are more people to be housed, but the glut they have created could then become a shortage. Targeting the right people will be the key issue because if you extend it to everyone, there are hundreds of millions of people who could potentially migrate.”

xxxxxx

The general direction is clear – China wants to extend affordable housing to include all people

IMAGES URBANUS

DR ALBERT CAO Oxford Brookes University

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IMAGES URBANUS

Affordable housing

SOCIAL SERVICE McIntyre Drive Social Housing, in the Melbourne suburb of Altona, was built for Victoria’s Department of Human Services and is a rare example of recent, affordable housing development in Australia

AUSTRALIA NEW TRANSFER POLICY

T

SHARED EARTH Tulou in the Chinese city of Guangzhou (opposite) is an affordable housing alternative to standard high-rise blocks, aimed at migrant workers and inspired by traditional earth houses in rural communities

he Great Australian Dream – a suburban home, a garden, perhaps even a pool – has for decades been a key part of the nation’s identity. But for many that dream has turned sour. Australia may be one of the world’s top 10 advanced countries, but it is a lowly 51st in the global Social Progress Index on the availability of affordable housing. Indeed, the International Monetary Fund records Australia as the third least affordable place in the world to buy a home. For those priced out of the market, soaring private rents and a lack of social housing are compounding the squeeze. The problem is rising up the political agenda. A long-awaited report on affordable housing from the Australian senate’s economics references committee, published in May, called for a big increase in affordable housebuilding. And some states are responding. New South Wales has recently announced a A$1bn (£502m) fund for new affordable housing – although it is not yet clear how that commitment will be made up.

But in the absence of large-scale federal government investment, after funding for affordable housing development was scrapped last year, efforts are now being made to expand the community housing sector. Already a series of stock transfers have taken place, whereby public housing is handed over to community providers. In this way, housing experts hope, more not-forprofit providers will be able to develop the new homes the country needs, by borrowing against the property portfolios. Last year in Tasmania, one-third of the state’s public housing was handed over to community providers. Australia’s largest ever stock transfer, in the Brisbane suburb of Logan, is expected to take place later this year, as part of plans to hand over 90% of Queensland’s public housing portfolio – or more than 50,000 homes – to the third sector by 2020. Australian providers could even take on stock internationally, some having expressed interest in plans to transfer public homes in Christchurch, New Zealand. Transfers, according to the City Futures research centre at the University of New South Wales, are “increasingly seen by industry insiders as a crucial fix for » JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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New enhanced BCIS Schedule of Rates The independent data source for estimating costs The new BCIS Schedule of Rates makes accessing the latest construction rates for comparing and benchmarking estimates easier than ever before. The service now gives you the ability to: • Enter quantities when you select the rate to improve usability and save you time • Quickly reuse stored abstract data by applying different location factors and project dates • Obtain more clarity and faster analysis with the new and improved download layout • Download a rate and resource build-up giving you in-depth analysis and detailed customisation.

Visit rics.org/newscheduleofrates or phone +44 (0)24 7686 8433

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Affordable housing

THEORY OF EVOLUTION Trilogy I in Saltwell is one of 19 sites being regenerated by the Evolution Gateshead partnership, with the aim of creating 2,400 homes – many of which will be affordable units – over a 20-year period

Australia’s rundown public housing”, enabling community providers to access additional funding to improve existing homes, as well as build new ones. Professor Hal Pawson, associate director at the centre, says that even under current public spending settings, community housing providers will be developing in the next few years. “The promised A$1bn fund [in New South Wales] is anticipated as funding some modest expansion over the next few years. Any such development will be taking place alongside a modest amount of debt-funded, affordable housing construction already planned by community housing providers over the next few years as a quid pro quo for receiving title to 6,000 new government-built properties.” If community housing providers are to be an increasingly important route for delivering new homes, there is certainly an appetite among lenders to get involved. Westpac has already said it will make A$2bn (£982m) available for social and affordable housing by 2017. The Australian bank sealed its biggest ever deal, worth A$61m (£30m), with New South Wales housing provider St George Community Housing last October to build homes across Sydney. Jon Ross, head of government and education at Westpac Institutional Bank, says the “landscape is now being reshaped” by the growing role of

community housing providers. The bank, he adds, is keen to strike more deals with the sector to build more affordable homes. “Our strategy is focused on partnering with key industry stakeholders, including not-for-profit community housing providers, government and asset managers to develop these innovative solutions in a sustainable and replicable way,” Ross says.

UNITED KINGDOM PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERS

W

hen Jonathan Dunk heads into work on the train every morning, he catches a glimpse of a relatively small building site that is part of a much bigger picture. For the 99-home scheme in the Bensham area of Gateshead, north-east England, is part of the first phase of a regeneration scheme which, its backers believe, offers an effective way of building high-quality new homes at a time of shrinking public investment. The Gateshead Regeneration Partnership, comprising Gateshead Council, the housing association Home Group and housebuilder Galliford Try, plans to build 2,400 homes over 15 years across 19 sites. The £350m programme will be rolled out in phases, and » JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Affordable housing

sites batched together in an area where relatively low house prices and the costs of developing on brownfield land make projects difficult or even impossible to stack up.“We bundle sites together because, if some of these sites were left to the market, they would be unviable,”says Dunk, joint venture project manager at the council. “If we didn’t have this model, with the reduction in grant from government, it’s difficult to see how we would be able to do what we are doing.” But what makes the model so special, Dunk explains, is that it brings all the partners together on an equal, profit-sharing basis. The council puts in the land, while the other two partners bring their development, commercial and housing management expertise. The result will be a series of mixedtenure schemes, to include homes for sale, for shared ownership and for affordable rent – and all built to the highest standards. “It’s all going to be fantastic quality,” Dunk insists. “The big thing about this model is the influence we can have on what’s built, whereas in the past we had to rely on the planning system to get what we wanted. We can specify that the homes should all be built to level 4 [of the sustainable homes code] and that they will all have good space standards. And we’ve also been able to get training, employment and apprenticeships opportunities included in the programme.” Capital investment in housing in England was cut under the last government by almost two-thirds, and only 118,000 homes were built last year – fewer than half the number the country should be producing to meet its needs. So housing associations and local authorities are having to squeeze more from less, both through innovative partnerships as in Gateshead, or by building more homes for sale in higher-value areas to cross-

The big thing about this model is the influence we can have on what’s built. In the past we had to rely on the planning system JONATHAN DUNK Gateshead Council

subsidise affordable homes. “Housing associations have had to be much more innovative because of the reduction in grant,” says Henry Gregg, assistant director of campaigns at the National Housing Federation. “At the current level of funding, for every £1 in public investment, we invest about £6. Most comes from private lending, but the rest comes from cross-subsidy and increases in commercial activities. There’s a real appetite out there – housing associations want to innovate and develop.” In Gateshead, Dunk says other areas are showing interest in the Bensham model. “This is all about the way the public sector makes best use of its land assets. It’s going to become increasingly important because the public sector is a significant land owner. Gateshead is at the forefront of making sure we look at the overall value of the assets – that goes beyond just the capital receipt we could get from selling. We have a mechanism to build the homes we need.” n

SECOND TYNE LUCKY Gateshead will be hoping its latest effort to build low-cost housing meets with more success than its last: Skanska and Ikea’s BoKlok concept, which was hit by the credit crunch on its launch in 2007

READ THE RICS REPORT on China’s affordable social housing at rics.org/chinahousing. For the latest from RICS on the sector, visit rics.org/affordablehousing

HOME ECONOMICS

How to build houses fit for purpose A decent, affordable home is a fundamental human right. Yet, across the globe, more and more people are struggling with housing that is either unfit or simply out of their reach. The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that, if current trends continue, by 2025, 1.6 billion people – or one in three of all urban dwellers – will either be in inadequate and unsafe housing, 22

or so financially stretched that they cannot afford other essentials such as healthcare. Developing and advanced economies alike are having to think smarter to bridge this gap. Below are some of the key approaches they might take: Unlock land supply. Land costs can account for as much as 80% of housing prices. So freeing up more land, whether

by making surplus public land available for development, cracking down on land-banking, or improving land use through higher density levels, is an important way of getting more affordable homes built. Build cheaper. The latest wave of prefab and modular homes and low-cost units, such as WorldHaus, can be built for less than £1,300 in 10 days.

Community-led approaches such as community land trusts, in which homes are kept affordable in perpetuity to help low-income households access good housing, are increasing in popularity. New financial models to stretch investment, for example offering incentives such as tax credits to institutional investors, or public-private partnerships.

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DESIGNER DISCOUNT RICS members can benefit from free metallic paint, plus discounted accessories, on all models in the Volvo range, including the V40 R-Design

uying a new car is a significant investment, so it pays to get the best possible deal. Thanks to Volvo’s Affinity programme, RICS members can access a variety of discounts and offers. That means you can get your hands on a new Volvo at a very tempting price. Our dealership network keeps a record of Affinity partners, making it easy to take advantage of the scheme. Simply visit your local showroom to view our range. Then, once you’ve selected the model of your choice, a member of the sales team will talk you through the options. First, we will apply a partner discount, which is awarded as a percentage of the vehicle’s net cost. This maximises the value of the discount and helps you get more for your money by keeping the pre-VAT price of the car as low as possible, putting Volvo ownership well within reach. The second element of our Affinity offer is a Volvo discount. We offer lump-sum reductions on the net value of our cars. These vary by model and ensure you’ll often secure a new vehicle for what feels like the cost of a secondhand car. Third, we offer the option of metallic paint, completely free of charge. This is usually sold at up to £700, and gives you a wider selection of finishes to choose from when it comes to specifying the car of your dreams. Meanwhile, the possibility of purchasing an up-front servicing deal means you can plan your running costs for the first years of ownership. We offer three years of servicing at a Volvo main dealer

for £300, and five years for £500. What’s more, packages like these are sometimes available at no cost to customers taking up a Personal Contract Purchase offer. The fifth component of our Affinity package gives you the chance to spread your purchasing costs and keep interest payments to a minimum. Our finance deals change over time, but we offer our partners incentives such as preferential interest rates – including occasional 0% deals – that aren’t available to customers outside the scheme. Finally, for those who like to personalise their car, we offer a selection of accessories at discounted prices. This includes some packages that have been designed specifically for Affinity customers, giving you a car that stands out from the crowd and is perfectly suited to your lifestyle. Accessories available include roof bars, cycling racks, interior mats and dog guards. By clustering these items together in packages, we’re able to offer significant discounts for the equipment that our Affinity customers tell us they most frequently need. MAXIMUM APPEAL This is all part of Volvo’s commitment to serving RICS members as effectively as possible. We design our Affinity packages to have the maximum appeal for our partners and strive to deliver the highest levels of service throughout your buying and ownership experience. Thanks to the Affinity scheme, RICS members can own a Volvo that is equipped to your favoured specification for a surprisingly modest outlay. As a result, even more people can enjoy the safety, elegance, economy and poise that characterises our industryleading range of premium cars. Even better, you can make a sound investment that repays you time and time again. n TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE CURRENT RANGE of Affinity offers, visit your local dealership, or call the Volvo Car Business Centre on +44 (0)844 4905 203 JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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HOME BUYERS REPORT

With the global population booming, and increasingly settling in urban areas, housing is becoming a planet-sized problem House price growth around the world in 2014 (%) Source: imf.org 0 Ukraine

Cyprus

-10 -8

Russia

-5.5

China Singapore Japan

-5

-4

-4.7

Italy

-3.8

Romania Vietnam

-3.3

France

0

0.3

0.5

1.1

Mexico

South Korea

Spain

Brazil

1.3

1.3

Hong Switzerland Kong

-1.5

-3.3

11,089

-20 -30 -40 -50 -48

World’s most expensive cities

7,225

Cost of a 120 m² apartment

Source: globalpropertyguide.com (2014 data)

6,431

Rent ($/month)

5,597

5,413

5,152

5,158

5,317

4,332

3,182

2,943

3,174

3,089 3,047 3,043 2,540

2,318

1,117

Latin America

24

81

110

Western Europe

59

Northeast Asia

Eastern Europe and central Asia

42

Africa and Middle East

51

37 South Asia

30

Rest of Asia-Pacific

48

Monaco 60,114

London 34,531

Hong Kong 22,814

New York 18,499

Paris 18,415

Moscow 16,021

Singapore 15,251

China region

Vienna 14,592

Tokyo 10,784

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The gap between the total amount that people are able to spend on housing and what that housing actually costs is $640bn. Mitigating the problem would require providing some 440 million housing units, which could cost as much as $16tn. If current trends in urbanisation and income growth persist, by 2025 at least 1.6 billion people will be living in substandard housing or be financially stretched by housing costs.

DATA BRENDON HOOPER ILLUSTRATIONS LAURA CATTANEO

US and Canada

Geneva 13,529

Source: McKinsey Global Institute 2014

Mumbai 11,455

Global affordable housing gap ($bn)

Tel Aviv 10,166

Stockholm 9,439

Helsinki 8,390

Toronto 8,288

Rome 8,007

Luxembourg 7,654

Sydney 7,250

Taipei 7,112

Bermuda 7,056

Buying price ($/m²)

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33 30 20 10 2.2

1.7

2.9

3.6

4.2

4.7

South Africa

US

Denmark

Serbia

2.6

2.2

Czech Bulgaria Poland Germany Republic

Percentage of housing in urban areas classed as substandard

India

7.6

6.6

4.4

England

Pakistan (4)

Brazil (11)

Ireland

Qatar

The Confederation of British Industry believes Britain needs to build 240,000 houses a year to keep up with population growth, or around four homes for every 1,000 people. Only Northern Ireland is currently above this rate.

Northern Ireland

41

47

China (62)

Estonia

2.6

Wales

12

UAE

Scotland

Phillippines (4)

29

UK

Portugal Australia Colombia

Source: Office for National Statistics

Share of total urban households (%) Substandard housing units in urban areas (million)

Russia (5)

10.2

16

13.8

UK housebuilding rates per thousand people, 2012-2013

Source: McKinsey Global Institute 2014

(xx)

5.5

4.7

11.5

1.8

Nigeria (11)

27 63

62

Source: Office for National Statistics

India (28) Iran (4)

Bangladesh (6)

15

30

23

2

Average UK house price to earnings ratio

33

Scotland Wales England London Northern Ireland

In London, the number of households forced to move out of their boroughs to find affordable housing doubled between 2009 and 2013, from 5,389 to 10,832 (Bureau of Investigative Journalism)

Indonesia (7) 12.5

DATA BRENDON HOOPER ILLUSTRATIONS LAURA CATTANEO

In the EU, 5% of households live in overcrowded or substandard housing. About 8% of Japanese households live in units that don’t meet acceptable standards. In the US, around 2% of the population lives in substandard housing.

