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MODUS FEBRUARY 2018 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE MOVING ISSUE

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Contents MODUS FEBRUARY 2018 RICS.ORG/MODUS

MODUS M

D • MO

S • RI C

Features

Foundations

ORMAL

A Z I NE • AG

E IN

S MAGAZ

24

DU

F IN

CP

CP

ORMAL

Intelligence

F IN

10

12

D • MO

07

ORMAL

CP

L CP D

11 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN The information revolution brings a host of new risks that we must be alive to, says John Hughes FRICS

A RM

08 THINKING: KATIE KING The AI in FM co-founder considers the opportunities – and challenges – artificial intelligence will bring to the FM sector

F IN

06

06 CITIES FOR OUR FUTURE How do you ensure a major infrastructure project benefits as many sections of society as possible? We hear two points of view 07-09 NEWS IN BRIEF Industry news, advice and information for RICS members

S I NF O

• RI C S

• RI C S

STEFFEN ENDLER, SIEMENS SMART CITIES, P24

R IC

E IN

E IN

D • MO

AGA MAGA S Mthoughtful Sdesigns “Creating a liveable city takes and plans, Z Z DU DU political will and societal support, technology that is fit for purpose, and good governance and collaboration”

34

35

39

12 COVER STORY Autonomous vehicles are just around the corner. How will our cities cope with them?

34-35 CAREERS Sexual harassment: know where you stand; COWI’s Antonio Contegiacomo MRICS

18 ANSWER THE BIG QUESTIONS Tackle some of the industry’s most pressing issues in the Cities For Our Future Challenge

36 BUSINESS Helping your staff through an office move

20 WHAT IS BLOCKCHAIN? The transformative technology that’s turning its attention to real estate 24 STREET SMARTS Advances in intelligent infrastructure are driving an urban planning revolution 28 COSTA BANKER How Spain booked its place as the world’s hotel investment hotspot 30 THE HALO EFFECT Will its new office at One Angel Square give Northamptonshire County Council wings?

37 LEGAL 101 Sprinkler systems post-Grenfell tragedy 39 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Become a BIM project management master 41 SURVEYED The latest products for professionals 58 MIND MAP WYG’s Glyn Utting on where the industry is getting disaster relief wrong PLUS 43 Benefits 44 Events

45-46 Obituaries + Conduct 47 Recruitment

Views expressed in Modus are those of the named author and are not necessarily those of RICS or the publisher. The contents of this magazine are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without the prior permission of the publisher. All information correct at time of going to press. All rights reserved. The publisher cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. RICS does not accept responsibility for loss, injury or damage or costs that result from, or are connected in any way to, the use of products or services advertised. All editions of Modus are printed on paper sourced from sustainable, properly managed forests. This magazine can be recycled for use in newspapers and packaging. Please dispose of it at your local collection point. The polywrap is made from biodegradable material and can be recycled.

FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS 03


E U S S I E S I R P R E T N E E H T S U D O M / G R O . S C I R 5 1 0 2 / 41 0 2 Y R A U N A J / R E B M E C E D S U D O M

RICS-everything-QS-needs-Oct2017.pdf

#RICSmodus

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29/9/17

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2:55 pm

Construction Journal

APRIL 2015 rics.org/modus

@RICSnews

THE VALUE ISSUE GOING, GOING, GONE

Can we really put a price on natural assets? / 16

PUBLIC BENEFITS

Assessing the role of PPPs in global infrastructure / 26

#RICSmodus

MODUS JUNE 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE CONFLICT ISSUE

@RICSnews

MODUS APRIL 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE VALUE ISSUE

rics.org/modus

MODUS MARCH 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE AFRICA ISSUE

MODUS FEBRUARY 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE PEOPLE ISSUE

#RICSmodus FEBRUARY 2015

ONE SIZE FITS ALL?

A universal language of property measurement / 30

C

M

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CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

THE ENTERPRISE ISSUE

THE HUMAN TOUCH

THE PEOPLE ISSUE EVERYONE CLICKS

BORDER CROSSING

Time to take crowd control of the office air con? / 24

How a small firm can make a big impact overseas / 16

MEET THE MENTORS

START ME UP

Helping hands for the next generation of surveyors / 28

Entrepreneurs’ wisdom on going it alone / 22

AHEAD OF YOUR TIME

ACES OF SPACE

Making the most of innovation to advance construction

THE BIG FIVE

Focus on African cities / 16

PG.

TAKE A SEAT

Next generation

An apple a day

Little and large

MAP TO VICTORY

Why we must engage younger members of the profession

How to factor health and wellbeing into buildings

ICMS mark new dawn for small construction firms

PG.



Risk and resilience THE HOME ISSUE

How construction policy supports disaster reduction

LOCKED OUT

PG.

How to combat the global housing crisis / 16

PG.

17

PG.

Rebuilding after conflict / 30

rics.org/journals

18

02/03/2015 16:21

BRUTALIST BUILDINGS LOVE THEM HATE THEM What

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®

@RICSnews

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

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DEC-JAN 2015-16

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01/05/2015 12:21

THE FRONTIERS ISSUE

MODUS MARCH 2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE FRONTIERS ISSUE

@ RICSnews

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MODUS FEBRUARY 2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE CONNECTED ISSUE

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Quality Structural Warranties

02/02/2015 15:40

MODUS DECEMBER/JANUARY 2015/2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE RISK ISSUE

JULY/AUGUST 2015 rics.org/modus

MODUS NOVEMBER 2015 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE CONCRETE ISSUE



14

November/December 2017

THE CONFLICT ISSUE Dispute resolution goes large 18 / Surveyors in the military 24 / Culture clashes, and how to avoid them 34

MODUS_Mar15_p1_Cover_v3.indd 1

#RICSmodus

PICKING UP THE PIECES

7

Governing Council: your chance to lead surveying / 26 Fighting the geospatial war against Ebola / 36

Diversity, demographics and the changing identity of surveying / 16

Is your CV ready for these jobs of the future? / 34

The surveyors for whom it is rocket science / 26

Digital revolution

THE AFRICA ISSUE

LAYER CAKE

3D printing: the next big thing, or just hype? / 20

AFTER THE FLOOD

How to adapt buildings for climate change / 26

DISINTERMEDIATE THIS Meet the first wave of proptech leaders / 30

FEBRUARY 2016

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

NO

should we do

EMPTY THREAT

with them? / 30

14

OPEN SEASON

Are flexible offices really more productive? / 26

skills shortage derail the recovery? / 14

Will the

AN OLD AGE PROBLEM

Defusing the retirement homes timebomb / 36

#RICSmodus rics.org/modus

RESIDENTIAL

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

COMMERCIAL

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@RICSnews

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PRIVATE RENTAL SECTOR

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The Q Policy is a Structural Defects Warranty for new build, refurbishment and conversion developments offering a highly risk-managed, quality focused approach. With a minimum of eight visits per plot, our highly experienced and pragmatic team spends more time on-site, working with your site teams to get it right first time, providing an

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NOVEMBER 2015

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IT’S A SMALL WORLD

Flame plan

The power of three

Keep it down

Why a new initiative is scrutinising fire safety

What makes Devon Building Control Partnership a success?

How to control noise from demolition or construction

PG.

10

PG.

18

PG.

November/December 2017

Balancing risk with reward in real estate investment / 16

rics.org/journals

22 THE CONCRETE ISSUE Cutting-edge construction 18 / Visualising BIM 28 / RICS UK Awards 2015: the Grand Final 34

Underwritten by Lloyd’s Syndicate 4444 which is managed by Canopius Managing Agents Limited. Firm Reference Number: 204847.

Micro-homes: the next big thing / 32

25/06/2015 10:58

®

@RICSnews

on milli 680

20 30

RESIDENTIAL

PERSONAL PROPERTY

More than numbers

Don’t panic

Cover story

What makes for quality energy data?

How to assess the impact of knotweed on valuation

Getting the right level of insurance for fine art

PG.

36

PG.

@RICSnews

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

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MARCH 2017

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NOVEMBER 2016

Modus_June16_P1_cover_v9.indd All Pages

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rics.org/modus ICS new

AS K

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DEC-

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s

BIG

JAN

QU

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2016

RICS guidance note on rural arbitration explained

12

PG.

16

Neighbours at war

November/December 2017

Mediation is the best way to settle costly disputes

rics.org/journals

PG.

24

Images ©

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 4

06/05/2016 14:02

#RICSmodus

@R

Common ground

Five technologies that will have the biggest impact on surveying

1

NS

#RICSmodus rics.org/modus

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@RICSnews

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

FEBRUARY 2017

-17

stru

ctu

re

I2

2

14

Info

GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

s I 26

China plots its course on the New Silk Road / 14

rule

DOWNFALL How do we avert a flooded future? / 14

THE CONFIDENCE ISSUE THE RUINED ISSUE Bringing up the past 18 / The cost of inconsistency 22 / RICS UK Awards 26

Modus_Nov 16_P1_cover_V5.indd 1

The future of regulation 22 / Cities at risk 26 / The science of investor sentiment 28

03/10/2016 14:10

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11/11/2016 10:30

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Incorporating Building Conservation Journal

MODUS JUNE 2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE EARTH ISSUE

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MODUS_July/Aug16_P01_Cover_v1.4.indd 1-1

Change is coming

PG.

THE CASH ISSUE The great wall of Chinese money 24 / Infrastructure’s property pay-off 26 / Can housing inflation be tamed? 30

MODUS APRIL 2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE DATA ISSUE

NOW’S YOUR CHANCE TO TELL US WHAT YOU THINK – JUST COMPLETE OUR READER SURVEY.

50

#RICSmodus rics.org/modus

December 2017/ January 2018

rics.org/journals

ignore / 16

sI

Asia-Pacific KEY

24

COMMERCIAL

30

WALK THE LINE Ethical dilemmas in surveying / 14

ot

North America Europe

338 millio n lion 251 mil llion 8 mi 3,22 n millio 313

Why creating vibrant spaces is essential for retail

A sinking feeling Finding out what lies beneath new homes to avoid costly subsidence PG. 6

no longer

MODUS FEBRUARY 2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE CONFIDENCE ISSUE

Everything in place PG.

a number we can

MODUS DECEMBER/JANUARY 2016/2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE DISRUPTION ISSUE

I N C O R P O R AT I N G T H E C O M M E R C I A L P R O P E RT Y J O U R N A L , R E S I D E N T I A L P R O P E RT Y J O U R N A L A N D P E R S O N A L P R O P E RT Y J O U R N A L

PG.

MOUSE BUILDER

The construction of Disneyland Shanghai / 26

MODUS NOVEMBER 2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE RUINED ISSUE

Property Journal

TT

And it’s

GENDER AGENDA

Does the sector have a problem with women? / 22

ob

32 m illio n 200 9

07/03/2016 15:20

Head

JUNE 2016

THIS IS WHAT 22,000 LOOKS LIKE

How BIM brings clarity to dispute resolution / 20

WHAT IS YOUR VIEW?

THE CLASS ISSUE Young surveyors 14 / Alternative assets 20 / Could you be an APC assessor? 30

Author Author Standfirst

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

NON-FUZZY LOGIC

MODUS AND RICS JOURNALS:

MODUS_April16_P1_Cover_v7.indd 2

JULY-AUGUST 2016

THE FAIR ISSUE

R I C S L A N DST R A P L I N E JOURNAL

Land Journal

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@RICSnews

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08/02/2016 16:45

RICS LAND JOURNAL

#RICSmodus

£100 IN AMAZON VOUCHERS

ion

How can housing supply keep up? / 24

@RICSnews

Modus_March16_P1_Cover_V8.indd 1

site

165 m ill

234 million

333 million

Source: Brookings Institution

1,740 millio n

illion 57 m 20 20 n illio 4m 66 ion mill 525

on illi

Central and South America

m

BY 2030 THE GLOBAL MIDDLE CLASS WILL HAVE GROWN 165%

n millio 322

n illio 7m 10

18 1

®

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

05/01/2016 16:31

rr

Middle East and North Africa

703 mil lion

on illi 5m 10

rics.org/modus

Modus_Feb16_P1_cover_v4.indd 1

fo

Sub-Saharan Africa

WIN

APRIL 2016

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

#RICSmodus

MARCH 2016

The new face of public space 18 / Make it big in infrastructure 25 / Pedal power for property 36

13/11/2015 15:16

MODUS JUNE 2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE CASH ISSUE

rics.org/modus

MODUS_Dec-Jan16_P1_Cover.v2.indd 1

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

THE CONNECTED ISSUE

THE CONCRETE ISSUE Cutting-edge / Visualising BIM 28 / RICS Awards 2015: Grand THE RISK ISSUE Counting the cost construction of carbon 22 18 / Saving lives in construction 24 UK / How resilient isthe your city? Final 28 34

12/10/2015 15:27

MODUS JULY/AUGUST 2016 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE FAIR ISSUE

#RICSmodus

MODUS_Nov15_P01_Cover.v8.indd 1

Off-

MODUS_July/Aug15_P1_Cover.v6.indd 2

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Conflict resolution

Virtual reality, actual fact 22

Why it is important to resolve conflicts of interest PG.

Under the skin

BUILDING CONSERVATION

How to avoid falling foul of reserved matters

What to look for when assessing cladding systems

Ensuring effective building use

PG.

MODUS_March 17_P01_Cover_v7_lightest.indd 1

06/02/2017 17:22

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ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

SEPTEMBER 2017

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12

December 2017/ January 2018

Holistic histories PG.

Mapping the future 26

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30

OCTOBER 2017

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ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

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08/05/2017 16:17

MODUS FEBRUARY 2018 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE MOVING ISSUE

JULY-AUG JUNE 20172017

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PG.

MODUS_June17_P01_Cover_v0.5.indd 1

MODUS DECEMBER/JANUARY 2017/2018 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE ELEMENTS ISSUE

ASK THE BIG QUESTIONS

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MODUS OC TOBER 2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE ADAPTABLE ISSUE

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MODUS SEP TEMBER 2017 RICS.ORG/MODUS THE AIR ISSUE

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14

Illegal advice?

DEC/JAN 2017/18

THE

DIVERSE

TECH-SAVVY

MULTI-TALENTED

HUNGRY

SKY’S

IT’S NOT US IT’S YOU

THE AND COMING YOUR WAY

LIMIT It’s time for takeoff in the airports sector 14

THE ADAPTABLE ISSUE Town vs country 24 / Car parks: recreation? 20 / Bouncing back 12

NATIONS

E rans SU / T IS 20 G in IN ha V kc O oc M bl E ng H ki T nloc U

THE NEXT GENERATION ISSUE Professionals of tomorrow 14 / Future roles 17 / Early adopters 21

IS IT VIABLE… AND DEEP DOWN, IS IT RIGHT? T H E F U T U R E O F M I N I N G AT S E A , P 1 4

CITIES

THE WORK ISSUE The office is dead. Long live the office 13 Do employees have a right to privacy? 19 Retirement: it’s on its way out 20

po rt ge ts ar t 24

THE ELEMENTS ISSUE Construction’s carbon killers 18 / How to live with earthquakes 26

sm

AND WHY THEY’RE GROWING APART THE CONCRETE ISSUE Cutting-edge construction 18 / Visualising BIM 28 / RICS UK Awards 2015: the Grand Final 34


USEFUL RICS NUMBERS CONTACT CENTRE +44 (0)24 7686 8555 Enquiries / APC guidance / Subscriptions / Passwords / Library / Bookshop REGULATION HELPLINE +44 (0)20 7695 1670 CONFIDENTIAL HELPLINE +44 (0)20 7334 3867 DISPUTE RESOLUTION SERVICES +44 (0)20 7334 3806 SWITCHBOARD +44 (0)20 7222 7000 LIONHEART +44 (0)24 7646 6696

Feedback

Join the debate REACTIONS AND RESPONSES FROM PREVIOUS ISSUES

Do you have a comment about this issue of Modus? Email editor@ricsmodus.com, or tweet us using #RICSmodus OFFICE POLITICS Sir, Hanno Schrecker’s view on the scale of potential UK office relocations is completely ill-considered and makes many assumptions as to what may happen after Brexit (Intelligence, p6, November). It is possible that when the UK leaves the EU and only Germany is making positive contributions, the whole badly run organisation may, in effect, become bankrupt. This makes a nonsense of his supposition. We should be much more aware of the potential strength of the many emerging countries in the Far East. Brian Miles FRICS THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM Sir, The arrogant attitude expressed in the UK that the remaining 27 EU countries will easily agree trading terms for us on a simple, friendly basis is now clearly shown to be unlikely, if not impossible. The promoters of Brexit forget that, from an EU point of view, the last 60 years of cooperation have been largely successful. And it is the success of the single market that underpins the whole development. Tariff walls exist to protect EU production and trade – a system that is especially important in agriculture. In the light of the current position and the realisation that our trading activity, from the City of London to the countryside of the UK, is the powerhouse of our economy, a failure to achieve successful talks is totally unacceptable. Such a situation will cause untold damage to the economy and expose the rural areas of the UK to a situation not seen for 100 years and more. Second thoughts are required before any more damage is done. We need a commonsense approach to the current situation so that we can have a successful UK, not one cast aside on the dangers and rocks of isolation. Edward H Perkins FRICS, Haverfordwest

@RICSnews // #RICSmodus @CraigHatch Great piece on the future of work. Surveyors can lead this area of how we work & pass that to advising clients real estate options. I work remotely at @wyggroup, any of 24 offices or space with wifi. Key to sucess is how we continue human interaction to build teams. @jesstabibi Cup of #coffee and a copy of

@RICSnews #modus... not a bad start to the day! #lovesurveying #construction #quantitysurveying #TuesdayTreat #lol @jummyjayo Just read @AnnaMinton’s

article in the #RICSmodus criticising the market for overheating but the bemoaning that market forces are hollowing out the cities (causing deflation) #cantwin #cakeandeatit @VernonProperty @AnnaMinton Great article in #RICSmodus but what we need to do is be telling @sajidjavid @PhilipHammondUK @GavinBarwell @theresa_may the answers, not the problem. What are yours? @HBC_Builders Great to see @Exeter Council Passivhaus initiatives gaining recognition in the latest @rics Modus magazine @EmmaOsmun @AshleyPerryUK #RICSModus How long before #Passivhaus hits #BuildToRent?

