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ISSUE TWO

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EDITOR’S LETTER RICH MAGAZINE UK IS BACK!!! We’re Back With Issue No.2, A special edition in celebration of Black History Month within the UK. Black History Month is a time of intense reflection on the achievement and inspiration of Black people. Although the accomplishments of Black people should be recognised and celebrated daily, greater emphasis is placed on it in the month of October in the United Kingdom and in the month of February in the USA. This month’s magazine showcase some up and coming stylists, designers, photographers and quotes from past and present black achievers. It shows their creativity, and artistic achievements. We celebrate the contribution to Society made by some great people, who have brought diversity, rhythm and a cultural balance. Black people has helped to shape the historical and political agenda This edition is fresh, exciting and shows the great talent that is within the black community. Thank You So Much for supporting RICHMAGAZINEUK, I hope you enjoy Issue No.2 and please let us know how you found this issue, I would love to hear your feedback. Also for any future topics that you would like to see, please contact us and interact with us on the website and social media pages. Peace & Love YolandaRenè

On The Cover: Photography: MARK.C Creative director: mark.c Model:Amiraa

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Editor-in-Chief YolandaRenĂŠe

contributors Special thanks to: nappy.co, infinity galore, mary martin london, bene caribe, marconoise, createdbyjerrod, mikara reid, cherrish n. barrett, luxe extensions, kenya meon, lambb, jelissa williamsoN, kyetaron, Nneka Gigi, KAYESHA CLARKE

SUBMISSIONS The magazine welcomes new ideas and contributors, photographers, editorials or publications. If you would like to sumbit or contribute to RICH MAGAZINE UK, Contact us: richmagazineuk@gmail.com

SOCIAL MEDIA

www.richmagazineuk.com

2017 rich magazine uk, unless otherwise specified. The copyright to all photo editorials lie with the respective photographers. All rights reserved. No Unauthorized Reproduction


ISSUE TWO

Infinity galore PROFILE PAGE New Upcoming Accessories Brand

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wanda nylon fw17 Diversity Collection

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MARy martin london African Fashion Week 2017, Photography by Monika Schaible

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The Paradise collection The Caribbean is Paradise, Designer Bene Caribe, Photography by Marlon James

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SUMMER SHOOT OUT Photography by Macrconoise

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rustic feels Photography by Createdbyjerrodd

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BLACK FEMALE ICONS WHO TRANSFORMED FASHION HISTORY Written by Mikara Reid GIRL NEXT DOOR VIBES/LOVE JONES 90’s Vibe Editorial, Photography by Fred Agho & Texx Henry new upcoming artist kyetaron

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amaka Artist by Nneka Gigi

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iN bLOOM Ongoing self discovery thorugh growth and inspiration, Phography by K.Meon

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THE DARK SKINNED WOMAN WITH 4C HAIR IS RECLAIMING HER PLACE IN THE NATURAL HAIR MOVEMENT Written by LAMBB lewis Photography by Kayesha Clarke STAY WOKE Poetry By Jelissa Williamson

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“Watch us walk, watch us move, watch us overcome, listen to our voices, the sway. The resilience. The innovation. The raw, unfiltered and untouched soul we have can not be touched.” “Why are you proud to be black?

- SOLANGE KNOWLES


Infinity Galore is a new and upcoming accessories brand, which plans to hit the fashion industry with a storm! Infinity Galore gives females plenty of reason to rejoice with our spectacular statement pieces. Infinity Galore is an accessories company which specializes in Chokers that offers a variety of different looks to empower women of all ages. The founder Roberta Okrah states that she created this platform for women to express themselves through jewelry with our slogan 'Ignite your spark forever'. We want every individual to feel beautiful, sexy and powerful regardless of what society dictates to us as 'beautiful'.

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Nah. - Rosa Parks, 1955


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Fashion

Wanda Nylon FW17

THE DIVERSITY COLLECTION Wanda Nylon’s collection was based of the idea of Women in the Black Panthers. She used the appropriation of black power, by stating that women that live with purpose and conviction need practical clothes. The collection featured clothing such as berets, jumpsuits, tailored back-pleated and topstitched coats, tapered jeans mixed with pieces that are pure and simple, alive and full of energy. The collection exceeds our expectations and shows modern day streetwear for day to day wear.