10

7.5

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Population residing in urban areas (%) Source: UN 2014 2010

35.4 30,8

38.3

2015

37.9

40.4

2025

42.9

2050

54.8 SubSaharan Africa

44.8

44.9

48.2

73.6

53.9

55.9 Africa

78.4

72.7

64.2

70.7

81.6

79.8

75.8

Asia

80.8

82.1

70.8 83.4

82.0

86.2

Europe

Latin America and Caribbean

71.1 87.4 North America

73.5 Oceania

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he workplace as we know it is changing. Thanks to advances in technology such as tablets, smartphones, the ubiquity of wifi and cloud computing, the office of today can just as easily be a coffee shop, a train carriage or your kitchen table. The most recent data from the UK Office for National Statistics states that, of the 30.2 million people in work in the period January to March 2014, 4.2 million (13.9%) were home workers – the highest rate since comparable records began in 1998. In addition, since the turn of the millennium, the number of home workers has grown by 1.3 million, driven largely by the aforementioned digital revolution.

Thanks to this shift, and the fact that the many office desks are no longer used on a regular basis, large corporations and organisations are being forced to rethink the workplace and embrace more “agile” practices, such as remote working, hot desking and collaborative work spaces. How will these changes in office environment shape the sort of spaces in which we will work in the future? Although technology companies have arguably been at the forefront of this trend, thanks largely to the very nature of their business, it was the renewed emphasis on cost cutting, in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, that accelerated the recent drive towards offering more agile working arrangements. In the wake of the crash, some businesses reduced their space requirements by as much as 40%, and office densities in the City of London, for instance, increased significantly. The average space per person in the 1990s was around 180 ft2 (17 m2), but in 2013 the figure was closer to 118 ft2 (11 m2). This downsizing commenced after corporate occupiers undertook reviews of their estates as part of cost-saving drives,

DESKTOP CLEAN UP From home working to shared spaces, the way in which we choose to work is rapidly evolving. What are the implications for our offices? Words Simon Creasey Illustrations Davide Bonazzi

and realised the buildings they occupied were not being utilised to the fullest extent, says Tim Allen, senior director and head of workplace consulting EMEA at CBRE. “The global average for utilisation in an office is around 50%-55%,” says Allen.“But that’s just one part of the equation. The other is that, for those people who work in an office and only have access to a desk or some uninspiring meeting rooms, this doesn’t provide them with all of the options that they need during the day to undertake all of the processes and tasks required of them. They need access to spaces where they can have a conversation with colleagues, or a coffee with a client, and they need more private spaces that allow them to concentrate on a task or make a confidential phone call.” The combination of these two factors spurred organisations to remove desks that were not being used efficiently and repurpose areas to create the sort of space that today’s workforce wants and needs. “We don’t come into the office any more to sit and type emails all day,”says Allen.“We can do that in other locations. We come into the office to communicate and collaborate with colleagues, so organisations need to offer space that is more comfortable and visually stimulating. This is all about creating spaces that encourage people to come back together in that space.” One organisation that quickly got its head around the seismic changes that needed to be made in the workplace is the BBC. Since 2004, the broadcaster has been tackling workspace efficiency head on, through a comprehensive review and overhaul of its property portfolio as part of its remit to deliver value to the UK’s licence payers. After examining its needs, the corporation was able to reduce its property footprint by 29%. It subsequently updated a vast proportion of the remainder of its estate to make it more suitable for the demands of what it calls “knowledge workers”. “In 1999, less than 5% of the estate was fit for purpose,” says Chris Kane FRICS, director of commercial projects at the BBC, who developed and implemented the corporation’s workplace strategy. “We’ve now upgraded 66% of the entire estate and in doing so we’ve embraced, engaged and experimented with agile working.” Kane says this“transformational journey” has enabled the BBC to drive down the cost of running the estate by £67m a year, through the addition of agile working initiatives such as “ratio working”. “What we learnt is that allocating one space per person is an inefficient approach to office space planning. We measured office space » JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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usage and recognised that, at best, it was used no more than 48%-50% of the time because people were on holiday or they were going to meetings, so they didn’t need the space that was allocated to them. The BBC took a brave step by saying ‘we’re going to move towards a more agile way of working’, but it’s worked.” Another organisation that took a bold approach to its workplace strategy is the Royal Bank of Scotland. Prior to revamping its property estate, on average 40% of the bank’s office portfolio was unoccupied at any given time, and much of this space was designed for the way people worked historically, in rows of regimented desks. “We recognised that, in the same way that how people work is changing, our customers need us to be flexible so they can interact with us how, when and where is most convenient for them,”explains Ray Carneiro, RBS’s head of location and property strategy. “The key to that is flexible working and creating workplaces that meet those changing needs. To do this successfully, we needed to bring together HR, technology and property to deliver a truly holistic solution across the entire organisation.” A key strand in the bank’s strategy was RBS Choice – its flexible working initiative. Although RBS reduced its footprint by more than 1m ft2 (93,000 m2) as a result of the review, just as importantly, it is utilising the remaining space much more effectively. “As the demand for space decreases, the amount of space and number of buildings we occupy will reduce, but it’s not just about space reduction, it’s about reinvesting in the right type of space to provide the variety of work settings and technologies that support new ways of working,” says Carneiro. “This means we’re moving away from traditional offices to workplaces where people go to collaborate and interact with colleagues.”

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BRE faced similar challenges when it prepared for a refurbishment of its City of London office, ahead of the second half of its lease occupation. According to chief operating officer Martin Lewis, who was senior sponsor of the programme, 20% of the company’s desks were not used on a one-to-one basis, and up to 40% were rarely used during the day. But the project was about more than just making the space more efficient and delivering value – CBRE also wanted to create spaces that were attractive for visiting clients and provided a motivating environment for employees. Lewis set about delivering on these goals through a strategy christened “Workplace 360”.

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“This meant people broke away from having their own desk,” he says. “This was enabled through our technology platform, which allows you to log on at any desk, or at home through your laptop.” The company also provided individual lockers as a replacement for permanent desk storage, switched out unused desk space for zones that could be used for group work and created the concept of “neighbourhoods”. Lewis explains:“Instead of having your oneto-one desk, you had an area where groups would gather and would come to associate with that area, but you could still be much freer with the way you used the space.” As you would expect when implementing such a dramatic overhaul of the workplace environment, Lewis concedes that some people were initially reluctant to embrace the changes, but once the new spaces had been created, he says that staff found the whole process “incredibly motivating”. The sort of engagement that CBRE garnered is vitally important to the success of such projects. Research carried out by the likes of Gallup, Bloomberg Businessweek and the Guardian has shown that employees who are more engaged in the workplace are more likely to stay with a company – they are also likely to be more productive. This is underlined by data from JLL, which discovered that 72% of companies were looking to their real estate to deliver improved workplace productivity and support talent attraction and retention. These workplace enhancements will inevitably include the addition of on-site amenities such as coffee shops and gyms, but also more collaborative and social spaces.

What we have learnt is that allocating one space per person is an inefficient approach to office space planning CHRIS KANE FRICS BBC

H

owever, as Sandra Jones MRICS, a consultant at Ramidus Consulting, argues, this is not just about altering the dynamics of an existing office to meet the needs of a modern business. Ramidus prepared the report Future Workstyles and Future Workplaces in the City of London, which discusses the elements that fall under the umbrella of agile working. “We’re seeing an emergence in demand for different types of office space,” Jones explains. “For instance, co-working space is becoming a much more established part of the office ecosystem. The role that serviced offices play is also changing. There are many forms of flexible workspace today and they’re not all expensive, which means that small businesses in particular can now see them as a long-term solution.” But in the drive to improve efficiency and embrace new technology, is the most important factor – the employee – being overlooked? Take hot desking, for example. In an article for the BBC’s in-house magazine Ariel, last June, reporter Carla Parks wrote that, one year on since the corporation introduced hot desking, it was still the “source of internal frustration, general dissatisfaction and much grumbling”. On a discussion thread, a BBC employee wrote: “Hot desking, whilst a nice idea in theory, doesn’t work. You don’t develop relationships with people around you. Those with their own desk are seen as ‘special’ and when there’s an area reserved for a team you feel hated having to ask someone to move.” This feeling of social isolation is one of the health and safety factors that the UK Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development highlights as a potential downside to hot desking. Employers also have a responsibility to provide workstations

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CASE WORKERS Flexible approaches to work space means offices can be used for other tasks without increasing floor sizes

that are suitable for an employees’particular needs. But this leads to time being wasted on a daily basis, setting a desk and chair up for whoever is occupying them. A greater onus must also be placed on cleanliness of equipment, such as phones and keyboards. Employees seem to have less of an issue when it comes to the addition of more collaborative space. In CoreNet Global’s 2012 State of the Industry Report, it noted that the office will serve as a “central place for collaboration” in the future. This is a view supported by Johnson Controls’ The Smart Workplace in 2030 report, which envisioned the office as a “hive” that responds to a “complex and competitive world focused on collaboration, innovation, and creativity”. This is clearly what Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer had in mind when she banned employees from working from home in 2013. Although Mayer acknowledged “people are more productive when they’re alone”, she argued “they’re more collaborative and innovative when they’re together”.

Her assertion appears to be supported by research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology visiting scientist Ben Waber, in his book, People Analytics. He found that programmers who work remotely are 8% less likely than co-located groups to communicate, which subsequently leads to 32% longer code completion times. In lay terms, people who work in isolation and are less collaborative, take longer to complete tasks than those working together.

W

hether or not employers embrace hot desking, collaborative space, remote working or any other form of agile working, it is unlikely that the changing nature of what goes into an office will have a significant impact on the space requirements of occupiers. So suggests Ciaran Gunne-Jones, economics director at town planning consultancy Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners, which earlier this year produced the paper Workspace Futures – The changing dynamics of office locations.

“What our research found is that it is not always possible for occupiers to downsize their requirements, even when adopting more flexible approaches, because conventional desk layouts simply become replaced by the breakout areas and collaborative working zones that employees are increasingly looking for,” he says. It is a view shared by Jones, who explains that, when remote working first started to take hold, people thought traditional office space would almost completely disappear – a scenario that has not really transpired.“Most corporations are occupying at higher ratios of people per square foot now because of desk sharing, flexible working and breakout spaces, so they can rent smaller amounts of space to accommodate the same size business, but people are still going to need offices.” The business world is changing at a breakneck speed thanks to advances in technology and it is highly likely that more organisations will embrace agile working practices to meet the changing needs of their business and their employees. As a result of these changes, developers, landlords, consultants and office design professionals need to be ready to meet these challenges head on to ensure that the workplaces of the future are fit for purpose. “It’s no longer about office working or home working – that debate was had five to 10 years ago,” says Kane. “It’s a bigger issue than that and the property industry would do well to really start to get to grips with this, because it could have huge negative and positive implications in the future.” n READ JOHNSON CONTROLS’ REPORT, The Smart Workplace in 2030, at bit.ly/workplace2030 JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Cover story

BY GEORGE! A concrete box flat in Barcelona (above and opposite) makes the most of its limited space by tucking appliances and furniture behind panels, and impressed architect and broadcaster George Clarke

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ool, tech savvy and fluent in the new foreign language of social media, the millennial generation has much to envy. But when it comes to buying a home of one’s own, especially in global cities, that appears to be where their luck runs out, with affordability becoming a problem for even the most skilled young professionals. In this context, the emerging “microapartment”segment offers a real alternative. Small units are being built in cities across the globe that are distinctly different from the cramped flats found in badly converted houses around London, or Hong Kong’s notorious metal cage homes. Specialist developers are creating centrally located, compact, well-designed homes that appeal to young people and, crucially, are affordable. “If we don’t develop smaller units where space is critical, the population will be driven out into the suburbs or to other cheaper cities,” cautions Ben Derbyshire, managing partner at architect HTA Design. “The economy of industrialised or postindustrialised countries now rests on the success of knowledge-based industries in our cities and this requires people to live and work in close proximity so they can share their knowledge and skills.” As people flock to developed cities and the population continues to grow, land will inevitably become even more in short supply. To alleviate this crisis, the housing produced will therefore have to be efficiently designed and affordable, and this is where the emerging micro-home comes into play. George Clarke HonRICS, architect, builder and broadcaster whose popular UK series Amazing Spaces was inspired by small-scale buildings, sees a huge amount of pressure on cities for space. “I’ve seen many small spaces that have been designed by incredibly talented and inventive people,” says Clarke, who has travelled the world visiting micro-units, such as an imaginatively designed, multi-level flat in Paris that employed raised beds and dining areas. He was also impressed by a rooftop concrete box in Barcelona, the size of a hotel room, that could be reconfigured for different uses as required. These examples have taught him that building smaller spaces in a creative way is an approach that should be adopted. In larger, high-cost US cities, such as New York, Boston, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington DC, there is a growing interest in micro-units. The American Urban Land Institute (ULI) published a report, The Macro View on Micro Units, last year that suggested micro-units appeal to city dwellers

Spiralling populations, skyhigh prices and a shortage of land demand a big idea in city living: the micro-apartment. Amanda Birch reports

in high-cost markets who are willing to trade space for improved affordability and closer proximity to the city centre. Although there is no standard definition of a micro-unit, the report defines it as a small studio apartment, typically less than 350 ft2 (32 m2), with a kitchen and bathroom. However, the size can range from less than 250 ft2 to 500 ft2 (23-46 m2), depending on the city building code requirements. More than 400 rental apartment communities, comprising more than 90,000 units, built in 2012-13 in 35 US metropolitan areas were analysed as part of the research. Stockton Williams, executive director of the Terwilliger Center for Housing at ULI, says the report highlighted a range of factors in the US underpinning the demand for smaller units. “At a macro level, American families and household sizes are getting smaller and particularly in our larger cities, more households consist of one person,”says

Williams.“More Americans are living alone and the emerging micro-units are a reflection, in part, of those demographic trends”. Williams acknowledges that the other contributing factor is that many American cities have severe affordability problems, creating pressure to add to the supply of lower-cost housing. “This doesn’t mean, however, that micro-units are restricted to those on lower incomes,” he adds. “Microunits also represent a new product at the high end to the millennials [those born after 1980] that have a significant disposable income and are attracted to urban living.” » JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Figures from the UK Department for Communities and Local Government reveal that less than 20,000 homes were built in London in the 2013-14 financial year, while its population is growing by 52,000 households a year. And the average price paid by a first-time buyer in London was 8.8 times the average wage in 2014 – the highest level since records began in 1983 – according to building society Nationwide.

