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I’M STILL HERE! 26 years in VASD Housing Market

It’s your paper! Friday, February 14, 2020 • Vol. 6, No. 12 • Fitchburg, WI • ConnectFitchburg.com • $1

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Kathy Bartels 608-235-2927

KBartels@StarkHomes.com

Inside Alders pass AirBnB regulations Page 3 Star seeks editorial board members Page 5

Business Sisters aim to create dream homes

Renderings courtesy of COPA

The COPA is a proposed performing arts center planned for the Fish Hatchery Road opportunity zone, which may open in 2022.

Performing arts center sets goal of opening in 2022

Page 15

70,000 square foot facility would provide space for theater, music and dance NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

Sports Wildcats secure fouth straight Big Eight crown Page B1

A new community organization is hoping to give Fitchburg a $35 million home to host the performing arts by 2022. Community Organizations Promoting the Arts presented the proposal to build a 70,000 square foot, three-story, multi-use performing arts event center to the Common Council at its Wednesday, Jan. 22 Committee of the Whole meeting. The proposed development would house classrooms, practice spaces,

rehearsal halls and administrative offices for several performing arts-related organizations, centered around a 400-seat auditorium. It’s the brainchild of Fitchburg-area business owner and longtime Verona resident Dale Sticha. Sticha, who has worked for over two decades as Elton John’s piano technician and tuner, spent three years developing connections with potential donors and partner organizations, several of which have signed on to the fledgling project.

Turn to COPA/Page 11

Community Organizations Promoting the Arts brochure.

Spring election

Displaced polling places won’t change until 2021 BRMS Circle provides support for black girls Page B6

KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

As Fitchburg voters head to the polls Tuesday, Feb. 18, for local and state primary elections, they’ll be traveling outside their respective districts for the

eighth straight election. Though city leaders considered that a temporary problem when they made the change for the April 2018 election, it’s likely to be at least four more elections before they settle on a solution. While two potential options have surfaced in the past few months – a nearby church and the return of the previous District 1 polling place to government hands – the city plans to wait until it redraws district lines in 2021 before

making any changes to polling places, city administrator Patrick Marsh told the Star on Tuesday Feb. 11. The unusual problem started when the city closed its King James Way fire station in 2017. Because that building was no longer staffed, meant the District 1 polling place had to be moved, and the replacement for that building, the Marketplace Drive fire station, is east of Verona Road. That made walking

Inside More election coverage and District 4 candidate questionnaires Pages 12 and 13

Turn to Polling/Page 10 151

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February 14, 2020

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Designing a dream Resident with rare seizure disorder gets new bedroom NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

When Makayla Schmidt began waking up her parents at night crying and disoriented in October 2017, they thought she was just having night terrors. It turned out the Fitchburg resident was having grand mal seizures during the night. Schmidt started taking epilepsy medicine to remedy that, but in January 2018, she began having them during the day. That was “shocking and scary” said her mom, Angela, because it meant M a k a y l a ’s m e d i c a t i o n wasn’t working the way it should. Then began many hospital trips, MRIs and EKGs. Makayla underwent surgery where sensors were planted deep in her brain to find the source of the seizures. It turned out she had multiple tumors. Makayla was diagnosed with Tuberous Sclerosis, a rare genetic disorder that leads to the growth of non-cancerous tumors throughout her body and will continue to do so throughout her life. While the tumors began i n h e r b r a i n , t h e r e ’s a chance they might reach other organs her mother said – including her heart and lungs. “She has a tough road ahead of her,” Angela said. M a k a y l a ’s r e s t l e s s nights should now be more comfortable, as she was gifted the bedroom of her dreams on Saturday, Jan. 11. Seeking a source of comfort for her daughter, Angela reached out

to Designing Dreams, a Beaver Dam-based charity organization with a mission to “inspire hope and happiness in the lives of children with cancer and cancer-like conditions by making their dream bedroom a reality,” according to its Facebook page. After Angela discovered the organization, she filled out a brief application form on their website to nominate her daughter. Angela said they found out Makayla had been selected for a bedroom makeover in September. “Just to be selected gave her hope and happy thoughts, just from being selected alone, the positivity started right away,” Angela said. Lead planner and decorator from Designing Dreams Mardel Curwick came to the Schmidts’ h o m e a n d i n t e r v i ew e d Makayla to find out what she would like in her dream bedroom. They then did all the makeover planning behind the scenes for several months. Designing Dreams began the makeover on Monday, Jan. 6, and were ready for the big reveal on Saturday, Jan. 11. T h e n ew r o o m h a d a custom-made bed, a crystal chandelier (her favorite feature of the new room), a large vanity mirror set with remote control color-changing lighting and a walk-in closet. Schmidt’s favorite colors – pastel red and teal – were integrated into every aspect of the redesign from the wall paint to an armchair. Every drawer and cupboard in the room was filled with gifts and

accessories including coloring books, makeup kits, Makayla’s favorite gum and an instant camera she had been wanting for a long time, complete with several extra rolls of film.

Making adjustments

The Tuberous Sclerosis diagnosis led to Makayla no longer being able to do many of the physical activities she enjoys, including swimming, biking, volleyball, climbing on monkey bars, sledding and skiing – any activity where if she lost muscle control, she would risk injury. “I couldn’t do gymnastics anymore, which is very hard for me, because I have loved gymnastics since I was a little girl,” Makayla said. In March 2019, Makayla underwent a major brain surgery at American Family Children’s Hospital, where doctors operated on the largest lesion with a laser. Angela said Makayla is doing much better and has gotten control of her epileptic seizures. It’s a cause for celebration, Angela said, because Makayla can resume some of the things she had been missing out on. M a k a y l a w a s fi n a l l y cleared by her doctors to start becoming more physically active again, with supervision. Makayla said being unable to ski was probably the hardest sacrifice for her, as she has dreams of becoming a professional skier. P r i o r t o t h e s u rg e r y, school, Makayla couldn’t go on the playground during recess because there’s not enough adult supervision. She wasn’t

Photos by Neal Patten

Makayla Schmidt, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder that causes epileptic seizures, was given the bedroom makeover of her dreams by Beaver Dam-based charity Designing Dreams. able to participate in summer rec programs, had been limited in gym class and used a buddy system when walking in the hallways. RCI staff were trained on how to handle seizures. Angela said Makayla couldn’t sleep or shower without her mom nearby. “I don’t think a lot of people understand what risk factors are involved with grand mal seizures, like she can’t take a bath, I would have to be watchi n g h e r eve r y s e c o n d ,” Angela said. “This loss of privacy for a kid enteri n g a d o l e s c e n c e , n eve r being able to be alone, that’s big deal.” Since the surgery, Makayla has been taking skiing trips with the school – with her dad coming along to supervise – and has also been able to do gymnastics again. Makayla is optimistic about her future. On the day of her dream bedroom reveal, she wore a shirt

Beaver Dam-based charity Designing Dreams gifts children with cancer and cancer-like conditions their dream bedrooms. Seen here is the bedroom of Makayla Schmidt, whose bedroom makeover was revealed on Saturday, Jan. 11. emblazoned with, “any- in her life,” Angela said. thing is possible,” a mantra Neal Patten, community she believes to be true. reporter, can be contacted “As a parent, we want any at neal.patten@wcinet.com. little glimmer of happiness

ELECT

SCOTT LEHMANN FITCHBURG COMMON COUNCIL DISTRICT 4, SEAT 8

We’re a bank that puts the community first. That’s why we’re proud to support our friends at the Badger Prairie Needs Network (BPNN)! More than a food pantry, BPNN offers free community meals and legal advocacy to fight homelessness and help level the playing field for people with limited financial resources. Join the Oak Bank family today by visiting

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“I’m proud to support Scott’s candidacy for Fitchburg Alder. We need members on the Council who have the experience and good judgment to represent the community. Scott’s life has been dedicated to safety and public service, and his roots here go many generations deep. I look forward to working with him as a member of the Council.” - AARON RICHARDSON, FITCHBURG MAYOR

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February 14, 2020

3

Fitchburg Star

City of Fitchburg

Council approves short-term lease regulations Renters subject to yearly inspections from city, county KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Short-term rental services, such as those booked on AirBnB, will be subject to regulation from the City of Fitchburg starting July 1. The Common Council updated its room tax and permit ordinance to cover such rentals, which are increasingly popular all over the country, at its Jan. 28 meeting. The change provides oversight on rentals of 28 days or fewer and gives the city the ability to cite hosts who are in violation of the policy. It defines occupancy requirements and enforces public health standards. Mayor Aaron Richardson

and Alds. Janell Rice (Dist. 4) and Julia Arata-Fratta (D-2) had worked on the ordinance since last summer, after concerns were brought forward by Seminole Forest neighborhood residents. Starting July 1, short-term rental hosts will be required to be licensed and undergo inspections from both the city and the county, which enforces state regulations. As a part of that license, any rental should also be used as the primary residence for the license holder and meet all public health regulations. That effectively outlaws the purchase of properties solely to use as rentals. Requiring license holders to live in the property they’re renting out allows for them to provide their neighbors with peace of mind, Arata-Fratta said. “If I am renting, for example, my basement – I live in

the house, it’s my primary residency … I am doing a screening of the people that I bring into my house,” she said. City licenses fees will be $100 to cover the cost of the building inspection, and licenses can be revoked if violations are not remedied. Another reason for the ordinance was to ensure room tax fees for Fitchburg rentals go to the city, Richardson said. AirBnB is supposed to collect hotel room taxes on properties, which are then given to a city and its tourism bureau, but with many Fitchburg residents having a Madison ZIP code, he said it’s likely some of the tax money has been going to Madison. Ald. Tom Clauder (D-4) was concerned the ordinance didn’t go far enough but still voted in favor. Initially, he told the rest

of the council he was a “no” vote, complaining that not regulating them more was effectively approving their use. When Richardson and Ald. Dan Bahr (D-2), who is the government affairs associate for the Wisconsin Counties Association, explained that such uses can’t be banned because state law allows them to operate, Clauder eventually indicated support for the ordinance but wondered if the licensing fee was high enough. “It seems weak to me,” he said. “I don’t want this next to me, and I know my neighbors don’t.” Ald. Dorothy Krause (D-1) suggested that if rules were too tight, people would avoid licensing, and Ald. Julia Arata Fratta said some short term rentals are simply less expensive options for people staying at the hospital. Krause asked whether the

city could partner with the county so only one inspection would be needed. Doug Voegeli director of Public Health Madison and Dane County’s environmental health division, said his department would not have the authority to look at nonhealth issues and has no enforcement over zoning or parking. The City of Madison is considering tighter regulations on short-term rental hosts. In addition to an inspection, City of Madison license holders would need to provide addresses and license plate information for each guest and provide proof that the short-term rental is the host’s primary address. Fitchburg’s ordinance update was partly inspired by the experiences of Fitchburg residents who claimed they had their Seminole Forest cul-de-sac turned into a

“party” destination for five months starting in March 2019. Laura Olsen, who lives in the Seminole Forest neighborhood, said the home next to hers was marketed as an AirBnB during that time as a location that could accommodate 16 people. That was too many people for the size of the home, she said, and the renters did not follow any public health standards for the duration of its operation. With large groups of people coming to the neighborhood every weekend, Olsen said, it prevented her family and her neighbors from being able to enjoy their weekends at home. “The cycle quickly became frustrating, exasperating and completely changed the very character of our neighborhood,” she said.

Dane County

Fire station becoming county’s emergency command JIM FEROLIE Fitchburg Star editor

After more than two years of sitting vacant, the former Fitchburg Fire Station No. 2 on King James Way has a new purpose. It will be the Dane County Emergency Operations Center. The 18,000-square-foot building will go through $1.8 million of renovations over the next several months to handle the varied functions of the EOC. Those functions are centered around hosting first responders and related agencies from all over the county during emergencies, County Executive Joe Parisi announced at a news conference Thursday, Jan. 23. The rest of the time, a staff of about 10 people will handle planning, training, meeting federal standards and other combined efforts for agencies all over the county,

including 21 emergency medical service and 27 law enforcement, Dane County Emergency Management director Charles Tubbs told the Star. It is expected to open in January 2021. Parisi said the county will purchase the building for $1.2 million from a development company, which had bought it from Fitchburg two years ago for about $1 million. The County Board introduced a resolution to purchase it Jan. 23 for later approval. Despite being on the southwest side of the county, Parisi said, the location is an improvement over the EOC’s current Downtown Madison location for several reasons. Among those are better accessibility, as it’s right off a newly rebuilt stretch of U.S. 18-151, and lower risk that an power outage shuts down both the EOC and the county’s 911 Communications Center, Parisi added. “It does have the benefit of not being in downtown, where the bulk of our operations exist,” he said. “It

allows us to centralize.” Tubbs added that all the agencies he communicated with were supportive of the locations and none showed concerns. “It’s easy to get to,” he said. Parisi said the existing EOC takes about two hours to set up when a crisis hits and is in a limited space that makes performing all the operations desired of it difficult. When the Fitchburg location opens, he said, the existing one will be used as part of the remodeling of the Dane County Jail. Tubbs said while the new space hasn’t been designed yet, the facility is well prepared for the multitude of operations it will host, including some things the county currently rents space out for, or isn’t able to do at all. “This is really our first time getting to spend some time here,” he said. In addition to a vast array of communications facilities, Tubbs said, the building will have space – and two-story ceilings – for

several emergency vehicles, including its 18-month-old, $500,000 Mobile Command Post, which essentially is an RV outfitted with specialized communications technology for commanding emergency incidents or handling crime scenes. It will also accommodate a bariatric ambulance, used for handling patients who are 500 pounds or heavier, and a mass casualty trailer, among other specialized vehicles. The building will also have ample room to hold more realistic training, including active shooter tabletop drills, medical training and simulated crashes, Tubbs and other county staff said. Fitchburg Fire Station No. 2 was decommissioned in June 2017, after the city built its Marketplace Drive fire and EMS station, the first of two new stations designed to improve response times and prepare for both the eventual addition of part of the Town of Madison to the northeast and development and growth to east of U.S. Hwy. 14. Unlike the Lacy Road station, which was kept for

office functions, the King James station (as it was sometimes known) was abandoned entirely. At the time, it had hosted a community center and a polling location, two functions

some people had hoped to keep there, but the city found doing so unworkable without the building being staffed and maintained, and in October 2017, it solicited bids for its sale.

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February 14, 2020

Opinion

Fitchburg Star

Letters to the editor

Healthy living

Girl Scouts more than just the cookies Girl Scout cookie season is upon us. This year, I encourage you to ask each Girl Scout eagerly selling boxes, “What are your goals?” As a Brownie Girl Scout leader, I work with my scouts for months in advance. They learn goal setting, decision-making, money-management, business ethics, and people skills. I love watching the girls build confidence to ask family, friends, and strangers. I’m invigorated by their excitement as they choose goals for the troop; this year it’s a trampoline park. And it warms my heart to see them choose how to give back to others; most troops donate 10-20% of

their cookie money to service projects. Our troop decided to donate cookies to the children’s hospital and run a food drive. So this season, consider buying a box from every girl you encounter and ask them why they work so hard. They each have dreams and goals. And please don’t forget the older girls! In high school, my troop fundraised for a trip to the Girl Scout World Center in India and to fund our Gold Award service projects. To this day, I use the skills I learned as a Scout. It’s about so much more than cookies. Gabriella Gerhardt City of Fitchburg

City should prioritize tennis courts I’m a 12 year old who lives walking distance from Chicory Meadow Park. I’ve seen that over the past few years that it has been through a lot, creating lots of wear and tear all over the park. For example, I still like playing on the tennis courts they have there, but sometimes I feel like an earthquake just passed by, because the courts are in such a bad condition. This is because the tennis courts have lots of cracks and holes all over, from the wear and tear that has been happening.