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FEATURE

MARY MARTIN LONDON

AFRICAN FASHION WEEK 2017 PHOTOGRAPHY TAKEN BY MONIKA SCHAIBLE

Mary Martin London, the eccentric and dynamic designer launches her new and much anticipated collection, The Hidden Queens. It plays visual ode The Great Benin Kingdom and its lost and returned treasures. Surviving for 2054-year-old history, this Nigerian kingdom is known to be the oldest surviving in the world. Mary Martin gained considerable interest regarding the historical and valuable artifacts that were returned to the city. Upon her investigations she was significantly moved and captivated by the pure beauty of these golden and bronzed pieces. Furthermore, the fact that items have remained on British soil for over 117 years cemented Mary’s affirmation that “We are great people. What have they done to us?” It is with this rhetoric that inspired Mary to call this collection The Hidden Queens. She enthuses, “If you look beneath the dresses you see all he hidden queens which are us. We are The Hidden Queens.” The images are both striking and stoic and speak to every hidden African - voice of our generation. She says, “I wanted to do this collections because it makes me feel I am some one in this life , (A Queen) I AM and will not be a hidden voice.”

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EDITORIAL

THE PARADISE COLLECTION

Designer: Abby Charles, Bene Caribe Styling: Emma Forster-Hiscock, Racked Studios Photography: Marlon James Models: Gabriella Bernard, Jennice Price, Curdesha Bynoe, Cyan Gomes 32


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Model: GABRIELLA BERNARD

@gabigabz

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Model: GABRIELLA BERNARD 36

@gabigabz


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Model: CYAN GOMES

@cyangomes_

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EDITORIAL

SUMMER SHOOT OUT Makeup: Decked Out Beauty Photography: Marconoise Models: Desiree’, Tera, Victoria Knight, Nyarich, Glamnrich

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On the left & Above

Model: Desiree’ instagram: @i.ez.d 47


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Above & On the Right

Model: NYARICH instagram: @NYARICH & GLAMNRICH 50


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On the left & Above

Model: TERA instagram: @TERABOMB 53


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Above & On the Right

Model: VICTORIA KNIGHT instagram: @VICTORIA_KNIGHT_ 56


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RUSTIC FEELS

ModelS: Nas’tassia Simpson & AMIRAA VEE instagram: @NASTASSIASAYS & @AMIRAAVEE PHOTOGRAPHY: CREATEDBYJERROD

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Move in space with minimal waste & maximum joy

- SADE ADU –1984


FEATURE

BLACK FEMALE ICONS WHO TRANSFORMED FASHION HISTORY WRITTEN BY MIKARA ReiD @MoreMikara www.MoreMikaraBlog.com

What comes to mind when you think of fashion icons? Is it their visual trademark that inspires many generations to come? Their notable demeanor with effortless confidence? If you thought along those lines then you’re on the right track. Fashion icons are individuals who inspire spans of generations far beyond their own. With their seriously bold styles, distinctive personalities, and alluring mannerisms, public figures like Rihanna, Solange, Zoe Kravitz, Michelle Obama, Lupita Nyong'o , Zendaya -just to name a few. But where do you think these women get inspiration from?

we’ve seen some incredible black women breaking the mold for decades and break down racial barriers in areas like music, film and modeling. But thanks to them, they have also paved the way for some of our most influential fashion styles today.

and fashion enthusiasts of today, and have become known as fashion legends.

Rounding up the historic black fashion innovators to celebrate and recognize the women who redefined the fashion world and have pushed beyond the So who do these current boundaries and their fashion icons refer too? contributions to fashion by Historical Fashion Icon -- an playing a significant role in individual who is considered the evolution of style today. Considering fashion has a historic fashion icon during So in honor of UK’s Black always played hand and hand the 20th century and possess History Month, here are with the entertainment a combination of extensive some of the most prominent business, these current boldness, over-the-top black historical fashion fashion icons grab elements glamour and groundfigures of the 20th century from women in the historical breaking appearances of their that influence many of your era who stood out as time. Mainly, these women of favorite celebrities now. trendsetters of their time. the past and present continue Over the course of a century, to inspire designers, stylists 64