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iven these startling statistics, it is no surprise that Pocket, a developer of compact apartments in central London, has a waiting list of 18,000 prospective buyers. As the name suggests, Pocket builds smaller than average units in central locations with good public transport infrastructure. The flats are sold at 20% below the prevailing market value to key workers who meet the necessary affordability criteria, and the discount is passed on to subsequent purchasers. Russ Edwards, Pocket’s design director, emphasises that they are not building micro-homes. “Micro tends to refer to units that are below the appropriate space standards and often rely on gimmickry to work as a functioning home,” he argues. “Our homes are compact and they fully comply with London’s space standards but, importantly, they rely on good design strategies to provide a fantastic home.” The main Pocket product is a 410 ft2 (38 m2), one-bedroom unit with full-length windows, generous floor-to-ceiling heights and sensibly shaped rooms. Efficient design means that no space is wasted. To date, Pocket has completed seven schemes around London, and sold about 200 homes with a further 500 units in the pipeline. “In London, only 1.7% of the entire housing stock is of intermediate tenure, where we feel the greatest demand is,” says Edwards. “There’s a huge squeeze in the middle who are poorly catered for and struggling to get home ownership. Our business is catering for that intermediate niche, and is targeted at first-time buyers, typically in their late 20s to late 30s.” Alix Green MRICS, residential director in JLL’s affordable housing team, is working with Pocket and providing independent valuation advice to its funding partners, Lloyds Bank and the Greater London Authority. She can see why the Pocket model appeals to prospective, first-time buyers because the product is simple and affordable: “Pocket puts location at the top of the list. It’s very much a city product and, clearly, market values are driven by location and proximity to central London, to

IMAGES NARCHITECTS COURTESY MIR.NO

SHARING’S CARING My Micro NY in New York (below) and the Collective’s Old Oak in London (bottom) sacrifice floor space in units for shared facilities such as gyms, gardens, games rooms and bars

If nArchitects’ vision for its nearly complete My Micro NY project is realised, tenants on different income levels and of all ages will soon live there. The project is New York’s first micro-apartment complex and comprises 55 prefabricated modules. Each unit ranges in size from 260 ft2 to 360 ft2 (24-33 m2) and rents are $2,000-$3,000 (£1,300-£2,000) a month. My Micro NY will also provide community spaces, including a gym, studies and small gardens for tenants to share. This is a very similar concept to one embraced by the Collective, a London developer of a new form of private-rented, shared living accommodation aimed at young professionals. The Collective’s Old Oak development, still under construction, will provide gyms, bars, a games room, cinema and outdoor space for its tenants, who will live in studios of 160-215 ft2 (15-20 m2) . The UK capital, where prices have risen 11% in the last year and the average cost per square metre of a city centre flat is £14,500, is also seeing a vogue for micro-housing. “There’s more micro design happening in London now than there’s ever been,” says Clarke. “I think people have become fairly bored of very, very expensive standard apartments and are rethinking how they want to live.” Clarke argues that the trend for smaller spaces in cities has started to influence how the British approach the appraisal of a flat. Like continental Europeans, they are increasingly describing how many square metres a flat has, rather than the number of bedrooms. “If building costs are based on the amount of square metres, then that has to have an impact on the sales cost,” he adds, “so the smaller we make them, hopefully the more affordable they will be.”

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IMAGES EDGE DESIGN INSTITUTE LTD

IMAGES NARCHITECTS COURTESY MIR.NO

services and public transport hubs. It’s fair to say that unit size comes second to location with the Pocket product.” Green is keen to point out that the Pocket units don’t feel cramped or too small.“There are some design features that have been very carefully thought through, which gives the feeling and illusion of space and this can make for a very efficient unit,” she says. So do the Pocket flats live up to the hype? Debra Stein thinks so. The 37-year-old project manager moved into Pocket’s W9 development in Westbourne Park in 2012. She works for a financial services firm in nearby Paddington, and paid £200,000 for her one-bedroom unit. Stein “loves” her flat and considers herself “exceptionally lucky” to have noticed the email offering full ownership of a Pocket property. “There are only 32 flats in our development and they went extremely early. If I hadn’t read that email, I don’t know what I would be doing today, probably still renting,” she says. “I was able to buy something, which meant I didn’t have to sacrifice price for distance. I would have greatly missed living in central London. Without solutions like this, no one’s going to get anything. It’s quite frightening.” Building micro-units may be a relatively new phenomenon in London, but in Hong Kong, often considered the birthplace of micro-living, it is a way of life. In a 426 square mile territory where around 7.2 million people jostle for space, Simon Smith MRICS, head of research and consultancy at Savills Hong Kong, has explored the trend for building “shoebox apartments” in Asia. “The demand for shoebox apartments has risen over the past few years in Hong Kong as an increasing number of the younger generation and single-person households have shown an interest in the sector,” says Smith. “Traditionally, shoebox apartments are single-block apartments located in core locations such as Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay and Island East and attract mainly executives, lawyers, bankers and accountants. In non-core areas, the demand is mainly from first-time home buyers, young couples and single-end users.”

People have become bored of very expensive, standard units and are rethinking how they want to live GEORGE CLARKE HonRICS Architect and broadcaster

SPACE INVENTORS A fluid approach to fixtures means this Hong Kong apartment (left) can be configured into 24 different rooms, while Pocket’s concept (below) sacrifices a little of the flexibility for floor space

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mith says that the housing situation in Hong Kong is more buoyant than in Tokyo and Singapore. Developers in Hong Kong have completed some highquality apartments of between 250 ft2 and 350 ft2 (23-32 m2) in established residential clusters. For example, the area around Kowloon station features developments such as the Arch, Harbourside, the Waterfront, Sorrento and the Cullinan. “More than half of the apartments in Hong Kong do not have a mortgage, and 52% of households own their home, of which 60% do not have a mortgage or a loan,” says Smith. “Mortgage-tightening measures, which favour small lump sums for properties, have meant that mortgage borrowers and lenders have changed their preference for shoebox units.” Savills has noted that demand in microunits has developed in two ways. They are now included in large-scale developments, not just in single-block schemes, and they are now being built in many emerging new towns, such as Tseung Kwan O and Kai Tak, and not just in key business districts. But is the rise of the micro-unit merely a symptom of urbanisation or actually a longterm cure? Will the novelty of living in a more compact space with fewer personal belongings lose its allure? “As long as major US cities remain appealing to single households and, as long as these places remain relatively high cost, there will be interest in innovative ways to expand supply,” says Williams. “Whether

[micro-units] become a mainstream product mostly depends on the health of US urban real estate markets and whether any significant regulatory progress can happen at a local level. There are some fundamental barriers that have to be worked through before the micro-unit becomes a common housing type. For example, locally imposed minimum sizes and limitations on building density, which are common in US cities, can create obstacles to multi-family development in general and micro-units in particular.” In the UK, experts argue that the market needs a lot more choice in terms of unit sizes, and the space standards are key to that process. Edwards says:“We’ve lost in the UK the ability to move through the property market, from bedsits, to one-beds, trade up to two-beds and then to a house in the suburbs. We are providing extra rungs in the ladder to fix that process and our view is that that’s true with a lot of Western cities.” n READ THE ULI REPORT, The Macro View on Micro Units, at bit.ly/uli_macromicro JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Demographics

A global shortage of later-life housing is looming on the horizon. Where is our rapidly ageing population going to live? Words Roxane McMeeken Illustrations Ray Oranges

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et’s face it, none of us are getting any younger. But more of us are living longer. Declining fertility rates and increasing longevity among the world’s developed and developing populations will lead to the number of people aged 65 and over mushrooming from 530.5 million in 2010, to 1.5 billion in 2050. So, you would expect there to be a global later-life housing building boom under way. In fact, there isn’t. Instead, a chronic lack of accommodation for older people is set to be the next great housing crisis. If we are to avoid it, we need a retirement home revolution. “We are facing a global imbalance as the numbers of people of working age shrink while the numbers of those that have traditionally been their dependents grows,” warns David Sinclair, director of the UK branch of the International Longevity Centre (ILC) Global Alliance, which studies the impact of the ageing population worldwide. The shift to a“greyer”population will be strongest in Asia and eastern and southern Europe. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development predicts that, in these countries, the number of people aged 65 and over per 100 of those of a working age (15-64) – is set to more than double. The exception is China, where it will quadruple. Even as the senior population grows, where and how they live is becoming less suitable. Monica Ferreira, former co-president of the ILC Global Alliance and honorary president of ILC South Africa, says:“In the developed world, affluent people tend to choose to live on their own.” This is creating a generation who do not have sufficient help from younger family members, and who are prone to loneliness. In the developing world, Ferreira says: “The migration of younger people to cities or to more affluent countries, is also leaving the older generation living alone. Or they might »

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In developing countries, policy for older people is usually nonexistent because governments are reluctant to commit to things that might be difficult to deliver MONICA FERREIRA International Longevity Centre Global Alliance

be left with the grandchildren and when they become unable to cope we see them “follow-migrating” to co-locate with the parents. In Africa and Latin America, this scenario frequently means the multi-generational family can only afford to live in inadequate shacks on the city’s periphery.” Some of the world’s most populous countries are among those in greatest need. In China, for example, where the speed and scale of the population’s ageing makes the need for later-life accommodation and care particularly acute, solutions are in their infancy. American Jim Biggs is managing director of Honghui Senior Housing Management Consulting Co, which has launched what it hopes will be the first of a chain of private care homes in Tianjin, China. He says: “In China, families were the traditional caregivers for the elderly. But the one-child policy has led to fewer working-age people to pay for the needs of their parents. Other families might have more money but they’ve moved away from the grandparents in the village to work in cities. There are some state-run care homes, but the range of choice that is needed, such as assisted living and retirement communities, are really only just starting to be developed.” In India, the provision of options is similarly nascent. A 2013 ILC Alliance report, Housing for Older People Globally: What are the best practices?, says: “India’s population aged 60+ is set to reach 315 million by 2050. There is an abysmal lack, however, of political and societal will to address the challenges this trend will bring.” Ferreira believes that governments should focus more on ageing: “In developing countries, policy for older people is usually nonexistent because governments are reluctant to commit to things that might be difficult to deliver. There are policies but they don’t always translate into great places to live. For example, a common tendency is to focus on safety – ensuring that there are fire alarms – rather than comfort.”

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etirement developments also face financial challenges, not least struggling to attract residents. Ben Hartley MRICS is director of Carterwood, a UK surveying firm specialising in social care. He says: “This is a tough market to sell to because people are more risk averse than the general population. For some, the idea of moving out of a family home where they have lived for decades is traumatic. This means that they can take a long time to decide to move. So a developer could take, say, two years to sell a scheme.” This long wait, in turn, deters investors. The lack of provision for an ageing population has a knock-on impact on the rest of society. Although older

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people are not necessarily better off in specially designed retirement housing, the dearth of this type of accommodation blocks many from moving out of larger family homes. This then prevents young families from moving into the space that they need. In the UK, for example, a 2013 report by thinktank Demos, called Top of the Ladder, found that onethird of people over 60 want to move to a smaller home. Demos found that if only half of those keen to downsize did so, some 3.5 million homes would be made available. John Slaughter, director of external affairs at the UK’s Home Builders Federation (HBF), adds:“Downsizing can also take the pressure off hospitals, because retirement housing has been proven repeatedly to improve the health and wellbeing of residents – many of whom are widows and widowers – by reducing loneliness.”

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o establish a way forward we first need to understand what type of environments older people need and will enjoy living in. Later-life housing experts agree that while building more – and better – retirement homes is part of the answer, there are other models that should be in the mix. Several inspiring initiatives around the world demonstrate some of the best approaches. Taking retirement homes first, the US has pioneered the idea of the private “continuing care retirement community” (CCRC). The model allows residents to move into villages of sometimes thousands of people from the age of 55 and stay for the rest of their lives. As and when they need, they can move from fully independent living, to receiving varying degrees of care in their own home, to moving to an on-site care home, either for the short or long term. The US has honed this model so that the communities feel more like resorts, replete with swimming pools and golf courses. The CCRC can also help reduce the trauma that older people experience when they are forced to move between several locations in the later years of life as their health deteriorates. The model is gaining ground in developed countries. Some of the best examples can be found in Japan, where, according to the national Statistics Bureau, one in four people are aged 65 or over. David Collins, chief executive of senior housing consultant Active Living International, says:“Japan is dealing with older people really well. They have adopted the CCRC model widely, they build beautiful environments and they really think about how to make them work – for example, building them close to the rail network, which allows family to visit easily.” However, Professor Duncan Maclennan HonRICS, director of the Centre for Housing Research at the University of St Andrews, says: “Most people in the world can’t afford retirement communities, so we need to think about more economical alternatives.” An intergenerational model being trialled in France offers an interesting alternative. Older people cohabit with a younger person, who benefits from lower rent in return for being contracted to provide a level of support, whether »

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that is cooking, cleaning, or even simply spending time with them. Ferreira says: “This is a low-cost approach that avoids older people living apart from the rest of the community, while ensuring they have security and help if they need it.” Some seniors, however, need a specialist environment – particularly those with dementia, a condition that non-profit organisation Alzheimer’s Disease International says affects one in five of those over 80. Gradmann Haus in Stuttgart, Germany, is a great example of how to tailor accommodation for specific needs. It caters for medium to advanced dementia sufferers and accommodates the impulses that they tend to have. For example, protected green space responds to the commonly felt urge to wander and explore, while remaining in a safe environment. A cosy, homely area, meanwhile, meets the needs of those that seek to be close to others. For many, the best option is to actually stay in their own home. Stephen Oxley FRICS, director of housing and care at Sweett Group, says: “The point is the care that is received, and that people have dignity, choice and independence. And there is a lot of evidence suggesting that people do best when they stay in a familiar environment and community.” The answer is, therefore, often for older people to stay in their own home, but adapt it – adding non-slip flooring and grab bars, for example – and provide care at home. In Brazil, a series of initiatives sponsored by financial institutions show how what experts call “ageing in place” can be achieved in lower-income neighbourhoods, with apparently no cost to the taxpayer. The ILC cites a scheme in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, where porters in apartment buildings have been educated about issues that affect older residents, such as falls and building accessibility, and “empowered to engage with building owners” to persuade them to make improvements. At another, bank-sponsored pilot project in a favela in Rio, community members are trained and paid to provide care for vulnerable older people.