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It saddens me to see what is happening here because it seems that no one really cares about the park. However, we can fix this and get this park back on its feet. If we can repair all the damage that has been done, I believe the park could gain more popularity. Also, I think this would form a better reputation for the area around it. Finally, I think this would make many people like me, who use the park, really happy. Zach Nilsson City of Fitchburg

Friday, Feb. 14, 2020 • Vol. 6, No. 12 Periodical Postage Paid, Verona, WI and additional offices. Published monthly on Friday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Fitchburg Star, 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593.

Office Location: 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593 Phone: 608-845-9559 • FAX: 608-845-9550 e-mail: ungeditor@wcinet.com Circulation customer service: (608) 845-9559

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This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.

General Manager Lee Borkowski lborkowski@wcinet.com Sales Manager Kathy Neumeister kathy.neumeister@wcinet.com Display Advertising Donna Larson veronasales@wcinet.com Catherine Stang stoughtonsales@wcinet.com Classifieds ungclassified@wcinet.com Circulation ungcirculation@wcinet.com News Jim Ferolie fitchburgstar@wcinet.com Sports Adam Feiner ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Community/Business Emilie Heidemann ungbusiness@wcinet.com Reporters Kimberly Wethal, Mark Nesbitt, Mackenzie Krumme, Neal Patten, Scott De Laruelle, Renee Hickman

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Woodward Communications,Inc. A dynamic, employee-owned media company Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.

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Watch for fatigue at desk

A

good part of my day in the office is spent bending forward as I adjust people. I try and offset that by leaning backward whenever I think about it and pressing my hands into my upper lumbar spine, right under the ribs, to undo the tightness that builds up there. I’ve learned I have to train my body to be able to withstand the simple demands of leaning forward. For me, that means strengthening my extensor muscles (back muscles), giving my spine frequent movement inputs that are opposite to my work postures and setting aside time for deep stretching and breathing into my mid and low back. The way we sit, stand and move every day leaves an imprint on our bodies, which builds up over time and can lead to pain, low energy and poor focus. And if you’re one of the many people who sit at a desk working with computers all day, it’s important to train your body to be able to handle this well. I talked with Lucas Koenecke, of Inside Out Intelligent Training in Fitchburg, about the work he does with people who have ailments from sitting for long periods of time. When he works with a client, he tests not only spinal mobility, flexibility, and gait mechanics, but also eye function. The reason for that is most desk jobs involve long hours of computer work,

and that can affect our visual system. Lucas explained that your body’s postural system relies heavily on the eyes. When your eyes become overworked or Konopacki strained from prolonged focus on a computer or phone, your posture is likely to take some of the burden. You might try to sit up straight, but because your eyes are compromised, your posture muscles will be weaker, making it even harder on your body to move and stay upright. Healthier eyes, therefore, generally lead to a healthier posture. He has people perform two functional tests to get an idea of how sitting is affecting them. The first is to start the day with a long-distance vision clarity test. For example, pick an object or sign which is anywhere from 20 feet to 100 feet away. Take notice on how clear the object is, and don’t forget to mark your position for later comparison. Check in with this vision clarity test throughout the day and compare your vision to previous tests. You might notice a decrease in clarity, which results from eye fatigue. The second test, if you can do it comfortably and safely, is to try

standing on one leg, testing your balance. This can be done with eyes open or closed depending on ability level. Take note on how well you can balance. Check in with this test throughout the day to assess strain on your nervous system. I asked Lucas to share a few things people who sit a lot can do on their own throughout the day. His favorite eye exercises are eye circles and looking at interesting objects at great distances. For eye circles, reach your arm out in front of you holding a pen. Focus your eyes on the pen and then move the pen in a large circle. Let your eyes follow the pen around without moving your head. Then choose something in the distance to observe for 1-5 minutes. Preferably distances further than 100 yards. When you look at objects in the distance it allows your inner eye muscles (the ones you use looking at a computer) a chance to relax. Even though I don’t look at a computer for eight hours a day, I’ll definitely be adding Lucas’ eye exercises into my daily routine. I’m always looking for simple ways to feel better at the end of the day. Dr. Laura Konopacki is the owner of Body Wave chiropractic in Fitchburg, and she has additional training in pediatrics and functional neurology..

Fast fashion is filling our landfills The production of clothing has always created waste, but major changes in production over the last decade, called fast fashion, have increased the amount of waste to alarming proportions. The fashion industry now produces more carbon emissions each year than international flight and maritime shipping combined. In the past 20 years, this faster system of producing and marketing clothing has been the driver behind a 60% increase in the number of garments people buy each year, almost doubling the production of the industry. Fast fashion has developed systems that follow fashion trends. Production can be quickly changed to make more or less of a style or color in a matter of days. This can lead to pulling items that are not selling from stores and sending them directly to landfills or incinerators, then replacing them with something new. One store chain alone was found to have burned 60 tons of finished clothing in 2017. It is estimated that 85% of all textiles are wasted. The equivalent of one garbage truck full of textile waste is either burned or goes to a landfill every second. The only solution to this growing problem is for consumers to rethink their buying habits, to change the demand side of the equation. In the United States, 21 billion pounds of textiles a year are wasted, and production in the United States not a big part of the industry, as most of its production has moved to areas of the world where the cost of labor is cheap. This has driven down the cost of manufacturing and fed the fast fashion fire

Corrections In the Jan. 10 edition of the Fitchburg Star, a feature about the Goldfish Swim School had an incorrect reference to the assistant general manager’s relation to the owner. The article stated that assistant general

Only the best donations make it to the sales floor. If they don’t sell quickly, they are sorted again for quality. The better items are sent to other parts of the world. What remains will either be shredded for filler or insulation or go to a landfill or incinerator. Because by lowering retail prices. of the glut, some countries have In Bangladesh, factory workers banned the import of used clothing. make less than $100 a month. Unsafe We can help slow fast fashion by working conditions, forced labor buying less. and child labor are found in factories Seek out companies that use natural around the world. fabrics. Make sure that what you buy Clothing production pollutes trillions is made from fabric that contains little of gallons of water each year. Growing or no plastic fibers. This might mean cotton takes a lot of water, and more is paying more per garment, but buying used in the production and the dyeing better quality will make your clothes processes. It takes 700 gallons of water last longer. to produce a cotton shirt and 2,000 galAlso, stay away from trends. Buy lons for one pair of jeans. simple, timeless items that mix and Dyeing fabric is the second largmatch, and use accessories as your est polluter of water worldwide. The fashion statement. Find a friend or a untreated waste water is often discard- group with similar taste and agree to ed into streams or rivers, taking chemi- trade accessories occasionally. cals and microfibers with it. Consider renting for special occaSynthetic fiber used in fabric has sions. Look online for clothing rental increased over the years. It is estimatcompanies. Or you could borrow from ed that 60% of new garments contain a friend or buy from a consignment some form of plastic fiber, mostly store. polyester. The production of these And shop in resale stores. You will microplastics emits carbon and polfind amazing bargains. Refashioning lutes water. good quality items can be fun. Microfibers, which are tiny particles Clothing can be mended, altered and of microplastics, take hundreds of dyed. Do not give up on good pieces. years to break down. Clothing sheds Breathe life back into them. microfibers every time it is washed. It Finally, be careful to not be lured is estimated that microplastics make by the multitude of sales that happen up 31% of the plastic pollution in the every day. If you do not need it, do not ocean. buy it. Unfortunately, even giving clothing If our consumption changes, producto Goodwill, St. Vincent de Paul or tion will change to meet our reduced other resale stores does not guarantee demand. that your garment will not end up in Nancy Horns is a member of the Fitcha landfill. These organizations are burg Resource Conservation Commission swamped with more than they can sell.

manager Eugenia Walters was owner Laura Liras’ cousin. However, Walters is Liras’ sister-in-law. Because of a page design and proofing error, the January issue of the Fitchburg Star had a headline indicating the 40th anniversary of

the senior center was one of our top stories. It was actually an honorable mention, part of a list that did not fit into the printed newspaper but was mentioned on our website. The Star regrets the errors.


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February 14, 2020

Fitchburg Star

5

City of Fitchburg

Factory redevelopment receives $3.5M TIF will be used for site clean-up, grading at former All-Juice site KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Renderings courtesy JLA Architects

A mixed-use apartment and commercial building proposal was brought to the Plan Commission for a rezoning of the former All-Juice factory site on Dec. 17. The proposed design, seen here from the Fish Hatchery Road side from the north, would feature four floors of apartments, 10,000 square feet of commercial space and an underground parking garage. TIF included, and voted to rezone the property to allow a mixed-use development. The plan is to use $3 million to demolish buildings, flatten and clean

contaminated soil on the site, the former home of the AllJuice factory and before that, the Bowman Dairy. The rest will fund the continuation of Traceway Drive to the east

Mayor creates census committee

The Fitchburg Star is seeking additional members for its editorial board. We formed this community-based group in 2018 as a way for our reporters to diversify their perspective of the community and to give people input and insight into how the newspaper is put together. This is a formula that has proven successful with two other Unified Newspaper Group newspapers – the Oregon Observer and Stoughton Courier Hub – and we have found it gives us a stronger link to our readers and a more vibrant editorial page. We believe both are essential to a well-functioning community. The timing of a tragedy in our newsroom last August put our editorial board on hold for several months, and we’ve lost a few members – including some on our staff – for various reasons since our initial call for participants. Before we restart, we’re looking for more people who are willing to get involved in discussions about issues affecting Fitchburg, from both a rural and urban perspective, and the three school districts that intersect here. The wider your range of

In preparation for the 2020 national census, Mayor Aaron Richardson has created a committee to make sure all residents get counted. The committee consists of Ald. Dorothy Krause (Dist. 1), who also represents part of the city on the Dane County Board of Supervisors, assistant senior center director David Hill, city clerk Tracy Oldenburg, Neighborhood Navigators Elizabeth Prado and Carmen Terres-Kinerk and community development planner Wade Thompson. “It’s really trying to ensure that we have everyone in Fitchburg counted,” he said at the Jan. 14 Common Council meeting. “It’s really important for lots of different reasons.”

Patient advocacy program approved The council approved a contract with Edgewood College for the senior center’s patient advocacy program. The program allows Edgewood nursing students to go with Fitchburg seniors to their medical appointments to guide them through appointments as a part of the school’s case management class.

Neighborhood Navigator funding approved An initiative started under the Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative in 2019 will get a second year of funding. The Neighborhood Navigators program, funded by Dane County, got council approval Jan. 14. The program provides part-time pay to two city residents — Carmen Torres-Kinerk and Elizabeth Prado — who work to connect other residents with city resources, city community development planner Wade Thompson said.

Apartment development approved The council approved a final plat for a five-building apartment complex on Lacy Road just west of U.S. Hwy. 14. The apartments will be built south of the roundabout at Lacy Road and Cheryl Parkway. Construction is scheduled to start in the spring with a 71-unit apartment building.

a

DAN BAHR • a•

FITCHBURG CIT Y COUNCIL DISTRICT 2 , SE AT 4 “Dan Bahr works hard to make sure residents are informed and heard at city hall when important decisions are being made. I know he will continue to be an effective leader on the Common Council and I am proud to support him for another term.”

engagement and represent as broad a cross-section of Fitchburg residents as possible. If you’re interested but not sure, call editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 to talk it through. If you know you’d like to be part of it, send an email briefly telling us about yourself and your interest to fitchburgstar@wcinet.com.

ELECT

MARC JONES

FOR ALDERPERSON DISTRICT 4, SEAT 8

• 3-generation Fitchburg Farmer born and raised and still operating the Jones Family Farm • Army Veteran • Owns and Operates the Jones Construction Company for 37 years COMMUNITY SERVICE

PRIMARY ELECTION: Tuesday, February 18th SPRING ELECTION: Tuesday, April 7th

• a•

TOP PRIORITIES

Listen and advocate for residents at City Hall. a Invest in vulnerable neighborhoods. Grow responsibly and sustainably. a Respect the taxpayer.

FOR CITY COUNCIL

two, and will be small groups that could lead to editorials or columns written by our staff members or can at least help us improve our coverage. Some of the discussion might be held through email. We hope to hold the first meeting of the new group as soon as March. Our intent is to foster discussion and community

PLEASE REMEMBER TO VOTE!

–Former Fitchburg Mayor Jeanie Sieling

BAHR

interests – schools, city ​government, business, public safety, social services – the better. The board comprises members of the community and Star staff. There are no requirements for serving on the board other than an interest in community affairs. Discussions will be held regularly, every month or

• Served on Fitchburg Township Board during incorporation • Served on Fitchburg City Council • Served as Communication Workers Union President, Local 4630 Southern WI. • Serves on Fitchburg Ag & Rural Committee • Serves on Fitchburg Veteran’s Park Subcommittee • Serves on The Board of Directors for Heartland Credit Union for 20 years

VOTE APRIL 7 RE-ELECT

3010 Yarmouth Greenway Drive, #107 Fitchburg, WI 53711

floors and more than 10,000 square feet of commercial space with a ground-level parking garage. Having the garage at grade rather than underground reduces complications with soil contamination. The four-floor, U-shaped building would feature a green space over the parking garage. Because Fish Hatchery Road is on a hill, the commercial spaces would be “bookends” of the building, with one set higher in the building than the other. The two-story commercial space on the north side of the building could be a restaurant, said developer Michael Thorson, managing director of Inventure Capital.

Star seeks more participants for editorial board

City in brief

CONTACT DAN

Greenway Cross to just south of Traceway Drive. The district was created in 2015 to fund the construction of a hotel off of Pike Drive, but is instead being used to partially fund the reconstruction of Fish Hatchery Road. Roman said the project would bring significant value to the TID, with $25.5 million in added value at the start of the building’s operation, and would also improve the blight that is the vacant factory property. “This would assist the city significantly in being able to move projects forward a little bit quicker,” he said. Preliminary plans show the building at 3101 Fish Hatchery Road would contain 157 apartments on four

Contact me with questions: 608-695-3497 or mjosyene@gmail.com

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A plan to put apartments and commercial space at the corner of Fish Hatchery Road and Traceway Drive will use $3.5 million in city taxpayer funding to prepare the property. The property developer, SFH, LLC, had asked for $3.5 million in tax-increment financing (TIF) to clean up the property before starting construction. The Common Council approved a developer agreement with the

across the northern side of the development. TIF is generally considered one of the few tools Wisconsin cities have to encourage development. It pays for infrastructure improvements or development incentives by pooling increased property taxes across all taxing jurisdiction in the TIF district (TID). Frank Roman, a representative from Minneapolis-based financial adviser Ehlers and Associates, recommended the city approve the use of TIF, saying it meets the “but for” test – that without the TIF, the project would not be able to move forward because of the cost of cleaning up the property. The financing will come from TID 10, which covers Fish Hatchery Road from


6

February 14, 2020

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Calendar of events Friday, Feb. 14

• 11 a.m. to noon, Stories and songs about love for ages 2-5, library, 729-1760 • 6-7 p.m., Make a stuffed gnome for ages 13-17, library, 729-1760 • 6-9 p.m., Live music: Myles Talbott Dyad, The Thirsty Goat, 3040 Cahill Main, 422-5500 • 7:15-8:30 p.m., Live music:The Madison Jukebox Society, Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 275-1050

Saturday, Feb. 15

• 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Nurtured Heart Approach® enthusiasts retreat, library, shinefromwithinconsulting.com • 1-3 p.m., Electronic circuits for ages 5-8, library, 729-1760

Wednesday, Feb. 17

• 6-7 p.m., Washi tape necklaces for ages 9-12, library, 7291760

Tuesday, Feb. 18

• 6:30-7:30 p.m., The Winner’s Circle evening book club for adults, library, 729-1760

Wednesday, Feb. 19

•10-11 a.m., Book discussion: “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas, library, 729-1760 • 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Agricultural Panel Discussion as part of the Veterans Affairs Farming and Recovery Mental Health Services pilot program, library, 256-1901

Friday, Feb. 21

• Schedule an appointment, AARP tax help, senior center, 270-4290 • 8 p.m., Live music: Nic Adamany, The Thirsty Goat, 3040

Cahill Main, 422-5500 • 8-10 p.m., Live music: Mackenzie Moore, Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 275-1050