ABOVE: Josephine Baker 65


Josephine Baker: 1920s–1975

A stage performer in the Jazz age 1920s, Josephine Baker quickly gained recognition for her bold dancing and brazen costumes with her vaudeville performances. Even though her notable Eton’s haircut, signature cloche hats and flapper dresses were her “it” factor, there was one particular outfit that outlives the other flapper dresses while also causing a lot of controversy, which was the infamous banana flapper dress. 66


Dorothy Dandridge: 1930s–1965

An actress, singer, dancer and classic pin-up girl, Dorothy immersed herself in elegance with her signature off-the-shoulder dresses, vivid red lipsticks and popped collar look, Dorothy Dandridge was Old Hollywood personified. Her stardom and visual trademark began to be noticed in the movie, Carmen Jones, that seemed to fit her sultry looks and flirtatious style for the role. 67


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Lena Horne: 1930s–2000

Singing gave Lena Horne her breakthrough, but her couture gowns commanded attention when she entered the room; she always knew how to accentuate her mile-long legs and hourglass figure with elegant body-skimming dresses. Her fashion choices amplified her performance appearances, and she exuded grace and class.

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Billie Holiday: 1930s–1959

The sultry songstress enchanted audiences with her unique jazz sound and style. From her ornate floral headpieces to the fit-and-flare dresses that accentuated her curves, this became her staple image throughout time.

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Joyce Bryant 1940s - 2004

During the height of Joyce Bryant’s career as a performer with a four-octave range, Bryant also stood out from the pack of singers with her signature silver hair and form fitting mermaid dresses or backless, cleavage-baring dresses.

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Eartha Kitt: 1940s- Present

Eartha Kitt made a lasting mark in fashion in the '50s and '60s with her signature head-to-toe leopard print look and turban headpieces. Kitt got bolder with her fashion as fashion became all the more tighter and suggestive.

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Diahann Carroll: 1950s -present

This award-winning actress, Diahann Carroll, had such a captivating personality that translated on and off the screen while donning perfectly-coiffed curls, classic black pant suits, and pointed-toe heels that provided women a perfect balance -- the feminine masculine look.

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Angela Davis 1960s - present

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The forefront lady for the movement “Black is Beautiful� while sporting an emblematic naturally blown-out Afro was an activist named Angela Davis . This movement started in the 1960s, sought for dispelling the idea that black features like textured hair, skin color, and facial features to encourage black men and women to avoid straightening their hair and bleaching their skin. Not your standard fashion innovator, but Davis’s Afro not only became a symbol for the movement, but later became a trend among other cultures.


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Nina Simone: 1950s–2003

Nina Simone captures the boldness and blackness as a jazz singer and civil rights activist. Simone’s voice served as a musical counterpart to her art, so did her style. Visually, she favored mixed/bold print head wraps, chunky jewelry, big sunglasses, and pure white evening gowns that made her skin look even darker.

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Tina Turner 1950s - Present

Rock and Roll hasn’t seen another queen like Tina Turner. Tina Turner embodied the true essence of a style chameleon. Throughout her career, she never shied away from the possibility of altering her image. Long thick wigs, spiky hair, or her signature fringed bodysuit, it was clear that her take on style was quite versatile in everyone’s eyes.

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Diana Ross: 1950s–Present

Entering the music business as the lead singer of The Supremes, Diana Ross later broke out of the group and elevated her personal style while going into her solo singing artistry alongside a budding career as an actress. Ross initially went to school planning to become a fashion designer, but soon found herself in the music industry where she was still able to channel her fashion attribute to the world.

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Donna Summer: 1960s–2012

The singer entitled, “Queen of Disco,” Donna Summer, proved that you can be have the combination of sexy yet sophisticated. Her style was nothing short of fabulousness. Donna boldly stepped on stage in head-to-toe white plumes, oversized sunnies, sequin dresses, adding blunt bangs and an oversized floral headpiece; her versatility and wardrobe set her apart as a well-revered legend that has always been a showstopper!

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Grace Jones 1970s - Present

Grace Jones paved the way for androgynous style to be fashion-forward and mainstream with her modeling, acting, and singing career. With her signature flat top hairstyle and avant garde fashion, Jones is often credited for influencing the cross-dressing movement of the 1980s.

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Pam Grier: 1970s–Present

Actress, Pam Grier, better known as Foxy Brown, epitomized the curvaceous women during the ’70s era with her undeniable sex appeal and physique. She confidently set the tone with denim hip-huggers, plunging necklines, platform shoes, and crop tops so women can accept their curves.