The point is that people have dignity, choice and independence … and evidence suggests that people do best in a familiar environment STEPHEN OXLEY FRICS Sweett Group

The Brazilian schemes were prompted by the World Health Organization’s (WHO) “Age-friendly World” initiative to raise awareness of the need for cities to provide environments that support older people. Ken Bluestone, head of influencing and policy at charity Age International, believes the initiative is a good starting point: “The WHO is providing good guidance for city planners and communities on how to respond to ageing populations. The idea is to think about issues such as how much time are traffic lights giving people to cross roads, and do we have enough benches in public areas.” Although an encouraging 258 cities and neighbourhoods have committed to becoming“age friendly”, they represent just 28 countries, so there is still far to go. RICS members are well placed to raise further awareness of the urgent need to respond to the rapid ageing of the world’s population. Oxley says:“Firms like ours work across housing, health and care sectors, so there is a real opportunity for surveyors to bring the relevant sides together to develop solutions.” Surveyors can then influence changes in built environments to better meet the needs of older people and champion the best solutions from around the world. n TO READ THE RICS REPORT on sustainable retirement communities, go to rics.org/retirement

DEVELOPMENT

Keeping down the cost of care homes Cost is a common barrier for prospective customers in the retirement housing market. Could these measures change the game? HIGH-RISE RETIREMENT The first threat to financial viability is the assumption that older people prefer to live in single-storey dwellings. Kevin Smith MRICS, Aecom’s director for affordable housing, care and extra care in the north of England, says it can be difficult to make low-rise schemes profitable because of the ratio of land to lettable space: “Higher-rise schemes can be more economically viable and meet demand from today’s retirees for modern design.” The Dutch pioneered high-rise retirement living with de Rokade in Groningen, which comprises 74 flats in a tower that is regarded locally as an architectural icon. 40

CONVERTING EXISTING STOCK If people may consider high-rise retirement homes, this opens up the possibility of adapting existing distressed residential blocks, as has been done by Northwards Housing at Whitebeck Court in Manchester. Residents’ responses to the building challenge the assumption that older people only want to live in bungalows, says Sweett Group’s Stephen Oxley FRICS. “They love the views, and the ‘sky lounge’ on the top floor is very popular.” PREFAB CONSTRUCTION Prefabrication has traditionally been rejected by the later-life housing market as too rigid. In the UK, Willmott Dixon is developing a suite of units that can be combined to create schemes that fit different sites. Product director Tim Carey says: “The solution responds to

specific requirements of developers but, at the same time, you know the cost of each component, so 90% of costs are certain and the pre-construction period is shorter because less time is spent on design.” SELLING SUSTAINABILITY A 2013 RICS report on the Australian market identified a gap in the market for sustainable housing for the growing number of environmentally aware older people. Report author Bo Xia, senior lecturer at Queensland University of Technology’s school of civil engineering and built environment, notes that, “residents are willing to pay a higher cost for a more sustainable living environment”. BCIS IS THE COST INFORMATION SERVICE owned by RICS. Find out more at rics.org/bcis

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Advertisement feature

For quantity surveyors, getting into a reputable residential team has never been easier JAKE MAJOR Oyster Partnership

RE-HOME YOUR SKILLS

As housebuilding activity ramps up, there’s never been a better time to consider a move into residential Words Jake Major, principal consultant – quantity surveying, Oyster Partnership

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he National Housing Federation reports that 3.7 million young people will be living with their parents by 2020 unless the UK addresses the shortage of affordable housing. Fast-forward another 30 years and we will be facing a shortage of retirement homes, as the number of people in the UK over 85 increases from 1.4 million to 7.8 million. Every cloud has a silver lining, particularly when it comes to your career. A recent report by EC Harris estimated that one million new recruits are needed across a variety of professions to hit housing targets. All this demand means employers are expanding their residential teams – from high-end developments and private dwellings in prime locations, to large affordable housing projects. For quantity surveyors, it means getting into a reputable residential team has never been

easier. Companies are becoming more open to employing people from different backgrounds, whether you are a quantity surveyor working in a different sector, a main contractor or on the client side. Gone are the days of interviewing several candidates for the same position. We are now in a market where specialists are hard to find, so companies are instead looking to take on people with transferable skills in order to develop their own specialists. You are able to set your sights on where you want to be and engineer career moves to get you there. The first move is to quantify your skill set and what will set you apart within the residential market. Because of the wide spectrum of work, there is a niche for all strengths. If you have a keen attention to detail and prefer bespoke and unique work, then high-end could be just up your street. If your motivations are cost efficiency and social responsibility and you have a diligent, methodical way of working, then affordable housing might suit you best. Understand, promote and enhance the traits that will see you through the next stage. Your personality will be a big contributing factor: your ability to handle clients, build relationships and collaborate with teams from other organisations to deliver a service that will have clients coming back for more. Establishing yourself within the residential market is just the first step. With more investment pouring into the UK and new developers springing up all the time, the opportunity to propel yourself up the ladder is a reality. If building your own team sounds a bit rough and tumble, why not explore working for a developer in estates or development management. Or, perhaps take on the world of private investment and build your own empire. The property market is always in flux. Make the most of the good times and get into a sector with real career prospects, surround yourself with the right people and go for it. n TALK TO JAKE MAJOR AT OYSTER PARTNERSHIP about your career prospects. Call +44 (0)20 7766 9000 or email jake.major@ oysterpartnership.com JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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NEW DAWN IN VIETNAM

A relaxation of the laws governing foreign owners may transform the market. Alex Frew McMillan reports

Singapore style Landmark City, under construction in west Hanoi, promises “Singapore-style living” in nine, 40-storey apartment towers, with international schools and business centres (1) Pool with a view The Residences (2), a luxury development of 12 villas near the coastal resort of Nha Trang, will appeal to overseas investors looking for value. A similar property in Phuket or Bali would be triple the price

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FOR A WHILE, EVERYTHING THAT COULD GO WRONG FOR VIETNAM’S PROPERTY MARKET, DID. It has been a region to avoid for the better part of five years. A systemic problem within its bank system created a mountain of bad loans. This caused interest rates to skyrocket to 23% in 2012, taking mortgage costs with them and making bank finance unavailable. Speculators shied away, and transactions ground to a halt. Developers, faced with massive oversupply, left projects partially built or simply walked away. This is now the third year in a row that property professionals have claimed will be different. But they may have finally called it correctly, with clear demand demonstrated by a jump in transactions. A new property law that frees up investment by non-nationals also promises to spark the tinder. The amended housing law allows overseas investors to buy up to 30% of any apartment building, and a maximum of 250 villas or townhouses in any one ward. Foreigners can also lease out their properties, something they were unable to do before, and get mortgages. The new law also grants non-natives an unlimited number of 50-year extensions, whereas before they were only entitled to a single lease of 50 years when they bought a property. To Tony Foster, a Hanoi-based lawyer with Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, that means ownership rights in Vietnam can be viewed as permanent. The new law also enacts a number of changes for foreign-owned property companies that will make it much easier to build real estate in Vietnam. Singapore’s Keppel Land and CapitaLand have already made headway with in-country developments. In terms of individual buyers, high-end condominiums in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City – formerly Saigon – should reap the benefits, as well as coastal resort property, particularly around Da Nang, Hoi An and Nha Trang.

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OECD* countries

24 DAYS

Other Europe & Central Asia

27 DAYS

Middle East & North America

33 DAYS

Sub-Saharan Africa

59 DAYS

Latin America & Caribbean

65 DAYS

East Asia & Pacific

South Asia

81 DAYS

99 DAYS Briefing

MALL OF SAIGON Singaporean developer€40.3 Keppel Land is scheduled to complete phase two of the Saigon Centre in Ho Chi Minh City – comprising Denmark a seven-floor shopping mall, €21.3 office space, and more than 200 serviced apartments – later this year Spain

BY NUMBERS TALE OF TWO CITIES The number of residential units launched dropped off a cliff in 2012, when interest rates hit 23%, but the expected change to rules on overseas investment has prompted a rebound, particularly at the high end of the market

25,000 22,500 20,000 17,500 15,000 12,500 10,000 7,500 5,000 2,500

Source: CBRE

IMAGE NBBJ INFOGRAPHIC IAN DUTNALL

Borrowing costs have come down from 20% two years ago to around 9%. The economy is also rallying. HSBC predicts growth of around 6% this year and next, an improvement over the previous three years. €37.4that everything Not is€31.4 smooth sailing. There was a spate €34.6 €29.8 €28.3 of anti-Chinese rioting last year after China installed an oil €22.3 rig in a part of the South China Sea claimed by both nations. Tension continues to simmer over the Spratly Islands, which €24.6 likely contain oil and gas reserves. So although Chinese developers are increasingly influential around Asia, they have not launched any kind of product in Vietnam. France Germany Ireland Sweden Italy average UK Korean and Japanese companies, however, areEUrapidly stepping presence€13.1 – particularly retailers, thanks to €15.6 up their €14.6 €8.4 €7.3 a rule change made in January that allows overseas companies €3.8 to set up wholly owned retail and wholesale subsidiaries. Vietnam has the lowest level of foreign-brand penetration in the world at just 1%, says CBRE, the same rate of participation as Iran, Kazakhstan and Oman. Slovenia Greece Portugal Poland Hungary Bulgaria The South Korean conglomerate, Lotte, has opened five supermarkets since late 2014, taking its total in Vietnam to 15. It plans to have 60 across the country by 2020. It is also building a £1.3bn “Eco Smart City” outside Ho Chi Minh. Luxury High-end Mid-end Affordable

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2010

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2011

It is likely that local expatriates will form the first wave of buyers. But Savills’ Vietnam office reports a jump in enquiries from overseas, particularly Hong Kong and Singapore. “You get a lot more bang for your buck than you do elsewhere in the region,”explains Matthew Powell MRICS, director of Savills in Hanoi. He is promoting 40 villas in the Point at Danang Beach Resort of 3,000 ft2 (280 m2), each with three bedrooms, a small garden and pool. They cost $250,000 (£164,000), and will yield around 5% if placed in the hotel’s rental pool. A category above, the Residences at Mia Nha Trang sit on lots of 13,000 ft2 (1,200 m2), with direct beach access for each five-bedroom home. The units cost around £1m and would sell for triple that amount in Phuket or Bali. The new law is due to come into effect this month. Although the government is committed to freeing up the market, the devil will be in the details, Powell suggests. “Sometimes in Vietnam it’s better to wait and see how things are implemented.” He believes the rule change will be pretty straightforward for the property that foreigners are likely to buy, but it is not clear how the intricacies will work out. During Vietnam’s extended crisis, there were more than two years during which banks essentially refused to lend to property projects. Most of the VND90tn (£2.7bn) pile of nonperforming loans that the government bought while bailing banks out originated in the property industry. But financial institutions are demonstrating a change of heart.

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2012

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2013

Ho Chi Minh Hanoi 2014

Japanese mall operator Aeon entered the market in 2014 with two malls in Ho Chi Minh’s suburbs. If all the plans come to fruition, Vietnam’s pool of supermarkets will increase by 40% in the next few years. Such retailers are looking to attract a growing middle class. Only around 25% of Vietnamese shoppers visit “modern” stores as opposed to traditional markets – half the rate of Thailand and Malaysia, and well below the two-thirds of shoppers in China. However, they need to pitch their product carefully, and squarely at needs-based consumption. High-end retail space is overbuilt in Vietnam, according to the 2015 Asian edition of the Urban Land Institute’s report, Emerging Trends in Real Estate. The biggest opportunity lies in mid-market residential real estate, the ULI predicts, since demand continues to grow. As the country’s manufacturing sector grows, industrial and warehouse space is also a good bet, the institute adds. n

REFERENCE POINT REPORTS AND RESOURCES New land laws Overview from law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer bit.ly/vietnamlandlaws The amended housing law Spotlight from Savills bit.ly/amendedhousinglaw Hotel Intelligence Vietnam JLL overview on hotspots for overseas visitors bit.ly/hotelintelligence

Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi residential and offices Research from Savills bit.ly/savillsvietnam_resi; bit.ly/savillsvietnam_offices CBRE Vietnam MarketView Q1 2015 Covering the main markets of Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi bit.ly/cbrevietnam_q12015

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NO WALK IN THE PARK In taming Sheffield’s concrete brute Park Hill, its developer took on a heritage listing, a sceptical community and a global recession. Simon Creasey reports

Developer Urban Splash Quantity surveyor Simon Fenton Partnership Cost consultancy Rider Levett Bucknall Architects Studio Egret West, Hawkins\Brown, Grant Associates

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CHEAP CHIC Affordable housing group Places for People has provided £18m for the 182-flat second phase. The first 78 were completed in June, with the remaining 104 due by the year’s end

ON ITS COMPLETION IN 1961, PARK HILL in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, was hailed as one of the UK’s most innovative housing estates. Much was made of its “streets in the sky”, wide enough to accommodate milk floats and a design that maximises natural light streaming through the floor-to-ceiling windows at different times of the day. However, by the time of its controversial grade II* listing in 1998, the estate was in a sorry state of disrepair and its remaining residents were referring to it as “San Quentin”, after the notorious American jail. Recognising that Park Hill was in dire need of help, in 2004 the city council invited developers to bid for the right to lead the regeneration of the brutalist block, eventually selecting Manchester-based regeneration specialist Urban Splash. This was a challenge unlike anything the company had come across before: stripping the building back to its original concrete frame and creating just shy of 1,000 flats, around 130,000 ft2 (12,000 m2) of work

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Case file

WINDOW BLINDER Dual-aspect units respond to the path of the sun to maximise heat and light, and follow the previous floor plans, making them more spacious than many new builds

COSMETIC SURGERY Crumbling brick walls have been replaced with aluminium panels, 5,500 concrete repairs were made and new balustrades built to replicate originals

NUMBERS UP As Europe’s largest listed building, just working up outline planning consent for Park Hill took two years. At 1m ft2, it is Urban Splash’s biggest project to date

space and the vital ingredients necessary – doctor and dentist surgeries, a nursery, and shops, bars and cafes – to create a revitalised neighbourhood. At the same time, the developer had to comply with the restrictions associated with the estate’s listed status. In addition to the architectural obstacles, the project also had to overcome some significant financial hurdles. “One of the big challenges was VAT,” says Urban Splash managing director Simon Gawthorpe MRICS. “This is a residential conversion to residential, which means VAT is applicable and that, in itself, was going to put an extra £15m-£20m bill on the project. Effectively we managed to get a Revenue and Customs ruling bypassing what’s known as the ‘shell test’, due to the fact that we are stripping the building right back to its shell and then putting it together again.” An injection of public funds also helped to get the project off the ground, but just as Urban Splash was about to push the button on construction, the recession struck.