PEARL OF WISDOM Sir, I very much enjoyed the article “Taking the Long View” (Case file, p36, November), especially as I am currently in Hong Kong. A potential slight correction, though. The three biggest urban centres on China’s Pearl River Delta to which the author refers seem to be Hong Kong (population: 7 million), Zhuhai (1.5 million) and Macau (0.5 million). Although those are three of the major cities in the Delta, I believe the largest are Shenzhen (10 million) and Guangzhou (12 million). The latter isn’t very well known, so it would be good if it got the recognition it deserves! Robert White, assistant consultant, Quod JUST NOT CRICKET? Sir, To ensure that the vacant “Strategy Seats” on Governing Council are filled “with the best equipped members of the profession”, the RICS Nominations Committee is adopting a process for evaluating candidates’ suitability before they seek votes. We are told that this “evaluation” is not mandatory, but the ballot will separate “Nominations Committee validated candidates” from those who refuse to submit to this vetting. Once upon a time the Marylebone Cricket Club operated a similar process, whereby some candidates for the committee had an asterisk placed by their name if their candidature was approved by the committee. It took several years of pressure from members for this blatantly undemocratic practice to be abandoned. How long will it be, I wonder, for RICS members to achieve similar success? James Offen FRICS, Oxford, UK

81,731 average net circulation 1 July 2016 - 30 June 2017

FOR SUNDAY Editor Oliver Parsons / Art Director Sam Walker / Deputy Editor Andy Plowman / Contributing Editor Brendon Hooper / Junior Designer Katie Wilkinson / Creative Director Matt Beaven / Account Director Karen Jenner / Advertising Sales Director Emma Kennedy / Advertising Sales Manager Chris Cairns / Senior Account Managers James Cannon, Sam Gilbert / Recruitment Sales Manager Milos Maguire / Production Manager Michael Wood / Managing Director Toby Smeeton / Repro F1 Colour / Printer Wyndeham Group / Cover Image Sawdust / Published by Sunday, 207 Union Street, London SE1 0LN wearesunday.com / For RICS James Murphy and Kate Symons, RICS, Parliament Square, London SW1P 3AD / Advertising enquiries chrisc@wearesunday.com, or +44 (0)20 7871 0927

FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

05


Intelligence

News / Reviews / Opinions / Reactions

CITIES FOR OUR FUTURE

How do we ensure that the benefits of capital infrastructure projects reach all of a city’s residents? Discuss.

ANSWER THE BIG QUESTIONS As part of RICS’ 150th anniversary, throughout 2018 we are asking how we safeguard the future of our cities, making them better places to live, work and do business

WiTh 5 million people, dar es salaam is TanZania’s largesT ciTy. The population is projected to increase to 20 million by 2030 and, like many of Africa’s major urban centres, the capital has suffered from acute traffic congestion. Clearly, growth at this scale could have become unmanageable without a bold improvement to the city’s transport, in terms of both congestion and pollution. Rather than just build new roads, which might have required widespread demolition and, in turn, become clogged anyway, the city looked to radically improve its public transport infrastructure. Since May 2016, the Dar es Salaam Rapid Transit (DART) Agency has been managing a contract for operational DAVID WILKES GLOBAL FLOOD RESILIENCE LEADER, bus services in a corridor that is already carrying up to ARUP, LEEDS 200,000 passengers a day. Using dedicated bus lanes, the system has reduced commute times significantly for naTional-scale infrasTrucTure Tends To be seen as large city dwellers, for whom being stuck in the lengthy traffic and remote, but every project starts and finishes somewhere, jams was a daily event. and its impact on the people in those areas can be adverse. Mitigating these Due to its supporting infrastructure for pedestrian and knock-on effects is crucial if a scheme is to be considered successful. cyclist movements, the rapid transit system is expected to When the High Speed 2 rail line terminates in Leeds, it will be on land that change the whole dynamics of people’s movement in could have been prone to flooding, or protected from floods only with the future, with cycle paths, pavements and at-grade pedestrian loss of significant public amenity. Such a huge infrastructure investment crossings. With one line fully completed, and five in the should enhance the lives of local residents, but 4.4 miles (7km) of the River pipeline, along with facilities for interchange from the feeder Aire runs through the centre of Leeds, carrying up to 400 tonnes of water services, DART will provide citizens with a web of faster per second in heavy rains and making the city prone to floods. connections to their destinations. Clearly, an HS2 terminal could not be built where it might flood, but Some would have opted for “big” infrastructure to solve conventional flood defence walls would have to be 3m high, disadvantaging a congestion problem like this, but DART has put Dar’s local people by blocking the river from view and destroying a public realm citizens first. The system has been cited by many as an much used by walkers, cyclists and cafe patrons. inspiration for other growing African cities. A solution was found by adapting two weirs built in the river during the industrial revolution. We made the UK’s first use of moveable weirs, removing the weirs’ fixed sections and replacing them with steel gates. What are the biggest challenges These remain in place during normal flows, but when water levels become facing the world’s cities? Be part of too high, sensors warn of this and the gates fall flat, allowing more water to the solution. Find out more on p18 flow safely through. Our design was created with an eye to the public realm, with the community consulted and shown a 3D virtual reality presentation. This flood defence has also made 300 acres (121 ha) of land developable for residential and commercial uses, in addition to the HS2 station. 06

RICS.ORG/MODUS

INTERVIEW MARK SMULIAN ILLUSTRATION ANTONIO SORTINO

MOSHIUZZAMAN MAHMUD SENIOR MANAGER, ATKINS ACUITY, MANCHESTER


PARCEL FORCE

(bn miles)

Intelligence

BUSES 2 MOTORBIKES 3

TRUCKS/LORRIES 17

UK road users travelled 324 billion miles in 2016. Van traffic has grown faster than any other vehicle type since 2006

VANS 49

Source: UK Department for Transport, 2017

NEWS IN BRIEF

CARS 253

WE LIKE

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rics.org/modus

Conflicts guidance required reading for all professionals RICS professionals and regulated firms are now required to follow the global professional statement: Conflict of Interest, 1st edition. The statement provides greater confidence and increased clarity because it addresses several concerns raised by end users and RICS practitioners on matters such as: definitions of and application of informed consent confidentiality; full disclosure and transparency between parties; the practice of ‘‘dual agency” in the UK commercial property market; and tighter rules around multiple agency relationships. Download the professional statement at rics.org/conflicts.

TERRA FORMER MIT’s prototype is able to scoop up and process its own building materials, which makes it ideal for disaster zones – or other planets SOUTH KOREA 19.7%

INFOGRAPHICS IAN DUTNALL IMAGE MIT MEDIA LAB; TERREMOCENTROITALIA

JAPAN MIT’s 7.5%construction robot CHINA

Have your say on International Land Measurement Standard Land and its effective use is a keystone of economic development, but levels of security around land tenure vary enormously around the world. Up to 70% of land in some countries remains unregistered. To help tackle this problem, RICS is among more than 30 organisations working on the International Land Measurement Standard (ILMS), an international principle-based standard for recording and reporting information and material relevant to land and property transfers. The draft standard will focus on removing risk from the process, which will help to strengthen tenure security, land rights, investment and governments’ revenue-raising capabilities. Consultation on the draft statement is open until 28 February. To add your comments, go to rics.org/consultations.

UK 7.5%

SOUTH KOREA

6.2%Researchers FRANCE What’s that? at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 5.6% (MIT) have developed a robot that can rapidly print 3D structures. Unlike NETHERLANDS 2.6% $170bn GERMANY most 3D printing systems –SPAIN which are generally mounted on a fixed support US 1.8% 1.7% 1.5% frame, and are therefore limited to building within ITALY their overall enclosure – 0.5% MIT’s robot is able to move around freely. In 2017, researchers completed a prototype 12ft-high dome in less than 14 hours of “printing” time. How does it work? The tracked vehicle carries a large, industrial robotic arm, which has a smaller, precision-motion robotic arm at its end. These computer-controlled arms can then be used to direct a nozzle that pours or sprays a material, such as concrete or insulation material, in a certain area, building up layer upon layer in a pre-programmed design. What’s next? The system could be deployed to remote regions to help developing communities, or to disaster zones to provide shelters. Using an on-board scoop, the robot could even acquire its own construction materials. UK JAPAN Project researcher Steven Keating said the ultimate vision is “to have somethingCHINA totally autonomous, that you could send to the moon, or Mars FRANCE or Antarctica, and it would just go out and make these buildings for years.”

$170bn

NETHERLANDS SPAIN GERMANY US

19.7%

TAKE PRIDE

ITALY

ROBERTO BANDIERI MRICS: THE 1.5% POST-EARTHQUAKE HERO 7.5% 7.5% 6.2% 5.6% 2.6% 1.8% 1.7% 0.5%

When the Italian region of Amatrice was hit by an earthquake in August 2016, causing the deaths of 297 people, chartered environmental surveyor Roberto Bandieri MRICS played a critical role. Bringing this

rural area’s working land back into productive use was a top priority, so he led a local team to rebuild wooden houses for cattle breeders and repair damaged cattlesheds. His efforts also went far beyond the physical recovery of the area, incorporating work to redevelop the local economy and educate young people on how best to make use of the supply chain. DO YOU HAVE A SURVEYING STORY TO SHARE? Submit your nomination for the Pride in the Profession campaign at rics.org/150 FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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“With advances progressing more rapidly than ever before, the potential for AI to assist us with almost every task has become very real”

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rtificial intelligence (AI) is now revolutionising businesses all over the world, accomplishing activities with greater accuracy and speed than the average human could ever dream of. Certain sectors have adopted advanced deployments at a very fast rate, with the pharmaceuticals, automotive, aerospace, telecoms, energy, healthcare and financial services industries all leading the way. As the technology has morphed from what was once an academic sensation into a cluster of mainstream technologies, it has become prevalent in almost every aspect of life – even if we don’t really notice it when using voice recognition software on our smartphones, browsing music or movie recommendations on Spotify and Netflix, or interacting with online customer service chatbots. And with advances progressing more rapidly than ever before, the potential for AI to assist us with almost every task has become very real. Despite some dubious reservations concerning smart machines “overtaking humankind”, most researchers can agree that the opportunities outweigh the threats by some margin. It will perhaps only be when AI becomes more mainstream – and starts to deliver huge benefits to businesses and society – that these fears will dissolve, as with other technologies over the past 50 years. This is not to say that there are no risks to developing such technology: of course there are. It simply means organisations must place more emphasis on the importance of risk assessments: we must seek out and maximise the opportunities, while minimising the threats. In fact, the use of AI – including smart apps and

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drones – in organisations will drive businesses to become more aware of the probability and impact of risk events, and the threats and opportunities that they present. So, what does AI mean for the future of how we manage buildings? By its very nature, facilities management (FM) is extremely labour intensive, with service areas ranging from cleaning, catering and reception tasks to logistical solutions – all of which demand daily repetitive tasks: the very lowest hanging fruits for automation. As service robots begin to take over more tasks in commercial kitchens, autonomous guided vehicles take over routine cleaning, and drones perform inspections utilising ultra-high-definition and thermal-imaging cameras, we can expect a great deal of disruption, both positive and negative. As the FM, construction, and property industries become more technology led, it is likely that existing human-dominated tasks will be transformed. Likewise, many established roles will cease to be viable, leading to substantial – even socially disruptive – waves of redundancies. When UK manufacturing was automated or outsourced to other countries, much of the displaced workforce transferred to the service sector; with the automation of the service sector there will be few places left to go. This poses no end of challenges in relation to mindset, training and recruitment. But at the very highest level, the influx of AI into the FM industry brings into focus the possibility of new business development plans that utilise this technology to enter, or even create, new markets that were otherwise inaccessible. This is an extraordinary opportunity for industry leaders to uncover and exploit new business potential that was previously off-limits. In the face of this “Fourth Industrial Revolution” of the built environment, it’s imperative that industry leaders comprehend the varied benefits and risks of the technology, and then swiftly formulate – and execute – their strategic plans. It’s time to get into gear. DOWNLOAD the new RICS Insight Paper Artificial Intelligence: What it means for the built environment, at rics.org/Artificialintelligence

ILLUSTRATION ANDREA MANZATI

KATIE KING CO-FOUNDER, AI IN FM, LONDON


Intelligence

NUMBER CRUNCH BOOM IN E-COMMERCE MEANS EUROPE’S CITIES NEED TO FIND A LOT MORE SPACE FOR LAST-MILE-DELIVERY WAREHOUSES (m2) Source: Cushman & Wakefield, 2017

40,940

SECRET SURVEYOR

“The assumption that over-55s have a difficult task securing employment has proved correct”

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xperience counts for a lot. But is it really recognised these days? I have my doubts. As the saying goes, I’ve been there, seen it and done it. I am a Fellow of two respected UK-based professional bodies. And, having spent most of my working life overseas, I like to think I’ve been exposed to plenty of different ways of working. If you’re looking for experience, I can safely say I have it. So, when I returned to the UK recently – after offshore oil and gas took something of a nose-dive – I thought, perhaps rather naively, that securing employment would be easy. Nine months on – and with massive help from LionHeart, for which I will be eternally grateful – I have finally secured a fantastic role. But it wasn’t easy. Whenever possible, I resisted informing recruiters and prospective employers of my age, as I believed, notwithstanding the law, that over-55s have a difficult task securing employment. This assumption proved to be correct. Many of my interviewers seemed crestfallen to be speaking to someone who was much older than them. Among the reasons given for rejection, I have seen: “We don’t think you will fit into the team,” after being informed during the interview that I would be working on my own; and: “We think you would be bored within a month,” from an interviewer half my age, with no professional qualifications. On another occasion a reputable recruiter contacted me about a role with an oil and gas company. Interview arranged, I drove 200 miles to discover my interviewer had gone on vacation. No one knew anything about me, the role or the project. What a waste of everyone’s time. How many people are there, I wonder, currently in employment that require serious training just to do their job? Do our future quantity surveyors pass muster? I certainly hope so. INTERESTED IN WRITING a Secret Surveyor column? Email editor@ricsmodus.com

36,227

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16 2021

2017

Parcel delivery volumes across Europe are expected to increase by 69% by 2021, as the e-commerce boom shows no sign of abating. This will necessitate a huge increase in urban logistics space to meet the demand for final-stage distribution, or “last-mile” deliveries, reports Cushman & Wakefield.

However, available sites for urban logistics use are in short supply in most of Europe’s cities. Therefore, an increasing number of stores are converting parts of their retail and stock space to click and collect, while in some cities, “virtual” warehouses are being set up in underground car parks. FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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FAIR SHARE OF TROUBLE The sharing economy model should, in theory, mean better use of available material resources. But the recent bursting of the bike-sharing bubble in the Chinese city of Xiamen demonstrates how it can also have the opposite effect, as several operators flood the area with their own fleets of bikes to achieve dominance in the market – often with insufficient care for the scale of local demand. Large numbers of these hire bikes, which unlock with the use of an app for immediate use and can be left wherever the rider wishes, now crowd public areas and pavements in many Chinese cities, leaving the job of cleaning up firmly in the hands of local authorities.