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Chaka Khan: 1970s–Present

No one pushed the boundaries of fashion more in the ’70s than the legendary singer Chaka Khan. As a 70s flowerchild, her eclectic bohemian outfits entailed lavish fur, lots of fringe, leather, suede pants, fluffy ‘fros, and funky headwear! Her infectious spirit and fashionable fearlessness is what truly allows her to stand out from other icons.

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We want to thank these women of color in the industry for really embracing and taking risks with fashion by following their keen eyes for style. Your style will live forever. 91


“For Africa to me ... is more than a glamorous fact. It is a historical truth. No man can know where he is going unless he knows exactly where he has been and exactly how he arrived at his present place.”

–Maya Angelou


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EDITORIAL

GIRL NEXT DOOR VIBES/LOVE JONES Photography: Fred Agho - @fredagho & Texx Henry @Texxhenry Makeup & Hair: Cherrish N. Barrett - @cherrishnajee Model: Cherrish N. Barrett @cherrishnajaee

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FEATURE

NEW UPCOMING ARTIST KYE TARON INTERVIWED BY YOLANDARENÉ @YOLANDARENEE

WE GOT TO CHOP IT UP WITH UPCOMING ARTIST KYE TARON ABOUT MUSIC, NEW VIDEO AND LIFE... When & How did you

what is the sound of

got into music?

your music?

I fell in love with music the moment I heard Exhale by Whitney Houston. However, after hearing The Life After Death album by Notorious B.I.G in elementary school, I realized the feelings that Hip-Hop gave were raw and real. I got into music officially while in the 6th grade. I wrote some of my first raps in middle school. Tell us about your

The sound of my music is hip-hop mixed with neo-soul and a little-spoken word sprinkled on top. I want to master the sound that I am trying to embody; I spend endless hours searching for beats with that fall in line with the vibes I so desperately want to create. what inspired the new single/music video?

The current events in the news about how unarmed My music is what I call, African-Americans are music for the soul. Some gunned down continuously people say my music is conscious, but I would like to by corrupt law enforcement. I understand and realize that say my music is human music, meaning I make music it could happen to me at any time. Being the sensitive about the experiences whether good or bad that we thinker that I am, I knew creatively that I had to face as human’s day in and express my discontent of the day out. policing in America towards people of color. music?

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what else do you do besides music?

I am a huge sports fan. I love playing basketball, that’s my shit. I swear me and friends could just hoop all day. I am also a Big Brother with the Big Brother Big Sister of Metro Atlanta. So that’s what I do outside of music, play ball and try to better someone else’s life. who are your influences?

dealt with, relationships with friends and family, or even the struggles I see my brothers and sisters go through on a day to day. All these elements have leaked into my music; this shows me that I am very critical and observatory of things and people that are in or that have left my life.

what’s next for you?

I am actually in the process of making new music as we speak. I have a benefit concert on the 11th of November. All the proceeds are going towards Hurricane relief, that’s always a good thing. I’m hearing that the show is going to be crazy. We shall see, I am excited nonetheless.

What is your motto to live by?

Keep God first and stay humble, that’s my motto.

Big K.R.I.T, Kendrick Lamar, Nas, J. Cole, Wale, what advice would and Freddie Gibbs. In that you give to another upcoming artists? orderwho are your favorite artists? Big K.R.I.T, Kendrick Keep God first, secondly, understand that what you Lamar, Nas, and Cole. put in is exactly what you get What have you learnt back. That’s all I can add at about yourself since the time; I am also an you started music? upcoming artist. Maybe I’ve learned that I am a very down the road, I can critical and analytical thinker. elaborate on this kind of I observe my world and pull question. This is an excellent from it, whether it’s my past question by the way. relationships with women I’ve 105


There is no singular black experience or black opinion or black thought. We are united in a lot of experiences. - CHANCE THE RAPPER


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FEATURE

AMAKA WRITTEN BY NNEKA GIGI Let's Chat!