“We were out trying to get bank finance for 200 to 300 units pre-recession, which wasn’t straightforward, but then in the middle of the recession it was completely impossible,” says Gawthorpe. Rather than allow this setback to stall the project completely, Urban Splash started to re-clad the building and by the time it went back to the market to secure funding it was able to find support for phase one of the development, consisting of 78 flats that were snapped up pretty quickly when they came on to the market in early 2013. The second phase, funded to the tune of £18m by Places for People, which specialises in the provision of a range of affordable homes for rent and sale through subsidiary companies, will see a total of 182 flats handed over by the end of the year. Urban Splash is also keen to move forward with the commercial elements of the scheme, which so far have been a resounding success – particularly with local creative companies attracted to the estate’s work space.

Added together, the residential and commercial elements of Park Hill come to around 1m ft2 (93,000 m2), making it Urban Splash’s largest project in terms of size to date. It will also be the lengthiest project in terms of the number of years the developer has committed to it. This commitment paid off in spades in 2013 when the renovation was one of six shortlisted projects for the RIBA Stirling Prize. But for Gawthorpe the main reward has been seeing people flocking back to the area again. At a recent event to coincide with Sheffield Design Week, around 3,000 people visited Park Hill – more than 1,500 of whom popped into the sales office as well. “We’ve endured numerous setbacks and challenges, but despite the recession we’re massively enthusiastic and we genuinely believe this will be the best development in Sheffield. It is so unique in character and something that we want Sheffield to be proud of because everyone is genuinely fascinated about Park Hill,” says Gawthorpe. n JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Careers / Business / Legal / Training

Foundations CAREERS Social media platform LinkedIn is a powerful tool, but users must never forget it is a public forum and always remain professional

QUICK WINS

LinkedIn is one of the few work-based social networks that has enough critical mass to be really useful. But, like all social media platforms, it is constantly evolving, and it has taken time for users to really understand its potential. For professionals and businesses, LinkedIn is a highly efficient means of creating and maintaining relationships, accessing information and ensuring you remain visible in a competitive sector. There are LinkedIn basics that all should undertake, such as ensuring your profile is complete, that it displays a professional picture and that new contacts are regularly added. But professionals and regular users suggest going further. Su Butcher runs Just Practising, a social media consultancy for the construction industry. She says one of the big mistakes people make is to think of LinkedIn as an online CV when, in fact, one of its most useful aspects is the way it allows users to write recommendations for one another. “You can invite people to recommend you and then choose which ones to display on your profile. If you have worked on a well-known building, others will be able to see who you have worked with and who you are associated with – in construction that’s really important. LinkedIn is a visualisation of a referral network, that’s the core of why it is such a useful tool.” Tim Garratt FRICS, managing director of Nottinghambased property consultant Innes England, uses LinkedIn to network, blog, find information and vet prospective staff. He agrees that the platform is great for recommendations and referrals, but he is also much more engaged. “I get an

01 The more you engage on LinkedIn, the more you can communicate about your personality and knowledge. 02 This doesn’t have to mean writing long blog posts – you can simply curate interesting stories that relate to your work, or engage in relevant discussions. 03 Shout about your victories. “If you want to advertise an award you have been nominated for, you can publish this information instantly,” says recruiter Lisa Townsend. 04 The RICS LinkedIn group is an ideal place to meet other surveyors and discuss issues facing the profession. Visit rics.org/linkedin. 46

email telling me who has viewed my profile. Sometimes I will call them and see if there’s anything we can do or if they’d like to meet for a coffee.” LinkedIn can also be tethered to other social media, as well as users’ blogs. The Buffer app, for instance, enables you to tweet and share on LinkedIn simultaneously. Garratt is a regular blogger and has linked his blog to his LinkedIn profile. He cautions that, while social media requires users to express their personalities, they should remember it’s a public forum. “People want to know what you’re like as a person. It’s important for it to reflect your views,” he says. “However, I am still surprised by what some people post. People really nailed their political colours to the mast during the [recent UK general] election campaign and made some quite aggressive comments. Clients do look at your profile, it is public, and once you’ve said it, it’s out there.” The public nature of LinkedIn is both a blessing and a curse, and users need to develop a little savviness around it. Nicholas Katz FRICS is founder of Splittable, an app designed to help those in house shares manage bills. He uses LinkedIn both openly and clandestinely, depending on his objectives. “I do check people’s profiles out on purpose when I want them to know I looked. If you want to check out a competitor and keep it secret, log out and use an incognito browser,” he suggests. Finally, LinkedIn users would do well to regularly update their details and add points of interest whenever possible. Recruiter Lisa Townsend, of Lisa Townsend Associates, says: “People should always be prepared to sell themselves online and LinkedIn is a quick way to reach a large audience.”

NEXT MONTH: VOLUNTARY WORK For further careers advice, go to rics.org/careers, and for the latest jobs, see ricsrecruit.com

ILLUSTRATION TOMI UM PORTRAIT MORGAN OMMER WORDS JON CARD

THINK BEFORE YOU LINK

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Foundations

HOW TO

BUILD AND PROTECT YOUR BRAND Select a distinctive name Check company names, the UK IPO trademark register (ipo.gov.uk), and carry out a Google search to try to avoid names and logos that are already in use by others. Secure a copyright If you engage someone to design your brand, make sure they assign copyright in it to you. Protect your mark Make sure you apply for a registered trademark. This gives you a monopoly right in the mark for the goods and services for which it is registered. Distinguish yourself from your competitors Don’t forget to actively police your brand – ensure it is always used consistently and that no one copies it or uses something close to it for similar services. Be social media savvy Consider using the brand as part of the naming for employee social media accounts, but think about encouraging employees to follow a particular format or code of conduct in using the account to be consistent with your brand. Also, it is easier to secure the removal of offending posts on social media websites if you have a registered trademark.

MY WAY

Neil MacGregor FRICS MANAGING DIRECTOR, SAVILLS VIETNAM

Jill Bainbridge is a partner at Blake Morgan. blakemorgan.co.uk

Growing up in Edinburgh, I was surrounded by some of the most inspiring architecture in the world. I’m pretty sure it was this that drew me to working with physical assets rather than simply being tied to a desk. Back then, it was not so common for people to travel long distances for work, and starting my career in London was exciting enough! I graduated from Aberdeen University in 1997 with a degree in land economy, and became a chartered surveyor in May 2000 after completing DTZ’s graduate programme in London. I joined the firm’s international investment team, and it was perhaps this move that initially stirred my interest in working in real estate elsewhere in the world. A huge turning point for me came in 2001, when I decided to join Chesterton in Vietnam. It raised many eyebrows in London,

where the country was more associated with its wartime past. But Vietnam has made incredible progress, and by the time Savills bought Chesterton in 2007, the market was starting to boom on the back of annual GDP growth averaging around 7.5%. Following a government decree that was issued last December, Vietnam is taking a big step by opening up its residential market to foreign buyers, which could make the country one of the most attractive investment destinations in the region. I oversee Savills’ 1,000-strong team in Vietnam, as well as the other emerging Asian markets of Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. After a slow start, membership is now starting to rapidly increase in Vietnam. As the market matures, I think RICS is playing an important role in ensuring greater professionalism here. The government has also been very open to listening to expertise from elsewhere in the world. For those looking to enter a market that is full of great potential, Vietnam is ideal, but there are many challenges. You’ve got to be ready for a certain amount of culture shock. rics.org/neilmacgregor

“For those looking to enter a market that is full of great potential, Vietnam is ideal, but there are many challenges. You’ve got to be ready for a certain amount of culture shock” JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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A LOAD OFF YOUR MIND

There is an oft-repeated saying in business that “behind every leader is a great team”. While originally intended to be complementary, nowadays it is a phrase that is more often regarded as damning with faint praise: there are always lots of minions who do the real work, but there is only ever one that gets the glory. The root cause in these circumstances, though, is that there has been a failure to perform an important but entirely normal management function that should be expected by all employees – delegation. As Virgin Group founder Richard Branson recently wrote in an article for Entrepreneur magazine: “If you want to grow, you’ve got to learn to delegate.” He added: “Good leaders know how to delegate in order to grow.” Put like this, delegation seems incredibly simple. But, as Branson also argues, “it is not an easy skill to master; five decades on, I’m still learning [how to do it]”. “Delegation is a skill that doesn’t come easily, but it must be learned, otherwise the danger to the business is significant,” cautions Adam Landau, director of Devono Property. The first thing it requires is the ability to let go – something that often does not come easily to managers. Landau says: “A few years ago, we realised too many responsibilities were being concentrated between too few people. We recognised we would curtail our business if we didn’t start spreading our expertise among more staff.” Failure to delegate can come from a fear that no one else could do the job better, or that, if it were given to someone else, NEXT MONTH: CURRENCY RISK it would take longer. It is these feelings that need to be quashed, argues Tim DON’T GET CAUGHT OUT by fluctuating Taylor, director of leadership consultant exchange rates. To take part in Making Great Leaders: “Good delegation future business advice columns, is as much about understanding what email editor@ricsmodus.com 48

STAY IN HOUSE Reluctant delegators will often end up outsourcing tasks rather than entrusting them to staff, believing that, at least, outsourcers are professionals in a specific field. However, Landau says outsourcing should only be reserved for the things that cannot be done in-house. “Delegation is realising you’re not experts in everything. So, if we need to design a website, or do Google search-engine optimisation, we’ll outsource, but for things we think we can do ourselves – with the skills we know we have – delegation will always come first.” Landau would not, he admits, delegate work to someone he felt was not up to it.

ILLUSTRATION TOMI UM WORDS PETER CRUSH

BUSINESS Relinquish some responsibility and everyone will reap the rewards

authority you’re actually retaining, as much as it is about what’s being given away,” he explains. “Are you maintaining a ‘strategy’ or ‘filter’ or ‘coach’ role? This needs to be established. For instance, a manager delegating responsibility for a project may decide to keep the filter role [how teams involved with it need to be organised], but leave that person to deal with the strategy.” What delegation should never be, Taylor warns, and which, if pursued, will simply cause resentment, is asking someone to come up with different options, but then leaving the final decision to the so-called ‘delegator’. “This is not good,” he says. “Taking this approach keeps the manager in the decider role. This will destroy morale, and break down trust. Delegation is handing over responsibility, and when you hand over responsibility, the manager has to accept they are changing their roles, too.” On top of not undermining your subordinates’ decision-making abilities, it is also important that leaders do not make it look as if they are dumping work on their already hard-pressed workforce. “We have a philosophy that delegation has to go hand in hand with personal development,” says Landau. “We want to elevate people so they can be better and stronger, which in turn makes the company stronger, and that’s how we position things, and communicate this to our workforce. If staff thought we were just heaping on them the stuff we don’t want to do, we would have failed.” For Landau, this means not settling for second best, nor accepting that delegated work will not be to the same standard. “For us, delegation is recognising the solution someone else comes up with might be different to your approach, but being open-minded to a new, or different way of doing things.”

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Foundations

LEGAL 101...

He argues that thinking about who to give work to is often as important as the work being delegated in the first place. “You must choose who to delegate to wisely,” he asserts. “There might be someone you know who could do it quickly and efficiently, but then, that being the case, is that person really being developed? “We would rather give a project to someone who might need to demonstrate they can step up to the plate, or show an

“We want to elevate people so they can be better and stronger, which in turn makes the company stronger. If staff thought we were just heaping on them the stuff we don’t want to do, we would have failed” ADAM LANDAU Devono Property element of ‘stretch’ in their capabilities. Then, when they achieve something they thought they couldn’t, the engagement you can create is immense.” It is no wonder delegation is an acquired skill. “Remember,” cautions Taylor, “good delegation is really good people management. Managers that overcorrect and interfere only create a sense of fear, and that’s when people become too worried about making mistakes. Done correctly, and with support, delegation is about making sure you give staff the guidance, but also the empowerment employees seek. Most people want to do the best they can in the workplace. So, by giving a bit, and trusting people, you will almost certainly gain a lot more back.” DOWNLOAD A FACTSHEET on people management from RICS’ UK Small Business Hub. Go to rics.org/sme

DELEGATION – TOP TIPS n Explain what your

n Describe how you would

employees are being asked to do – make sure goals are specific but also attainable.

evaluate their performance – reach an agreement on the standards set for the task. n Fix problems – but only as they arise, and then agree a new plan to properly execute the delegated task. n Give credit where it’s due – make sure your whole team shares any rewards or accolades for a job well done.

Protect the data you share MARK GLEESON partner – data protection, Squire Patton Boggs

Surveyors, developers and their advisers regularly share commercial information with local authorities. As a result of the legal rights of access in the UK’s Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) and Environmental Information Regulations 2004 (EIR), there is a risk that valuable information may be disclosed to the world at large. There are several steps that can be taken to manage the risk. Get agreement in advance Try to secure a formal information sharing agreement in advance of supplying any documents to the authority. This should set out the ground rules of what can be disclosed following a request. It is a matter of best practice, but not a legal duty, for authorities to seek the views of the information supplier before disclosure. Setting that best practice as a contractual obligation will provide better protection. Mark it up Prominently marking a document as “confidential” is a good first step in protecting the information, as is adding a notice that the document should not be disclosed to third parties. A more robust approach would be to mark each section of a document with the relevant exemptions or exceptions that might apply. Alternatively, you could produce for the authority a disclosable version of the requested information with the sensitive parts redacted.

Get your point of view across When an authority seeks an information supplier’s view on disclosure, it is essential to respond in a timely manner. The authority is obliged to respond to the request within 20 working days, and there is limited scope for extensions. There has been a tendency for authorities to overuse EIR and assume that anything to do with land or the planning process is outside FOIA. There can be benefits to having the authority consider the request under FOIA rather than EIR. Arguments should be put forward on what is the correct regime for each piece of information. Ask the authority Asking the authority to reveal the requester’s identity allows the information supplier to make fuller representations. Although FOIA and EIR are said to be applicant and motive blind, the identity can be relevant to some of the exemptions and exceptions, and to the application of the public interest test. The response should set out, in full, each of the FOIA exemptions and EIR exceptions that apply to the information requested. Importantly, explain in detail why the public interest favours the maintenance of the balanced FOIA exemptions and the EIR exceptions, and outweighs the public interest in disclosure. The ultimate step If an authority does not accept the representations, the only recourse to prevent disclosure will be to apply to the court for an injunction. squirepattonboggs.com JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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New look BCIS The BCIS Online platform has changed: • Enhanced usability • Improved legibility

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knowledge coupled with wide-ranging practical application. While studying part-time this degree can be completed in 18-24 months, either at the RAU’s www.rau.ac.uk/clearing cotswold campus, or Regent’s University London, admissions@rau.ac.uk and benefits from RICS accreditation. +44 full (0)1285 889912

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Foundations

Public sector property asset management follows more or less the same techniques as corporate real estate asset management, except that the emphasis is on social benefits within reasonable or budgeted costs, rather than profit.