10 RICS.ORG/MODUS


SOUTH KOREA 19.7%

JAPAN 7.5%

Intelligence CHINA 6.2%

GROCER DOMESTIC PRODUCTS

FRANCE 5.6% NETHERLANDS 2.6% SPAIN 1.8%

E-commerce revenue as a share of the fast-moving consumer goods sector in selected countries Source: Statista/Kantar World Panel, 2017

NEWS IN BRIEF

UK 7.5%

GERMANY 1.7%

US 1.5%

ITALY 0.5%

®

rics.org/modus

RICS standard on whole-life carbon supports climate aims RICS has released its first UK JAPAN SOUTH KOREA professional statement requiring its members to follow CHINA FRANCE requirements for conducting whole-life carbon assessments NETHERLANDS $170bn SPAIN GERMANY US for construction projects. The new standard, Whole Life ITALY Carbon Assessment for the Built Environment, 1st edition, sets out how RICS professionals should 19.7% 7.5% 7.5% 6.2% 5.6% 2.6% 1.8% 1.7% 1.5% 0.5% assess the carbon emissions arising from built projects throughout a building’s life-cycle. JOHN HUGHES FRICS RICS PRESIDENT It addresses embodied emissions BITS THAT BITE of all the components that go moVemenT is cenTral To The fourTh indusTrial reVoluTion, WiTh neW It’s the currency into a built asset over all stages ways of transporting people and goods, and – perhaps more significantly of tomorrow’s of its life: from extracting raw – the constant exchange of information of all kinds. economy, but materials to any maintenance, responsible Today, all types of structures are becoming “smart” as monitoring and repair, replacement and potential use of data controls systems become more sophisticated. City leaders are also beginning will be critical future demolition and disposal. to recognise that being a “wired” community is advantageous for economic to avoid the The standard is another downsides development and benefits citizens’ quality of life. important tool that supports Whether it is to make buildings and infrastructure run well or to help larger RICS objectives to make businesses make smart decisions, data is at the heart of everything. But as a tangible contribution to the the connected digital economy gathers pace, the stakes in terms of data built environment, achieving quality and management get higher. the commitments made in the Paris Agreement during the In property, those with access to the most comprehensive and reliable data 21st Conference of the Parties are at an advantage. In the past, data was closely guarded and professionals (COP21) in 2015. were limited to using it only in the way that was prescribed. Today, data Download the statement at availability is far greater and access is easier. Advancements in technology rics.org/wholelifecarbon. are also providing numerous benefits to the market, enabling surveyors to capture information more rapidly, and to edit and share it immediately. However, with opportunities come challenges. As the range and volume Last chance to help us shape the world in which we live of data increases and the ability to use it for commercial purposes grows, many questions arise regarding responsible data capture and management. RICS is seeking high-calibre While today blockchain is largely known for its connection to Bitcoin, individuals who can contribute to the profession by performing many suggest it has greater potential in records storage (Blockchain, p20). the ambassadorial role of Senior Used in combination with standardised, trusted sources of real property Vice President, progressing to information regarding ownership, sales transactions and leases, blockchain becoming President after two could remove the need for repeated data checks by providing efficient access years. These are part-time, nonto trustworthy, uniform information. executive positions. Applicants Most blockchains are ledgers that simply keep track of transactions. One must be highly effective members might imagine an additional layer on top of the blockchain protocol, giving of the profession: prominent, it the authority to tell whether a real estate transaction is valid or not. engaging and strategic. We need to be alert to the innovations that are certain to arise as this The deadline for applications revolution progresses and be ready to adapt our standards, working practices is 6 February. To apply, go to and business models in order to benefit from them. rics.org/vicepresident. Follow John on Twitter @JohnHughesTO

IMAGE GETTY, VCG ILLUSTRATION BERND SCHIFFERDECKER

“As the ability to use data grows, many questions arise”

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Automation

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How will cities be changed by the arrival of cars that never need to be parked, driven or even owned? Adam Branson hails the autonomous vehicle revolution

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icture the scene. It is Monday morning and time to go to work. You pat your pocket in search of a car key. Then you stop and chide yourself – maybe your memory really is getting worse? – and instead reach inside your coat for your smartphone. You load up an app and discover that a car will be there to collect you in five minutes – perfectly on time, as it has been since you dumped your own car six months ago. The vehicle picking you up has no driver to distract you with complaints about “bloody cyclists” and its electric motor is practically silent. You settle back into your seat, pull up the morning’s newspaper on your tablet and enjoy a congestion-free, peaceful journey into the office. As you alight, you ask yourself yet again how you ever put up with your old commute. It sounds great, but this is surely still a scenario at least far enough off that you will be long-retired before you stand to benefit. Not so. If both the automotive industry and city authorities get it right, fleets of affordable, driverless cars could become a reality within the next five years. The technology required to support such a scenario is tantalisingly close. Car manufacturers, among them BMW, Volvo, Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen,

are developing autonomous or semiautonomous vehicles, and at the time of writing Tesla chief executive Elon Musk was planning a test drive for a fully automated Model S car from California to New York. Such cars may not yet be evident on the streets of most towns and cities, but in some parts of the world residents are starting to get used to the sight of test vehicles without drivers gliding past their homes or places of work. In the UK, Milton Keynes is the favoured spot because of its logical grid system, while General Motors has been testing its Chevrolet Bolt prototype on the streets of Detroit, Scottsdale in Arizona and San Francisco. Indeed, Philippe Crist, senior economist at the Paris-based International Transport Forum (ITF), reports that on a recent trip to San Francisco, the preponderance of driverless cars on the city’s streets was unmissable. “In the time I was there the volume of automated vehicles I saw on the street went up by a serious magnitude,” he says. “One day I was out taking pictures and when I looked back at them I realised there were several different types of driverless vehicles in the background.” The fact that the technology appears to have reached a tipping point has prompted myriad organisations, from international transport thinktanks such as the ITF to architecture, engineering and management consultancy businesses, as well as real estate advisory firms, to start thinking about how it might be put to best use. Most experts in the field agree that in an ideal world, fleets of shared vehicles – think Uber without the controversy over drivers’ employment rights – would simply replace private cars in urban areas. However, they are also a pragmatic bunch and recognise that this will not happen overnight. As a result, a scenario in which fully automated vehicles (AVs) – whether privately owned or as a new form of mass transit – share road space with traditional cars has to be considered. “How that plays out is highly uncertain because the more that situation presents itself, and the more experience people have of how autonomous vehicles react, will potentially lead to new behaviours,” says Crist. “So, at a four-way junction, if you know the autonomous vehicles will just stop if you edge out, then you might [do so]. There is the potential to ‘game’ the system.”


Automation

One option open to city authorities, of course, is to simply ban traditional cars from central urban areas. In Western societies, such a move would no doubt be regarded as draconian, however. Instead, researchers hope that if the benefits of AVs as mass transport can be sufficiently well demonstrated and communicated, market forces will do the job just as well as legislation. The evidence base to support those benefits is building all the time. A 2015 ITF report, for instance, honed in on a modelling exercise conducted in Lisbon, Portugal, which found that integrating a fleet of driverless vehicles into the city’s public transport system could make 90% of conventional cars redundant. An exercise in Helsinki, the results of which were published late last year, reached similar conclusions. The benefits also extend into the realms of public safety – for pedestrians, drivers, passengers and cyclists alike. Estimates vary, but the general conclusion is that around 90% of accidents are caused by human error. Even 100% AV saturation would not eliminate accidents completely – Crist notes that AVs are only as good as their algorithms, which are of course written by humans – but even partial introduction should cut accident rates dramatically.

the introduction of fleets of AVs will have a massive impact on cityscapes around the world. But his conclusions on how the freed-up space might be used are subtly different. “In terms of parking lots and structures, there should be some significant gains in cities. [But] in terms of on-road space, this is not generally useful for development, and if some is freed up due to AVs and vehicle sharing, it might more productively be allocated to bike lanes, transit lanes, or even landscaped linear parks.” All this will, of course, have implications for both developers and landlords.“[Through either] constructing new commercial real estate with reduced parking, or redeveloping an older building’s parking spaces into modern offices, driverless vehicles will ultimately alter the demand for parking, freeing up space in and around existing properties,” says Neil Gorman MRICS, a partner at Cushman & Wakefield in London. So, the evidence that shared autonomous vehicles could make a massive difference on multiple issues is increasingly solid. What is not clear, however, is whether »

LOOK MUM, NO HANDS

Chevrolet’s Bolt EV prototype (below) is currently undergoing self-driving trials in several cities across the US, while Mercedes-Benz’s F015 research car (bottom) points the way to what an autonomous-vehicle-filled future might look like

IMAGES JEFFREY SAUGER FOR GENERAL MOTORS; DAIMLER

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hen there is the small matter of what AVs could mean for the built environment. A 2016 report by multidisciplinary consultant WSP and architect Farrells, Making Better Places: Autonomous vehicles and future opportunities, suggests the introduction of AVs could free up thousands of hectares in urban areas (graphic, p16), both in terms of reduced parking provision and road space requirements. That could free up land that could be put to better use, which at a time of rapid urbanisation, could prove to be transformational. “Each hectare of additional developable land is worth millions,” says Rachel Skinner, UK head of development at WSP in London. “Freeing up this land will create more viable developments. Shared autonomous vehicles will require storage, but not parking spaces. There is enormous potential for a new generation of living streets and communities.” David Levinson, professor of transport in the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Sydney, Australia, agrees that

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Running on empty The technical challenges of perfecting self-driving cars are huge. But they’re nothing compared to the savings they could offer to passengers. Just don’t set your heart on becoming a cab driver …

MILEAGE DEPRECIATION $0.07 FINANCING $0.01

LICENCE, REGISTRATION $0.01

FUEL COST $0.09

PLATFORM REVENUE (EG UBER) $0.40

DOLLARS PER MILE UBER-STYLE TAXI WITH HUMAN DRIVER

DRIVER NET EARNINGS $1.33 INSURANCE $0.08 MAINTENANCE $0.05

TOTAL

$2.04 INSURANCE $0.08

DOLLARS PER MILE SELF-DRIVING UBER-STYLE TAXI

TNC REVENUE $0.40

FINANCING $0.01

MILEAGE DEPRECIATION $0.07 FLEET MANAGEMENT COST $0.08 FUEL COST $0.08

AUTONOMOUS HARDWARE $0.08

$0.86

HOW MUCH SPACE WOULD BE SAVED BY CARS THAT NEVER PARKED?

LICENCE, REGISTRATION $0.01

HOW MUCH OF ITS LIFE DOES A CAR SPEND PARKED? TIME IN USE 4%

PARKING SPACES TAKE UP 16% OF LONDON’S STREET SPACE

16 RICS.ORG/MODUS

TIME PARKED ELSEWHERE 16%

TIME PARKED AT HOME 80%

Sources: Rocky Mountain Institute, 2016; WSP/Farrells, 2016

TOTAL

MAINTENANCE $0.05


Automation

individuals – both those in power and regular consumers – will choose to make it happen. First, there is the general public’s love affair with driving, which the ongoing popularity of automotive TV shows such as Top Gear and The Grand Tour demonstrates clearly. However, Levinson does not believe the issue is insurmountable.“The new paradigm emerges when the proponents of the old paradigm die off,” he says bluntly. “Over the next 25 years, more than 25% of the population will be new residents to a city. While some people like to drive, eventually the safety consequences of that will be recognised as unacceptable when there are safer cars available.”

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he more pressing issue is what steps public authorities and industry will have to take to realise the potential benefits. This is a complicated area – we are, after all, talking about the introduction of a new form of mass transportation into often dense, existing urban areas – but one that a new report from WSP, New Mobility Now, launched in Montreal at the end of last year, addresses head on. The research involved talking to about 50 organisations around the world, and analyses the complex interplay between private sector entrepreneurship and state intervention that will be required to maximise the benefits of shared AVs. It makes clear that solutions will have to be tailored to local circumstances, but “what it doesn’t do is give a road map, because road maps are nearly always wrong”, says Ian Patey, head of intelligent transport at WSP and author of the report. What the research does do is assert that city authorities will have to get stuck in, particularly when it comes to licensing what vehicles are allowed on which roads at what times. That, however, is neither revolutionary nor draconian: as Levinson points out, authorities already license taxis, separate bus lanes and ban high-polluting vehicles from city centres, to take just three examples. “City governments will need to manage when and where and how cars can be used, just as they do today,” says Levinson. “Deciding which roads are for movement and which are for local access will remain an important function.” Authorities will also have to think hard about how AVs interact with existing mass transport systems, such as above-ground

and underground rail services, as well as buses. While this could lead to a reduction in services on underused routes, the hope is that AVs will complement rather than damage existing services. “Infrequent services with few passengers are likely to be replaced with more taxi-like services,” says Levinson. “[But] high-flow services in large cities cannot be easily replaced because AVs, efficient as they are and might become, will still consume more space per person than a crowded train.” The partnership between Uber rival Lyft and train company Amtrack in the US, whereby a first/last mile option is offered to customers when they buy a train ticket, perhaps points the way forward.

So, when might we come to rely on these fleets of AVs? Crist is willing to hazard a guess. “I think we will probably see the rollout of fully automated vehicles in specific contexts within the next five years,” he says. Levinson predicts a more dramatic – if longer-term – revolution.“Over the next 25 years, there will be a transition from 0% to 100%,”he says.“Eventually, just as there are, essentially, no horses in our cities any more, there will be no human-driven vehicles.” It will not happen everywhere at the same time, but once the concept is proven, the advantages offered by shared AVs could rapidly sweep around the world. Once you get your head around the concept, it is hard not to get impatient. n

EVENTUALLY, JUST AS THERE ARE, ESSENTIALLY, NO HORSES IN OUR CITIES ANY MORE, THERE WILL BE NO HUMAN-DRIVEN VEHICLES DAVID LEVINSON University of Sydney

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Cities

What can cities like Durban do to ensure they protect natural environments as they continue to grow? What can cities like Nairobi do to encourage a low-carbon economy? How can cities such as Lagos build more affordable housing to keep pace with their growing populations? What can cities like Mexico City do to ensure supplies of drinking water? How can sprawling cities with growing slum populations like São Paulo create safer and more affordable neighbourhoods? What can cities like New York City do at a local level to make a meaningful contribution to global issues like climate change? What new ideas can cities like Toronto use to help increase the appeal of low-carbon transport such as walking, cycling and public transport? How can cities like Washington DC protect rivers and the natural environment from pollution? How can cities like Hong Kong provide the affordable housing they need to attract young talent? How can coastal cities like Mumbai better protect their populations from the increased threat of flooding? What new ideas can help rapidly growing cities like Delhi reduce the number of slum dwellers? Cities like Beijing have already taken steps to improve air quality. What more can they do to ensure cleaner air as they expand? How can rapidly growing cities like Shanghai adopt innovations such as gamification to improve energy efficiency further? How can cities with declining populations like Tokyo attract the talent they need to remain competitive? What innovative ideas can help developed cities like Melbourne cope with future waves of population growth? How can disaster-struck cities such as Christchurch attract the people, investment and entrepreneurs they need to rebuild? What more can densely populated cities like Singapore do to cope with ongoing urban growth? What new ideas can help cities like Glasgow tackle high levels of homelessness? How can cities like Milan reduce the space required for car parking to make more room for green spaces or affordable housing? What can popular tourist cities like Amsterdam do to ensure they remain great places to live for residents? How can cities undergoing rapid regeneration like Budapest ensure that local communities share the benefits of infrastructure spending? What can cities with poor air quality like London do to make their air cleaner? How can growing cities like Manchester use smart technology and data to increase the quality of life and work for their inhabitants? How can cities in the Gulf Cooperation Council diversify from petrochemicals and embrace solar energy to combat climate change?