Saturday, Feb. 22

• 11 a.m. to noon, DIY calming glitter jars, library, 729-1760 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Drag queen bingo brunch with Bianca Lynn Breeze ($50), Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 2751050

Sunday, Feb. 23

• 1-4 p.m., Live music: Chicago Cellar Boys with Roya Naldi, Wyndham Garden Fitchburg, 2969 Cahill Main, 274-7200

Monday, Feb. 24

• 10-11 a.m., STEAM story time for ages 2-5, library, 729-1760 • 6-7 p.m., Board game night for adults, library, 729-1760

• 1:30 p.m., Mystery book club: “A Carrion Death” by Michael Stanley, senior center, 2704290 • 5:30-8 p.m., Warhammer Underworlds league, 2990 Cahill Main Suite 110, 270-1402 • 6-7 p.m., Stuffed animal sleepover for ages 1-8, library, 729-1760 • 6:30-7:30 p.m., Disney World vacation planning basics, library, 729-1760

Friday, Feb. 28

• 8 p.m., Live music: Shekinah King, The Thirsty Goat, 3040 Cahill Main, 422-5500 • 12:40 p.m., Movie screening: “The Irishman”, senior center, 270-4290 • 7:15 p.m., Live music: Avian Aura, Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 275-1050

Saturday, Feb. 29

Tuesday, Feb. 25

• 8:30-11:30 a.m., Rain garden workshop, senior center, • 11 a.m. to noon, Dinosaur party for ages 2-5, library, 729- 5510 East Lacy Road, 2704290 1760 • 10 a.m., Food allergy aware• 2-3 p.m., Palliative Care: ness discussion, Hy-Vee, Coping Better with a Serious 2920 Fitchrona Road, 273Illness, The Waterford, 5440 5120 Caddis Bend, 270-9200 • 11 a.m. to noon, Leap Day • 4-5 p.m., Breakout challenge for ages 5-12, library, 729-1760 celebration, library, 729-1760 • 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Strike • 6:30-8 p.m., Great Decisions at the Library, library, 729-1760 for a Cancer Cure hosted by the Someday Foundation, Ten Wednesday, Feb. 26 Pin Alley, 6285 Nesbitt Road, • 10-11 a.m., Toddler art for thesomedayfoundation.org ages 1-3, library, 729-1760 • 1:30 p.m., Quarry Ridge • 5:45-6:45 p.m., Circle of winter workday, Quarry Sacred Activism, Perennial Yoga Ridge Recreation Area, 2740 Studio, 5500 E Cheryl Pkwy, Fitchrona Road, madcitydirt. 288-8448 com

Thursday, Feb. 27

• 11 a.m. to noon, Cookbook club, library, 729-1760

Monday, March 2

• 6-7 p.m., Magazine poetry for kids, library, 729-1760

Book sale set Feb. 21, 22 EVAN HALPOP

If You Go

Star correspondent

The Friends of Fitchburg Library is hosting a used book sale from noon to 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at the library, 5530 Lacy Road. The book sale proceeds benefit the library. There will be a wide variety of children’s books, fiction, mystery, nonfiction as well as other genres at low prices. For more information, visit friendsoffitchburglibrary.com.

Tuesday, March 3

• 6-7 p.m., Pot O’ Gold slime for ages 9-12, library, 729-1760

Wednesday, March 4

• 10:30-11:30 a.m., Stoughton Norwegian Dancers performance, Fitchburg Community Center — Oak Hall, 270-4285 • 7-8 p.m., Tax assistance, library, 729-1760

ages 5-12, library • 6:30-8 p.m., Great Decisions at the Library, library, 729-1760

Wednesday, March 11

• 6-9 p.m., Legos for adults, library, 729-1760

Thursday, March 12

• 10:30-11:30 a.m., Understanding the Basics of Parkinson’s Disease, The Waterford, 5440 Thursday, March 5 Caddis Bend, 270-9200 • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Book • 1:30 p.m., Book club: “Calling club for adults: “The ImmortalThis Place Home” by Joan Jenists” by Chloe Benjamin, library, sen, senior center, 270-4290 729-1760 Friday, March 13 • 5:30-8 p.m., Warhammer • 6-9 p.m., Live music: Myles Underworlds league, 2990 Talbott Dyad, The Thirsty Goat, Cahill Main Suite 110, 270-1402 3040 Cahill Main, 422-5500 Friday, March 6 • 6-9 p.m., NERF lock-in for • 5 p.m., Frank Mittelstadt art ages 8-12, library, 729-1760 opening reception, Yahara Bay • 6-11 p.m., Euchre night, VeroDistillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, na Area International School, 275-1050 5830 Devoro Road, 845-4200

Saturday, March 7

• 10:30-11:30 a.m., Bridge and tower building for ages 2-5, library, 729-1760 • 1-3 p.m., Strike Out Lupus, Ten Pin Alley, 6285 Nesbitt Road, lupus.org/wisconsin • 1:30-2:30 p.m., Live music: Yahara Fiddle Club, The Waterford, 5440 Caddis Bend, 2709200 • 8-9:30 p.m., YaHaHa Comedy Night, Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 275-1050

Monday, March 9

Saturday, March 14

• 10 a.m., Solomon Carter fuller brain health brunch, Wyndham Garden Fitchburg, 2969 Cahill Main, adrc.wisc.edu • 11 a.m. to noon, Leprechaun traps for ages 4 and older, library, 729-1760 • 3-3:30 p.m., Trinity Irish dancers, library, 729-1760 • 7 p.m., St. Patrick’s Day party with Shruggers and El Donk and Acuyuta, Yahara Bay Distillers, 6250 Nesbitt Road, 2751050

• 6:30 p.m., Mom’s night out for Sunday, March 15 kids on the spectrum, Benvenu- • 11:30 a.m., Warhammer to’s Italian Grill, 2949 Triverton Underworlds tournament, Noble Pike Drive, autismsouthcentral. Knight Games, 2835 Comorg merce Park Drive, 758-9901 Tuesday, March 10 • 2-3 p.m., Biggie beads for • 4-5 p.m., Catapult design for ages 2-5, library, 729-1760

ELECT

DAVE HERBST

What: Friends of the Fitchburg Library used book sale When: Noon to 5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 21; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22 Where: Fitchburg Public Library, 5530 Lacy Rd. Info: friendsoffitchburglibrary.com

Fitchburg Alder District 1 Seat 2

Tuesday April 7, 2020

Memorial United Church of Christ

Independent Professional Experienced Common Sense Representation

5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg 273-1008 • www.memorialucc.org

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February 14, 2020

7

Fitchburg Star

Coming up “Gnome is Where the Heart Is”

Youths ages 13-17 are invited to make a plush gnome at the library from 4-5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14. Participants will take home their own stuffed bearded man with a pointy hat. Registration required, call 7291760.

Veterans and farming presentation

Madison VA Hospital is hosting an Agricultural Panel Discussion as part of their Veterans Affairs Farming and Recovery Mental Health Services (VA FARMS) pilot program at 11 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 19, at the library. There will be a keynote speaker and moderated panel discussion with a panel of farmers with expertise in one of the following areas: vegetable farming, grain crop, dairy, beef, emerging or niche farming markets, value added/food production and small/diversified farming operations. This panel discussion is geared toward veterans who are farming or are interested in farming. To register, call 256-1909 ext. 16431 or 256-1901 ext. 16433.

Learn Android phones

set to meet 11 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, at the library. Participants are encouraged to make a favorite recipe and bring the dish to the library, along with the cookbook where it came from. Samples will be available for all the dishes and participants will disDinosaur party cuss the recipes and cookbooks. Children ages 2-5 can join the For information, contact the library for a morning of dinosaur fun library at 729-1763. on Tuesday, Feb. 25. From 11 a.m. to noon, children Make flavored popcorn can dig for fossils and make dinoChildren ages 9-12 can learn how saur crafts. to make their own flavored popcorn Space is limited and registration is from 4-5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27, at required. the library. For information, call 729-1762. The library will provide sample recipes for both sweet and salty Agrace class snack cravings. Living with a chronic or serious Registration is required. illness on an everyday basis can be For information, call 729-1762. trying – a workshop by Agrace aims to provide information on how to Leap Day celebration make coping easier. The celebration comes only once From 2-3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. every four years. The Leap Day cel25, at The Waterford at Fitchburg, ebration is set for 11 a.m. Sunday, 5440 Caddis Bend, Kelly Planton, a Feb. 29, at the library. nurse practitioner with Agrace, will The event is geared for children talk about palliative care and how a ages 9-12. whole-person approach can improve Participants will play games, how you deal with the toll of serious make a time capsule and be providillness. ed a snack. The presentation is free. For information, contact the For information, call 270-9200. library at 729-1760. bring the necessary paperwork. Three more AARP Tax Help sessions will be held on Friday, March 20; Friday, April 3; and Friday, April 10. For information and to make an appointment call 270-4290.

Learning Annex

The Learning Annex at the senior center is hosting a program with Fitchburg chef Dave Heide 1 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the senior center. Heide is the owner and executive chef for Liliana’s Restaurant in Fitchburg, Charlies on Main in Oregon and has launched a donation based restaurant called Little John’s. During the Learning Annex sessions participants will learn about Tax Help Heide’s journey and his mission to Seniors are welcome for free tax “help others through food,” accordassistance on Friday, Feb. 21, at the ing to an event description. senior center. For information, call 270-4290. The sessions run 45 minutes and Cookbook Club are by appointment only. The monthly Cookbook Club is Participants are encouraged to Get a crash course in how to use an Android device and its operating system from 7-8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, at the library. The demonstration will cover the basics of using Android phones or tablets. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own devices with them to follow along. Registration is required. For information, call 729-1763.

Healthy Neighborhood grant applications open KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Guidelines for the Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative grant program have changed from 2019. Modifications were made to the eligibility requirements after the city withdrew a $10,000 grant to Chapel Valley Church in the program’s first year. The funding, which had yet to be paid out, was canceled in November after violations of separation of church and state were raised by the Freedom From Religion Foundation. FFRF alleged in a news release the church had planned to proselytize during events funded by the city, despite telling the city the gatherings would be secular. School districts are not eligible to apply for HNI funds, and religious organizations who apply are expected to use funds for non-religious purposes, and there can be no advancement of religion

either directly or indirectly. The grant application is open until Feb. 17, 2020. A Verona Area High School initiative received $8,000 last year from HNI, which is now prohibited under the new guidelines. Two other VASD schools, Stoner Prairie and Sugar Creek elementary schools, also applied for HNI funds, as did the Madison Metropolitan School District Trails to Success program, none of which had its requests granted. Other changes to the HNI program for this year include the creation of the United Way’s “Fitchburg Fund,” which will include $15,000

I Spy STEM

Children ages 5-12 can show off their STEM skills through a variety of puzzles and games from 4-5 p.m., Friday, March 6, at the library. The games and activities will help build skills like memory retention and developmental sorting. For information, call 729-1762.

Catapult Design

Children ages 5-12 are welcome to build a catapult from 4-5 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, at the library. Participants and staff will use everyday household materials to design and build a catapult. They will talk about the science of how catapults work and get to test their creation. For information, contact the library at 729-1760

Parkinson’s Disease 101

An informational program about Parkinson’s Disease will be held from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, March 12, at The Waterford at Fitchburg, 5440 Caddis Bend. Rachel Wilberding, the executive director for the Wisconsin chapter of American Parkinson Disease Association, will provide information about the condition and tips for better living for both people who have Candidate forum the disease and their caregivers. Get to know the candidates in the The program is free to attend. four aldermanic races in Fitchburg For information, call 270-9200. with a forum from 7:45-9 a.m. Tuesday, March 3, at Hawthorne Suites, St. Patrick Day 5421 Caddis Bend. events at the library Hosted by the Fitchburg ChamAs St. Patrick Day approaches the ber, Visitor and Business Bureau as library will offer festive activities. a part of its regular Fitchburg BusiFrom 11 a.m. to noon on Saturness Before Nine events, Mayor day, March 14, children ages 4 and Aaron Richardson, who is running older are welcome to build lepreunopposed, and aldermanic candi- chaun traps. Participants will build a dates will participate in a panel dis- trap and try to catch leprechauns. cussion. From 3-4 p.m. on Saturday, March Attendees can submit questions in 14, the Trinity Irish Dancers are set advance. to perform at the library. Since 1982, A light breakfast buffet will be the dancers have performed in Chiserved. cago, Milwaukee, Madison and the F o r i n f o r m a t i o n , v i s i t surrounding communities. The event

City of Fitchburg

City makes changes to program from prior year

fitchburgchamber.com.

is open to all ages. From 4-5 p.m. on Sunday, March 15, there is a St. Patrick’s Day Party at the library. There will be crafts and games. This event is geared towards ages 5-12. For information, contact the library at 729-1760.

Toddler Art

Children ages 1-3 are invited to “Toddler Art” from 10-11 a.m. Wednesday, March 18, at the library. Participants will practice fine motor skills as they create crafts. Parents are encouraged to stop by the event at various times throughout the hour. Participants should “be prepared to get messy,” the event description states. For information, contact the library at 729-1760.

‘What is in my mouth’

A taste challenge event has been opened to the most daring participants. The library is holding at “What is in my mouth” challenge from 3-4 p.m. Saturday, March 21, at the library. Participants will wear a blind fold while something edible is placed in their mouth, and then they will guess what it is. Taste can range from sweet, spicy, squishy, or slimy. The event is geared for children ages 13-17. For information, contact the library at 729-1760.

Fitch-Rona Art Crawl

The annual Fitch-Rona Art Crawl will return March 27-28. The event, which takes place at various businesses in the Fitchburg and Verona area, features 16 artists who create one of their works over a period of two days. Attendees can vote on their favorite artists, and two artists will receive cash prizes. Artists can be viewed from 5-8 p.m. Friday, March, For information, visit fitchburgchamber.com

See something wrong? The Fitchburg Star does not sweep please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 845errors under the rug. If you see some- 9559 or at fitchburgstar@wcinet.com so thing you know or even think is in error, we can get it right.

in grants for improving academic proficiency, developing leadership qualities and promoting career-readiness in three city neighborhoods, according to an email from city community development planner Wade Thompson. According to the email, the city intends to keep the majority of the money in the Verona Road West neighborhood, but will also use funds in the Belmar/Renaissance on the Park and North Fish Hatchery Road neighborhoods. Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@ wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

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February 14, 2020

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Fitchburg Star

Building a neighborhood Operation Fresh Start, Habitat for Humanity partner to erect home for Fitchburg family

City will use $100k pump to help residents with overflow KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

Come summer, Fitchburg residents Mostafa Chater, his wife Rajaa and three kids Zainab, 11, Ismail, 8, and Bilal, 3, will move into their newly constructed house at 4610 Unity Lane. That was why Chater told the Star he moved to America from Morocco in the first place — for his family to have opportunities like owning a home, getting an education and obtaining a fulfilling occupation. In a partnership between the Operation Fresh Start Legacy program and Habitat for Humanity of Dane County, the Chater family is having its future home erected in Fitchburg’s Renaissance on the Park neighborhood. A Habitat news release states OFS staff officially picked up hammers at the construction site in December, starting on a four bedroom house. “It’s an extremely important partnership for us to be together,” Cory Rich, OFS construction and conservation manager told the Star. “There’s not a lot of organizations dedicated to affordable housing in the area.” Rich said this isn’t the first time the two organizations have worked together on projects.