BRENT CONTROL Brent Civic Centre in London brings under one roof services that were spread across 14 buildings

The UK’s public sector asset base is worth around £380bn. Successive governments have looked at the portfolio and come to the conclusion that it needs to be much better strategically managed to get the most out of what is being used. But that’s not to say every public sector organisation, or property practitioner, is managing public property badly. Chartered surveyors generally receive very good training around core disciplines, but this training can fall short when it comes to strategically managing a property portfolio for their public client’s or employer’s business. Most public sector bodies have

Remember, property asset management is an organisational issue, not a department issue. The chartered surveyor or asset manager is the facilitator, but at the end of the day, it has to be thought about on a corporate- or organisation-wide scale. KEITH JONES FRICS is director at Performent Consulting. performent.co.uk

Pic2Paper It is: An iPhone or iPad app that helps surveying professionals add photos and captions to customised reports or presentations. It does: The app is a quick and effective tool for adding captions to site photos, and presenting the images within a customised PDF

report. It’s ideal for reporting on construction site progress, recording notes when buying and selling houses, property or mechanical inspections, or environmental monitoring. Once you have taken a photo, you can add captions in the form of notes or doodles, then select a template to generate your PDF report and share it with clients or colleagues. The report also

Practical Guide to Using the CDM Regulations 2015 Teamwork not paperwork

Tony Putsman and Paul McArthur

Practical Guide to Using the CDM Regulations 2015 Draws together principles of how to deliver quality projects and explains in an easy-toread guide, how to apply them. £30

CDM Regulations 2015 Explained Provides a straightforward, independent and authoritative assessment of the new CDM Regulations and a detailed analysis of the individual roles of each party involved in a project. £65

With improved training, surveyors would be more able to strategically plan an asset base on behalf of an organisation. They would gain techniques to assess the social and financial benefits and costs, and be better equipped to help a public body recognise the need for joinedup management and decision-making on its assets.

APP LAUDED

ICE Publishing

IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST

Public sector debt remains high, so every pound that is tied into property in its value or running costs needs to be used wisely. But when we think strategically, it allows us to ask: could some money be released to pay off local authority debt, or reinvested in the portfolio, or used to build something new that would give better returns?

rics.org/shop

Putsman and McArthur

BRAIN GAIN

RICS books Practical Guide to Using the CDM Regulations 2015

traditionally managed their property on a day-to-day basis, instead of seeing it as a strategic resource that needs to be deployed to its best effect. Strategic public sector property asset management helps us look at the asset base as a whole and its contribution to the objectives of the organisation.

Managing Health and Safety in Construction Provides guidance on the legal requirements for CDM 2015 £15

time-stamps the photos, to verify when they were taken. What else can it do? Report layouts can be created in portrait and landscape, and shared via email or Bluetooth. An upgrade option allows you to embed your company logo in the PDF report. Price: £1.49 (in-app purchases also available) Search: Pic2Paper at the Apple App Store. JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Advertorial

BENEFITS To view the latest offers, new partners and promotions, visit rics.org/benefitsplus

GNSS data that covers the whole country. The data streams enable the correction of GNSS errors to be computed in real time and, when transmitted, allow you to coordinate new map features to an accuracy of just a few centimetres using RTK (real-time kinematic) GNSS.

NET INVESTMENT Make smarter business decisions based on location analytics

Access to detailed information about land and properties across Britain can enable you to make better business decisions. From assessing an area of land to planning a project, clarifying addresses or managing assets, you can rely on Ordnance Survey (OS) location data – particularly as it updates its database with more than 10,000 geographic changes a day. Ordnance Survey’s topographical digital data covers the whole of Great Britain, making available the most accurate and current representation of sites across land and property. The data, which includes building heights and imagery, can help support land and property professionals throughout all stages of a project life-cycle, including 3D modelling; and BIM.

As a surveyor, Ordnance Survey knows how important accurate positioning information is. Surveying professionals can take advantage of an OS Net-based service available through its partners, which offer highly accurate positioning services. OS Net is Ordnance Survey’s network of permanent, highaccuracy GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) receivers. A GNSS can be used to pinpoint the geographic location of a user’s receiver anywhere in the world. Combining GNSS observations with our freely available precise transformations OSTN02 and OSGM02 allows GNSS positions to be accurately related to OS mapping. For OS Net, its day-to-day operation is to supply a stream of real-time

ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES Back in the office, by linking your business information to OS location data, third-party datasets and analytics, you can achieve cost and time savings. Through combining data from geographic areas or features with land ownership, risk and peril data, underground assets, planning applications, historic growth and boundaries and specific site definition into one visual map, the possibilities to help you make smarter business decisions are endless. Combining OS data with thirdparty datasets creates visualisation and analysis to inform decisionmaking. Head of OS Land & Property, Paul Griffiths says: “We want to help industry professionals solve business problems by unleashing the power of rich attribution of geospatial data. Talk to us about the information you need. Together with our partners we can provide data and services to meet your business needs.” TO FIND OUT MORE about how location intelligence can help your business, please contact Ordnance Survey’s Land & Property team on +44 (0) 2380 055 336, email landproperty@os.uk, or visit the website at os.uk/landandproperty

AS GOOD AS OUR WORD

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Foundations

EVENTS

FULL RICS EVENTS LISTINGS ONLINE AT rics.org/events For enquiries, call +44 (0)20 7695 1600. All prices are +VAT

UNITED KINGDOM

››Spring CPD Series July, various locations One-hour seminars covering topics such as: structural appraisal, management and control of invasive weeds, BIM for health and safety, and commercial uses for permitted development rights. CPD: 1 hour / £30, or £25 for three or more bookings / rics.org/cpdseries ››RICS Building Surveying Seminars July, various locations One-day seminars providing practitioners in building surveying, building control, construction design and management (CDM), health and safety, facilities and building projects with the latest information in CDM regulations, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), case-law updates, asbestos, renewables and energy, social media and inclusive design requirements. CPD: 5 hours / £150 / rics.org/buildingseminars ››Autumn CPD Series September-December, various locations Gain formal CPD hours with more than 200 seminars taking place across the UK. Covering a range of topics across land, property and the built environment, meet your CPD for 2015 and ensure you are up to date with the latest market developments. CPD: 1 hour / £30, or £25 for three or more bookings / rics.org/cpdseries

››RICS Building Control Conference 22 September, Birmingham One-day conference providing legal updates, technical information, breakthrough technology innovation and the latest changes for building control practitioners. Plus a two-hour, interactive APC stream for candidates to receive expert advice on how to pass from senior member assessors. CPD: 5.5 hours / £195 early bird rate, £220 standard rate / rics.org/bcconference ››RICS Rural Conference 7 October, Hexham Auction Mart Keep up to speed with the latest developments in the rural sector and meet up with colleagues from across the region to discuss, debate and learn the latest solutions to rural issues. CPD: 5.5 hours / Price TBC / rics.org/northrural

››RICS Environment and Resources Conference 8 October, Bristol Attend this half-day conference and network with your peers across the environment, minerals and resources sector. Take the opportunity to view the future and explore the solutions and the contribution that your profession can make to the UK economy. CPD: 3 hours / Price TBC / rics.org/ envandresources

RICS DILAPIDATIONS FORUM CONFERENCE

30 September, London

››RICS & SPAB Building Conservation Summer School 6-10 September, Cirencester Unlock your career in historic building surveying with essential guidance into inspecting and repairing old and traditional buildings. Spanning five days, this event aims to reinforce undergraduate and graduate training in traditional buildings, construction techniques and materials, as well as support new surveyors and other specialists in this field. CPD: 30+ hours / £425 / rics.org/summerschool ››RICS CPD Days 15 September, Bournemouth; 13 October, Leeds Regional conferences full of CPD within land, property and the built environment, also providing breakout sessions tailored to meet your specific learning requirements. CPD: 6 hours / £145 full day, £90 half day / rics.org/cpddays

This historical event returns with a choice of technical breakout sessions, allowing you to gain detailed knowledge across a variety of dilapidations issues and providing you with exceptional value in your daily role. Don’t miss the opportunity to update your knowledge on important court cases, many of which our legal experts were directly involved in, such as Sunlife v Tiger. Refresh yourself on the pitfalls in diminution valuations, schedules of condition and updates on the impact of the energy act to ensure you are adhering to best practice. CPD: 6 hours / £195 early bird rate, £220 standard rate / rics.org/dilapsconference JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Notices

OBITUARIES Please email obituary notifications to contactrics@rics.org or call +44 (0)870 333 1600

EASTERN

››Christopher Eric Burton FRICS 1947-2015, Bedford ››Christopher Hugh Cockshott FRICS 1938-2015, Bedford ››Roger Gurney Hawkins 1931-2015, Hitchin ››Ivor Jeffrey James FRICS, 1928-2015 Girton ››Keith Gerald Moore 1938-2015, Cambridge ››Stanley Muth FRICS 1929-2015 Woodford Green

EAST MIDLANDS

››William Edward Brian Barlow MRICS 1930-2015, Newark ››Peter Reginald East MRICS, 1961-2015 Chesterfield ››Michael Kirk Ogden 1932-2015, March ››Eric Roe FRICS 1933-2015, Leicester

LONDON

››Raymond Arrowsmith FRICS, 1949-2015 Enfield ››Gordon David Bell FRICS, 1926-2015 London ››Brian Albert Blackman FRICS, 1927-2015 London ››John Terence Blowfield FRICS 1922-2015, Enfield ››James Cosgrave FRICS 1928-2015 London ››John Patrick Hollamby FRICS, 1930-2015 London ››Patrick Bernard Reddin FRICS 1947-2015, London 54

NORTH WEST

››Myles Richard Constantine MRICS 1972-2015, Southport ››Derek James Cowie FRICS, 1936-2015 Wilmslow ››Jack Wignall Dobson MRICS, 1943-2015 Preston ››Peter Dennis Richard Ellis FRICS, 1947-2015 Kirk Michael ››David EG Faragher FRICS, 1930-2015 Birkenhead ››Peter Robin Mitchell FRICS, 1936-2015 Manchester

SOUTH WEST

››Paul Stewart William Bell MRICS, 1924-2015 Teignmouth ››Ronald Seymour Gardner FRICS 1929-2015, Cheltenham ››Ken James Hall FRICS, 1946-2015 Highbridge ››Roy Hunter Hudson FRICS, 1920-2015 Bournemouth ››John Martyn Beatson Mackie FRICS 1918-2015, Bideford ››John Andrew Maitland MRICS, 1954-2015 Warminster

WEST MIDLANDS

››Hugh Fielding Moore MRICS, 1922-2015 Stoke-On-Trent ››Peter Thomas Charles Nevard FRICS 1932-2015, Tamworth ››Frederick G Oldfield FRICS, 1933-2015 Telford ››Paul Alan Taylor MRICS, 1958-2015 Stoke-on-Trent

YORKSHIRE & HUMBER

››Leslie Beaumont Rock FRICS, 1933-2015 Ossett

SCOTLAND

››Alan Douglas Begg FRICS, 1961-2015 Edinburgh ››Frederick Wilson Fleming FRICS 1934-2015, Stirling ››Robert Bruce Methven FRICS 1923-2015, Edinburgh

WALES

››Steven George Piper 1958-2014, Swansea

NORTHERN IRELAND ››Eamon Paschal McAnuff MRICS 1950-2015, Newry

SOUTH EAST

››Peter John Blackwood FRICS, 1928-2015 Reigate ››Reginald Maxwell Booth FRICS 1930-2015, Woking ››Derek Bradnam FRICS 1924-2015 Southampton ››Roy George Dickenson FRICS, 1932-2015 Sevenoaks ››Peter Charles Freeman FRICS, 1953-2015 Maidstone ››Russell Gwilliam FRICS 1931-2014, Coulsdon ››Herbert Frank Hollands MRICS 1926-2015 Southampton ››Colin Kemp FRICS 1937-2015, Romsey ››John Charles Tarring MRICS, 1934-2015 Woking ››Michael William Wood FRICS, 1956-2015 Reigate ››Jack Wright MRICS 1931-2015, Brighton

DAVID BUCKNALL OBE FRICS, 1938-2015 David Bucknall, former chairman and founder of Rider Levett Bucknall, died on Sunday 7 June aged 76, while out cycling in preparation for a forthcoming Ironman triathlon. David was a leading figure in the quantity surveying profession, well known for his enthusiasm and desire to innovate and push the boundaries in everything he did. He was renowned for his perseverance in striving for best practice, pushing conventional boundaries and encouraging collaboration across the industry to ensure that the profession would be at the forefront of any changes in the construction sector. He was also always active in RICS, latterly as Chair of both the global and UK quantity surveying and construction groups, leading both with drive, enthusiasm and his vast experience in the industry. David began his career in 1961 with Bucknall Austin and held a number of roles, culminating in his leadership of the global merger of Rider Hunt, Levett and Bailey and Bucknall Austin to form Rider Levett Bucknall in 2007. He retired in 2012 but remained part of the firm, acting as patron for the company’s graduate recruitment scheme, Protégé. David was passionate about the future of the profession, and Protégé was later expanded to include Bucknall’s First Rung, a scheme to increase diversity in the industry and widen the opportunities available for people who found it difficult to enter the profession. During his time in practice, he was responsible for such auspicious projects as the development of Birmingham’s International Convention Centre and the rebuilding of Windsor Castle following fire damage. He was awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Wolverhampton and Birmingham City University for his contribution to the built environment, was a board member of Midlands Constructing Excellence, and a trustee of both the Construction Youth Trust and Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. He leaves a widow Moya, two daughters Julia and Lucy, four grandchildren George, Tashi, Gabriel and Alice Maude and sister Margaret.