RESOURCE SCARCITY C L I M AT E C H A N G E R A P I D U R B A N I S AT I O N

ANSWER THE BIG QUESTIONS Modus is all about the big questions, and now there’s an opportunity to have your voice heard over how these questions should be answered – and win a major grant in the process. The Cities For Our Future Challenge is a global competition run by RICS in partnership with Unesco. If you’re a professional or student involved in urban design, architecture, surveying or engineering, then share your transformative ideas for projects and policies that solve some of the defining challenges of our time: rapid urbanisation, climate change and resource scarcity. The winner will receive a £50,000 grant and mentoring with industry experts to help make their concept a reality. To find out more, visit citiesforourfuture.com

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= this.calculateHash();} calculateHash() {return SHA256(this.index + this.previousHash + this.timestamp + JSON.stringify(this.data toString()} class Blockchain {constructor() {this.chain = [this.createGenesisBlock()];} createGenesisBlock() {return new Block(0,“01/01/2017”, “Genesis block”, “0”);} getLatestBlock()return this. chain[this.chain.length - 1]; addBlock(newBlock) {newBlock.previousHash = this.getLatestBlock().hash; newBlock.hash = newBlock.calculateHash(); this.chain. push (newBlock);} isChainValid () {for (let i = 1; i < this.chain.length; i++) {const currentBlock = this. chain[i]; const previousBlock = this.chain[i - 1]; if What is blockchain? (currentBlock.hash !== currentBlock. calculateHash()) {return false;} if (currentBlock. previousHash !== previousBlock.hash) {return false;}} return true;}} let savjeeCoin = new Blockchain(); savjeeCoin.addBlock(new Block(1, “20/07/2017”, { amount: 4 })); savjeeCoin addBlock(new Block(2, “20/07/2017”, { amount: 8 })); Is it *really* going to change the property sector? constructor(index, timestamp, data, previousHash = ‘’) {this.index = index; this.previousHash = previousHash; this.timestamp = timestamp; this.data = data; this.hash = this.calculateHash(); this.nonce = 0;} mineBlock And how does it work, anyway?(difficulty) {while (this.hash.substring(0, difficulty) !== Array(difficulty + 1).join(“0”)) {this.nonce++;this.hash = this. calculateHash();} console .log(“BLOCK MINED: “ + this. hash);} calculateHash() {return SHA256(this.index + this.previousHash + this.timestamp + JSON.stringify(this. data) + this.nonce).toString();} class Block {constructor (index, timestamp, data, previousHash = ‘’) {this.index = index; this.previousHash = previousHash; this.timestamp = timestamp; this.data = data; this.hash = this. calculateHash(); this.nonce = 0;} calculateHash() Everything you always wanted to know about blockchain* {return SHA256(this.index + this.previousHash + this. timestamp + JSON.stringify(this.data) + this.nonce). toString();} mineBlock(difficulty) {while (this.hash. substring(0, difficulty) !== Array(difficulty + 1).join(“0” {this.nonce++; this.hash = this. calculateHash();} console .log(“BLOCK MINED: “( *but were afraid to ask) + this.hash);}} constructor() {this.chain = [this.createGenesisBlock()]; this.difficulty = 2;} addBlock(newBlock) { newBlock.previousHash = this. getLatestBlock().hash; newBlock.mineBlock| 20 RICS.ORG/MODUS


Blockchain

WORDS // STUART WATSON

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handful of years ago hardly anyone except tech geeks had heard of blockchain. Today, the digital world is abuzz with claims that the system’s decentralised database technology has ushered in a new internet that is transforming the way people do business in every sector of the economy, real estate included. Blockchain is an application of computer science that enables highly secure peer-topeer digital transactions (graphic, p22). It offers the potential to increase transparency and trust, reduce fraud and speed up a wide variety of business processes by reducing the need for middlemen and paperwork. “This is a technology that is incredibly interesting and could be transformational, but there is a lot of hype around it,” observes Alan Penn, professor of architectural and urban computing at University College London’s Bartlett School of Architecture. UCL has established a Construction Blockchain Consortium which, Penn says, is “bringing together the industry with academics and scoping out whether or not these technologies have any real use”. Some dizzying scenarios are being sketched out for blockchain’s potential to overhaul the way the property sector operates, and a multiplicity of tech start-ups are now developing applications employing the technology. Stockholm-based Chromaway is among the most advanced blockchain companies in developing a practical application for the technology within the property sector.“You can take the analogy with the internet,” says

CEO Henrik Hjelte. “In the early days of the internet, some business models were totally unrealistic and futuristic, like showing video on the internet or buying groceries online. “[But] you don’t have to buy into a futuristic vision of blockchain with everyone buying and selling property using tokens on their mobile phones. This technology also has a lot of advantages for incremental improvements,” he adds. One sector of the real estate business in which blockchain looks likely to have an early impact is the registering and transferring of land titles. By creating an immutable digital token that represents the title to a property, and storing it within a publicly accessible ledger, blockchain can remove the need for paperwork and vastly reduce the opportunities for corruption and fraud. Several national or state governments have already begun to explore the potential benefits of creating such a registry, including Georgia, Dubai, Honduras, Cook County, Illinois in the US and the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh.“That makes it fast and easy to register titles and has an effect on GDP – in particular for developing countries, but also for developed countries,” says Hjelte. Chromaway is undertaking a pilot project with the Swedish land registry that goes a step further, exploring how to create a blockchain“smart contract”that can facilitate transfer of ownership. “We are taking a paper-based process that takes three months and creating a digital process that can bring it down to less than a day,” claims Hjelte. Olly Freedman MRICS, director of sales at commercial property data solutions provider Datscha in London, believes blockchain applications could speed up the conveyancing process: “If all the data for a property is held on a virtual ledger, and that ledger can be accessed and amended in

seconds, the whole legal process becomes much faster. The process of lawyers doing searches and then reporting back would be shortened significantly.” Smart contracts, which can be coded to execute when certain conditions are met, offer exciting possibilities for the real estate sector, argues Rob Parker MRICS, senior portfolio manager, global occupier services at Cushman & Wakefield in Singapore. “For example, you can have a deposit paid in at the start of the lease and because all transactions are visible on the blockchain, you can check that your landlord hasn’t spent that money or run away with it. Then, at the end of the contract, you can implement a multisignature system so if both landlord and tenant are happy that the deposit should be returned, then it comes straight back. Alternatively, if there is a query, then a third party can arbitrate the dispute and when two of the three agree, the money is released.”

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ithin the construction sector, smart contracts could be coded to pay subcontractors automatically as soon as work has been completed and checked, reducing the payment delays that cause cashflow problems for small businesses. Smart contracts could even remove the need for human intervention in some processes altogether. “You could use internet-of-things-connected devices to record energy and water usage. The service charge would be very easily verified and the payments could automatically be taken through a smart contract,” says Parker. Blockchain can be combined with BIM to reduce the potential for disputes in the construction sector, suggests Penn. “If you have a history of exactly what took place within the blockchain, which with BIM becomes possible because everything is »

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Someone requests a transaction

The requested transaction is broadcast to a P2P network consisting of computers, known as nodes

The network of nodes validates the transaction and the user’s status using known algorithms

Once verified, the transaction is combined with other transactions to create a new block of data for the ledger The new block is then added to the existing blockchain in a way that is permanent and unalterable The transaction is complete

Blockchain was developed in 2008 to support the digital “cryptocurrency”, Bitcoin. It has since become clear that the technology has applications across a wide range of processes and transactions. At the heart of blockchain is a an innovative form of database: the distributed ledger. Each digital transaction is recorded

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in the ledger in an immutable encrypted form as a “block” of data, and the ledger is distributed across thousands or even millions of computers in a network of “nodes”. For each individual record to be accepted as valid, more than half the nodes must agree that it is the correct one. No centralised version of the

information exists, so it is impossible for a hacker to corrupt it without simultaneously taking control of an enormous number of systems. Change any part of the record by conducting a new transaction or even altering a letter of a document, and a new encrypted block of data is added to the chain, creating a permanent

imprint of the information in the ledger at that point in time. Because it is decentralised and distributed, blockchain offers the potential for transparent, incorruptible peer-to-peer digital transactions without the need for permission or validation from a third party, which could slow the process down.

Source: BlockGeeks

Need to node: how blockchain works


Blockchain

within the one data repository, you stand a chance of shifting the culture to a much less litigious and much more collaborative one.” Marcus Granadeiro MRICS, a director at Brazilian construction management firm Constructivo in São Paulo, has already begun to record all of the information relating to the construction process on certain projects on a blockchain-based application: “With blockchain you can take a picture of the evolution of the contract at any moment. Every change is reproduced on the system from the beginning of the work to the end. There have been problems with scandals in the construction industry in Brazil, so there is a market for more compliance and consistent information.” In the Netherlands, the City of Rotterdam, Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC) and Deloitte are developing the first real estate blockchain application to record lease agreements at CIC’s Dutch business incubator. Leases are recorded digitally on a blockchain platform, which also monitors rental payments so that the financial performance of the building and its tenants can be documented over time. “Lease agreements are one of the main drivers for the value of real estate,” says Jan-Willem Santing MRICS, manager, real estate and partnerships at Deloitte in Utrecht. “With this system, if you sell or refinance your property you can save a lot of time because you can instantly see whether the parties do what they have agreed upon, and you can make better-informed decisions.”

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ooking to the future, blockchain could revolutionise the real estate investment market. Some property developers have already begun to accept bitcoin in payment, although the volatility of cryptocurrencies has deterred some investors. Meanwhile the possibilities arising from tokenisation have already begun to be explored, as realestate-backed “initial coin offerings” (ICOs) invite investors to buy digital tokens that represent a share in properties. “Real estate is an illiquid asset and that is what we think we can solve with blockchain,” says Ragnar Lifthrasir, the California-based president of the International Blockchain Real Estate Association. “What people are doing with ICOs is trying to represent property assets as a token. You trade the token to trade the asset and you can divide

(NEW.QUOTE)“ }= WE ARE TAKING A PAPERBASED PROCESS THAT TAKES THREE MONTHS AND CREATING A DIGITAL PROCESS THAT CAN BRING IT DOWN TO LESS THAN A DAY.+0’)

HENRIK HJELTE Chromaway

a property represented with a blockchain token into pieces. That is the long-term future for property and blockchain, but it has to be well designed and thought out.” To date, most big institutional investors have considered ICOs to be too risky. Thomas Herr, head of digital innovation for EMEA at CBRE in Berlin, believes that the industry is likely to adopt blockchain at a measured pace. “One school of thought says that blockchain will change real estate within the next three to five years. I belong to another, which says there will be a longer period of introduction of 10 to 20 years. There will be a smooth integration of this technology in certain applications that are not as crucial as property transfer, then when we are more used to it we will use it for more complicated transactions and acceptance will grow.” Disintermediation – cutting out the middleman – is pivotal to the disruption that blockchain will wreak. As the property industry’s skilled intermediaries, surveyors could be forgiven for asking what that will mean for their career prospects.

“Yes, people in the property industry are middlemen and there will be a slow movement away from them, but they can leverage their knowledge to help tech entrepreneurs come up with the best applications. They should educate themselves about blockchain and start playing around with bitcoin, getting some hands-on experience,” advises Lifthrasir. “Lawyers and bankers should probably be more worried about this than surveyors,” adds Parker. “Blockchain won’t reduce the need for a surveyor to confirm the structural integrity or accuracy of the floor area, and I don’t believe it will affect the way we go about the negotiating leases.” The technology is still in its infancy, and hurdles remain to be overcome, not least the carbon consequences of the vast amount of energy consumed by the server farms needed to maintain blockchains. It is as difficult to predict exactly what forces blockchain will unleash today as it was to foresee the impact of the internet in the early 1990s, but the results could be almost as revolutionary. n

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As emerging technologies converge with urban planning, a revolution of automated, on-demand and ownerless transport beckons. But is the concept of an intelligent city network a deliverable reality, or just sci-fi fantasy?

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Smart cities

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he recent return of Blade Runner to cinemas provides us with a timely reminder of the world created in the first film, set in the Los Angeles of 2019. In truth, director Ridley Scott’s original vision is now some distance from the aspirations of today’s city planners. An emerging world of smart cities – the convergence between technology and urban planning – is already opening up massive opportunities to rethink the way that we live, work and play. But the film’s predictions for flying cars, synthetic human-like robots, space colonisation and artificial intelligence have turned out to be – for the most part – wide of the mark. Yet, according to Siemens senior vicepresident Steffen Endler, Blade Runner did, if nothing else, correctly anticipate today’s world of rapid urbanisation, rising population, climate change and the birth of the technology-supported smart city. The way we live our lives is unavoidably set for disruption. “Creating the liveable city takes four components to make it happen effectively,” explains Endler, who heads Siemens’ Digitalization Hub in Singapore.

“It takes thoughtful designs and plans, political will and societal support, technology that is fit for purpose, and good governance and collaboration to sustain the plan.” And the glue that holds this smart vision together is the transport networks that enable the new landscape to be traversed. We are, Endler points out, already on this development journey, beyond a so-called Infrastructure 1.0 of dumb brick and steel, and moving through the semi-automated Infrastructure 2.0. Ahead of us lies the intelligent Infrastructure 3.0 of driverless trains, fully automated buildings and smart grids managing loads, storage and generation, before we reach Infrastructure 4.0 – the fully integrated, intelligent and adaptive smart city infrastructure that is able to provide demand-responsive city services and incident management. It is, without question, a very attractive prospect, and one that is already exciting city leaders, infrastructure designers and transport planners. The question is: can it be delivered, or are we simply heading off towards a new Hollywood fantasy? “Look at the world around us and you will already see the evidence of the smart transport network in action: paperless e-ticketing on transport systems, sensors built into highways, driver assistance systems in cars, intelligent traffic lights and traffic management systems, and train automation,” explains Endler. “Our road transport will inevitably follow the same pattern of technical progress of all past machines: we motorise, we electrify and we automate.” Being able to construct a smart city from the ground up is a rare privilege but one that Qatar is already embracing with its $45bn Lusail City. Work started on the 38 km2 city in 2008, in preparation for the 2022 FIFA World Cup for which Qatar is – somewhat controversially – the host. It is the largest development ever planned in Qatar and a key real estate plank in the National Vision 2030, which sets out to invest in and strengthen the national economy, but also to balance growth with environmental protection and sustainable development.

As such, developer Qatari Diar has set out stringent international design standards and embarked on a programme of detailed planning that it hopes will ensure that Lusail embraces the latest smart city technologies and builds in the flexibility to accommodate future innovations. Once it is completed in 2020, Lusail is expected to be home to 200,000 residents, with another 170,000 workers travelling in each day. Its 19 city districts will include residential, commercial and entertainment sectors, schools, mosques and medical facilities. Two Foster & Partners-designed towers will act as landmarks in the new financial district. A comprehensive transport network underpins its ambitious smart city plans in a way that is only really possible when you plan, design and construct a city from new, according to Eugene Seah MRICS, senior director, special projects, in the Group CEO Office of Surbana Jurong, the Singapore government’s infrastructure consultant. “Lusail is an example of a project starting in the right direction and with effective investment into the smart city,” he explains. “The project planners have looked at the end state and then started planning from the onset of the project.” At the heart of Lusail’s transport system is a low-energy, light-rail transit network connecting the city’s districts with four underground and overground lines, 36 stations and 38.5 km of track. Eventually, this will link up to future intercity rail services. But it is not all about trains. Cars will still be a significant element in the transport system, so interconnected underground car parks will support a carefully planned road system designed to limit congestion »

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in the city. A devoted bicycle and pedestrian network, with water taxis taking advantage of a canal network, will also relieve pressure on the road- and rail-based public transport. Seah points to other global cities, particularly in the rapidly developing regions of Asia such as Singapore, Hong Kong and Shanghai, which have been leading the charge when it comes to developing smart cities and transport networks, using technologies such as the internet of things (IoT), sensors and data analytics. “Getting these correct would mean better systems for maintainability and predictability for instance, moving large quantities of people, safely, efficiently and conveniently,” he says. “The ultimate aim is to improve the commuters’ quality of life.”