Do you know the laws regarding rape in your country? No? Let's have a conversation! Head to my Instagram (@nnekagigi) and not only let me know your thoughts about Amaka but your feelings, interpretations and actions against unfair systems that try to govern what's not meant to be ruled. I took the opportunity to participate in Amber Rose's 2017 Slut Walk (yes, I said slut..get over it) and created this piece. Nigeria just passed a bill in 2015 that "widened" the scope of what was considered rape. Prior, a woman could be gang raped, sodomized, you name it and it wasn't considered rape. Marital rape? Doesn't matter. Rape was only acknowledged as penetration of a vagina by a penis. I rejoiced but wept at the fact this this bill was just passed TWO YEARS AGO. I created this piece to start a conversation. To make us ALL AWARE. An attack on one pussy is an attack on all kitty kats. The government. The church. NO ONE has the right to your body. Let's not be afraid to hear 

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FEATURE

AMAKA Artist: Nneka Gigi - @Nnekagigi Photography: Zach Patton - @zacharybxllion Contributions: Shay Ratcliffe - @wbkmovement

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EDITORIAL

IN BLOOM Photography: Kenya Meon - @K.Meon Creative Director: Kenya Meon - @K.Meon Models: Ramia Green, Taylor Johnson, Keyarow K., Ezee, Taylor Williams, Jaye Gardner 114


oN THE LEFT: Model - Ezee Creative Director - Kenya Meon BELOW: Model - Taylor Williams Creative Director - Kenya Meon

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ABOVE: Model - Jaye Gardner Creative Director - Kenya Meon 116


BELOW: Model - Ramia Green Wardrobe - Ace & Jig Styled by - Uncommon Deux Creative Director - Kenya Meon

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BELOW: Model - Keyarow K. Creative DIrector - Kenya Meon

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BELOW: Model - Taylor Johnson Styled by - Taylor Johnson Creative Director - Kenya Meon

Kmeon.com

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FEATURE

THE DARK SKINNED WOMAN WITH 4C HAIR IS RECLAIMING HER PLACE IN THE NATURAL HAIR MOVEMENT WRITTEN BY LAMBB @lambb

The dark skinned woman with 4C hair is reclaiming her spot in the natural hair movement. After the movement was hijacked by a specific kind of curl pattern, LAMBB brings to light the beauty in every kink and curl.

just don’t work for kinkier hair types. By documenting the results of women with different hair types; they discovered that the products and styles did in fact work; the curls achieved were just different.

The London based company, LAMBB interrogated the idea that some products or hairstyles

The documentary features women with 4C hair who has since been removed from the mainstream idea of natural

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hair. The women discuss the politics of black hair, and unpack what good hair is and how to achieve it. LAMBB’s aim was to open a dialogue about an issue that has gone under discussed for far too long, and prove that there is more than just one way to embrace natural hair.


Javonna Williams, reviewer of the documentary says, “I enjoyed this documentary so much! Healthy hair is good hair. People tend to forget this. We have some beautiful hair in all textures and colours of skin! I love variety.

Many conversations about the black community happen within America, and these opinions seem to represent the entire black community. But the UK (black British) has a different experience that's worth documenting.

“I learnt so, much in terms of the illustrations between the women speaking and showing their personal hair tutorials”

LAMBB Co-founder, Naomi Grant says “We are slightly shifting from the stagnated ideology of what beauty is. However the shift has only been marginal and it is still rare to see a dark skinned woman with 4C hair centralized in a discussion on natural hair.”

“Great documentary! I'm happy to see issues like this finally being addressed in the UK! Big up from Birmingham” said Aaliyah.

“There is a longstanding legacy that comes with our hair, and a history rooted in its roots. The afro was once a symbol for radicalism, an unapologetic portrayal of black beauty, with the likes of Angela Davis and Huey P. Newton rocking their afros whilst they fought oppression. Today, there is a lesser fight, but it doesn't strip it of its importance.” For more information on LAMBB please visit

www.lookatmyblackbeauty.com

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EDITORIAL

LEWIS Photography: Kayesha Clarke Makeup: Kayesha Clarke Model: Lewis Paradzai Assistants: Molly Baber & Afonwy Duff 122


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“Reality is wrong. Dreams are for real.”

- Tupac Shakur


WRITTEN By jelissa williamson - @ xscaped.x

RICHMAGAZINEUK ISSUE NO.2 (BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPECIAL)  

Fashion, Culture & Lifestyle Magazine.

RICHMAGAZINEUK ISSUE NO.2 (BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPECIAL)  

Fashion, Culture & Lifestyle Magazine.

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