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Notices

CONDUCT rics.org/conductcases

IRELAND

››Jeremiah Michael Farrell MRICS 1947-2015 Grange Bective ››Kenneth Kilbride FRICS, 1946-2015 Dublin 2 ››Denis Myles FRICS 1942-2015, Bangor ››Brendan Pius Sheridan FRICS 1953-2015, Dublin 16

NORTH AMERICA ››Thilak Mahanthe Bandara MRICS 1947-2014, Surrey

ASEAN

››Azmi Bin Ahmad FRICS, 1950-2015 Sungai Petani ››Tiang Huat Khoo FRICS 1949-2013, Malaysia

SOUTH ASIA

››Palitha Pushpakumara Ekanayake MRICS 1952-2014, Veyangoda

NORTH ASIA

››Kai Leung Wong FRICS 1956-2015 ››Stewart Tsui MRICS 1962-2014, Kowloon ››Tsim Sha Tsui Wai Ming Pun MRICS 1960-Unknown, Shatin If you are facing hardship after the loss of a family member, or if you are considering leaving a legacy, please contact LionHeart, the charity for RICS members and their families. Call +44 (0)24 7646 6696, email info@ lionheart.org.uk or visit lionheart.org.uk.

Mr Christopher Jeff, Cambridgeshire Disciplinary Hearing – 22.04.15 The Panel heard the case against Mr Jeff who was charged with failure to act in accordance with his professional obligations (Rule 3 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007), failure to submit in a timely manner information reasonably requested (Rule 8 of the Rules of Conduct for Members) and failure to fully cooperate with RICS staff (Rule 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007). The Panel found the charges proved and expelled Mr Jeff from membership. Mr David Gurl & DAG Property Consultancy, Avon Disciplinary Hearing – 29.04.15 The Panel heard a case against Mr David Gurl & DAG Property Consultancy (the Firm) in accordance with Rules 3,5,8 & 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007 and Rules 3,7,9 & 12 of the Rules of Conduct for Firms 2007. The Panel found the charges proved and expelled Mr David Gurl from membership and ordered the removal of the Firm’s registration for Regulation. Mr David Gurl was ordered to contribute towards RICS’ costs. Mr David Green FRICS, East Sussex Disciplinary Hearing – 05.05.15 The Panel heard the case against Mr Green who was charged with failure to act with integrity and that he did not avoid actions or situations that were inconsistent with his professional obligations (Rule 3 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007). The Panel found the charges proved and imposed a Reprimand and costs. Mr John Keenan FRICS, Surrey Disciplinary Hearing – 06.05.15 The Panel heard a case against Mr John Keenan FRICS in accordance with Rules 3 & 4 of the Rules of

Conduct for Members 2007. The Panel found the charges proved and imposed a Reprimand against Mr Keenan. The Panel ordered Mr Keenan to contribute towards RICS’ costs. Mr A Warde & Alan J Warde – Chartered Surveyor, Essex Disciplinary Hearing – 13.05.15 The Panel heard a case against Mr A Warde & Alan J Warde – Chartered Surveyor in accordance with Rules 3, 4, 8 & 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007 and Rules 3 & 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Firms 2007. The Panel expelled him from RICS membership and removed the Firm’s registration for Regulation. Mr Warde was ordered to contribute towards the costs of the hearing. Mr Peter Judd & Peter Judd and Associates, Tavistock Disciplinary Hearing – 20.05.15 The Panel heard a case against Mr Peter Judd and his firm, Peter Judd and Associates, in accordance with Rules 3, 8 & 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007 and Rule 3 of the Rules of Conduct for Firms 2007. The Panel expelled him from RICS membership and removed the Firm’s registration for RICS Regulation. Mr Judd was ordered to pay a Fine of £890 and to contribute towards the costs of the hearing. Mr David Pugh, West Midlands Disciplinary Hearing – 27.05.15 The Panel heard a case against Mr David Pugh who was charged with failure to act in accordance with his professional obligations (Rule 3 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007) and failure to fully cooperate with RICS staff (Rule 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007). The Panel expelled him from RICS membership and ordered Mr Pugh to contribute towards the costs of the hearing. JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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ricsrecruit.com / To advertise, email nick@wearesunday.com or call +44 (0)20 7871 7406

Recruitment Residential Valuation Surveyors Do you want to work for a private firm with a corporate attitude - a firm that is quality driven and that has a strong tradition of VALUING its surveyors as INDIVIDUALS. Valunation is part of one of the country’s largest independent and privately owned Estate Agency groups with over 200 branches and we’re looking to further expand and strengthen our national team of residential valuation surveyors. This is your opportunity to make a positive and rewarding change to your working life and join a leading name in the residential surveying marketplace where we pride ourselves on the emphasis we give to the quality, rather than the quantity, of what we deliver. We have vacancies for RICS qualified and registered experienced residential surveyors, who are highly motivated. You must be familiar with undertaking valuations and surveys for both lenders and private clients There are immediate vacancies in London and the South East but new vacancies are being added all the time, so send us your CV and we will contact you when a vacancy arises. We offer a competitive benefits package including private medical care, life insurance, Audi car scheme or car allowance, together with a generous bonus scheme. We are also happy to consider part-time or flexible working.

If you are interested in joining us we would be delighted to hear from you. Please email your CV directly to kimberley.stockley@valunation.com or call Paul Lancaster on 07974 090 113 or David Atter on 07973 543 010 for a confidential chat.

Everyone is recruiting – you are in demand!

Residential Surveyors

Full and Part-Time positions exist all over London/M25(codes WD, N, NW, NE, EC, E, SE, BR, CR, SM, TW, RH, SW, plus DA1, SE3, SW3, 6, 7, 11, W8, HA2, UB8, RM1, 8. Plus Ashford, Basildon, Basingstoke, Bath, Bedford, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Cheltenham, Chichester, Colchester, Dorking, Essex, Gloucs Sth, Guildford, High Wycombe, Hertford, Inverness, Kent, Leeds, Leicester, Loughborough, Luton, M Keynes, Northants, Norwich, Nottingham, Oxford, Peterborough, Plymouth, Preston, Reading, Redhill, St Helens, Sheffield, Slough, Southampton, Suffolk, Stevenage, Surrey, Swindon, T Wells, Walsall, Warrington, Warwicks, Winchester, Windsor, Woking. Also: High value, Inner London specialist £60k basic/high OTE. Also: Self Employed Consultants required across England, Scotland & Wales. Existing or past experience of undertaking mortgage valuations, Homebuyer reports or building surveys required. Client employers include smaller local practices through to all major surveying organisations and direct lenders. The current high demand for surveyors is reflected in the outstanding remuneration packages available. We are experts at finding you the right job in the residential surveying sector. We discuss your objectives and advise you with the most suitable and widest choice of opportunities. We discretely arrange all job applications and resulting interviews for you. NEW VACANCY INSTRUCTIONS DAILY: Please call Jeff Johnson on 07940 594093 or email your CV in confidence to: jjohnson@mlarecruit.com

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www.mlarecruit.com

BE PART OF AN EXPERIENCED TEAM

MORE THAN JUST A VALUER?

Bring your Surveying expertise and join our team of 6 experienced Chartered Surveyors.

Bring your Building Surveying expertise and join

Substantial for either Residential, Commercial our teampackage of 6 experienced Chartered Surveyors. or Party Wall surveyors or valuers, from newly qualified Residential, Commercial or Party Wall experience, to Director level.

must be MRICS or FRICS.

Woodward Chartered Surveyors Woodward Chartered Surveyors From Oxford to Oxford Street From Oxford to Oxford Street woodwardsurveyors.co.uk/about-us/careers for woodwardsurveyors.co.uk/about-us/careers details or email stephen.woodward@woodward.co.uk for details or email careers@woodward.co.uk in confidence

The September issue will be published on 1 September Recruitment copy deadline Wednesday 5 August

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Recruitment

Are you

one of us?

All our surveyors are methodical, professional, technically proficient, and highly qualified. In fact, we manage more valuation work than anyone else in the UK. And because of our structure, we’re able to offer our customers the flexibility of national coverage with local expertise. But you wouldn’t expect anything less from the UK’s largest provider of residential valuation services, would you? What you might not expect, is the friendly and resourceful central team providing invaluable support to all our customers, clients and surveyors. Or the commitment to the personal and professional development of all our people. And when you factor in the flexible benefits, Share Save and BAYE schemes, along with our fresh approach to incentive earnings, you start to understand that we do things a little differently at e.surv.

Who are we? From left: John (AssocRICS), Gary (Fleet), Melanie (Customer Care), Steve (MRICS), Mark (I.T.), Lewis (Finance), Sam (PA), Martin (Health & Safety), Mohammed (Information Security), Emma (Marketing), and Vicki (Learning & Development).

Do you have that certain something needed to join our team? Right now, we’re looking for employed and consultant surveyors across the UK, particularly in the following locations: • Inverness • Leeds • Malvern/Worcester (part-time or zero hours) • North West Wales (part-time or zero hours) • Colchester • Milton Keynes/Bedford • Oxford • Reading • Winchester • Kent • Woking • SW / NW / SE / East London • Nationwide consultancy opportunities

But it’s not all about surveying. To find out more about life at e.surv, to arrange a meeting with one of our Directors, or for a confidential chat about a specific vacancy, please contact Matt in our Talent

Acquisition team on 01773 711912. Or email your CV to matthew.siddons@lslps.co.uk. For a full list of opportunities with e.surv, visit www.esurv.co.uk/jobs

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With so many Residential Surveying opportunities available, who should you speak to? The property recruitment team at BBL has an association with the residential property sector going back almost 20 years, servicing the career and staffing needs of individuals and organisations across the UK. For a professionally accredited, quality-assured and completely discreet service, look no further... We have a deep, first-hand understanding of the residential surveying sector built over many years servicing it at all levels nationally. With access to (and preferred or sole agency status with) many leading employers, we offer a truly one-stop-shop recruitment service to applicants who can be sure of discretion, consultation and transparency from registration to securing a new role and beyond. Our website is updated with the latest vacancies by the hour and our offices are always open for those who would prefer to visit and discuss their needs in person – in or outside of business hours, or at weekends by arrangement.

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We welcome enquiries (in confidence, without obligation and however speculative) from: • Residential surveyors already working in the sector • Residential surveyors who left the sector post 2008, but would like to return with refresher training • Semi-retired surveyors (with residential experience) keen to keep active on a part-time/flexible basis • Freelance surveyors keen to secure additional fee-sharing instructions • MRICS-qualified surveyors with relevant – although perhaps not direct – inspection or valuation experience.

• Staff Valuers/ Residential Surveyors keen to work client side We can help you achieve: • An improvement in earnings, be that basic salary or a bonus scheme that offers greater incentives • A reduction in hours or a move to part-time or zero hours working • A reduction in the volume of work that you are expected to handle • An improvement in the general quality of your instructions or fee levels.

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Recruitment

Opportunities for experienced Residential Surveyors within corporate environments: All London postcodes (N, NW, W, SW, SE & E), Essex (SS, CM, RM, CO, IG & E), Hertfordshire(AL, SG, WD, EN), Bedfordshire/Luton (LU, MK), M4 Corridor generally (SL, RG, OX, SN), East & West Sussex (BN, TN, RH), Dorset, (DT, BH), Hampshire (SO, PO), Surrey (CR, TW, KT, SM, GU), Kent (ME,TN, CT, BR, DA), Gloucestershire (GL), Bristol (BS), Cardiff/South Newport (CF, NP), Chichester, Basingstoke Aberdeen,Northants, Uxbridge, Harrow,Twickenham, Swindon, Leicester. Remuneration includes a basic salary of £40-55k (depending on location), bonuses (based on fee income), a car (or allowance), healthcare and pension. Staff Valuer / Clientside opportunities. We are recruiting NOW for specialist lenders (buy to let, HMO, Development finance etc.) who require experienced Surveyors in-house for top-tier valuation work on an exclusive (nonvolume / 3 point per day) basis in the following locations: • East London • Fareham These positions offer HIGH basic salaries with excellent benefits packages and cars and best suit those keen to focus on quality over volume

with one reporting format as opposed to several. We are happy to retain CVs (in confidence) for future needs in other patches if your location isn’t listed. Opportunities for first time entrants / Trainee Residential Surveyors nationally Our client is an independent, well-established and growing firm of chartered surveyors undertaking the full range of survey and valuation services for main lenders and private clients. They are able to train enthusiastic chartered surveyors from most backgrounds so previous residential surveying experience is not essential. Opportunities currently exist in Peterborough, N/NW London, Middlesex, Maidstone, Dorset, Colchester / Chelmsford, Southampton / Portsmouth, Twickenham, Bristol / Bath, Leeds / Wakefield, Newcastle, Gloucester, Carlisle and Slough with additional requirements to follow. Basic salary to £50k + Bonuses + Car allowance Opportunities within panel– appointed, non-corporate practice-based environments (with a focus on service over volume but not at the expense of job security) – Our clients are traditional, independent private practices who service main lender, private client and in-house (agency) instructions undertaking the

full range of residential reports for high average fees. Their ethos is quality over quantity and, as such, surveyors working for them are not put under the same pressures as they might be elsewhere in the sector. Vacancies exist in the following locations immediately with additional needs following on a near weekly basis: South London, South Hampshire (Portsmouth/Southampton/ Winchester), Chilterns, North West London, North East London/Essex, Kent, Oxford, Bristol/Bath. Chichester, North London, Reading, St Albans, Bromley, Dartford, East London, SW London, Loughton/ Chigwell, Romford, Colchester, Chelmsford, Milton Keynes. Basic salary circa £50k+ with excellent “zero threshold” bonus scheme, quality car and benefits. To discuss your current situation without obligation or express your interest please contact:

Greg Coyle Head of Property Recruitment 020 8514 9116 GregC@bblproperty.co.uk www.bblproperty.co.uk

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I’d always been

fascinated by the

railway ” John, Commercial Manager

Here at Network Rail, we’re changing the way millions travel every day, working with a drive to create a better railway for Britain. We’re looking for passionate Commercial Managers to provide essential guidance, support all pre-contract activity and mitigate commercial risks. To play your part in our exciting next chapter, please visit our careers site and type ‘Derby’ in the keyword search box.

www.networkrail.co.uk/Careers

General Practice Surveyors We are looking for more like-minded surveyors who are seeking a variety of work which can be challenging, yet rewarding. We need people with general practice skills who would like to specialise in such types of work as Building Surveys, Commercial Valuations, HMOs/ Residential Investments, Landlord and Tenant, Party Wall Act, Probate/ Inheritance Tax, Charities Act Sec 117, New Build Data Research, Compensation, Expert Witness……as well as residential Mortgage Valuations and Homebuyer Reports. We are seeking ambitious, self-motivated people with flair who may not fit the corporate mould but who are prepared to ensure uniformly high quality by submitting to our auditing and CPD regime.