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aving spent much of the last two years travelling around the developed and developing world, RICS pastPresident and CBRE partner Amanda Clack FRICS agrees that projects such as Lusail City are accelerating the development of smart city transport networks. “The great

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thing with experimental or new cities like Lusail is that they can develop from a blank canvas and, as such, help develop and push on technologies and concepts covered elsewhere,” she says. “Lusail is fascinating, as much of the initial seven years of development was focused on installing the subterranean infrastructure to service the future city above ground. This has created a range of plug-and-play development opportunities that push the city to a different level.” And, she adds, while they may seem like expensive, one-off exercises, projects such as Lusail are vital to push the boundaries of what is possible. Other cities also now leading the way include Shenzhen and Tianjin in China, Songdo in South Korea, Brasilia in Brazil, plus Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai. “We need these examples to help bring new thinking to developed or developing cities around the world,” says Clack. “The way people use transport is likely to become more on demand, with less reliance on car or personal transport ownership. This will

IMAGE DORSCH GRUPPE

PLUG AND PLAY Qatar’s state-backed development company, Qatari Diar, is spending $45bn turning 38 km2 of desert and shorefront into Lusail City. Key to its success as a smart city is the infrastructure that is being built in to service future development. Light-rail lines, dedicated walking and cycling networks and water taxis are being created to service an anticipated 200,000 residents and 170,000 commuters.

place increased pressure on public and private services to meet this demand on time, and to provide data and data networks to help people make informed decisions on transport modes in the moment. People are requiring more personal data networks that can travel with them to provide an immediacy of information on the go.” Amy Child, associate transport and urban planner with Arup in Melbourne, agrees that creating smart networks is very much about engaging with people and, critically, embracing the ways that we are all now living our lives.“Digital technology and the ubiquitous smartphone means that we are now all very much geared around the user experience across all sectors and services,” explains Child. “The rise of on-demand, individualised services such as Netflix, Apple music and Airbnb have demonstrated the power of customer-focused business models, and this is now rapidly transferring to the transportation space.” Personalisation of transport means a future beyond simply providing static infrastructure. Customers now want a personalised service whether they are using public or individual personal transport. That means the traditional mass transit business models such as heavy rail, based on big infrastructure investment and governed by timetables and levels of services are no longer the only solution in town. On-demand, digitally enabled transport systems, which can be more agile and responsive to meet customer need, will fill the gaps where demand exceeds supply, or where no supply currently exists. Singapore’s Beeline bus service is a great example of this new wave of thinking. The crowd-sourced private bus service was set up in 2015 and now has 130 routes run by seven private bus operators, with 19,000 active monthly bookings. The concept is simple – the public suggests a route, Beeline analyses the crowd-sourced data


Smart cities

to identify whether the route is viable and, if so, asks private operators to bid to run it. Such services are part of the new sharing economy which, according to PwC, was thought to be worth $15bn a year at the time its report, The Sharing Economy, was published in 2015, but could rise to £335bn by 2025. And transport could potentially be the biggest sector of this market. Swedish automotive start-up Unity will this month launch its prototype for a new purpose-built lightweight electric vehicle designed specifically to integrate with this emerging digital-platform-based economy, either driver controlled or autonomously. But the sky is literally the limit for transport options backed by such platforms. Dubai’s Roads and Transportation Agency, for example, is pressing ahead with plans for an autonomous passenger drone network, while Israeli firm Urban Aeronautics says its military-designed passenger drone could be in civilian use by 2020. Back in the present, ride-hailing app Uber now operates in more than 600 cities around the world, and bike-sharing schemes are being taken to the next level by“dockless” operators such as Mobike and Ofo, which have embarked on aggressive expansion campaigns beyond their Asian bases.

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espite this personal transport revolution, smarter and more efficient mass public transport solutions will remain core to serving ever-growing city populations, says Alistair Gollop, technology services engineering lead at Mott MacDonald in Southampton. “The need for efficient transport modes will inevitably result in the requirement for mass public transport to offer a reliable and comfortable means to travel,” he explains. “There simply will not be the capacity to handle the huge daily commuter influx that our cities need to cope with, by using individual vehicles for each person.” However, he adds: “Supporting that tidal flow of workers will also require a mix of transport modes to get people to the transit hubs, and for shopping, school and leisure trips. Although the use of privately owned vehicles is bound to continue for some time, alternative mixes of sustainable modes such as walking and cycling will increase.” This mix, says Gollop, will include the emergence of Mobility as a Service – or Maas for short. It is a key phrase that will soon permeate our lives in the way that smartphones have over the last decade.

Essentially, it is the integration of transport – a single monthly charge to cover and plan all your travel needs across trains, buses, trams, taxis, bikes and hire cars without the need to buy or book a ticket. Already operating in Helsinki, pioneering Finnish operator Maas Global is now rolling out its Whim app and services in the UK across the West Midlands. Its goal is to make it unnecessary for any city resident to own a private car by 2025 (box, below). Without question, technology will create significant change to the way that smart cities of the future are planned and built, with improved capacity freeing up land for public transit, walking, cycling and housing. City transport will become cleaner, more rapid and also more autonomous – with

many even predicting that development of this technology means the next generation of children will have no requirement to even take a driving test. “The reality of hyperloop, drones, fewer cars on our streets and electric vehicles will become the norm,”explains Clack.“We need cities such as Lusail to push the boundaries.” On this basis, Blade Runner’s dystopian city vision looks even less likely as a reality. n READ RICS’ RESEARCH REPORT on smart cities and big data at rics.org/smartcities

All-in-one travel solution hopes to reach critical Maas Maas (Mobility as a Service) aims to improve transport efficiency and reduce the need for car ownership. This should not only benefit residents’ quality of life by cutting congestion and improving air quality, but also increase productivity for businesses and transform the urban environment as road space requirement is reduced. Maas Global’s service, and its Whim app, is a new ticketless travel concept that combines different transport options into a single mobile service, and intends to obviate the need to own a car by 2025. Services are currently operating in Helsinki in Finland and are being rolled out across the West Midlands in the UK. The aim is to package and sell transport journeys as a single monthly purchase for all the services people need, regardless of mode. The premise is that the average car owner spends much more each month on running costs than they think, and make use of their vehicle far less than they care to admit. The money spent by households on depreciation, fuel, insurance and maintenance could instead, says Maas Global, buy substantial bus, train, taxi or car-hire services. The Whim app helps customers find and plan the most effective and efficient route and mode. For a monthly fee, Helsinki residents buy access to all the city’s public transport services and collect credits to use on a set number of taxi rides each month, or on days driving rental cars. In the West Midlands the Whim app includes Gett taxis, National Express buses and Midland Metro trams, and city bikes and rental cars will soon be added. Currently both pay-per-ride and monthly subscription services are available.

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COSTA BANKER Spain’s enduring popularity with tourists has helped the country bounce back from the global financial crisis, and now hotel investors are cashing in. Brendon Hooper reports

GARDEN PARTY Last October Blackstone paid €630m for HI Partners, the hospitality company owned by Banco Sabadell. Its portfolio of 14 hotels includes the Jardín Tropical in Tenerife (1) TOWER PLAY Foncière des Régions’ €535m purchase of 19 hotels from Merlin Properties, including the Barceló Torre Madrid (2), accounted for almost 25% of investment volumes in 2016

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The collapse of Spain’s property bubble in the aftermath of the global financial crisis triggered one of the most severe recessions in Europe. But over the past decade, following reforms to the banking system and labour market, the Spanish economy has recovered unexpectedly well. In 2015 and 2016, GDP grew by 3.2%, making Spain one of the fastest-growing countries in the eurozone. The strengthening economy has helped catalyse a resurgence in Spain’s hotel investment market. According to JLL, 2015 and 2016 together represented more than 40% of the total hotel investment volume of the past 11 years, while CBRE reports that in the first half of 2017, volumes soared by an astonishing 228% year-on-year. Furthermore, heightened security concerns in competing hotel destinations around Europe and north Africa have brought record-breaking numbers of visitors to Spain. More than 36 million tourists arrived in the first half of 2017, an increase of 12% yearon-year – an unexpected benefit that Christie & Co describes as “borrowed tourism”. It might have also informed Blackstone’s decision to pay Banco Sabadell €630m for hotel group HI Partners in October 2017. The group’s portfolio of 14 hotels are primarily in popular coastal tourist destinations. “As a stable market offering attractive yield levels, Spain has become an appealing country to invest in,” says Inmaculada Ranera MRICS, managing director of the agent’s Spain and Portugal office in Barcelona.“During the downturn, the Spanish hotel industry proved to be a very resilient economic sector, but many hotel-owning companies were unable to invest, given the scarcity of available finance,”she adds.“But since the Spanish economy began to grow above the EU average, investors have refocused on the market and its perceived stability.”


Briefing

CHECKING IN Other notable deals include (from top): the sale of Hotel Villa Magna in Madrid to Doğuş Group for €180m; a Saudi investor’s €93m purchase of the Pullman Barcelona Skipper; and KKH and Perella Weinberg’s €80m purchase of the former HQ of Monte de Piedad in Madrid for conversion into a hotel

enough for new hotel beds, but it is uncertain when this could be. Ruiz believes it could happen after the municipal elections in 2019 if there is a change in the city’s government. Considering that of the 32 million people who visited the city region in 2016, only 9 million stayed in hotels, while 16 million were day-trippers, Ruiz is sceptical as to the longterm efficacy of the plan. “The moratorium and the PEUAT have been useful, but you cannot change tourism drivers by just limiting hotel development in certain areas,”he suggests. “A mix of public and private funds should be invested into more infrastructure, cultural offerings and green spaces to attract people to the less crowded areas of the city.” At nearly a quarter of all international arrivals, the UK clearly remains the main feeder market for Spain. In 2016, 17.8 million tourists came to Spain from the UK – a rise of 7.5% on the previous year. So to what extent will the Spanish hotel industry feel the effects of the UK’s exit from the EU next year? With the pound falling against the euro and UK inflation rising, there is a concern that in the coming years, British tourists feeling the pinch may prefer a “staycation”, look elsewhere for a cheaper holiday, or reduce the length of their holiday and the money they spend while in Spain.

BY NUMBERS

228%

BULL RUN The Spanish hotel investment market had a bumper two years in 2015 and 2016. And with volumes soaring 228% in the first half of last year, 2017 is on track to maintain this streak. Sources: JLL; CBRE, 2017

IMAGES BARCELÓ HOTEL GROUP; CBRE; ACCOR UK; CECA INFOGRAPHIC IAN DUTNALL

*Forecast

59% -9% 2012 €0.38bn 2013 €0.72bn 2014 €1.18bn 2015 €2.77bn 2016 €2.27bn H1 17 €1.64bn*

-10% -77%

In some respects this is already happening.“Our research And Jorge Ruiz MRICS, head of hotels at CBRE Spain in shows that due to the depreciation of sterling, UK travellers Barcelona, observes that the current cycle is quite different have already reduced their trips to Spain by 4.5%, and to the one that precipitated the 2007 crash.“Right now, many overnight stays also decreased by 1.1% during the months hotel operators and investors in Spain are using their equity of July and August 2017,” says Ranera. to re-invest more in their hotel portfolios, to increase the Despite the recent overall record numbers of tourists, the quality of their offering, and raise average daily rates.” industry looks nervous about the potential drop-off in Although the flow of money into coastal hotel resorts British visitors. A 2017 survey conducted by Christie & Co remains strong, most of the invested capital in 2016 shifted of Spanish tour operators and hoteliers on the future towards hotels in urban destinations. Madrid and Barcelona consequences of Brexit, found their 228 expectations were not alone accounted for almost half of the total volumes invested positive. More than two-thirds thought Brexit would have in Spain’s hotels in 2016, reports JLL. negative repercussions on their businesses, predicting that It is no wonder investment is up in Barcelona – the city 59 rates and it could considerably dampen their occupancy continues to be one of the most attractive destinations for average prices. Add to this the further uncertainty caused international travellers. More than 9 million tourists stayed by Spain’s own secessionist issues, following Catalonia’s in hotels in the city in 2016, an increase of over 7 million -9 -10 chaotic unofficial independence referendum in October, and people since 1990. However, potential overcrowding of -77 the outlook for the sector in 2018 looks more unsettled. n tourist hotspots has compelled the city council to begin €0.38bn €0.72bn €1.18bn €2.77bn €2.27bn €1.64bn restricting the number of beds available. A moratorium on 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 the conversion or development of new hotels morphed into a more permanent new urban plan (PEUAT) in March 2017. REFERENCE POINT REPORTS AND RESOURCES “As a consequence, existing hotels have been able to uplift their average daily rates, thanks to less competition from new Hotel Investment Analysis Spain 2016 CBRE’s Europe Hotel Investment MarketView Snapshot for Q3 2017 hotels,” says Ruiz. “They’ve also capitalised on the renewed by JLL (June 2017) bit.ly/JLLSpainhotels (registration required) cbre.eu/research interest from investors, who were previously hesitant about Spanish Hotel Market Review – the most News, opinions and events related to the competitive cities, by Christie & Co putting their money into new builds.” Spanish property market iberian.property bit.ly/CCoSpainhotels At present, there is no time limit on the plan. It will be up The potential impact of Brexit, analysis by Support and networking opportunities for surveyors in Spain surveyspain.com to the current administration to decide when there is room Christie & Co bit.ly/CCoBrexit FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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THE HALO EFFECT Tasked with regenerating a forgotten corner of Northampton and saving the council precious pounds, there’s a lot riding on One Angel Square, reports Brendon Hooper

Client: Northamptonshire County Council Project manager & client representative: Lendlease Architect/landscape architect/structural engineer: BDP Quantity surveyor: Gleeds Main contractor: Galliford Try

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IN THIS TOGETHER One Angel Square consolidates departments from 12 properties under one roof. The council hopes the £40m building will save taxpayers £50m over the next 30 years

After almost a decade of enforced budget cuts, cash-strapped local authorities across the UK have been compelled to look for evermore creative ways of rationalising their estate portfolios. Given that last November’s Budget brought no real shift away from the austerity agenda,“doing more with less”will continue to be the order of the day. One Angel Square in Northampton perhaps epitomises the trend. Completed last September, Northamptonshire County Council’s development pools together departments from 12 separate properties into one flexible, sustainable building. Delivered within the contract sum of £40m – £53m once direct costs are included – the council claims the office will save at least £50m of taxpayers’money over the next 30 years, and regenerate a neglected area of the town. “The building is designed as two ‘yin and yang’ forms enclosing a central courtyard, with office space, informal meeting areas and other collaborative spaces grouped around it,” explains James Baker, architect


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LIGHT FANTASTIC The combination of natural light and open spaces is intended to improve wellbeing and encourage collaboration between the council’s 2,000 employees

UPPER CLASS Copper fins have been designed to evoke leather cutting patterns, in reference to Northampton’s history as a shoe-making centre. They also help to reduce solar gain

IMAGES HUFTON + CROW

BRIGHT IDEA Energy-efficient LED strip task lighting installed around the working areas has helped the building achieve a BREEAM Excellent standard and an EPC B rating

director at BDP.“The use of natural light, and [a sense of openness] between the floors and courtyard helps increase staff and visitor wellbeing, and encourages collaboration.” Its construction was not without its complications, explains Nottingham-based Matthew Lancaster MRICS, director at cost manager Gleeds, who was seconded to the project for Lendlease to provide postcontract management services. Even before a spade went in the ground, the discovery of several unexpected archaeological features held up the tendering process.“Work had to be delayed while these were documented and removed,” he says. “The project team [then] had to reduce the outlay costs of the build as the tenders were initially over budget,” adds Lancaster. Further delays pushed back the building’s original opening date of December 2016. “It was a real team effort to overcome these issues and get the project moving.”   Throughout the building, best-practice passive design strategies help reduce energy

costs and carbon emissions. Copper fins provide shade and reduce solar gain. In a nod to the town’s cobbling heritage, their shape has been inspired by traditional leather cutting patterns. A rainwater-capturing green roof also houses a photovoltaic array to supplement the office’s power demands, while a highly insulated facade combined with efficient heat-recovering air handling units helps reduce heating bills. “The building services are automatically controlled through a building management system, which is focused on energy use reduction,” says James Hepburn, principal in building services engineering at BDP. “[But] user overrides and simple feedback panels are also provided to help occupants learn how to use their building.” The project followed the Building Services Research & Information Association’s Soft Landings framework. This ensured that all stakeholders were involved in the design, development, handover and occupation stages, in order to get the best

operational performance out of the building and meet the client’s expectations. It is fair to say One Angel Square has not had the most auspicious build and postbuild periods. Initial feedback from some of the council’s 2,000 employees brought complaints that the new hot-desking setup was taking them around 20 minutes to find a space to set up every morning. Furthermore, the financial difficulties the council finds itself in, which they attribute to an unfair government funding formula, show no sign of being resolved soon. A recent review of the council’s finances recommended a sale and leaseback of One Angel Square to free up some more money. But Lancaster is hopeful that the building’s location will help bring more regeneration to a previously neglected part of town, as well as boost the council’s coffers. “One Angel Square was built on a brownfield site, and adjacent to some new student halls of residence,” he says. “What was once a car park now has a lot more life and activity.” n

FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS 31


Think bigger with this year’s training budget How can you get more training for your people from the same budget? Here are five ways we make it easy 1: Be the early bird Book any face-to-face training course more than six weeks in advance to receive a 10% discount.

too, especially if you’re considering various courses to support you through the process. rics.org/coins

2: Cash in with Academy Coins Academy Coins are a payment method that can be used across all courses on the RICS Online Academy at a discounted rate. The more Coins you buy, the more upfront discount you’ll receive.