Hillside Heights pond gets flooding plan

Photo by Emilie Heidemann

Photo submitted In a partnership between the Operation Fresh Start Legacy Fitchburg residents Mostafa program and Habitat for Humanity of Dane County, the Chater family is having its future home erected in Fitchburg’s Renaissance Chater, his wife Rajaa and three kids Zainab, 11, Ismail, 8, and on the Park neighborhood at 4610 Unity Lane. Bilal, 3, will move into their Habitat for Humanity wished excited to move into his new newly constructed house at to break ground on some of home. 4610 Unity Lane this summer. The family came to Ameriits projects, but not many conThe family applied for a struction organizations in Dane can in October 2009, and Chahome, and Habitat for Humanity fer recollected not knowing any County work in the winter like English, which was scary for staff approved right away. And OFS. Chater now works as a kitchen He said as of Thursday, Jan. him. manager at a Madison CheeseBut he had a close friend here 30, the house still needed siding, gutters and the entirety of the who helped him find a job at a cake Factory location. Like OFS staff, Habitat for interior had yet to be finished Cheesecake Factory in Chicago. — but everything is on track to He also had his wife, his good Humanity families also work luck charm, as he called her. Six on the construction sites, each finish around July. OFS Legacy program partic- months before they were accept- having 375 volunteer hours to ipant Xavier Covarrubias, who ed into a lottery program for an satisfy, Jenny Ballweg, Habitat has been with the organization American green card, the two for Humanity communications director said. And the mortgage for nine months, said he is hap- were wed. Then in 2017, Chater was pre- each family pays on the houses py to be building a home for the sented with the opportunity to they own in the Renaissance on Chater family. the Park neighborhood go back “I’ve been homeless before,” move his family to Madison. “I met with my friends here into building more homes for the 17 year old said. “If there’s one less person out on the and they talked to me about the people in need. “Each family is a chain,” Habitat for Humanity program,” streets, that’s a good feeling.” Ballweg said. Chater said he is beyond he said.

The city has a plan for how to relocate water from the Hillside Heights Pond, should it flood. The Common Council approved the plan at its Jan. 28 meeting. It establishes how city staff would remove excess water from the pond, which is a kettle with no natural outlets. The plan involves using a six-inch pump to send water east on Irish Lane toward Syene Road and plugging culverts underneath the road to reduce seepage into nearby agricultural fields and homes. Staff would send the water into a culvert at Greenfield Park near the intersection of East Hill Drive and Oakhaven Road. The Hillside Heights Pond takes nine and a half hours to drain with a pump that displaces 40,000 gallons of water an hour. The city purchased the trailer-mounted equipment to divert water away from the area for around $100,000. Staff can take the mobile unit to multiple areas in need of pumping, public works director Mike Bisbach said. “When there’s flooding, everybody’s renting (pumps), so they’re not available when we need them,” he said. “We have to have it for when there’s an emergency.” The state Department of Natural Resources has approved the plan, which Bisbach said has its downsides. It could lead to the potential flooding of crop land if seepage occurs, and erosion in the culvert channel at Greenfield Park. Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

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February 14, 2020

Fitchburg Star

9

City of Fitchburg

Comprehensive plan process winding down NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

The eight-month process for renewing the city’s comprehensive plan is nearing its end. On March 10, the Common Council will review and possibly adoption the plan, which has been the focus of about 30 public meetings over the past several months. Public comments will be taken up to the date of that meeting in email, in writing or by public appearance at the meeting. The plan provides a broad overview of the city’s goals and objectives for the next decade in nine areas – land use and zoning; financial i nve s t m e n t s ; e c o n o m i c development; community character; housing; public facilities; utilities; transportation; and natural, cultural, ecological, architectural and agricultural resources. By state law, all city landuse decisions must accord with the plan, and it must be updated every 10 years. The last plan was adopted in March 2009, and they are generally designed to look ahead 20 years, though Fitchburg’s last plan set a 50-year planning horizon. Updating a comprehensive plan is an exhaustive public process that involves solicited feedback from residents, businesses and neighboring governments, as well as many opportunities for

Feedback on the plan To offer feedback on the final draft of the plan, emailing planning@fitchburgwi.gov with the subject line: “Comp Plan Update Comment,” deliver them in person to City Hall, 5520 Lacy Road or submit verbal comments at the March 10 meeting. The plan can be viewed at Fitchburg City Hall, Fitchburg Senior Center, Fitchburg Library, Fitchburg Pick ‘n Save, Luna’s Groceries, Boys and Girls Club of Dane County (Allied Family Center), Novation Senior Commons, Centro Hispano of Dane County and Urban League of Greater Madison. unsolicited comments. The previous comprehensive plan involved more than 100 meetings. The final public hearing for citizen feedback was held Jan. 21, and the following day, city planner and zoning administrator Sonja Kruesel presented alders with a summary of the main revisions proposed. She told alders Fitchburg has “grown from a hamlet to an energetic city” and is a “young community creating a sense of place, but it takes time for a sense of place to evolve.” She added that her goal is continued orderly growth while maintaining the city’s character with balanced neighborhoods, ecological sensitivity and technology. Four of the alders provided Kruesel with their proposed amendments to the document, such as

including provisions for affordable workforce housing, encouraging more sustainable land use, promoting funds for first-time home buyers and creating a plan for implementing 5G wireless connectivity. Some expressed discontent at not having been able to provide their input sooner. Alder Julia Arata-Fratta suggested that the public had also not been involved enough in the process. Kruesel responded that in addition to the 30 meetings since the process began in May 2019, and all resources for public outreach had been exhausted. Alders voted in July to set a timeline that would complete the comprehensive plan before this year’s elections. Neal Patten can be contacted at neal.patten@wcinet. com.

Ordinance defines responsible bidders Unified Newspaper Group

By state law, when bids come in for public projects, the city has to award a contract to the “lowest responsible bidder.” Now, for projects with contracts higher than $1 million, the city has a definition for a responsible bidder. The Council approved its responsible bidder ordinance at its Jan. 28 meeting, with 16 points of criteria potential contractors must meet to be considered, including being authorized to work in Wisconsin, having proper classifications and compensation for works and maintaining a safety program. Ald. Dan Bahr said the ordinance will add “integrity” to the city’s public works projects. Several communities around the state have responsible bidder ordinances, he said, including the City of Sun Prairie, which developed a strict policy after a July 2018 gas line rupture caused by an under-qualified company resulted in an explosion and death of a firefighter. “It’s common sense,” he said. “If we’re going to spend millions and millions of dollars on projects in

the city … it makes sense that there’s a certain criteria or level of training that the state recognizes that we ought to recognize.” Andrew Disch, the political director for the North Central States Regional Council of Carpenters, said the ordinance protects taxpayers by ensuring projects are done correctly the first time by a credible company. Under the ordinance, contracts cannot be awarded to companies barred from working with any government at the local, state or federal level or that have been in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s severe violator enforcement program within the two previous years.

The ordinance was passed with two changes – one requiring an apprenticeship provision for contractors and another changing the threshold of the law’s applicability to projects $1 million or more, an increase from the proposed project cost of $250,000. While the ordinance creates standards for contractors, Disch said, responsible companies in compliance support responsible bidder laws. “While low cost is the first priority, no doubt about it, value is also essential,” he testified in support of the ordinance. “You get what you pay for, everyone knows that.”

Solar farm project approved 20 megawatt array sees strong support at Plan KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

The creation of one of the county’s largest solar farms was approved last month. At its Jan. 21 meeting, the Plan Commission approved a permit for a 20 megawatt solar array on almost 180 acres of agricultural land south of Lacy Road and on either side of Seminole Highway. The solar farm will have 12-foot tall solar panels that adjust to the sun’s movement during the day and will generate enough energy to power 6,300 homes, equivalent to half the City of Fitchburg. Under the rental agreement, Madison Gas and Electric would operate the solar farm on brothers Tom and Pat O’Brien’s land for 35 years, with pollinator plants underneath the arrays. After the rental agreement is up, the land would go back to being used for agriculture. Other solar farms in Dane County include a 6MW solar farm at Morey Field Airport in Middleton and a 9 MW setup at the Dane County Regional Airport. Epic’s 2 MW field on its 900-acre Verona campus was the biggest in the state when it was completed in 2012.

Large solar farms around the state include a 150-megawatt project in Two Rivers near Lake Michigan north of Milwaukee and a 300-megawatt solar farm in Iowa County that together create enough power for 1% of Wisconsin’s households. The contractors of the project, EDF Renewables, plan to start constructing the solar farm’s first phase starting in spring 2020. Initially, the Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee was concerned about water runoff, but the planting of the pollinator-type plants with long roots and a reserved space at the corner of Lacy and Seminole for a retention area alleviated that concern. The project received strong support at the public hearing, with six people speaking in support of the project and others submitting comments stating their desire to see the project move forward. Pat O’Brien said he’s proud to be a part of the project, and is glad to know that his family’s land will stay in the family for a fifth generation. “We’ve been excited right from the start that this project was going to be on our farm,” he said. “I like to think that maybe another step in being innovative, like our family has been, right from the start.” Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

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Rendering courtesy EDF Renewables

A 20 megawatt solar farm is being proposed for the farmland on either side of Seminole Highway on the O’Brien brothers farmland. The solar farm would be powerful enough to power half of the homes in Fitchburg.

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10

February 14, 2020

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

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The leaders of Chapel Valley Church started looking for a new facility a decade ago. Little did they know their 10-year search wouldn’t take them very far – they’ll be moving across the street to 2970 Chapel Valley Road from the original location. Pastors Jeremiah and Suzie Genin said they would have preferred to find a space in Fitchburg’s northwestern neighborhoods near Verona Road, where the church does the majority of its outreach.

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The Common Council approved new polling place locations for Districts 1 and 3 last month. “We don’t want any barriers redistricting done and we’ll listening to the feedback and will use it to make equitable for elections,” he said. “We’re have all these locked in.” decisions. Email reporter Kimberly hoping by 2022 we’ll have the

Chapel Valley Church to move KIMBERLY WETHAL

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difficult for many in that heavily populated area, one of the poorest parts of the city. The polling places for Districts 2 and 4 are also outside of the district, but aren’t quite so egregious – the Lacy Road fire station building is across the street from the District 2 boundary, and the Fitchburg Community Center, next to City Hall, is close to a heavily populated area in District 4, which spans a significant amount of rural land in the city. The selected locations were meant to distribute the polling places evenly throughout the city, Marsh said. But he acknowledged the difficulty it can cause some people. “We don’t want people without transportation or people with mobility issues to have to cross major roadways,” he said. “We’d like to keep something at the old fire station or a church … it was more based on equity and fair distribution throughout the community.” Then-clerk Patti Anderson had told the Council in October 2017 the polling locations were “temporary” when District 1 Alds. Dorothy Krause and Anne Scott raised concerns that the polling place was inaccessible by walking

underneath Verona Road or crossing McKee. Marsh said there have been a lot of concerns regarding the location of District 1’s polling location being located across a major thoroughfare and how difficult it is to access. One possible solution is the building that caused the problem in the first place. Dane County bought the former King James Way fire station last month and plans to reopen it in 2021 as its Emergency Operations Center. Another option could be Redeemer City Church, located on King James Way, Marsh said. He noted that Leadership at the church expressed interest in becoming a polling place even before fully moving into its current location, because of how isolated from services the neighborhood west of Verona Road is. Either way, Marsh said the current polling places will be in effect throughout 2020 and parts of 2021, as the city expects to have U.S. Census data back mid-year 2021. After the census data is received, Marsh said, the city will start the redistricting process. Part of that process will take into consideration the population increase from the October 2022 Town of Madison dissolvement. Marsh said the city is

RE SE

Continued from page 1

EGGIM AN RD

Polling: Future Town of Madison population will be taken into consideration with redistricting

“Ironically, to be right across the street, I’m sure there’s something deep in there for me to discover,” Suzie Genin told the Common Council before alders unanimously approved their rezoning and permit request to allow a religious use Tuesday, Jan. 14. Starting in 2021, Chapel Valley Church will use the second floor of the building, Genin told the council. While the church has purchased the entire building, she said the first floor tenants will not be affected and will be subject to property taxes, while the second floor of the church or any nonprofit tenants will not. Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

Wethal at kimberly.wethal@ wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

Old National Bank to close EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

Old National Bank is planning to close three area branches, including one in Fitchburg. The Fitchburg branch, 3052 Cahill Main, is set to close Friday, April 24. Andrea Marquardt Finck, community relations manager for Old National Bank, told the Star the Fitchburg, Stoughton and Oregon locations will consolidate services in Verona, 420 W. Verona Ave. All four locations were Anchor Bank branches before 2017.

She said even though the physical bank locations are closing, the company is working to keep active ATMs there. The company is assessing staffing needs for each branch, Finck said, with some newly created and open positions available. “In the financial services industry as a whole, retail branch traffic is down as more and more people are choosing to be served digitally,” Finck said. She said there are still several Old National Bank retail locations in Dane County to meet clients needs.

Madison agrees on share of Fish Hatch rebuild It will pay 25% of intersection at Greenway Cross to the Beltline KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

The City of Madison has agreed to pay $572,000 for its share of the Fish Hatchery Road reconstruction project. The project, scheduled to start this year and finish a second phase in 2021, will get partial funding Madison for segments of the roadway in its jurisdiction. That includes 25% of the Greenway Cross intersection and the stretch of road going north up to the Beltline. There are also some water utility lines owned by the City of Madison that stretch further down the corridor included in the approved funding, Fitchburg city administrator Patrick Marsh told the Council at its Jan. 28 meeting. The rest of the $20.3 million project is being funded by Dane County, which is paying for half of the reconstruction

costs. Fitchburg picks up the rest, including any beautification costs. The first phase will rebuild the portion of the road between the Beltline to Traceway Drive in 2020. The second phase, which runs from Traceway Drive to Brendan Avenue, will be completed in 2021. That project will reconstruct all six lanes of both north- and southbound Fish Hatchery Road, improve traffic flow at the eight intersections, replace five failing retaining walls, mitigate flooding through stormwater improvements and add landscape planting and decorative paving. The project will also include the construction of a bridge on the edge of the Nine Springs Golf Course property for a multi-use path. Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

This free event includes live music from the Cajun Spice Band along with a delicious lunch of jambalaya, corn bread and King Cake! Our bar will be open serving free drinks, there will be a prize drawing and lots of Mardi Gras beads.

Please RSVP by February 13 by calling 608-620-6010 or email receponist@noelmanorliving.com.

471 Prairie Way Blvd. • Verona, WI • 608-620-6010 • noelmanorliving.com

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February 14, 2020

COPA: Providing accessibility to the arts important Continued from page 1 The center would be located on Index Road in the area south of Post Road and east of Fish Hatchery, where COPA executive director Nancy Mistele – a former Dane County executive candidate – estimated 40,000 cars drive through daily. Mistele said the proposed location would place 80% of the county – 246,000 area residents and 47,000 youth – within a 15-mile drive of the center. “Fitchburg is our footprint, Dane county is our reach,” she stated. Mistele emphasized the diversity of the area: 45% Hispanic, 30% black and 22% white. “The most important thing is about this center is to provide accessibility to the arts for communities that don’t normally have access to this kind of facility,” she said. “Dale’s vision is to locate it here to help under-served communities.” Mistele began working with Sticha on the project around the same time she was leaving her job in the state’s Office of Business Development, as part of the transition to the Gov. Tony Evers administration. She has a long history of working in construction, real estate, fundraising and development. Since then, she has assembled a board of directors including a founder of the Madison Ballet, leaders from the Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra and Capital City Theatre, individuals with affiliations to art programs at University of Wisconsin-Madison, the founder of One City Schools and bankers. The board also includes one former City of Fitchburg District 3 alder, Dan Carpenter, who resigned after he moved out of his district. Mistele said Carpenter supported the project while on the council and stated she believes he will continue to be instrumental in helping alders understand the economic impact of the project. Mike Leckrone, former UW-Madison marching band director of 50 years, is the

honorary capital campaign chair for the project. The organization seeks to raise $35 million, partly through corporate grants, for the proposed center by the end of 2020. Mistele said she believes the center would become a cornerstone for the city, catalyzing and driving development in the Fish Hatchery Road opportunity zone, a designation that signals to developers that the city is interested in developing – or in Fitchburg’s case, redeveloping the area. A redevelopment plan originally created in the early 2000s resurfaced in November that outlined where city staff envisioned the corridor could be redeveloped. Parts of that plan are already changing its landscape, including the senior housing development on the corner of Traceway Drive and Fish Hatchery Road and the building of a second UW Credit Union within the city’s borders. Mistele said the center would help attract additional restaurants and hotels to the area faster.