Valuing all we survey! Allied Surveyors & Valuers is entirely owned by chartered surveyor business people who lead regional teams throughout the country

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We have several vacancies throughout England and Wales: • MRICS or FRICS entrepreneurs wanting to create their own businesses by joining our organisation (We do not appoint self-employed consultants but owning a complementary agency business may not exclude) • New entrants to the profession seeking training • Part qualified/Assoc RICS seeking employment • Experienced MRICS or FRICS seeking relocation/ part-time work To find your niche, please email your CV to simon.jago@alliedsurveyors.com or telephone first for further information on 0333 666 7777

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Recruitment

Surveyors with stories: apply here When you think of Countrywide, you might think of the UK’s largest estate agency and property services group. You might think of our impressive Assoc RICS Trainee programme. Or even the brilliant way we handle over 30% of UK residential mortgage valuations.

We move more people than any other business in the UK. We want you to move us. We’re looking for qualified Residential Surveyors for roles in the South West, North Devon, M4 corridor, London, West Yorkshire and North East Scotland. You’ll be a local expert, passionate about what you do. And you’ll be as dedicated to your career and personal development as we are. More importantly, you’ll want to contribute to those big statistics by making every Countrywide story count, providing fantastic service to all our clients.

We know Countrywide is a great place to work. But don’t just take our word for it.

I was attracted to Countrywide because of their clear commitment to employee development and progression, and a strong investment in people to help them reach their potential. Caroline Kelly

Tell us your story. Get in touch with our Head of Professional Development, Paul Cutbill on 07802 519835, or send your CV to recruit@countrywide.co.uk

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Join our panel

Tom (Assoc RICS)

We’re already one of the UK’s largest panel managers, trusted by the biggest mortgage lenders to create bespoke service solutions and monitor performance. Our secure interface means we’re able to allocate instructions to panel members and produce management information in real time.

Join Knight Frank’s expanding Rural Consultancy Team in Hungerford

Land Agent – Country House Consultancy Country House Consultancy is a progressive and niche service offering day-to-day and strategic help and advice to new or existing owners of the very best country houses and small high-value estates. A position has become available within the team for an individual with an aptitude for delivering a discreet, diverse and unconventional brief to a fascinating range of high net worth, and often high profile, clients. Applicants should be RICS rural qualified and have private client estate management experience.

Now, as a result of our ambitious growth plan, we’re looking to increase the size of our panel and we’re currently considering applications from residential valuation firms across the UK with two or more RICS qualified valuers holding residential valuation registration. Given our reputation for service excellence and flexibility, successful applicants must be able to demonstrate the high quality service and confident approach that both we and our clients value. And in return, you’ll have access to mortgage valuations, homebuyers and building surveys produced on behalf of the UK’s main mortgage lenders. For more details and an informal chat about working with us, please contact Matt Siddons on 07794392858 or via email to matthew.siddons@lslps.co.uk.

Apply online at KnightFrank.co.uk/Recruitment

Head of Estates & Asset Management Salary: £69,811 to £78,943 Contract status: 5 year Fixed Term Contract

Jersey Property Holdings (JPH) has a vacancy for a ‘Head of Estates and Asset Management’ within its Estates team. The successful candidate will lead the provision of a professional estates and asset management service for all States owned property under the control of JPH. This is a key role which is both central to the delivery of services and will inform future property and asset management strategies across the States of Jersey portfolio.

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Treasury & Resources Department Jersey Property Holdings

The successful applicant will: · Be an Associate Fellow of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and preferably be a graduate in a relevant discipline; · Possess a minimum of 10 years’ previous experience working at a high level with at least 3 to 5 years’ experience as of Head of Service in a similar property department or practice; · Preferably have commercial experience in a property management environment and a detailed knowledge of strategic planning, the setting of standards, conveyancing, leases, acquisitions, letting, property management maintenance; · Have proven organisational, planning and time management skills, as well as a high level of self-motivation and ability to work under pressure; · Have experience in managing a team whilst creating and contributing to Departmental or Island wide policy development and implementation; · Have high level of interpersonal skills together with excellent oral and written communication skills. The ability to relate to people at all levels is essential; · Possess political and strategic awareness and be able to apply breadth of knowledge of Departmental, Government and Island wide issues. For an informal discussion please contact Mr Ray Foster, Director of Estates on 01534 447800. Applicants should upload their CV, covering letter and supporting statement through the online application process at www.gov.je/jobs

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Recruitment

Looking for a new home? residential valuation surveyor jobs, secure, established, strong client base

SEARCH

Stop searching. Looking for a new home? Looking to make a change but nervous about taking the first step? Connells can offer the perfect home for you to put your skills to use in an established, respected and growing company.

What we’re looking for MRICS, FRICS and AssocRICS Surveyors, with recent experience of carrying out mortgage valuations, homebuyer reports and building surveys, probably in the volume residential sector. Our first class remuneration package includes a competitive substantial basic salary, bonus arrangements based on quality and performance and the choice of company car or allowance. Our success is fuelled by our professionalism and you will need to share our commitment to deliver quality client service.

Oxford, Bristol, Croydon, Aberdeen, Peterborough, Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, SE and E London, Twickenham, Liverpool We have specific vacancies for experienced surveyors to carry out a full range of residential survey reports for lenders and private clients in these locations.

Claims Handler – Leighton Buzzard This role would suit an individual with sound technical knowledge of residential surveys and valuations, the ability to communicate at all levels and strong negotiating skills. Some knowledge of the PII market would be an advantage.

Next steps Next steps If you believe you have the necessary skills and experience, and these opportunities interest you, please contact SVcareers@connells.co.uk enclosing your curriculum vitae including current remuneration details. Alternatively, if you would like to have an initial conversation, please call Tim Jones on 020 8540 7970. The UK’s premier Chartered Surveying and Valuation Panel Management company

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PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS ▲ AGENTS VALUERS & SURVEYORS IN KENT AND THE THAMES GATEWAY

www.harrisons.property AGENCY / DEVELOPMENT SURVEYOR We require an enthusiastic and ambitious Chartered Surveyor with several years post qualification experience to assist us with the expansion of our agency and development work for our corporate and public sector Clients who are very active within the Thames Gateway / Medway and Maidstone, M20 Corridor and Ashford areas. Business opportunities are increasing and we are keen to strengthen our team in order to ensure that we are able to maintain the highest standards of professional service through our range of property and development activities. You will ideally have knowledge of our local market but more importantly will bring enthusiasm and ambition that will increase our market share and progress your career to director level within a prominent regional firm.

SURVEYOR / ASSISTANT SURVEYOR If you are recently qualified or undertaking your APC and interested in gaining experience in a wide range of professional, agency and development work we would be pleased to hear from you. You will need a high level of IT, presentation and communication skills and be sufficiently competent to be given responsibility in a number of different activities to stretch your ability and experience. Attractive salary package offered including bonus and pension / health benefits. If you are interested in either of the above positions or would like further information; please email Douglas Rogers - Harrisons Chartered Surveyors, in confidence, enclosing your C.V. to: work@harrisons.property

Providing property consultancy for over 30 years

Due to continued growth, A.W. Jenkinson Forest Products requires an Assistant Land Agent to help with the development of the farms and commercial properties. The position will be based at our Estate Office at Whinfell Park near Penrith. The position will include: • Assisting with the management and support of the Property Maintenance Division • Valuing rural land and commercial property, crops, machinery and livestock • Assisting with planning and building control applications and appeals The successful candidate will have a minimum of two years post RICS qualification and a sound knowledge of UK and EU agricultural and land-use regulations. The ability to communicate with people at all levels, a diplomatic approach and good negotiating skills are essential. Please forward your C.V. and covering letter to Tracey Taylor, HR, A. W. Jenkinson Forest Products, Clifton Moor, Clifton, Penrith, CA10 2EY or by email to tracey.taylor@awjenkinson.co.uk, by the end of July 2015. A.W. Jenkinson Forest Products is an equal opportunities employer.

Chartered Building Surveyor Salary commensurate with experience Hertfordshire/ Bedfordshire McNeill Lowe & Palmer are a busy and respected Chartered Surveying practice looking for an experienced Building Surveyor to join their growing team. The opening has been created due to a growing workload and recent retirement of one of the business directors. You will be a Chartered Building Surveyor (MRICS) who is confident in your abilities and able to critically appraise diverse

residential and commercial building types. You will have experience in Building Surveys, Party Wall matters, contract administration, project management and preparing schedules of condition. CAD skills are preferable but not essential. This is an ideal opportunity for an individual to develop their own client base and to progress their career within an ambitious and growing practice.

If you are interested please forward your CV in confidence to owen@mlpsurveyors.co.uk

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Recruitment

further your career Senior Building Surveyor

Associate Building Surveyor

Associate Quantity Surveyor

Well established independent firm of chartered building surveyors who work across the South East of England are on the search for a Senior Level Building Surveyor for their West Sussex office. The ideal candidate will be a RICS qualified building surveyor, operating at or looking to move into a senior level position with a mixture of professional and project experience along with experience of working on private sector projects.

An award winning consultancy is looking for a professionally qualified Associate Building Surveyor with several years PQE in building surveying, professional services and project delivery. There is a need for specific skills in maintenance scheme implementation and party wall matters as well as excellent business development skills to drive forward the building surveying section within the region.

This leading international, multidisciplinary consultancy is known across a vast array of services which includes engineering, project management and surveying. Our client works with prestigious clients in both the public and private sector within the construction industry. Following a period of expansion, they are on the lookout for an experienced Quantity Surveyor to take on a leading role, providing efficient surveying services. You will be responsible for budget estimating, cost analysis across a variety of repair and maintenance projects as well as management of tender and contract documentation. It is essential that the successful candidate is educated to degree level and possesses exceptional written and verbal communication skills. Chartership and experience within the defence sector would also be advantageous, though not essential.

West Sussex £40,000-£45,000 Plus Benefits

Associate Quantity Surveyor

Central London £55,000-£70,000 Plus Healthcare and Pension Independent partnership which is rapidly expanding and offers cost management services and procurement advice to their diverse range of clients is on the search for an Associate Level Quantity Surveyor to join their team based in Central London. The ideal candidate will be MRICS qualified with experience of undertaking senior or associate level positions within a consultancy. You will be expected to manage a team of surveyors and take on client facing duties on projects throughout London.

Yorkshire £40,000-£45,000 Plus Excellent Benefits

Senior Quantity Surveyor

Central London £45,000-£55,000 Plus Benefits Property and construction consultancy boasting a wealth of experience undertaking commercial property issues is on the search for a Senior Quantity Surveyor in Central London. The successful candidate will deliver cost planning and cost management services for construction projects, in support of the project consultancy team in the South East and London. You will also develop the cost consultancy services in the area and expand the existing offer to key commercial investors within office, retail and industrial portfolios.

Principle Chartered Building Surveyor

Senior Building Surveyor

Manchester Negotiable Plus Car Allowance, Healthcare and Pension

An award winning property consultancy practice within the built environment is on the search for an experienced and driven Senior Level Building Surveyor. The ideal candidate will be operating at a senior level and experienced in undertaking dilapidations, party wall surveys and contract administration across a diverse range of sectors within a multidisciplinary team.

A dynamic, forward thinking practice, providing a comprehensive range of project, cost and construction management are expanding their operations. Our client is looking for a Principal Building Surveyor to help manage the building surveying team and to become involved in business development activities across the region. You will also take responsibility for carrying out surveys, inspections, schedules and the overall management of schemes in the North-West of England.

Suffolk £35,000-£45,000 Plus Benefits

Birmingham £50,000-£55,000 Plus Benefits

Senior Chartered Building Surveyor Leeds £35,000-£45,000 Plus Car Allowance, Healthcare and Pension

Our client offers a comprehensive range of high end professional services to their impressive client base within the commercial, public and leisure sectors. The ideal candidate will be RICS qualified with a wide range of professional experience which will include dilapidations, pre-acquisition surveys, contract administration, employer’s agent and project management services, all across a varied client base.

Find more jobs online at conradconsulting.co.uk For more information about any of these positions, please contact kevin@conradconsulting.co.uk or call 0203 1595 387

For a confidential chat, call us 8am to 8pm on 0203 1595 387 JULY/AUGUS T 2015_MODUS

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Mind map

HOW SHOULD HOTELS BE ADAPTING TO THE FUTURE? Rohit Talwar futurist speaker and CEO, Fast Future Research, London

Many hotel brands are struggling to respond to a world in which everyone wants choice and flexibility.

There are huge amounts of furniture in hotel rooms that no one uses. Why shouldn’t guests choose exactly what goes in their room? The increasing personalisation of services could become a major cost for hotels.

We can expect experimentation. I think we’ll see new players who will employ very innovative designs, such as moveable, customisable walls to vary the size of the room according to the guest’s desire.

The internet of things will tell hotel operators a huge amount. Sensors will provide data on what furniture is being used, whether a kettle has been used, and what items need replacing.

ILLUSTRATION GIANMARCO MAGNANI

For instance, we’re in a time now when guests may want to choose if they have a TV screen in their room or not, because they might already be bringing one with them in the form of a tablet.

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23/06/2015 09:58


Relax and enjoy your holiday! Call us when you get back FRICS/MRICS/AssocRICS Residential Valuation Surveyors All locations considered

Contact Jon Charlesworth on 07825 634137 or email jcharlesworth@landmarksurveyors.co.uk

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Steve Hardwick on 07572 878996 or email shardwick@landmarksurveyors.co.uk

24/06/2015 15:55


WE’VE HEARD THE ONE ABOUT THE FLYING FISH At Hiscox, our claims experts always begin by believing your claim is valid. As your home becomes more important, so does your insurer.

Home insurance 0845 365 1734 | hiscox.co.uk/rics Terms and conditions apply, for full terms and conditions see www.hiscox.co.uk/rics The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors is an Appointed Representative of Hiscox Underwriting Ltd which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. For UK residents only. 14658 06/15

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23/06/2015 16:36

Profile for RICS

RICS Modus, Global edition - July / August 2015  

It used to be said that the world is getting smaller. But these days – thanks to increased urbanisation and rocketing property prices – so a...

RICS Modus, Global edition - July / August 2015  

It used to be said that the world is getting smaller. But these days – thanks to increased urbanisation and rocketing property prices – so a...

Profile for ricsmodus