3: Plan your year with Rewards Ideal for organisations looking to set out their spending over a 12-month period. Receive a discount of either 10 or 15%, depending on how much you spend. Rewards can be redeemed on: • Face-to-face training • In-house training • Online training • CPD events • Flagship conferences rics.org/rewards

They’re fantastic for organisations looking to allocate their training budgets, as Coins can be transferred between colleagues. They’re brilliant for APC candidates

4: Bundle your e-learning We’ve curated a number of online training bundles, each containing short e-learning courses on skills for professionals such as client management, communication, leadership and financial activities. rics.org/bundles 5: Keep an eye on our offers page Visit our website for our latest offers, and a recap of how you can save on training or other products rics.org/offers Any questions on the above? Call us on +44 (0)24 76868584 or email training@rics.org


COMING UP Here is a selection of face-to-face, online and distance learning options from RICS Training

GETTING QUALIFIED

DISTANCE LEARNING

Conduct Rules, Ethics and Professional Practice London, 14 March 2018 CPD: 6 hours | £310*

Certificate in Corporate Real Estate and Facilities Management 13 February 2018 CPD: 200 hours | £895*

Preparing for the APC Case Study London, 28 February 2018 CPD: 3 hours | £110 … or two-part web class 21/27 March 2018 CPD: 1.5 hours | £79 Understanding the APC Two-part web class 21/28 March 2018 CPD: 1.5 hours | £79

Construction Projects: PreContract Cost Management 27 February 2018 CPD: 70 hours | £495* E-LEARNING BUNDLE OFFERS New Managers CPD: 3 hours | £75 Introduction to Leadership CPD: 3.5 hours | £99 Financial – Core Skills CPD: 4 hours | £99 Communication Skills CPD: 4 hours | £99 Client Management Skills CPD: 8.5 hours | £199 *RICS member price

To find out more, visit: rics.org/moduscourses


Careers / Business / Legal / Training

Foundations CAREERS  The first step in having the confidence to call out sexual harassment in the workplace is recognising when it occurs

BEING HARASSED?

As any woman who has tried to walk down La Croisette after 5 pm during Mipim is acutely aware, the sexual harassment scandal that exploded late last year is not just confined to politicians and Hollywood types. The property sector – male dominated and still, in parts, determinedly old fashioned – has its own problems. But with awkward conversations now swirling around our workplaces, one question pervades: how do you know if “banter” has tipped over into harassment territory? For many, the effect of the scandal has been the surprising discovery that even now, in the 21st century, harassment takes place in almost all workplaces. But most women already knew: research published by the UK’s Trades Union Congress last year found that 52% have experienced some form of sexual harassment at work. To distinguish between innocent exchanges and genuine harassment, the first step is to look at how it is defined in the UK Equality Act 2010, says Amanda Okill, an employment law specialist at Furley Page Solicitors in Kent. The Act describes harassment as “conduct from a colleague that has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile and degrading environment for the recipient”. “It could be that the perpetrator thinks it is just a laugh, but if it has the effect of creating an intimidating and degrading environment, then it is harassment,” she says. Power is part of the equation, adds Sally French, a counsellor and a member of the Counselling Directory. In many cases, people in senior positions use their power

Confirm it Talk to someone at work you trust to see if they’ve noticed anything. Confront them The offender will most likely be unaware they are making you feel uncomfortable. If you feel confident enough, a quiet word should suffice. Keep a diary Write down each time it happens, noting who was present. Then, when you raise a complaint, you will have a complete list of events, and witnesses. Three-month rule If you choose to pursue the legal route, be aware tribunal action must be taken within three months from when you first complained about the act. 34 RICS.ORG/MODUS

to manipulate someone lower down the order. “A lot of true sexual harassment is actually the opposite of flirting,” she says. “It’s about power, position and privilege.” Okill agrees: “I had a case where a senior manager was sending [a younger employee] text messages. He was in his late 40s, she was 20. [The messages] were quite flirty, but because she didn’t want to lose her job, she felt she had to play along. When she didn’t reply, he’d send her a chaser saying ‘do you not like me?’.” Needless to say, when she finally reported his behaviour, he lost his job. Part of the difficulty in recognising and tackling harassment stems from historic societal norms, suggests French. “Women haven’t always been empowered to say: ‘I find that patronising’ or, ‘I don’t like it when you do that.’ I think we’re frightened of being told: ‘It’s only a joke’ or, ‘Where’s your sense of humour?’.” If there is any doubt, another point of view can help. Confiding in a colleague can help to confirm whether what is happening is fairly harmless, or something darker. More often than not, they will have noticed. Raising it with someone else can also help victims overcome the nagging doubt that they might be over-reacting, because a tribunal is unlikely to rule against behaviour most people would view as “a bit of fun”, Okill suggests. “The way a court tends to look at such behaviour is: what would a reasonable person perceive it as? “As soon as you make it known that you feel uncomfortable, and nothing is done, the perpetrators and the employer are in dangerous territory,” says Okill. “No one is saying you can’t have fun [in the workplace]. But when [comments] alienate a certain group of people, that’s not fun any more.”

ON RICSRECRUIT.COM Does your mouth keep getting you into trouble? Follow our advice on what not to say at work: rics.org/whatnottosay

WORDS EMMA HASLETT ILLUSTRATIONS MARINA MUUN  PORTRAIT TUALA HJARNØ

ADVANCE WARNING SIGNS


Foundations

TIMELINE

2000 Studies surveying diploma in Italy

MY WAY

Antonio Contegiacomo MRICS SPECIALIST COST MANAGER, COWI, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK THE BEGINNING From an early age, I used to gaze up at buildings and wonder what went into constructing them. After training as a project surveyor, I was lucky enough to start my career on some prestigious refurbishment projects, such as the restoration of Bari’s beautiful cathedral. I worked in Italy for five years, but I felt a need to broaden my international experience. What I love about the construction industry is how it is always different, no matter where you work. No project is the same, and it keeps your brain engaged all the time.

THE PRESENT In 2017, I had the urge for a new challenge, and I decided to move to Denmark. The country is at the forefront of using innovative, environmentally friendly building materials, so I was keen to expand my knowledge. I’m very glad I made the move. I love being able to use my knowledge and contribute towards the achievement of a client’s vision. I get such a buzz when projects are on site, as they finally become live. I’m working on a variety of high-sustainability projects, from hospitals to sports centres and apartments.

2002 Freelances as a surveyor, and becomes member of the Italian board of surveyors 2007 CAD technician, Davis Langdon (now Aecom), and later, associate quantity surveyor

THE FUTURE Quantity surveying is still not fully recognised as a profession here, compared to say, the UK, but it is growing in importance. I spend a lot of time trying to promote the specialism so it is used in all phases of construction. Given the global nature of construction today, I believe that quantity surveying has an increasingly key role in the profession. The next generation is key to this. I enjoy advising colleagues and junior members on how to achieve their own career goals. rics.org/antoniocontegiacomo

2009 Degree in construction cost management, University of Reading 2011 Becomes chartered

THE BREAKTHROUGH Moving to London in 2007 was a huge step. At the time, I was still weighing up which direction was right for me, hence I took a job as a CAD technician at Davis Langdon, now Aecom, providing in-house training to help improve accuracy while measuring. However, after working with a colleague who was a quantity surveyor, I realised I wanted to follow in his footsteps. Between 2007 and 2009, while still working, I studied for a construction cost management degree at the University of Reading, and “What I love about this industry is how it is achieved RICS membership in 2011. It wasn’t an easy period, but, looking back, always different, no matter where you work. it was worth putting in the extra effort. It keeps your brain engaged all the time”

2017 Specialist cost manager, COWI, Denmark

FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS 35


LEADER OF THE PACKING

FIVE-POINT PRIMER

Among life’s most stressful events, moving house is regularly up there. So it is hardly surprising that few employees will ever look forward to an office move as well. Whatever the reasons behind the decision – whether it is to be closer to clients, or to facilitate expansion – one thing is certain: get an office move wrong, and managers could experience plenty of unwanted relocations of their own: staff leaving to take new jobs elsewhere. “Most office moves aren’t from one city to another, but somewhere else in the same conurbation, but you have to remember it’s still disruption,” says Simon Gammell, director of workplace relocations at Crown Worldwide.“Ten miles in a big city might as well be the other side of the country, and can add more than an hour to people’s journeys. We always say that if you’re going to affect the journey times of more than 25% of staff, then you’ve got to work with them early to talk about the bigger picture – why a move is happening, and the reason the business has had to do it.” For Gammell, it is the responsibility of managers to turn staff scepticism into excitement about a move; to talk up the fact it represents expansion and personal opportunity. The main problem, as Adrian Powell, director at Reading-based workplace services firm Active, observes, is that “most moves are faits accomplis. They have to be done, so they’re

Set the tone Being positive about the benefits of the move means you’re more likely to bring staff along with you. Talk it over You can never have too much communication. Keep staff informed to prevent unhelpful rumours spreading. Get involved Allowing employees to have a say in the look and feel of the new space will galvanise support for the move. Work it out Use the relocation as an opportunity to reassess your working practices. Stop gap Covering staff’s travel costs is not a long-term solution. 36 RICS.ORG/MODUS

PRIDE OF PLACE Firms can actually “capture” pre- and postmove sentiment with a range of tools – the very use of which should help to persuade staff that their views matter. Tim Oldman, CEO of workplace productivity consultant Leesman, offers businesses a benchmarking effectiveness tool that captures the more esoteric feelings staff have – like the “pride” they feel working for a business. “There’s a strong link between how workplaces ‘work’ for people and the level of pride they show,” he says. “But pride can also have the most variance, and this can be particularly brittle during a move. Conducting pre- and post analysis shows that companies are willing to listen. Bravery is required – not all views can be accommodated – but staff need to be able to say what’s working or not working about where they are, and where they will be next.”

WORDS PETER CRUSH IMAGE GETTY

BUSINESS  Involve staff from the outset and help your office move progress smoothly

rarely something you can consult about from a location point of view”. That said, he still believes leaders can influence the outcome better. “Relocating is like making a stir-fry. At the moment it comes together it’s quick, but the only reason it happens this way is because you’ve prepared the veg in advance.” Preparing people, Powell adds, is all about communication: “A successful move often happens when people feel they’ve been informed. They may not like where they’re going initially, but as long as they can see the reasons, most will buy into it. The worst thing that can happen is for rumours to spread, so we say it’s essential you appoint ‘move champions’ – people charged with disseminating news and canvassing employee opinion. The one thing about an office move, is that failure isn’t an option, so you almost have to over-compensate communication.” Former DeVono director Adam Landau, founder of new advisory firm One One One, suggests adopting the Sun Tzu approach: keep your enemies close. “There will always be people who’ll moan, so bring them in and involve them,” he argues. “While the office location will have almost certainly been decided, there are plenty of fine details over which employees can – and should – get involved, such as the layout of the office, the furniture, the finish, the sort of environment they want to work in. For these aspects it’s useful to appoint mini project teams. Bosses will soon find they get a buy-in that creates a positive, more galvanising effect. “Managers need to remember, it’s mostly fear of change, rather than the change itself, that people react against,” Landau adds. “Involving staff helps eradicate this.”


Foundations

LEGAL 101

All agree, however, that although a move has to happen, it should not simply comprise picking up people’s desks and plonking them down somewhere else. “Good firms will recognise an office move is a valuable chance to take a holistic view of their entire working practices – such as their approach to flexible working, home working, and even job sharing,” says Landau. “Bolstering flexiworking is one very good way of appeasing those for whom getting to the office will now

“Relocating is like making a stir-fry. The moment it comes together is quick, but it only happens this way because you’ve prepared all the veg in advance” ADRIAN POWELL Active be harder. Giving faraway staff the option to work two days a week at home may be all that’s needed to get their buy-in.” Another way to appease staff is with travel support, such as paying extra public transport costs for a limited time. In extreme moves, firms could also offer relocation costs, or provide temporary housing for high-worth staff while they look for their own homes. Although help with transport is a good short-term benefit, most agree it has limited long-term value: “These sorts of perks have to end at some point, so firms are only really putting off the inevitable,” argues Gammell. “Most effort should be spent on engaging people’s hearts and minds. The biggest bang for your buck will always be from good communication and the more people are kept in the loop, the better.”

ON THE RICS UK SMALL BUSINESS HUB So you’ve found your new office, but before you move in, there are a few points worth considering, writes property consultant Dayle Bayliss FRICS. A new space shouldn’t just be about the number

of desks you need, it can be used to help change behaviours. For example, if your staff rely too much on emails to communicate, find a layout where it’s easy for staff to walk around and talk to each other. Be aware that any changes to your space could affect what makes your business a success. To read the full version of this article, go to rics.org/smallbusiness.

Sprinklers in a post-Grenfell world IAIN COX Chairman, Business Sprinkler Alliance, London The Grenfell Tower tragedy has led to a nationwide debate in the UK around fire safety, particularly in regard to building materials, regulations and the value of fire sprinkler systems. In the aftermath of the fire, which occurred in west London on 14 June 2017, it was announced that building regulations and fire safety are to undergo an independent review. Is there a legal duty to fit sprinklers? There is no general duty but there is regulatory guidance to provide certain premises with sprinklers. This applies to residential buildings and offices taller than 30m that were erected after 2007, retail stores greater than 2,000 m2 (21,500 ft2) and warehouses over 20,000 m2 (215,300 ft2). They are also required when specified in a fire-engineered solution that allows other fire safety measures to be reduced, such as larger glazed areas or extended travel distances. But there is also ambiguity within the guidance, as hotels, hospitals and blocks of student accommodation taller than 30m are not covered by the regulations. What would my duties be in such circumstances? To comply with Regulation 38 of the building regulations, you should be clear why a sprinkler system has been fitted. This regulation entails providing suitable and sufficient information to allow the responsible person to make an appropriate Fire Risk Assessment.

For example, a responsible person would need to know if sprinklers had been fitted to meet regulations, or to enable the fire resistance around a staircase to be reduced from 1 hour to 30 minutes, because if the sprinklers were subsequently removed, those resistant materials would need to be upgraded. There is also a duty under Regulation 7 to ensure that work is carried out with the proper materials and in a “workmanlike” manner. This will apply to the individual responsible for product specification and installation methods and standards. If sprinklers aren’t needed for safety, are they needed at all? There is a common misconception among occupiers that complying with building regulations means their people and property are protected from fire. However, property protection is only indirectly covered under the current building regulations. This is why occupiers might specify sprinklers for business resilience, or on an insurer’s recommendation. Such decisions are borne from understanding the limits of building regulations and dealing with the wider economic, social and environmental impacts of a fire. Property protection must be given greater consideration, and having sprinklers fitted protects both employees and assets, and helps to maintain business continuity. DOWNLOAD the BSA report, The Impact of Automatic Sprinklers on Building Design – Commercial Sector, Offices, at bit.ly/BSAoffices FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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Summit London 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24 April 2018 Intercontinental London â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The O2 Global strategic thinking and practical solutions to the most pressing challenges of our changing world. Keynote address announced: JB Straubel, co-founder and CTO of Tesla, a driving force behind the revolution in alternative energy storage and next generation transport solutions.