Home for the arts

The center would have multiple uses, Mistele said. It could offer venue space for weddings, anniversary parties, senior citizen activities and youth events, she said. But on a day-today basis, it would become a home for children’s and adult theater groups, ballet companies, dance organizations, after-school programming and arts-related educational opportunities and internships. Capital City Theatre and Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra are interested in collaborating on the project. “Someone from WYSO has been at the table for this from day one envisioning this as their future home,” Mistele said. “WYSO wants to make sure the community is behind them before committing to move.” Fitchburg’s new Milestone Democratic School would also become a tenant in the building. The charter school is associated with the University of Wisconsin

11

Fitchburg Star

City of Fitchburg

North Stoner developments approved

and recently received approval for a rezone on its Index Road property. “My goal and my mission is to build this in Fitchburg and make it for Fitchburg,” she said.

Finding funding

As Sticha was often on the road touring, he knew needed help getting momentum behind the project, Mistele said. He is the owner of Sosonic, which is located about a halfmile from the proposed center on Latham Drive, just outside the Fitchburg border with Madison. Sosonic provides equipment and production services for community music events including staging, lighting and audio systems. Sosonic hosts The Listening Room, a monthly event inviting up-and-coming local artists to perform in the rehearsal studio. Sticha had previously purchased land elsewhere in Fitchburg with the goal of building the center there. But after enlisting the aid of Mistele, she convinced him that forming a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and putting the center in a more visible area would be the best way to see his dream realized. “The reason this didn’t grow legs before now is Dale is always on the road,” she said. “He needed to employ boots on the ground.” While Mistele is just now beginning the fundraising process, which is still in the “quiet phase,” she said the funding is starting to come in and the majority will come from private investors. Mistele said she has been working closely with Michael Zimmerman and Joyce Frey from the city’s economic development department on the project. “In a perfect world, we would start construction in 2021 and begin operation in 2022. We are hoping to be ready to open when the Fish Hatchery road construction is finished,” she told the alders. “Some people may say it is an aggressive timeline, but we need a goal.” Contact Neal Patten, Community Reporter, at neal.patten@wcinet. com.

Rendering courtesy Veridian Homes

The preliminary design for the Crescent Crossing development at the corner of Lacy Road and Seminole Highway in the North Stoner Prairie neighborhood. District 1, shown in yellow, would consist of single-family homes, while Districts 2 and 3 would hold twin homes. All homes would be built on compact lots. KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Two residential developments in the North Stoner Prairie neighborhood totaling 164 housing units can begin development this year. The Common Council approved final plats for the Crescent Crossing development in the northeast corner of Lacy Road and Seminole Highway and the second addition to Stoner Prairie development directly east of it at its Jan. 14 meeting. The Second Addition to Stoner Prairie development will have 43 single-family homes and serve as

a connection to Lacy Road for the Crescent Crossing project adjacent to the west. The Crescent Crossing project will have 65 single-family homes and 56 twin homes. Debbie Beaver, vice president of operations for William Ryan Homes, which is developing the Second Addition to Stoner Prairie, said the company anticipates building infrastructure after a sanitary sewer is put in at Lacy Road to connect to the development, with the remainder of development beginning in late summer. No timeline for the Crescent Crossing development was discussed during the meeting.

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February 14, 2020

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Spring election

Three to compete in Feb. 18 primary Unified Newspaper Group

Voters in the City of Fitchburg’s 4th Aldermanic District will have a primary election next Tuesday to narrow down candidates before the April election. Three candidates, Marc Jones, Scott Lehmann and Randy Udell will vie for the District 4, Seat 8 spot on Feb. 18. Ald. Janell Rice, the incumbent, announced last year she would not be running for reelection because of a “family matter.” The two highest vote-getters will move on to the April 7 election, which will feature contested races in each of the other three aldermanic districts. This will be Fitchburg’s first election where only half of the Common Council is running for re-election at a time, as the seats up for re-election this year all were 1-year terms. This year, winners all will have two-year terms starting in April. District 4 covers the largest geographical area of Fitchburg, with much of it rural. Areas to the south

Marc Jones

Jones, who serves on the Agriculture and Rural Affairs committee and is a former alder, Town Board member and mayoral candidate, said he’s running to preserve Fitchburg’s “great quality of life.” The city’s split between urban and rural areas and its accessibility to amenities such as bike paths and farmers markets, is part of what creates that quality of life, he said. Jones said his experience in local government and on the board of a regional

credit union, as well as his status as self-employed, makes him a good candidate for alder because of his availability to serve and knowledge of issues. Jones, who was on the Town Board when the city was incorporated from a township almost 37 years ago, said he thinks the agreement to bring part of the Town of Madison into the city by 2022 should remain as it is. “There’s five entities that created that agreement years ago,” he said. “To try to make changes now, you’d have to get all five of those to agree with it … I don’t think we got a bad deal out of it.” The main concerns Jones outlined in his questionnaire are road conditions and stormwater management, because those issues are all affected by development in the city. He said he’d like to see the city adopt a purchase of development rights program, such as the Town of Dunn has, and preserve the southern portion of Fitchburg as farmland to maintain a strong quality of life. “I’m very passionate about development rights,” he said. “Once you know that you can’t go that way, then you focus on redevelopment.”

Scott Lehmann

Lehmann, a crime scene investigation detective for the Dane County Sheriff’s Office, also serves on the Agriculture and Rural Affairs committee, and has volunteered as a coach and as a part of the leadership board for his childrens’ football program. Lehmann said he looks at the role of alder as an opportunity to be more educated on how local government works while simultaneously serving and listening to his neighbors. “I’ve always been giving back to my community in my law enforcement role, but now I wanted to come at it with a different angle,” he said. “I’ve done things with my kids in sports and giving back to the community in that way, volunteering and coaching, but this is just another way I see that I can give back to my community.” Lehmann said he’s concerned about road conditions and construction timelines in the city, as well as stormwater management and flooding in the Lake Barney area on the southern border with Oregon. In his questionnaire, Lehmann also mentioned increasing investment in renewable energy sources and maintaining open lines

City to debut electronic poll books for February primary Devices to speed up voting process, reduce work for clerk’s office KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

The city will introduce electronic poll books for the February election to speed up voting and reduce work for poll workers and the clerk’s office. City of Fitchburg clerk Tracy Oldenburg told the Star the electronic poll books, called Badger Books, will replace paper versions and will be more efficient in checking voters in and processing absentee votes. “It’s basically a wonderful time-saving tool, not only for our department, but for the voters, for the election inspectors, for everybody involved,” she said. “It’s so easy to use, everything is right there on the screen for you to use.” The books will debut on Tuesday, Feb. 18, where two local primaries and one state primary will be on the ballot. Typically, primary elections see lower voter participation, Oldenburg said, which

is why the city decided to implement them at a time when it’s not quite as busy at the polling places. Badger Books only do what a printed poll book could do, Oldenburg said. They don’t have the ability to tabulate votes, and are only connected to other electronic poll books throughout the state through an internal server. Voters will still receive a printed ballot, and those will go through the same tabulation system as prior elections. The Badger Books are a completely different technology than the ones used in the Iowa caucuses earlier this week. Those held back results because of “coding issues” with the state’s Democratic Party’s app, which was being used for the first time. Badger Books were created by the Wisconsin Elections Commission in 2017 to work in tandem with the state’s WisVote registration database. The electronic poll book system ensures that voter counts and numbers are correct, because it eliminates human counting err, Oldenburg added. All poll workers in the City

Check your registration Before you head to the polls, check to make sure your registration is up to date, especially if you’ve moved since the last election. People can check their voter registration status online at myvote.wi.gov, as well as see where their polling place is located and look who’s on their ballot.

of Fitchburg will be crosstrained on both the Badger Books and the tabulation machines, Oldenburg said. Should there be technological issues with the Badger Books – the main one Oldenburg said could occur is a power outage – the devices

have a back-up battery that will allow the election chief to see where the books left off, and start using paper poll books as a back-up system. “The same materials you’d have at any election will be there, regardless of the Badger Book usage,” she said.

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of communication as priorities he’d like to see in the city. Lehmann said he’s eager to talk to people in the district and continue to have good conversations with them. “I want them to look at me as someone who’s approachable,” he said. “I want to be that person where if you have a concern and you have an idea about how we can make something better, I want to be open and I want to hear that.”

Randy Udell

Udell, a retired AT&T engineer who volunteers as the treasurer for the state Democratic Party, said he’s running for the seat because he wants to be a forward-thinking leader for the district. He got involved in politics as a teenager during a period of unrest, Udell said, and worked behind the scenes for Wisconsin members of Congress as a college student. He then worked for the state of Maryland investigating

white-collar fraud in the attorney general’s office and had a brief stint with the FBI before working with his father’s engineering company. “I felt it was time to represent my community of 22 years,” he said. Udell said he and other residents of his district are concerned about climate change and the impact it’s having on the rural areas o f F i t c h bu rg , a n d h e ’s also concerned with fiscal responsibility. In his questionnaire, Udell said he would like to see the city improve its watershed practices and create better means of draining excess rainwater and managing climate change. “This is good, in a sense that we recognize that there’s an issue,” he said. “In Fitchburg, it is the flooding – property, basements, even my own backyard. I haven’t had any water in my basement, but it’s been a swamp all summer.”

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of Irish Lane and east of Syene Road are in District 4, as are the areas west of Fish Hatchery Road south of Lacy and south and west of Mckee and Mutchler roads. All three candidates told the Star stormwater management and flooding are among their main concerns in their district. The candidates also stated their interest in other issues the district and city face, including growth and property rights, road conditions and climate change. The Fitchburg Star interviewed all three candidates, listed below in alphabetical order, for the seat this month and had them fill out questionnaires regarding their thoughts on the city.

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Top two vote-getters will go on to April 7 election


ConnectFitchburg.com

February 14, 2020

Fitchburg Star

13

Spring election

The Fitchburg Star sent candidate questionnaires to all three of the candidates for a two-year term as alder in District 4, Seat 8 in the City of Fitchburg. There is no incumbent, as Janell Rice is not running for reelection. Marc Jones, Scott Lehmann and Randy Udell are competing in a primary Feb. 18. Candidates were asked to limit their answers to 50 words, with an exception of one question up to 100 words. They were also allowed to skip two questions.

Scott Lehmann

community, listen and understand the issues and be a voice for Fitchburg. Another is to ensure balanced development and growth. I will do so by maintaining open lines of communication between the developers, city staff and the residents. As a member of the Agriculture and Rural Affairs committee, I am familiar with the flooding issues across the city. I know a plan is in motion for Lake Barney, and with the knowledge of the experts and feedback from the residents, I’m optimistic we can achieve a positive outcome. The city put the comprehensive plan process on an eight-month timeline. Do you agree with how this was handled? Yes, the city council and staff worked diligently and with transparency during the comprehensive process. Once adopted, I expect it will guide our decisions for where and how much to develop. My approach is to balance development and growth, listen to local residents and represent their perspectives on the council. How can the city balance promoting development with the needs of the rural residents? Open lines of communication and transparency between residents and developers will be essential to reach balanced development for the city. Residents should have the opportunity to provide ideas and feedback for all of the proposed plans.

W h a t re s p o n s i b i l i t y does the city have to manage increasing problems with stormwater and flooding? The city needs to consult with experts on how to fix flooding. Once those options are laid out, the residents need to be informed and allowed to voice ideas and concerns. The city needs to make it clear to developers once a plan is approved, changes need proper explanation and approval. If budgets and spending limits did not prevent it, what is one project you would champion to improve the quality of life in Fitchburg? I n c r e a s e i nv e s t m e n t and up the timeline of the renewable energy resolution. It set ambitious targets and guidelines for energy use reduction and renewable energy generation for city operations. The goal is 25% in 2025 and 100% in 2030. It would be great to see Fitchburg meet these goals sooner. What is the best thing about Fitchburg Fitchburg has a thriving urban area with successful businesses and a variety of entertainment and dining options on the northern edge. On the southern end lies prosperous agriculture and farming communities. The city is home to a diverse population who are passionate and care how we can make it a better place.

Marc Jones

CWA while with Local 4630

Age: 69 Family: Married to Lois Beck for 31 years. Four children, eight grandchildren. Originally from: Fitchburg. Education: High school; some continuing education courses through CWA and my Jones employer Occupation: Farmer; I own and operate our family farm (since 1973), my family has farmed in Fitchburg since 1913 and I have owned and operated a small construction company, the Jones Company, for 37 years Political experience: I served on the Fitchburg Township Board during incorporation, Fitchburg City Council, Fitchburg Ag and Rural Affairs Committee, Fitchburg Veterans Memorial Park sub-committee, have run for council and mayor Other notable affiliations: Heartland Credit Union board for 20 years; president of Communication Workers Union Local 4630 during time with AT&T; national committees for

Why are you running? I have a lot of experience in local government, am a small business owner, and help manage a $300 million Credit Union. I can provide a voice for the Fitchburg farmers, and business people among with all of our residents (in) our district. I am self-employed and have the time to give back to our local government and help all of the people in our district. W h a t a re t h e m o s t important issues facing your district? Managing development and all of the issues that come with it: Traffic, roads, stormwater. The biggest one is maintaining our great quality of life. Fitchburg is a great place to live, and we must try to keep it that way for both the urban and rural residents. The city put the comprehensive plan process on an eight-month timeline. Do you agree with how this was handled? Yes, the staff did a great job of trying to get input from everyone. How can the city balance promoting development with the needs of the rural residents?

One way is by following the comp plan, we have a plan, we need to follow it. It also requires open communication and common sense moving forward. What does the city need to do to ensure equitable access to city services, particularly for those west of Verona Road and in rural areas? Open communication with as many residents as possible, We only have so much money to provide services to everyone. If we work together we can solve any problems that come up. Would you push for any changes to the agreement to annex part of the Town of Madison when it dissolves? No, it was a well thought out plan, we along with the Town of Madison, City of Madison, Dane County and the State of WI, developed the plan and it will be complete soon. I support it. What responsibility does the city have to manage increasing problems with stormwater and flooding? We have a responsibility to try and help manage stormwater. I serve on the Ag and Rural Affairs Committee, we have been active in trying to solve problems in the rural area, especially the Lake

Age: 46 Family: Wife Jenniffer and three amazing children (17, 12, 10) Originally from: Fitchburg Education: Associates degree in criminal justice, graduate of Leadership in Police Organization Lehmann program Occupation: Dane County deputy sheriff Job title: Crime Scene Investigator Political experience: Member, City of Fitchburg Agriculture and Rural Affairs committee, candidate, District 4 Seat 8 alder in 2019 Other notable affiliations: Board member, Oregon Youth Football League

Essay questions

Why are you running? I am a fifth generation Fitchburg resident, growing up on the family farm where I still reside. I want to continue to give back to my community, be a voice for the residents, and set a positive example for my children. I want them to see the importance of participating in the local government. What are the most important issues facing your district? My first priority is to serve as a strong advocate for the

Essay questions

Age: 58 Family: Spouse, Brad (60), dog, Morgan (11) Originally from: Beloit, grew up in Janesville Lived in Fitchburg since: 1998 Education: Bachelor of Science from UW-Whitewater Udell Occupation: Treasurer of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin Employer: Retired engineer for AT&T Political experience: President of Young Democrats, student senator at UW-Whitewater, worked for Congressman Les Aspin (district office, Campaign, and D.C), worked for the Maryland Attorney General, chair and treasurer of the 2nd Congressional District Democratic Party of Wisconsin, at-large board member of Democratic Party of Wisconsin, treasurer of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin (3rd term).