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Foundations

CPD booster Related content from RICS

CERTIFICATE IN BIM: PROJECT MANAGEMENT Peter Morton (above) presents a distancelearning course covering the entire BIM project life-cycle, which can support you in becoming an RICS BIM manager. ››CPD hours: 200 £895 rics.org/bimmanagement

UPGRADE TO THE LATEST MODEL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Mastering BIM is the natural next step for the experienced project manager looking to progress their career Empower tool Building information modelling (BIM) has brought greater efficiency to projects, added value for stakeholders and increased awareness of physical and data security. Its use empowers engaged clients to specify their asset requirements to achieve operational efficiencies with their built assets. Torch bearer This new approach to technologies, processes and behaviours has also created new roles, responsibilities and authorities. The BIM-enabled project manager, for example, now plays a crucial role in advising clients, and internal and external stakeholders on the benefits of BIM, and in implementing and managing BIM processes throughout the project life-cycle. Engagement party Many clients are still disengaged from the BIM process, either through lack of knowledge or awareness. Ultimately, they may not fully appreciate what they want to achieve CPD: ON DEMAND from using BIM on their The CPD Foundation offers projects, or what value UK members a convenient can actually be realised. and comprehensive way to This can leave clients as meet their CPD goals for one passengers, rather than annual payment. Sign up an integral part of the at rics.org/cpdfoundation process. It is the project

manager’s role to engage clients and identify exactly what they want to achieve from BIM, and the purpose of any data requirements throughout the project life-cycle. All together now A BIM-enabled project manager should demonstrate a deep knowledge of the BIM process, and be able to foster a positive and collaborative environment, in which a project can realise the full potential of BIM. It is also important to simulate the BIM life-cycle processes, both on the client side and the delivery side, before putting them into practice. Technical requirements have to be balanced with project management skills, so you can confidently implement a BIM methodology. Mine of information It is vital to have a good command of delivery documentation, such as organisation information requirements, asset information requirements, employer’s information requirements (EIR) and the BIM execution plan, among others. The EIR is particularly important, as it enables you to communicate the client’s requirements to stakeholders in a clear, structured format. PETER MORTON is a principal consultant at Turner & Townsend, and course tutor for RICS’ Certificate in Building Information Modelling (BIM): Project Management (above, right)

FIDIC CONTRACT MANAGEMENT – FOUNDATION Vincent Leloup of Exequatur (above) provides an overview of the main responsibilities when a project is governed by a FIDIC contract. ››CPD hours: 1.5 £40 rics.org/ fidicmanagement

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY DEFECTS – TIMBER DECAY AND INFESTATION Paul Kilvington MRICS (above) looks at the common forms of timber infestation and how it affects buildings. ››CPD hours: 1.5 £40 rics.org/residefects FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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››Struggling to identify a particular plant? There’s an app for that. PlantNet identifies plant species from photographs, using visual recognition software. identify.plantnet-project.org ››Drones are being increasingly deployed to assist in surveying tasks and save costs on large-scale projects. A new online portal helps connect key players in the drone industry, from private operators to manufacturers and regulation experts. dronemajorgroup.com ››Another 2.5 billion people are projected to move into the world’s cities by 2050. Urban designer Peter Calthorpe shares seven universal principles for solving sprawl and building smarter, more sustainable cities. bit.ly/CalthorpeTED

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RICS Valuation – Global Standards 2017 The 2017 global edition of the Red Book reflects changes made to the International Valuation Standards, which took effect on 1 July 2017. £75

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“I COULDN’T LIVE WITHOUT” REBECCA FLEMING MRICS

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you make clear and engaging reports. It does: Power BI is a very useful piece of “business intelligence” software. Its live interactive dashboard of information relating to projects is easy to access and you can produce reports at a number of different

levels using its powerful filters. It’s a particularly helpful project control tool, which takes data from a range of sources to help me commercially manage my projects. For example, I can take a snapshot of the programme data out of my project management software and budgetary

information from Excel, and present the findings at meetings. It helps us to visualise the projects we’re undertaking, and filter the data so we focus on key areas for review. powerbi.microsoft.com REBECCA FLEMING MRICS is a commercial manager at Costain in Birmingham FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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EVENTS Full RICS events listings online at rics.org/events For enquiries, call +44 (0)20 7695 1600. All prices are +VAT

UNITED KINGDOM

››RICS World Built Environment Forum Summit 23-24 April, London Developed with internationally renowned industry figures, the summit will explore the transformative impact of digitalisation on global economic models. Discussions will focus on the commercial strategies needed to harness the enormous potential of the 21st century’s people and places. £850 wbef.rics.org

››RICS CPD Days March, various locations Regional conferences full of CPD within land, property and the built environment, with breakout sessions tailored to meet specific learning requirements. CPD: 6 hours £155 full day, £100 half day rics.org/cpddays

››RICS Building Surveying Conference 2 May, London This year’s topics will include dilapidations, building defects, reinstatement cost assessments, energy performance certificates and building conservation. CPD: 5.5 hours £235 rics.org/bsconference

››RICS Landlord and Tenant Essential Update March-April, various locations An expert panel of speakers addresses crucial areas of landlord and tenant law and practical guidance. Followed by a seminar on the RICS Service Charges in Commercial Property Professional Statement. CPD: 5.5 hours £195 rics.org/landlordseminars ››RICS Valuation 2018 1 March, London Featuring talks on global market conditions, risks and liability in valuation works, and latest changes to the Red Book. Join a discussion on the rise of AI, valuation technology, and what these mean for the valuer. Parallel sessions for each valuation group will ensure topics are covered that are most relevant to you. CPD: 6 hours £235 rics.org/valuationconference

››RICS QS & Construction Conference 10 May, London Combining high-level strategic debate with practical sessions that will improve your day-to-day practice, including: whole-life costing, off-site construction, data and a legal roundup. CPD: 6 hours £260 rics.org/qsconference

INTERNATIONAL

››RICS Summit Africa 30-31 May, Johannesburg Designed for presidents, chairmen and CEOs, this event will consider how smarter urbanisation can drive sustainable economic growth across Africa. The event enables property institutions and associations to work together to accelerate the professionalism of the land, construction and property sectors throughout the continent. Early-bird prices: dinner and conference, R2,200 (£121); conference only, R1,650 (£91) rics.org/africa2018

RICS AT MIPIM 2018

13-16 March, Cannes, France

››RICS Commercial Management in Infrastructure Conference 8 March, London Infrastructure experts address core elements of the commercial manager’s role, including establishing the business case, procurement methodologies, BIM, build off-site, post contract delivery and the commercial management in the operation of assets. CPD: 5.5 hrs £260 rics.org/infrastructureconference ››RICS Wessex Briefing 14 March, Winchester Topics will include technical guidance around issues such as structural movement, dilapidations, surveying modern methods of construction, and MEES. CPD: 5.5 hours £110 rics.org/wessexbriefing 44 RICS.ORG/MODUS

MIPIM, the world’s largest real estate conference and exhibition, returns bringing together more than 20,000 delegates from around the world. During the event, RICS will run free sessions and host a keynote conference. RICS professionals may use the RICS stand to host client meetings. To see the full range of activities, visit rics.org/mipim, and to register for the event, go to mipim.com.

IMAGE S D’HALLOY/IMAGE&CO

››RICS Survey in Practice Roadshow Feb-March, various locations Focusing on key elements of the Home Condition Report, HomeBuyer Report, Building Survey and Home Report (Scotland only). The programme includes guidance on solar panels, trees and climbing spaces, offsite and modern construction methods. CPD: 6-12 hours £135-£230 rics.org/sip


Notices

OBITUARIES Please email obituary notifications to contactrics@rics.org or call +44 (0)247 686 8555

EASTERN

››Cyril Maurice Needleman FRICS 1929-2017 Woodford Green ››William Richard Price FRICS, 1919-2017 Felixstowe ››Stanley Lynham Read FRICS, 1925-2017 Fakenham

EAST MIDLANDS ››Stanley Collins FRICS, 1922-2017 Peterborough

LONDON

››Bryan Wallace Davis FRICS, 1932-2017 Beckenham ››David Dollar FRICS 1923-2017, Hendon ››David Roy Phillips MRICS, 1959-2017 Bromley

››Graham Godfrey Rice FRICS, 1948-2017 Twickenham ››Raymond Turner FRICS 1933-2017, Edgware

NORTH EAST

››Bernard Keith Harrison FRICS 1934-2017, Hartlepool

NORTH WEST

››Frank Holt FRICS 1938-2017, Lytham ››Paul Edward Suchland MRICS 1960-2017, Bramhall ››Phillip George Williamson MRICS 1969-2017, Wirral ››Antony James Wright 1930-2017, Penrith

SOUTH EAST

››George David Burton FRICS, 1934-2017, Jersey

JOHN GIDEON DOEL FRICS 1927-2017 John Doel passed away peacefully on 29 September 2017 in Lymington, Hampshire. Born in Bath in 1927 into a longtime farming family, John was educated at the City of Bath Boy’s School, taking his school certificate in 1944. He then volunteered for the Army, serving in India as a young subaltern during the last days of British rule. Following demob from the Army in 1948, he gained his qualification as an associate of the Auctioneers Institute, and joined the Bristol firm of John Potter & Co. In 1955, he moved to Edward T. Parker & Co and, with Keith Whitehead, developed ETP into a successful regional company. Over the next 30 years he built up considerable expertise in valuation, having two wellrespected articles published in the RICS Journals, before deciding on a change of scenery in the late 1980s, leaving ETP to work for local councils. John retired in 1989 and moved to the New Forest, which he much loved and where he had holidayed throughout his life, with wife Hazel and dogs Jody and Ginny. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. ››Trevor Graves FRICS 1937-2017, Surrey ››David JE Heard FRICS 1935-2017, East Meon ››David Owen Jones MRICS, 1960-2017 Bourne End ››Victor William Miller FRICS, 1922-2017 Henley-on-Thames ››Ronald Percy Pike FRICS, 1922-2017 Sevenoaks

ROBIN THOMAS BISHOP FRICS, 1931-2017 Robin Bishop died peacefully at home at the age of 84, following a stoic battle with advancing prostate cancer. Educated at Charterhouse, Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and University College, London, Robin entered service with the Royal Naval Reserve in 1949, and was commissioned in 1951 during two years of national service with the Royal Navy. He remained a reservist until 1959, by which time he had started his professional career, in 1955, as an assistant surveyor at Cluttons. There he assisted in the preparation of the masterplan for the Bangladesh capital Dacca following partition of the Indian sub-continent. In 1958 he joined Drivers Jonas – now part of Deloitte – where he remained until 1992, serving as estate surveyor to Trinity House, among others. During his long and distinguished career he served as a Member of RICS Council (1963-65), president of Cambridge University Land Society (1991-92), and was a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Chartered Surveyors. Robin was as dedicated to his profession as he was passionate about sailing. Between 1984 and 1992 he was chairman of Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, and he was a former commodore of the Chartered Surveyors Sailing Association. He counted the Royal Thames Yacht Club, Royal Naval Sailing Association and Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) among his many memberships. In 1976, he was the skipper of the smallest boat to complete RORC’s inaugural non-stop Round Britain and Ireland Race, a record that still stands 40 years later. He is survived by his wife Creina, son Andrew, sister Jane, step-sister Pamela, and numerous nieces and nephews.

››Brian Richardson AssocRICS, 1937-2017 Maidstone ››Anna Marie Stewart FRICS, 1964-2017, Herts ››Joseph Merriam Stuart-Smith 1935-2017, Ashford ››Brian Olsen Watmough FRICS, 1928-2017 Redhill ››Derek Barnard Whitehorn FRICS 1922-2017, Petersfield

SOUTH WEST

››Anthony Neil Ash MRICS, 1927-2017 Dursley ››Roy Glanville MRICS 1941-2017, Truro ››Denis Frank Greenhill-Tanner FRICS 1926-unknown Babbacombe ››Roger Jeffrey Michelmore FRICS 1924-2017, Totnes

WEST MIDLANDS

››Christopher Hartshorn FRICS, 1943-2017 Coventry ››Peter Raymond Jones FRICS, 1921-2017 Stratford-upon-Avon ››Bruce Nottrodt MRICS, 1955-2017 Northwich

YORKSHIRE & HUMBER

››David John McCall FRICS, 1948-2017 Dronfield

SCOTLAND

››William George Cameron MRICS 1925-2017, Glasgow ››David Irwin Walker Campbell FRICS 1929-2011, Edinburgh ››Roger David Price MRICS, 1968-2017 Dundee

NORTHERN IRELAND ››Ernest Leslie Kerr MRICS, 1951-2017 Enniskillen

OCEANIA

››Thomas David Loxton FRICS, 1928-2017 Mosman ››Ronald Vince FRICS 1933-2017, Auckland If you are facing hardship after the loss of a family member, or considering leaving a legacy, contact LionHeart, the charity for RICS members and their families. Call +44 (0)24 7646 6696, email info@lionheart.org.uk, or visit lionheart.org.uk. FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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Notices

CONDUCT rics.org/conductcases Mr Joshua Kitsul (1291925), Vancouver, Canada. Appeal Panel – 31.10.17 Mr Kitsul appealed the decision of a Disciplinary Panel hearing heard on 19 July 2017. The Appeal was listed to take place on 31 October 2017. Mr Kitsul withdrew his Appeal on 28 October 2017. The Appeal Panel considered an application of costs on behalf of RICS, together with written representations from Mr Kitsul. The Appeal Panel ordered that Mr Kitsul should pay costs in the sum of £1,770. Mr David Lawal (1159486), Middlesex, UB10 Appeal Panel – 07.11.17 Mr Lawal appealed the decision of a Disciplinary Panel hearing heard on 27 April 2017. The Appeal was listed to take place on 7 November 2017. Mr Lawal withdrew his Appeal on 5 November 2017. The Appeal Panel considered an application of costs on behalf of RICS, together with written representations from Mr Lawal. The Appeal Panel ordered that Mr Lawal should pay costs in the sum of £2,000.

Clifford Dann Management Limited, Lewes, East Sussex, BN7 Disciplinary Panel – 08.11.17-09.11.17 The Panel heard a case against the Firm Clifford Dann Management Limited for failure to preserve the security of clients’ money entrusted to its care in the course of its business, by withdrawing the sum of £10,622.77 from a Client Account on or around 27 April 2015, contrary to Rule 8 of the Rules of Conduct for Firms 2007. The Panel found charges 1(a) and 1(b) proved as a fact and charge 1(c) proved as a fact on a limited basis. It did not find the Firm liable to disciplinary action. Mr Marcus Friend MRICS and Friend Associates, Lichfield, Staffordshire, WS14 Disciplinary Panel – 23.11.17 The Panel heard a case against Mr Marcus Friend and the Firm Friend Associates for failure to ensure that he and/or the Firm were covered by an appropriate policy of professional indemnity insurance, and that Mr Friend and his Firm failed to carry out

professional work with due skill, care and diligence and with proper regard for the technical skills and standards expected, contrary to Rules 3 and 4 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007 and Rules 3, 4 and 9 of the Rules of Conduct for Firms 2007. The Panel found charges proved and imposed a Reprimand, a Fine of £12,000 and a condition upon Mr Friend and Friend Associates. It also ordered Mr Friend and his Firm to contribute towards the costs of the hearing. Notice of Disciplinary Panel hearings in relation to CPD non-compliance Between July and October 2017, a Disciplinary Panel considered cases concerning Members for a failure to comply with RICS’ requirements in respect of continuing professional development (CPD) in that they had not recorded their CPD activity online, contrary to Rule 6 of the Rules of Conduct for Members 2007. A full list of the Members and the relevant decisions can be found at rics.org.

Commercial Management in Infrastructure Conference 8 March 2018, Cavendish Conference Centre, London

Don’t miss this opportunity to identify solutions for meeting the UK’s growing need for high-performing economic infrastructure assets. Join leading experts to address how RICS can increase the commercial capability needed to deliver optimum value and benefits to our clients, investors and end users over the whole asset life-cycle.

Book now: rics.org/infrastructureconference

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RICS Recruit Looking for a new challenge? Opportunity awaits across these 11 pages. Can’t see anything you like? We also have a website, ricsrecruit.com, featuring 100s more jobs, including executive-level positions and exciting overseas placements. Whatever the stage of your career, RICS Recruit has just the job. ricsrecruit.com

To advertise, email milos@wearesunday.com or call +44 (0)20 7101 2772

All the latest jobs, in one place.

Happy New Year!

RESIDENTIAL SURVEYORS

(AssocRICS & M/FRICS) Full Time + Part Time. London East and South East, Aylesbury, Beaconsfield, Birmingham, Blackburn, Bolton, Bournemouth, Bradford, Bristol, Canterbury, Cardiff/The Valleys, Carlisle, Croydon, Derby, N.Devon, Edinburgh, Gloucester, Halifax, Hereford, Huddersfield, Hull, Kettering, Leeds, Leicester, Luton, Maidstone, Manchester, Milton Keynes, Newcastle, Norfolk North, Northampton, Nottingham Oldham, Oxfordshire, Penrith, Peterborough, Rochdale, Southampton, Sunderland, Swansea, Swindon, Teesside, North Wales, Worcester, Wrexham. ALSO: Staff Surveyors-outstanding employer, various locations. Senior Regional Director-Midlands/North Region, exec package. Building Surveyors-BS only, NW, NE, East Mids. If you are AssocRICS/MRICS/FRICS and VRS Registered with residential valuation experience, then contact the valuation industry’s most experienced recruitment expert to discuss your career options. For a personal discussion, call Jeff Johnson on 07940 594093, or you can email your CV in confidence to jjohnson@mlarecruit.com and Jeff will get back to you. Or connect via LinkedIn: Search Jeff Johnson MLA.

At SDL Surveying, we are committed to nurturing your career through personal development and structured, industry-leading training schemes. www.sdlsurveying.co.uk Whether you’re fresh out of the traps or looking for a new leash of life, we’re recruiting

NEW VACANCIES CONSTANTLY – KEEP IN TOUCH

Get on the dog and bone:

0115 9517 517

VRS registered, AssocRICS

Or, email your CV to:

and MRICS surveyors today.

recruitment@sdlgroup.co.uk

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To view more jobs online visit ricsrecruit.com

QUANTITY SURVEYOR & COMMERCIAL MANAGER ROLES QUANTITY SURVEYORS • London • South East • Birmingham • Manchester

SENIOR QUANTITY SURVEYORS • London • South East • Midlands

COMMERCIAL MANAGERS • London • South East • Manchester

Sir Robert McAlpine is a leading UK building and civil engineering company. We combine outstanding technical expertise with the personal touch that comes with being a family-owned company. We are seeking applications for the following roles to support various major construction projects: Salaries are commensurate with experience, on top of which you can expect excellent career development and learning opportunities, a fantastic range of employee benefits and the opportunity to play an integral role in some of the UK’s most iconic construction projects. To be considered, you’ll need to demonstrate previous experience within the construction industry, ideally within a main contractor environment alongside significant business acumen, communication and collaborative working skills and a drive for sustainability and on time delivery. TO APPLY: Please email your CV alongside a cover letter to craig.ruff@srm.com.

HARGREAVES JONES RECRUITMENT 2018 Quantity Surveyors at Junior, Intermediate, QS and Senior QS Level sought to meet company expansion plans Location: Nationwide Excellent Salaries + Car/Car Allowance + Generous Pension + PHI. Sector Experience Sought– Gas, Oil, Nuclear, Utilities, Commercial and Traditional Building Hargreaves Jones is a commercial and Project Management Services Consultancy serving the Oil, Gas, Nuclear, Utilities, including overhead Transmission Lines, Pharmaceuticals, Fast Moving Consumer Goods sectors (FMCG) and Commercial and Traditional Building sectors. We pride ourselves on delivering commercial and project services to clients engaged in capital construction and engineering activities on both large and small infrastructure projects for Blue Chip clients, or their respective design and project management service providers. The continued expansion and success of our growing business is reliant upon finding enthusiastic and motivated professionals. We provide APC training and support & opportunities to grow in an exciting professional environment.

Please send a copy of your CV and covering email to kim@hargreavesjones.com For further deatils please contact www.hargreavesjones.com

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RICS Recruit

?

GOING PLACES Connells Survey & Valuation is seeking Residential Surveyors. We are an established, respected and successful business offering an excellent remuneration package and work-life balance. We are looking for enthusiastic Residential Surveyors to join our team. Experienced candidates are preferred but we are prepared to provide relevant training for the right applicant.

We are looking to recruit RESIDENTIAL SURVEYORS in the following locations: • Birmingham • Bolton • Bournemouth • Bradford • Bristol • Cardiff/The Valleys

• Croydon • East London • Edinburgh • Hereford/Worcester • Hull • Leeds

• Maidstone • Manchester • North Devon • North Norfolk • Nottingham • Oldham/Rochdale

• SE London • Southampton • Swansea • Swindon • Wrexham/North Wales

If you are interested in any of these locations, then we would love to hear from you. Please contact:

Ian Jones MRICS on

01752 251220

or send your CV to svcareers@connells.co.uk

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New year opportunities for Staff Surveyors / Valuers UK wide For 2018, would you like to focus on quality over quantity with a single reporting format, a workload comprising mostly Mortgage Valuations, a tight-knit patch, logically booked jobs, market leading tablet technology and an outstanding remuneration package that isn’t commission led on EITHER a Full OR Part time (employed) basis?

Our association with some of the best known and most prestigious high street and specialist lenders nationally is very well established, so much so that we can offer quality focused, thorough residential surveyors an exclusive, discreet and highly efficient route to client side working in the following locations: NW England (Various) SE England Home Counties Yorkshire (Urgent)

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As well as the obvious workload, lifestyle and team benefits, successful Staff Surveyors can expect a remuneration package comprising: • High basic (up to £67k+) depending on location • Profit share or bonuses based on multiple (quality) factors as opposed to volume only • Efficient, logical booking within a small patch • High quality prestige company car • 6 weeks holiday to start • Market leading Pension • A wide range of health, lifestyle and wellbeing benefits • Preferential staff mortgage rates

As well as having a strong service mentality and exceptional attention to detail, suitable surveyors will need to hold: • MRICS/FRICS qualification (though AssocRICS may be considered with sufficient levels of experience) • VRS accreditation • PII claim free • Strong track record in their chosen patch • A stable career history demonstrating strong commitment to past and present employers Greg Coyle 0208 514 9116 Gregc@BBLproperty.co.uk


RICS Recruit

New year opportunities for Residential Surveyors UK wide Favourable stamp duty changes… an upturn in confidence as EU talks move to trade… panel managers and independent firms actively recruiting nationally to keep pace with work volumes… 2018 looks set to be an excellent year for Residential Surveyors across the UK. Capitalise on demand and beat the post annual review rush by talking to the industry’s leading recruitment experts whose client base makes up the bigger picture… What have you got to lose? London Norwich Nottingham Oldham/Rochdale Plymouth SE London Southampton Swansea Swindon Wrexham/North Wales

As we head towards annual reviews and the payment of withheld bonuses, you may now start to focus on whether your present position provides what you require professionally, financially and personally. Changing jobs can be daunting, particularly if you’ve been with an employer for a long period of time, but our one stop shop service will ensure the process is as stress free as possible addressing all the issues in confidence on your timescales.

Cardiff/The Valleys Croydon East London Edinburgh Guildford Hereford/ Worcester Hull Isle of Wight (ZH/ PT) Leeds

Accordingly, through our 20 year (often exclusive) association with some of the top employers in the UK we can help you achieve:

Remuneration includes a basic salary of £40-65k (depending on location), bonuses (based on fee income), a car (or allowance), healthcare and pension.

• An improvement in earnings, be that basic salary or a bonus scheme that offers greater incentives • A reduction in hours or a move to part-time or zero hours working • A reduction in the volume of work that you are expected to handle • An improvement in the general quality of your instructions / a more refined patch.

Opportunities within panel appointed, non-corporate practice-based environments:

Opportunities for experienced Residential Surveyors within corporate environments: Birmingham Bolton Bournemouth Bradford Bristol Canterbury

Leicester Manchester Manchester North Devon North Norfolk North West

Our clients are traditional, independent private practices who service main lender, private client and in-house (agency) instructions undertaking the full range of residential reports for high average fees. Their ethos is quality over quantity (but not at the expense of security) and, as such, surveyors working for them are not put under the same pressures as they might be elsewhere in the sector. Vacancies exist in the following locations immediately with additional needs following on a near weekly basis:

Opportunities with Partnership Potential: Independent firms seeking experienced Residential Surveyors for Partnership potential: • Preston Based covering Lancashire, Merseyside and West Yorkshire postcodes • Bristol Based covering Bristol and prime Bath postcodes Consultant / Freelance Opportunities: Work is offered on a non-exclusive basis (with full PII cover provided in most cases) enabling suitable surveyors to enjoy all the financial benefits of consultancy working with none of the usual drawbacks. Our clients are currently looking for coverage in the following locations: YO / HG / NE / DG / CA / LL / LN / EX / OL / SA / SY / IP / DT Andy Welham 0208 514 9177 Andyw@BBLproperty.co.uk James Irving 0208 514 9120 Jamesi@BBLproperty.co.uk

South East London / North West Kent / Croydon / Blackburn / Derby / Leicester

Find out more about current opportunities and the latest sector news at:

www.bblproperty.co.uk FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS

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To view more jobs online visit ricsrecruit.com

OPPORTUNITIES FOR FIRST TIME ENTRANTS / TRAINEE / RETURNING RESIDENTIAL SURVEYORS NATIONALLY Our client is an independent, well-established and growing firm of chartered surveyors undertaking the full range of survey and valuation services for main lenders and private clients. They are able to train enthusiastic MRICS and AssocRICS surveyors from most backgrounds so previous residential surveying experience is not essential. Vacancies exist nationally

with particularly urgent needs in the following areas: Birmingham/Coventry, Dorset/Taunton, Romford/Ilford/ E.London, Suffolk/Norfolk, Notts/Derby, Reading/Oxford, Southend/Essex, Cumbria, Harrogate

James Irving Jamesi@BBLproperty.co.uk 0208 514 9120 For our full range of opportunities alongside helpful career & CV advice please visit www.bblproperty.co.uk

Basic salary cÂŁ50k + Bonuses + Car allowance

Take your career to new heights... Valuation Surveyor, Development Surveyor and Professional Services Surveyor

Guildford - attractive packages

If you are a talented professional with proven experience Bruton Knowles wants to hear from you. Due to sustained growth within the South East region we are seeking qualified surveyors who are full member of RICS to join our team in Guildford. As one of the UK's most successful property consultancies we are very much a people business, striving for excellence in everything we do. And to us, that means empowering our people, giving them the freedom and confidence to develop their talents and achieve their full potential. We are looking for candidates who have 1-5 years' PQE. You should have strong client relationships and the necessary skills and ambition to take our team even further forwards. In return, we will create an attractive package which suits you and rewards success. If you have the ability and personality to deliver, visit us at brutonknowles.co.uk/careers and select the role to apply. For a confidential discussion, please contact Jane Wynne on 01483 238380 or email jane.wynne@brutonknowles.co.uk You will be required to complete a DBS check.

Bruton Knowles is a leading and long established independent Property Consultancy, with 13 offices throughout England and Wales. BK is an equal opportunities employer. Strictly no agencies.

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RICS Recruit

A New Career? Tyser Greenwood Surveyors are a long established company looking to increase its footprint and service offering. Could you be part of our forward thinking and expanding team?

We currently have a large network of home based surveyors serving our wide client base, utilising the latest technology. We are looking to expand our team with vacancies in the South East as well as across the country; notably around Northampton, Burnley, Bradford and the North West. Approaches from sole practitioners are also welcome. There is an above average remuneration package available for experienced mortgage and HBR surveyors who offer a wide range of skills and are willing to develop new business in their areas.

Get in touch to find out more, call 01932 736 501 or email recruitment@tgsurveyors.co.uk

FEBRUA RY 2018_MODUS TGS_Recruitment_Ad_A4_FA.indd 1

03/01/2018 13:51

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Recruitment and Search & Selection specialist within the Construction and Property industry

CARRIERA

Carriera is a Recruitment and Search & Selection specialist within the Construction and Property industry. We work closely with our clients who are employers, as well as professionals seeking to develop their career. We do this by taking time to understand the brief, motivators and opportunity. The clients we work with have a number of key opportunities, a few of which are detailed below:

BUILDING SURVEYING

COST & COMMERCIAL MANAGEMENT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Partner – Commercial – Project focused Berkshire £90k plus

Commercial Manager – Developer North London £120k plus

Associate – Education Oxford £65k plus

Director – RSL/Public – Project focused London £90k plus

Director (Des.) – Commercial London £90k plus

Senior – Commercial & Engineering Birmingham £55k plus

Associate – RSL/Public London £60k plus

Associate – Commercial & Residential Winchester £65k plus

Senior – Education & Engineering Oxford £60k plus

Senior – Commercial & Heritage Oxford £50k plus

Associate – Health & Life Science Oxford £65k plus

Senior – Education & Life Science Oxford £60k plus

Senior – Commercial Milton Keynes £50k plus

Senior – Commercial & Residential Reading £50k plus

Project Manager – Industrial Surrey £50k plus

For more information and to view our latest vacancies, please visit www.carriera.co.uk You can also follow our company page CARRIERA LIMITED on LINKEDIN or contact the Carriera team on +44 (0) 203 817 0000 for a more personal service. Recruitment – Search & Selection – Market Intelligence – Benchmarking

www.carriera.co.uk

Chartered Building Surveyor Wimborne, Dorset. Remuneration will be dependent on experience Due to ambitions for the expansion and development of this successful Department, Symonds & Sampson LLP are now recruiting for an experienced Chartered Building Surveyor. This is a permanent and long-term position, with opportunities for great career progression.

The candidate will have a full UK driving licence and must be willing to travel to cover the Firm’s area of work – Wessex region. The candidate will have between 1-5 years’ post-qualification experience.

This is a superb opportunity to join an established and ambitious regional, multi-disciplinary Firm of Chartered Surveyors.

To apply, please call 01202 639 401 or forward a current CV with a covering statement to: dmeaden@symondsandsampson.co.uk

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RICS Recruit

Quantity Surveyor, London. Competitive Salary and Benefits If you are a confident and analytical Quantity Surveyor with construction and cost management experience, plus experience in dealing with claims or disputes and are wondering where to find your next challenge, the answer may well be to talk to Blackrock Expert Services. Blackrock Expert Services, market leaders in programme management, forensic delay, project management and quantity surveying expert work, are looking for Chartered Quantity Surveyors with the drive and ambition to take the next step in their careers. Expert witness work is among the most demanding and challenging work you can face as a professional surveyor. It involves working with demanding clients and their legal representatives, working to tight deadlines and often on difficult and complex cases that take a lot of detailed forensic work to unravel and report on. Then comes the challenge of being cross examined, often by some of the brightest barristers in the world. Successful candidates will have the opportunity to work on the largest national and international projects in arbitration or litigation as part of an expanding and highly regarded expert team.

THIS ROLE WILL ENTAIL • Forensic quantity surveying analysis. • Support to leading quantum experts in international arbitration and litigation. • A competitive salary and benefits package is also on offer, plus a rewarding bonus scheme and the opportunity to progress. DESIRED SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE • BSc or MSc in Quantity Surveying • MRICS qualified, or equivalent. • MSc in Construction Law - preferred but not essential. • Experience working for either contractors or professional quantity surveying firms. • Deep industry expertise, such as power, energy, process, civil, building or mechanical and electrical. • Energetic, proactive and professional with a good understanding of commercial management. • An interest in construction law and a desire to develop (sponsorship opportunity available). • Excellent analytical skills, an attention to detail and clear report writing. • Eligibility to live and work in the UK with fluent written and spoken English.

To find out more, please email: Sarah Ludbrook on recruit@blackrockx.com

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RICS Recruit

Land Agent

This is an exciting position for an enthusiastic RICS rural qualified, experienced Land Agent. Longleat is a dynamic estate with many diversified interests. The estate consists of approximately 9,400 acres that includes: let agricultural property, large residential portfolio, extensive in-hand forestry operation, commercial lettings, and mansion house and gardens. As Land Agent for the estate you will be expected to carry out all the typical duties of a resident land agent. It will not be a requirement to live on the estate but a house would be made available at a reduced rent should the candidate require accommodation be provided. The successful candidate will report directly to the chairman and owners, and work alongside the CEO of the extensive leisure business. We are looking for someone who enjoys working in a stimulating and fast-moving environment, who can operate alone or together as a part of a team and is able to work collaboratively with senior stakeholders from the leisure business. He or she should be RICS qualified. Salary and benefits package to match experience and qualifications.

For further information, and to apply for this role, please contact Simon Askew, Head of Human Resources. Email simon.askew@longleat.co.uk or telephone on 01985 845 504 to discuss in more detail. All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence.

Closing date: 9th February 2018

Find your perfect job today Building Surveyors & Quantity Surveyors London and the South East Packages from ÂŁ30k - ÂŁ70k + cars Professional and confidential recruitment service

Call Roger Dunning - 07769 551846 / 01243 933263 or email - roger@hdsurveyors.com

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Mind map

WHAT’S WRONG WITH DISASTER RELIEF?

Commendable as they are, project managers tend to arrive with a lot of funding, but without a construction background. So buildings often fail due to a lack of professional oversight.

Glyn Utting, associate, strategic advisory services, WYG, Leeds, UK

There is a serious lack of construction expertise within NGOs and large charities.

We too often neglect the talent already there in a disaster-hit country. We need to provide expertise in the background, while building the competence and confidence of local builders and engineers.

Construction industry firms and organisations could do more via their corporate social responsibility or pro bono schemes to offer professional expertise, rather than cash.

ILLUSTRATION DANILO AGUTOLI

The biggest mistake “the West” makes in these situations is not engaging properly with local communities. We make broad assumptions about what people need and want.

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RICS Modus, Global edition - February 2018  

#RICS Modus, January 2018 - The Moving Issue

RICS Modus, Global edition - February 2018  

#RICS Modus, January 2018 - The Moving Issue