Essay questions

Why are you running? My jobs have taken me all over the United States, but Fitchburg is where I feel my heart is for 22 years now. I feel that my experience has fine-tuned my ability to succeed as your representative. I know I can be the forward thinking leader that our district needs. What are the most important issues facing your district? The most pressing issue facing Fitchburg has to be climate change, followed by the debate over development, and maintaining our high standard of living. First on my agenda would be addressing the detrimental effects of flooding

Barney area. I have attended most of the meetings with the local land owners, along with 7+ state, county and local governments. We have been meeting to bring solutions that will help local property owners while not causing flooding of our neighbors to the south and further down the watershed. If budgets and spending limits did not prevent it, what is one project you would champion to improve the quality of life in Fitchburg? I intend to work towards a purchase of development rights – state grants would help create funding that would help buy the rights to ever develop, leaving as much of the south Fitchburg area as open space and farmland. We have had a great quality of life in Fitchburg, why do we want to spoil it by letting it develop. What is the best thing about Fitchburg? Great quality of life. We are close to a large urban area, but still rural in parts. We have great access to bicycle activities, to farmers markets, a chance to see where our food is grown, and in some cases, meet the farmers who grow our food. It does not get better than that.

in my district, followed by discussing where development should and should not happen. The city put the comprehensive plan process on an eight month timeline. Do you agree with how this was handled? There must be adequate time for the people of Fitchburg to advocate for their opinions. As long as we have enough time for this dialogue between our city council and my constituents, then an eight-month timelines is adequate. It still must maintain its thorough outline for the future of Fitchburg. How can the city balance promoting development with the needs of the rural residents? First, there must be a conversation of how both sides of this debate can be appeased, especially through discussion over the comprehensive plan and where the urban service line will limit development. From that discussion, I will deliver a forward thinking consensus back to the council. What does the city need to do to ensure equitable access to city services, particularly for those west of Verona Road and in rural areas? There have been several attempts to address this issue, which at the time did not work for various reasons. We need to revisit our transportation options, to analyze costs and make the most fiscally responsible decision for where my constituents want transportation improvements. Would you push for any changes to the agreement to annex part of the Town of Madison when it dissolves? This is first about negotiation, I would put forth the conversation to my constituents. I would hold neighborhood forums to encourage

discussion and to see how my district would like our city council to act moving forward. I would then present their input to the other alders of Fitchburg. What responsibility does the city have to manage increasing problems with stormwater and flooding? It is our city’s responsibility to address the flooding. We require improved management of our water and drainage; we need the focus of county and state officials to offer their resources to improve our accessibility to clean drinking water. This is an issue that needs our focus. If budgets and spending limits did not prevent it, what is one project you would champion to improve the quality of life in Fitchburg? I would focus on strategic decisions to improve our watershed practices. That would mean creating better drainage methods in southern Fitchburg, thorough mechanisms to deal with rainwater collection, and an overhaul of our water supply pipes. I would create better mechanisms to deal with the detrimental effects of climate change. What is the best thing about Fitchburg? My husband, Brad, and I chose to move to Fitchburg over 22 years ago because of its mix of urban and suburban living, while also having access to parks and nature preserves, I want to maintain our reason for moving here. Fitchburg to me is our opportunities, our services, and our high standard of living. In every way Fitchburg offers the best opportunities for every stage of one’s life. It is diverse, it is changing, and to have a part in the changing and maintaining of the city I love would be an honor.

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14 Fitchburg Star - February 14, 2020

City Hall - Main Line Administration Assessing Building Inspections City Clerk Economic Development

270-4200 270-4213 270-4235 270-4240 270-4210 270-4246

FACTv Finance Fire Department FitchRona Human Resources Library Municipal Court

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Parks & Forestry Planning/Zoning Police Public Works Recreation/Community Center Senior Center Utilities

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5520 Lacy Road, Fitchburg, WI 53711 • www.fitchburgwi.gov

SENIOR CENTER The Senior Center is now offering spring Madison College classes. Courses include Beginner Spanish, Fundamentals of Drawing, Creative Writing and Genealogy. For specific course numbers, call the Senior Center at 608-270-4290.

Learning Annex 2.0 Learning Annex 2.0 will feature Chef Dave Heide, owner of Liliana’s (Fitchburg) and Charlie’s on Main (Oregon). Learn about Dave’s newest endeavor to help others through food called Little John’s on Wednesday, February 26 at 1:00 p.m. in the upper level of the Senior Center.

Milwaukee Beer Line Gallery Since statehood, beer has played an integral role in the growth of Wisconsin industry, while bringing Milwaukee national fame. What might be less obvious, but no less important,

was the profound role that rail transportation played in this story. To shine a light on both, the Center for Railroad Photography & Art curated the touring exhibition Milwaukee’s Beer Line, which narrates the rise, fall, and rise again of Milwaukee’s beer industry through the eyes of the Milwaukee Road’s Beer Line. Photographs from the show come from the Center’s Wallace W. Abbey Collection. During the 1950s, Abbey as an associated editor for Trains magazine, the nation’s foremost railroad magazine. With offices located in downtown Milwaukee, the Beer Line became a natural subject of interest. The Senior Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The display will be available for viewing through March.

A PERFORMANCE BY THE STOUGHTON NORWEGIAN DANCERS Wednesday, March 4th at 10:30 a.m. The internationally known Stoughton Norwegian Dancers will present their authentic folk dances at 10:30 a.m. in the Fitchburg Community Center – Oak Hall. This talented group of high school students, dressed in Norwegian bunads, will showcase a variety of dances to music provided by keyboardists and a hardanger fiddle. The perfor-

mance will include humor and gymnastic skills. The Dancers have toured extensively in the United States and have performed in Canada and Norway. They are the goodwill ambassadors for the City of Stoughton. All ages are invited to attend this free performance, sponsored by the Fitchburg Senior Center.

SAVE THE DATE Fitchburg Senior Center Friends Pancake Breakfast Fitchburg Senior Center April 26, 2020 ~ 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

RAIN GARDEN WORKSHOP RECREATION DEPARTMENT 2020 Winter/Spring Recreation Programs Are Open for Registration! Go to www.fitchburgwi.gov/recreation and click on “View Activities” to see our full list of programs!

Martial Arts Classes – (Ages 9-15 & Adults)

Martial Arts classes are held each month at the Fitchburg Community Center. Each student will receive a well-rounded martial arts and fitness education. We teach the standard striking and blocking movements, traditional forms, and weaponry. We also offer more unique aspects, such as practical self-defense and joint manipulation applications, tumbling and acrobatics, fitness tracking and goal setting, two different kinds of ground fighting, armored weapon fighting, two different kinds of stand-up fighting that incorporate elements of boxing and take-downs, throws, and more. Martial Arts are not about fighting, they are about self-defense and self-betterment. Therefore, we have a Code of Conduct that we expect all students to uphold. Students of any age can maximize their potential through our program and become better people. Values like courage, optimism, and humility, along with concepts of leadership including outstanding citizenship & community service, are all character development goals embodied in the program. • Days – Mondays & Wednesdays, March 2 – March 25 • Time - 6:00 – 6:45 p.m. • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – $50

Daddy-Daughter Dance

Girls, take Dad or Granddad out for a special night of dinner and dancing. Fathers, enjoy a wonderful evening with your daughter(s) while creating lasting memories. FACTv will take your photo and then you will have access to download your digital copy online. Space is limited. • Day – Friday, February 21 • Time - 6:00 – 8:30 p.m. • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – $50 per couple, $15 for each additional participant

Fitchburg Community Center February 29, 2020 ~ 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Register at https://ripple-effects.com/Event/Home/Detail/689 $10 registration fee; space is limited

SPRING RECYCLING DAY

Theater Workshop

This program is perfect for youth interested in imagination, art, and theater. Participants will enjoy creating skits, acting, creating props, storytelling, and more! This program will be led by recreational therapists, ensuring fun for participants of all abilities! • Ages – 6-10 • Day – Friday, February 28 • Time – 1:00 – 4:00 pm • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – $30, sibling discount: $15

Super Scientists

Calling all young scientists! Join this exciting program to enhance your knowledge of science, your problem solving skills, and your creativity. There will be experiments, games, research, problem-solving, and so much fun. This great program will be led by a recreational therapist to ensure fun for participants of all abilities. • Ages – 6-10 • Day – Friday, March 20 • Time – 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – $30, sibling discount: $15

Spring Dance Classes

We offer a variety of dance classes for kids ages 2-12. We offer Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Saturday classes. Dance classes vary by day. Please visit the Recreation website for more information regarding exact time and days of specific classes. • Day/Time – Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday nights, Saturday mornings, April-May • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – Fees range from $56-$84

Youth Soccer (Birth Year 2015 - 2016)

Practices & scrimmages will be on Saturday mornings (9:30 a.m., 10:15 a.m. or 11:00 a.m.) The goal of this program is to teach kids basic skills and for them to gain an appreciation for the game. • Ages – Birth Year 2015 - 2016 • Day/Time – Saturdays, April 11 - May 9 • Location – McKee Farms Park • Fee – $30 resident, $35 non-resident

City Hall Campus April 18, 2020 ~ 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Paper shredding, electronics recycling and MedDrop

2020 CENSUS The 2020 Census provides a count of the nation’s population. The Census occurs every 10 years, with data collected from the Census used to determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and to inform distribution of billions of dollars in federal funds to local governments. By formulating a Complete Count Committee (CCC), local governments play a key role in developing partners to educate and motivate residents to participate in the 2020 Census. Mayor Richardson recently formed a five-member City of Fitchburg CCC. The

CCC will be tasked with encouraging participation in the 2020 Census by all City residents, through various channels. The first meeting of Fitchburg’s CCC will be February 10, 10:30 a.m., Fitchburg City Hall, 5520 Lacy Road. Please see this link for further information on this meeting, https://agendas.fitchburgwi. gov/OnBaseAgendaOnline/ or contact Wade Thompson, the City’s Community Development Planner, at wade.thompson@ fitchburgwi.gov. For further Census information, please see: https://2020census.gov/en

CITY OF FITCHBURG AND UNITED WAY OF DANE COUNTY PARTNERSHIP HEALTHY NEIGHBORHOODS INITIATIVE The City of Fitchburg is pleased to announce a partnership campaign with United Way of Dane County, to support the City’s Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative (HNI). This campaign, called The Fitchburg Fund – Powered by United Way, will run through the month of February, 2020 and will focus on the following youth educational issues:

• Improving academic proficiency • Developing leadership qualities • Promoting career-readiness For more information, visit http:// www.fitchburgwi.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/20337 To support the campaign, visit bit.ly/fitchburgfund

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Dwellings offers living room sets and other furnishings of varying styles to suit every taste and palette.

February 14, 2020

Fitchburg Star

15

Dwellings offers fabrics of every color at its new Fitchburg location, which opened in October of last year.

Designing ‘Dwellings’ Fitchburg business offers interior decor services EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

Photo courtesy of Dwellings

From left, Jenny Haley and Jennifer Umhoefer are sisters who own Dwellings.

The owners say Earthy colors are on trend this year, as evidenced by the variations of green.

Dwellings 2924 Hardrock Road 230-6604 dwellings-furniture.com

Sisters and Dwellings co-owners Julie Umhoefer and Jenny Haley have one goal in mind – to help their clients make their houses into dream homes. What started as staging service to furnish vacant houses for sale on Madison’s west side around eight years ago has turned into a Fitchburg retail store space that opened in October 2019 on 2924 Hardrock Road. Dwellings offers interior design services, complete with a furniture showroom. Dwellings was inspired by the sisters’ experiences growing up in the family’s furniture store. Umhoefer and Haley recall sitting inside that store one night as teenagers, brainstorming the names of the business they might open one day. The name Dwellings came to them immediately, and they decided to stick with it – as is their decision-making style. The sisters got their post-secondary education before starting Dwellings – they both ventured to school, Haley for business and marketing and Umhoefer for interior design. Around eight years ago, the sisters combined their expertise and the connections they made through their family furniture store with vendors and brands to provide services on Madison’s west side. But the building Dwellings inhabited then didn’t suit the burgeoning potential of what the business could offer. After seeing examples of showrooms with aesthetically pleasing furnishings, the sisters saw an opportunity to have their own – but not in the Madison space, which was built in the 1980s. The Fitchburg space fell into the

Photos by Emilie Heidemann

Dwellings, which offers a furniture showroom and interior design services, is located on 2924 Hardrock Road. sisters’ lap. “This was always our dream,” Haley said, looking at her sister with a smile. The sisters do both in-store and in-home design consultations around Dane County. They discuss space needs, take its dimensions and customize it with North American-made furnishings and decor, the Dwellings website states. The reasons for hiring Dwellings vary from client to client – some simply want to give their living room a facelift or bring the entire house into the 21st century, the sisters agreed. Clients have the option to choose from paint, design and accessorization consultations for $150. For $500, the sisters will dedicate five hours to help a client design their new home. Showroom furniture includes sofas, ottomans, tables, bedroom sets, reclining chairs and other accents, the website states.

Haley said if a piece of furniture doesn’t fit the clients taste, there are an array of fabrics and materials available in store for them to choose from. She and Umhoefer provide a casual and comfortable atmosphere for clients to explain what they want both in-store and in client homes, Haley said. But Umhoefer said the sisters challenge clients to think outside the box and encourage them to try new and emergent trends. Filling the Dwellings showroom is charcoal greens, deep navys, rustic reds, burnt oranges, creams, blacks and golds. The sisters concurred those colors reflect how people are gravitating toward a modern and contemporary feel inside the home, shifting away from the minimalist industrial vibes of the previous decade. The aforementioned colors pair well with natural wood finishes and all things Earthy, they agreed.

Luna’s Groceries to get expanded building for development EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

Fitchburg’s Luna’s Groceries has been selected to anchor the Rule development on South Park Street, according to a January Wisconsin State Journal article. On Thursday, Jan. 16, Milwaukee-based Rule Enterprises, led by Brandon Rule, informed the City of Madison that the Allied Dunn’s Marsh neighborhood store will operate a 24,000 square foot space on 1402 South Park. The story states the new space is expected to be much larger than the

Luna’s Groceries 2010 Red Arrow Trail 285-5422 store at 2010 Red Arrow Trail that opened in early 2019. The Red Arrow Trail location will continue to serve the Allied Dunn’s Marsh neighborhood. “We’re super excited about it,” Mariam Maldonado told the State Journal. “We will try to identify with our customers and what they are looking for. The beautiful thing about Park

Street is that it’s as diverse as the Allied neighborhood, so I cannot wait to research what to provide our customers.” The Park Street store, like the Red Arrow Trail one, would serve a neighborhood that has been without a grocery store since the Pick ‘n Save next store will be razed to make way for future developments, the story stated. The store’s Allied neighborhood location brought fresh produce to a place that had been without its own grocery store for nearly a decade. Email Emilie Heidemann at emilie. heidemann@wcinet.com or follow her on Twitter at @HeidemannEmilie.

‘Your corner store’ is located at 2010 Red Arrow Trail in the Allied Drive/Dunn’s Marsh neighborhood, providing as a convenient place to shop for residents and is stocked weekly with fresh fruits and vegetable.


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Start with the best. The best ingredients make the best meals.

Shop for delicious fresh produce, quality meats, cheeses & so much more. Your locally owned grocer for 118 years.

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Verona boys hockey

Wildcats race through Big Eight ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Celebrating Senior Night is something all high school and college teams do, but few teams celebrate the way Verona boys hockey did. Three seniors scored in the Wildcats’ 4-2 home win over the Janesville Bluebirds on Tuesday, Feb. 11, completing an undefeated run through the Big Eight Conference. Verona (20-4, 14-0 Big Eight) earned the No. 1 seed in the Division 1 Edgewood Sectional and will host the winner of Madison Memorial and Baraboo/Portage in the regional finals Friday, Feb. 21, at 7 p.m. The Wildcats are ranked fifth in D1 in the latest Wisconsin Prep Hockey Coaches Association Poll.

Verona 4, Janesville co-op 2

S e n i o r D r ew Ye a g e r scored the game winner for the Wildcats late in the third period, and Conrad Moline added an insurance tally off an assist from Anthony Heinrichs. The Bluebirds tied it at 2 with a pair of quick goals in the third. Verona seniors Parker Ploc and Keegan Lindell scored in the first period. Heinrichs assisted on both goals. Osting also assisted on Ploc’s goal and Moline also assisted on Lindell’s tally.

Verona 5, SPASH 2

After a scoreless first period, Wildcats erupted for four straight goals in the second to beat the Panthers

at home Saturday, Feb. 8. Ryan Ritter scored 2:02 into the second off assists from Ploc and Troy Tollefson. Lindell scored a little more than five minutes later off an assist from Nathan Jurrens. Verona tacked on two power-play goals in the second. Cale Rufenacht collected the assist on Walker Haessig’s tally with 7:56 left, then scored with 1:31 left off assists from Ritter and Leo Renlund. SPASH scored 37 seconds before the second intermission and 6:40 into the third period to cut it to 4-2, but Rufenacht added an insurance goal with 1:03 left in the game off an assist from Haessig. Kaden Grant made 20 saves in the win.

Verona 5, Sun Prairie 1

Rufenacht recorded a hat trick and also had an assist as the Wildcats clinched their fourth straight Big Eight title on the road Tuesday, Feb. 4. “It’s kind of an expectation at this point,” Rufenacht said of winning the conference crown. “We came into this season expecting to win conference. When we all buy in, we feel like we can beat anybody.” The Wildcats capitalized on their second power-play opportunity with 5:08 left in the first period. Jurrens ripped a wrister past Sun Prairie goaltender Alex Liegel, as Rufenacht and Renlund assisted on the goal. Renlund applied pressure to Liegel, stole the puck away and found Rufenacht

Photos by Adam Feiner

Verona’s first line of Josh Osting (back left), Leo Renlund (21), Nathan Jurrens (middle), Walker Haessig (9) and Cale Rufenacht celebrate after Jurrens scored in the first period against Sun Prairie on Tuesday, Feb. 4, at Sun Prairie Ice Arena. The Wildcats won 5-1 to clinch their fourth straight Big Eight Conference championship. in front for his first goal with 1:21 left in the first. Rufenacht was denied by Liegel on a penalty shot 27 seconds into the second period, but he picked up his third point with 3:02 left before the second intermission. The captain muscled his way in front for a short-handed goal off an assist from Haessig. Renlund beat Liegel fivehole on a breakaway 38 seconds into the third period to make it 4-0. Rufenacht completed his hat trick by tipping in a shot

from the point by Renlund with 1:59 left. Osting also assisted on the goal. Grant finished with 14 saves.

Arrowhead 4, Verona 1

The Wildcats couldn’t mount a comeback against the Warhawks on Saturday, Feb. 1, at Howard G. Mullett Ice Center in Hartland. Arrowhead scored one goal in the first period and the first three of the third. R u f e n a c h t s c o r e d w i t h Verona goaltender Kaden Grant makes one of his 15 saves 6:22 left off an assist from against Middleton. He recorded his seventh shutout of the Turn to Verona/Page 5 season in the Wildcats’ 8-0 win.

Edgewood boys hockey

Crusaders peaking as D1 postseason nears ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Without hype in the state rankings, Edgewood has quietly rounded into form with the Division 1 postseason on the horizon. The Crusaders, winners of nine straight games, are 18-4 overall and completed a perfect 12-0 run through the Badger South Conference. Coaches took notice and seeded Edgewood second in its own Division 1 sectional, which it will host at Madison Ice Arena. The Crusaders will play the winner between Reedsbu rg / Wi s c o n s i n D e l l s / Mauston and the Monroe co-op in the regional finals Thursday, Feb. 20, at LaBahn Arena in Madison. Puck drop is scheduled for 6 p.m. “Conference was our first

Photo by Mark Nesbitt

Edgewood senior Drew Lenz (top) shoots in front of Oregon senior Ben Wiedholz on Friday, Feb. 7, at LaBahn Arena in Madison. The Crusaders won 8-2.

at LaBahn Arena. J.J. Wiebusch and Parker Murn each scored two goals and Payton Smith dished out four assists for EdgeEdgewood 8, Oregon 2 wood. The Panthers outshot the The Crusaders flexed their muscles against the Crusaders 33-32, but had a Panthers on Friday, Feb. 7, hard time getting the puck

goal and sectionals is our second one,” Edgewood coach Pete Rothering said. “We feel good about the way we are playing.”

past Edgewood goaltender Zach Walker, who made 31 saves. The Crusaders’ Drew Lenz scored off an assist from Smith 4:15 into the game. Cooper Fink scored with 4:36 left before the first intermission off assists from Wiebusch and Geoffrey Rossow. Murn beat Oregon goaltender Colton Dailey gloveside 5:29 into the second period. Wiebusch scored with 26 seconds left before the second intermission to make it 4-0. Edgewood’s Cody Menzel scored 46 seconds into the third period off an assist from Nathan Walker. Murn scored his second goal 13 seconds later off a pass from Smith. Wiebusch scored his second goal on the power play with 7:43 left, and Aidan Lenz scored nine seconds later.

Oregon capped the scoring with two goals in the final 2:30. “We came into the season wanting to go undefeated in conference,” Murn said. “We knew Oregon and McFarland would be our two toughest opponents. We knew they had a good goalie and we had to capitalize on our opportunities. It just shows that we are on our way to bigger goals – sectionals and state.”

Edgewood 12, Stoughton 0

The Crusaders scored six goals in the first period, three in the second and three in the third in a Badger South road win over the Vikings on Tuesday, Feb. 4, at Mandt Community Center. Wiebusch (four assists) and Drew Lenz (goal and three assists) each recorded

four points. Menzel netted a hat trick, while Fink added a goal and two assists. Smith, Aidan Lenz and Nathan Walker each had a goal and an assist. Murn, Rossow and Karl Gilmore dished out two assists apiece. Matthew Moyes, M a t t h ew S c h a c h t e a n d Oliver Zemke each scored once. Zach Walker made 23 saves in the shutout

Edgewood 8, McFarland 4

The Crusaders clinched the Badger South title with a road win over the Spartans on Thursday, Jan. 30, at McFarland Community Ice Arena. Edgewood scored three straight goals to go ahead 5-2 early in the third period, then scored the final three goals.

Turn to Crusaders/Page 2


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February 14, 2020

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Fitchburg Star

Metro Lynx girls hockey

Metro Lynx land top sectional seed MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

T h e M a d i s o n M e t r o Ly n x girls hockey co-op will bypass regional competition as the No. 1 seed in the Sun Prairie Sectional, putting them just two wins away from the state tournament. Madison earned the top seed over the Cap City Cougars, who lead the Lynx by one game in the Badger Conference. “We were lucky,” Lynx coach Mike McKersie said. “Cap City is a really tough opponent that was probably just as deserving to get the No. 1 seed. There are also some teams in the sectional that could play spoiler.” Madison (20-3, 10-2 Badger) will host the winner of Black River Falls and Viroqua in the sectional semifinals Tuesday, Feb. 25, at Madison Ice Arena. The Lynx are currently ranked second behind Eau Claire Area in the Division 1 Wisconsin Prep Hockey Coaches Association Poll.

Metro Lynx 4, Icebergs 0

Madison took advantage of two early miscues and tacked on a pair of insurance goals in the third period of a Badger home win Tuesday, Feb. 11, at Madison Ice Arena. Hannah Kolpien pounced on an Icebergs turnover and scored with 3:32 left in the first period off an assist from Abby Ahlborn. The Lynx caught the Icebergs in the middle of a line change shortly after, and Sydney Raaths dished an uncontested pass to Lauren Johnson for a goal with 1:55 left in the first. The Icebergs couldn’t take advantage of a pair of 5-on-3 opportunities, and Lynx goaltender Cam McKersie made two of her nine saves on breakaways. Hannah Kasdorf added the first of two insurance goals with 6:42 left in the third period off an assist from Stella Raichle. Grace Bonnell sniped a short-handed goal a little more than three minutes later off assists from Johnson and Kolpien.

Metro Lynx 5, Viroqua 0

Photo by Mark Nesbitt

Edgewood senior Sydney Raaths (2) celebrates with her Madison Metro Lynx teammates in the third period against the Cap City Cougars on Tuesday, Jan. 21, at Madison Ice Arena. She scored two goals in the Lynx’s 4-2 win. shot from the right side off Viroqua goaltender Abigail Severson and into the back of the net with 6:25 left in the first period. Abby Ahlborn and Josie Dragoo assisted on the goal. Bonnell skated through the Blackhawks’ defense and beat Severson five-hole less than two minutes later to make it 2-0. Raaths scored 1:04 into the second period off an assist from Rachel Mirwald. The Lynx took advantage of their only power-play opportunity, as Raaths faked out Severson and sent a backhand into the back of the net with 1:20 left before the second intermission. Sam Olander ripped a slap shot from the left slot past Severson 2:22 into the third period off an assist from Ruby Dykstra. Lynx goaltender Addie Armstrong made 10 saves in the shutout.

Madison beat the Blackhawks Metro Lynx 4, for the second time in five days in Central Wisconsin 2 Madison earned a marquee a conference game Monday, Feb. nonconference road win over 10, at Madison Ice Arena. Maddy Ahlborn got the Lynx the Storm on Saturday, Feb. 8, on the board when she banked a at Greenheck Field House in

Schofield. Central Wisconsin came into the game ranked No. 1 in the Wisconsin Prep Hockey Coaches Poll, while the Lynx were ranked fifth. Raaths scored two first-period goals, the first at the 8:26 mark off an assist from Mirwald, and the second a little more than four minutes later off assists from Bonnell and Johnson. Mirwald scored on the power play a minute into the second period off assists from Bonnell and Johnson to make it 3-0 Lynx. The Storm cut it to 3-2 after two periods, but Claire Wischhoff scored on the power play with 11:51 left off assists from Bonnell and Ava Jambor. The Lynx finished 2-for-5 on the power play and killed two of three penalties. The Storm held a slight edge in shots (18-17), as Armstrong made 16 saves in the win.

Community Arena. Rachel Simonson scored 2:33 into the game to give the Blackhawks their only lead. Raaths tied it 19 seconds later off an assist from Ally Jacobson. Kaya Pelton-Byce scored the go-ahead goal early in the third period off assists from Jacobson and Maddy Ahlborn. Raaths added a short-handed empty-netter off an assist from Bonnell with 1:07 left to seal the victory. Cam McKersie returned to the lineup and made six saves in the win.

scored one goal. Armstrong, Mirwald, Bonnell, Jacobson and Alina Stiller had one assist apiece. The Lynx outshot the Beavers 66-3, as Abby Nutini stopped three shots in the shutout.

Beaver Dam 0

Metro Lynx 20, Beaver Dam 1

Metro Lynx 2, Fox Cities 0

R a a t h s a n d M i r wa l d e a c h scored for the Lynx, and Armstrong made 23 saves for the shutout Saturday, Jan. 25, at Tri-County Ice Arena in Neenah. Raaths scored the first goal off an assist from Bonnell with 2:51 left in the first period. Mirwald scored a power-play Rock County 3, goal off a pass from Raaths 32 Metro Lynx 2 seconds into the third period to The Lynx had their 10-game seal the victory. winning streak snapped by the visiting Fury on Saturday, Feb. 1, Metro Lynx 4, Cap City 2 The Lynx earned a key sectionat Madison Ice Arena. Raaths put Madison ahead ear- al win Tuesday, Jan. 21, at Madily, as she raced up the right side son Ice Arena. past two Rock County defenders Raaths scored first from just and beat goaltender Olivia Cronin above the circles after Johnson glove-side with 12:35 left in the pinched in on the boards with first period. 4:48 mark left in the first period. Rock County tied it at 1 with Cap City tied it 36 seconds into 5:13 left in the second, as Sara the second period, but Olander Loerke scored off an assist answered 31 seconds later with a from Claudia Boehlke. Madison go-ahead goal off an assist from responded 46 seconds later when Abby Ahlborn. Ally Jacobson rifled a shot past Mirwald scored on the powCronin off assists from Kolpien er play off a cross-ice pass from and Olander. Bonnell to give the Lynx a 3-1 Alyssa Knauf tied it at 2 with lead with 46 seconds left in the 11:11 left off assists from Anika second. Johnson also assisted on Einbeck and Haley Knauf. Loerke the goal. scored the go-ahead goal with Cap City scored with 5:35 left 8:27 remaining off a pass from in the third period to cut the defiEinbeck. cit to 3-2, but Raaths put the game Armstrong made 25 saves for away with a breakaway goal with Madison. 2:50 remaining. Armstrong made 25 saves. Metro Lynx 18,

Twenty different Lynx recorded at least one point in a road rout of the Golden Beavers on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Beaver Dam Family Ice Center. The Lynx scored six goals in the first period, three in the second and nine in the third. Kolpien recorded two goals and three assists, while Raaths added two goals and two assists. Pelton-Byce netted a hat trick and Kasdorf also had three assists. Johnson and Olander scored two goals apiece. Raichle, Abby Ahlborn, Mia Goetzke and Claire Wischhoff each had one goal Metro Lynx 3, Viroqua 1 and one assist. Jambor and Neva Madison scored the final three White dished out two assists goals in a Badger road win apiece. Thursday, Feb. 6, at Viroqua Dragoo and Ava Downing each

Madison scored 10 goals in the first period and seven in the second in a home win over the Golden Beavers on Thursday, Jan. 16, at Madison Ice Arena.

Metro Lynx 2, Western Wisconsin 1

Raaths scored with 6:01 left in the third period off an assist from Alina Yazek to lift Madison past the Stars on Friday, Jan. 10, at Madison Ice Arena. Raaths converted on the power play with 2:13 left in the first period off assists from Mirwald and Jacobson, tying the game at 1. Armstrong picked up the win in net with 20 saves.

Crusaders: Sectional hosts eager to continue regular-season success goals, while Murn and Nathan win Saturday, Jan. 18, at HartWalker each had two assists. meyer Ice Arena in Madison. Wiebusch (hat trick and two Moyes pitched in one goal. Menzel (hat trick and an assist) assists) and Menzel (two goals and Fink (goal and three assists) and three assists) each recorded Edgewood 4, Monroe 2 each recorded four points. All of the scoring came in the five points. Fink dished out four Aidan Lenz added two goals third period, as the Crusaders a n d a n a s s i s t , w h i l e D r e w assists. Nathan Walker chipped in a netted the first thee and held on L e n z c h i p p e d i n a g o a l a n d goal and two assists. Aidan Lenz for a road win Tuesday, Jan. 21, two assists. Smith and Nathan added a goal and an assist, while at Stateline Ice and Community Walker each dished out three Drew Lenz had two assists. Smith Expo in Monroe assists. Smith and Drew Lenz recorded netted one goal. Murn and Wiebusch each had Zach Walker finished with 28 saves. a goal and an assist. Hartman and a goal and an assist. Zach WalkAndrew Budzinski each scored once. er completed the shutout with 19 Edgewood 7, Monroe 0 Menzel, Moyes, Murn, Aidan saves. Daniel Hoefer made 15 saves Lenz and Nathan Walker added in a Badger South home win over one assist apiece. Hoefer made 29 Edgewood 6, Sun Prairie 1 the Cheesemakers on Monday, saves. Menzel netted a hat trick in Jan. 27, at LaBahn Arena. the second, one of five Crusaders Wiebusch scored one goal and Edgewood 9, goals in the period, in a nonconhad three assists. Smith netted Monona Grove 0 ference home win over the CarThe Crusaders scored six goals dinals on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at two goals and an assist. Will Hartman added a goal and two assists. in the first period and three in the LaBahn Arena. Menzel chipped in a pair of second in a Badger South road Nathan Walker dished out three Continued from page 1

assists. Drew Lenz added a goal the shutout. and an assist, while Moyes and Edgewood 2, Oregon 1, OT Smith each scored once. Drew Lenz converted the game Zach Walker stopped 19 of 20 shots faced. Quinn Senke stopped winner 1:45 left in the extra period off a pass from Nathan Walker both of the shots he faced. on Tuesday, Jan. 9, at Oregon Ice Edgewood 7, Milton 0 Arena. The Crusaders scored four “We worked hard all game. goals in the second period and This was a good team win,” Lenz three more in the third in a Bad- said. “I just crashed the net hard. ger South road win Monday, Jan. We knew we were going to get a 13, at Mandt Community Center garbage goal.” in Stoughton. Oregon’s Joe Roemer scored Wiebusch recorded four points on the power play with 3:18 with two goals and two assists. left in the first period off a pass Smith (two goals and an assist) and Nathan Walker (goal and from behind the net by Adam two assists) each chipped in three Franken. Hoefer settled in after the goal points. Menzel and Murn added a goal and finished with 22 saves. Murn and an assist apiece. Fink and tied it at 1 with 1:12 left in the second period off assists from Drew Lenz each had two assists. Zach Walker made 16 saves in Menzel and Wiebusch.


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February 14, 2020

VA/MH’s medley relay wins conference title Assistant sports editor

When Verona Area/Mount Horeb sophomore Oscar Best broke the scaphoid bone in his wrist snowboarding, he knew missing critical training time in the pool could become a stumbling block in his push to qualify for state. In his second meet back on Saturday, Feb. 8, Best showcased he’s still in top form as a member of the 200-yard medley relay team that won a Big Eight Conference championship at the Beloit Memorial High School Natatorium. He also finished third in the 50 freestyle (21.94) and the 100 butterfly (52.02). Best said he doesn’t think his wrist is back to 100% yet, but once he starts swimming, adrenaline takes over. The scaphoid bone is one of the carpal bones of the wrist. It is situated between the hand and forearm on the thumb side of the wrist. “Whenever I start, I can feel a strain,” Best said. “Once I’m going, it feels fine. The biggest thing affecting me is the lost time in training.” VA/MH rached up 311 points to finish fifth as a team. It is the third-highest point total the Wildcats have registered at conference in the past 12 seasons. For the second week in a row, we had more season-best times than any other team at the meet,” VA/ MH coach Bill Wuerger said. Middleton (508) edged Sun Prairie (494.5) for the conference title. The Wildcats started the meet with a bang, as Best teamed with sophomore Luke Bennin and seniors Kyle Hoppe and Gabe Piscitelli in the top medley relay (1:37.06). “I don’t focus on what

seed we are or what heat we are in,” Best said. “We all had state-level splits. That’s the reason we won.” Hoppe used the medley relay to build momentum for another medal later in the meet. “I feel like that (medley relay) set the tempo and the mood for the whole meet,” Hoppe said. “We were hyped.” Best’s time was .01 seconds behind Middleton’s Forrest Peterson for second in the fly. Hoppe finished fourth in the event (54.04) after entering as the eighth seed. Owen Rothamer (55.43) and Bennin (55.79) placed 10th and 11th, respectively. Sophomore Conner Arneson finished third in the 500 free (4:55.93) and 10th in the 200 free (1:50.53). Senior Parker Jones took fifth in the 100 breaststroke (1:02.16), ahead of sophomore teammate Nathan Rozeboom (sixth, 1:02.68). Piscitelli (seventh, 1:02.70) and Bennin (eighth, 1:03.04). J u n i o r B e n We l l n i t z took fifth in the 500 free (4:58.62) and sophomore Avery Blas finished fifth in the 200 individual medley (2:01.55). Best, Hoppe, Piscitelli and sophomore Max McCartney placed sixth in the 200 free relay with a time of 1:29.74. Arneson, McCartney, Wellnitz and Christopher Lofts placed eighth in the 400 free relay (3:24.66). Hoppe and many of his teammates were partially-tapered for the conference meet, but all will be fully-tapered for the Division 1 Middleton Sectional on Saturday, Feb. 15. “ We ’r e l o o k i n g f o r ward to our sectional taper group dropping substantial amounts of time this week,” Wuerger said.

Photos by Eddie Brognano

Edgewood senior Truman teDuits swims ahead of Fort Atkinson’s Greyson Gottschalk in the 200-yard individual medley at the Badger South Conference Meet on Saturday, Feb. 8, in Monona. teDuits won the event in 1:56.64.

Crusaders eye repeat ADAM FEINER Sports editor

After ending Monona Grove’s four-year run as Division 2 state champions last season, Edgewood is hungry to start its own streak at the state tournament. The Crusaders took their first step towards repeating with a dominant performance at the Badger South Conference Meet on Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Silver Eagles’ home pool in Monona. Edgewood, which went undefeated in Badger South duals this season, won eight of the 11 events at the conference meet and finished with 469 points, well ahead of the runner-up hosts (400). University of Wisconsin recruit Truman teDuits played a part in four of the victories. He won the the 100-yard butterfly (51.83) and 200 individual

Edgewood sophomore Colin Senke competes in the 200yard IM at the Badger South Conference Meet on Saturday, Feb. 8, in Monona. The Crusaders won the team title with 469 points. m e d l ey ( 1 : 5 6 . 6 4 ) , a n d swam in two of the Crusaders’ three first-place relays. teDuits, Adam Moen, Chase Korb and Colin Senke kicked off the meet by winning the 200 medley relay (1:38.60) by more than six seconds.

Boston University recruit Nate Frucht joined teDuits, Moen and Senke in the top 400 freestyle relay (3:17.85), which won by almost six seconds. F r u c h t , Ko r b , D av i s Petersen and Josh Weber won the 200 free relay

Photo by Mark Nesbitt

(1:32.32) by more than five seconds. Individually, Frucht won the 200 free (1:48.57) and took second in the 500 free (5:02.11). Moen won the 100 free (49.31) and placed third i n t h e 1 0 0 b a c k s t r o ke (55.31). Korb touched the wall first in the 50 free (23.25). Senke finished second in the 100 back (53.36) and 200 IM (2:08.55). Edgewood enters the postseason ranked second behind Cedarburg in the Division 2 Wisconsin Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association Poll. The Crusaders will compete at the D2 Baraboo Sectional on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Jack Young Middle School in Baraboo. The Division 2 state meet will be held Friday, Feb. 21, at the UW Natatorium in Madison. Competition is slated to start at 6:30 p.m.

Madison West boys swimming

Regents kick to third at Big Eight Meet MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

Verona Area/Mount Horeb sophomore Oscar Best (left) congratulates senior Gabe Piscitelli after the Wildcats captured the Big Eight Conference title in the 200-yard medley relay on Saturday, Feb. 8, at Beloit Memorial High School. The Wildcats won the event with a time of 1:37.06.

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Edgewood boys swimming

VA/MH boys swimming

MARK NESBITT

Fitchburg Star

Spearheaded by Division I recruits in Isaac CaseyHrenak (University of Wisconsin) and Charlie Feller (University of Iowa), the Madison West boys swimming team has its sights set on winning a third straight Division 1 state championship. The Regents, ranked fifth in the Division 1 Wisconsin Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association Poll, finished third at the Big Eight Conference Meet on Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Beloit Memorial High School Natatorium. We s t r a c ke d u p 3 6 4 points. Third-ranked Middleton (508) captured the team title over second-ranked Sun Prairie (494.5). The Regents went 7-2 in Big Eight duals this season, with the only losses coming to Middleton and Sun Prairie. Casey-Hrenak won the conference title in the 100yard freestyle (46.85) and took second in the 50 free (21.18). He wasn’t satisfied with his time in the 50 free.

Photo by Mark Nesbitt

Madison West senior Charlie Feller finished second in the 200-yard individual medley at the Big Eight Conference Meet on Saturday, Feb. 8, at Beloit Memoiral High School. The Regents took third as a team. “I felt fantastic for the first half of it,” CaseyHrenak said. “I thought it was going to be a lot faster. I will be faster at the sectional.” Feller finished second in the 200 individual medley (1:57.95) and the 100 breaststroke (58.34). “Charlie is starting to come around,” West coach Jack Englehardt said. “He’s more of a late-season swimmer. He’s a really

hard worker and has a lot of dense muscle. He’s beat up most of the season.” Casey-Hrenak, Feller and fellow seniors Ethan Dong and Max Weygandt to take second in the 200 freestyle relay (1:28.66). The Regents’ 400 free relay team of CaseyHrenak, Feller, Weygandt and senior Jack Barber finished third (3:14.53). Sophomore James Stadler took second in

the diving competition (436.25) and Vaughn Pfaff placed fifth (350.45). We s t f r e s h m a n A t t i cus Nordmeyer took third in the 100 breaststroke (1:00.97) and Dong placed fourth (1:01.48). Weygandt took fourth in the 200 free (1:49.16) and seventh in the 100 free (49.34). Senior Victor Bulat placed sixth in the 100 butterfly (54.18) and Dong took eighth in the 200 IM (2:03.51). Freshman Nick Aus tin swam to an eighthplace finish in the 500 free (5:01.66) and sophomore William Jin placed eighth i n t h e 1 0 0 b a c k s t r o ke (56.39). Nordmeyer took ninth in the 200 IM (2:04.23) and sophomore Daniel Bocsi finished 10th in the 100 free (50.46). The Regents will compete in the Division 1 Middleton Sectional on Saturday, Feb. 15. The sectional champion in each event earns an automatic berth to the state meet, which is set for Saturday, Feb. 22, at the UW Natatorium in Madison.


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February 14, 2020

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Fitchburg Star

Oregon girls basketball

Panthers perched atop Badger South ADAM FEINER

and nine rebounds.

Sports editor

Oregon 63, Edgewood 54

Oregon won two games last week to extend its winning streak to six straight, pushing the Panthers to the brink of winning at least a share of the Badger South Conference championship. Oregon (15-4, 11-1 Badger South) is 11-1 in its last 12 games, with the only loss coming to Beaver Dam (ranked second in the Division 2 Associated Press state poll). The Panthers can clinch at least a share of the conference title with a road win over Watertown on Thursday, Feb, 13.

Oregon 89, Fort Atkinson 48

Kaitlyn Schrimpf scored a game-high 22 points and added six assists and five rebounds as the Panthers cruised past the Blackhawks at home Friday, Feb. 7. Oregon raced out to a 44-22 lead at the half. Liz Uhl added 18 points and hit four 3-pointers. Jaelyn Nedelcoff chipped in 14 points. Emily Statz and Izzie Peterson each had 11.

Oregon 60, Stoughton 51

When it mattered most, the Panthers made clutch free throws and forced turnovers off its press to pull out a road win over the Vikings on Tuesday, Feb. 4. Oregon made 3 of 4 free throws in the final 30 seconds to seal the victory. The Panthers jumped out

The Panthers picked up a road win over the Crusaders on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Earl J. Wilke Gymnasium in Madison. Uhl scored a game-high 17 points and swiped five steals. Peterson pitched in 15 points. Roberts and Schrimpf added eight points apiece.

Oregon 71, Milton 45

three-time defending Division 2 state champions on Saturday, Jan. 18, but lost to the hosts in the first-place Badger Challenge game. The Panthers outscored the Golden Beavers 31-28 in the second half, but dug too big a hole to climb out of. Beaver Dam jumped out to a 15-1 lead to begin the game. Schrimpf and Statz each scored a team-high nine points. Schrimpf helped the Panthers rally, as she hit a 3-pointer to cut the Golden Beavers’ lead to 17-8 with 10:19 left. However, the Beavers closed with a 14-6 run to take a 31-14 lead into halftime. Uhl finished with eight points and Roberts had seven points. Bloyer chipped in six points and grabbed a team-high eight rebounds.

The Panthers rolled to a home win over the Red Hawks on Thursday, Jan. 23. Peterson scored a gamehigh 19 points and had six assists for Oregon, which led 37-24 at the half. Oregon made nine 3-pointers, with two each from Peterson, Liz Uhl and Kaitlyn Schrimpf. Uhl scored 16 points and Oregon 67, Photo by Mark Nesbitt Statz added 11. Schrimpf Monona Grove 63 Oregon senior Liz Uhl (left) goes up for a layup in front of Monroe senior Grace Mathiason pitched in eight. Uhl scored a game-high on Saturday, Feb. 1, in Oregon. Uhl scored a team-high 16 points in the Panthers’ 77-57 win. Bloyer chipped in seven 27 points and also had five points and grabbed a gameto a 16-5 lead, as Uhl and 2-3 zone with drives to the mark. rebounds and three steals to Megan Bloyer combined basket and pinpoint passing Uhl scored 11 of her high 12 rebounds. propel the Panthers to a key for 14 points during the on the way to a home win team-high 16 points in the Oregon 61, Elkhorn 29 home win over the Silver spurt. first half to help the PanSaturday, Feb. 1. The Panthers used pres- Eagles on Tuesday, Jan. 14. Uhl scored 14 of her Peterson hit a jumper and thers to a 41-21 lead at the sure defense in a nonconSchrimpf scored 15 team-high 20 points before a layup to give the Pan- break. p o i n t s a n d h a d s ev e n ference road win Tuesday, halftime to help Oregon thers a 15-6 lead with 12:53 Statz drilled a 3 to start rebounds. She made three take a 32-25 lead at the left in the first half. Uhl the second half and Roberts Jan. 21, over Elks, who finof the team’s seven 3-pointished with more turnovers break. knocked down a jumper and knocked down a 3 to give (36) than points. ers. Schrimpf and Nedelcoff Schirimpf followed with the Panthers their largest Peterson chipped in sevSchrimpf recorded game each added nine points. a 3-pointer tio extend the lead at 70-39 with 8:13 left en points and dished out six highs in points (19) and Peterson pitched in eight. lead to 12. Peterson then in the game. steals (5). Uhl scored 14 assists. Bloyer had seven points and knocked down a jumper Schrimpf finished with Oregon led 36-32 at halfsix rebounds. Carliegh Rob- to give the Panthers a 24-8 14 points and five steals. points and Peterson chipped time. The Panthers shot in eight. erts also had seven points. lead with 9:16 left in the Roberts scored eight of her 43.7% (7-for-16) beyond Oregon 77, Monroe 57 half. Emily Mortenson hit 12 points after halftime and Beaver Dam 59, the arc, 72.7% from the free-throw line (16-for-22) The Panthers put on an a 3 and Schrimpf knocked grabbed seven rebounds. Oregon 45 offensive clinic, exploiting down a jumper to extend Statz nearly posted a douT h e Pa n t h e r s e a r n e d and outrebounded the Silgaps in the Cheesemakers’ the lead to 21 at the 7:17 ble-double with 11 points a r e m a t c h a g a i n s t t h e ver Eagles 36-28.

Verona/Edgewood gymnastics

Wildcat/Crusaders healthy ahead of conference MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

The Verona/Edgewood gymnastics team is getting healthy at the right time a little more than a week before the Big Eight Conference Meet. The Wildcat/Crusaders (4-2 in Big Eight duals) had their top lineup intact for the past two duals and Cardinal Invitational on Saturday, Feb. 8. Health and depth paid off for the Wildcat/Crusaders, who had had three of the top six all-around gymnasts and finished third at Middleton High School. The conference meet is slated for Saturday, Feb. 22, at Madison Memorial High School.

Cardinal Invitational

Senior Hailey Dohnal finished fourth in the allaround competition with a score of 33.80 to pace the Wildcat/Crusaders. Freshman Ella Crowley took fifth (33.10) and sophomore Alyssa Fischer placed sixth (32.40) out of 40 gymnasts. Verona/Edgewood finished third as a team with 133.075 points. Host

Middleton (136.675) edged the Waukesha co-op (135.65) for the team title. Dohnal finished second in the vault (8.70), just behind Middleton’s Taylor Engelkes (8.75). She added a fourth-place finish on the floor (8.85) and a seventh-place finish on the balance beam (8.525). Fischer took second on the uneven bars (8.550), just behind Middleton’s M e g g We i l e r ( 8 . 7 2 5 ) . Crowley finished fourth on the vault (8.6) and eighth on the balance beam (8.5). Freshman Katie Ryan finished eighth on the floor (8.7) and ninth on the vault (8.25). Sophomore Lily Merrick tied Weiler for 10th on the floor (8.6) and added Photo by Mark Nesbitt an 11th-place finish on the Verona senior Hailey Dohnal competes on the bars Thursday, uneven bars (7.975). Jan. 9, at Glacier Edge Elementary School. The Wildcat/ Crusaders beat Janesville Parker 131.40-112.45. Verona/Edgewood

130.475, Sun Prairie 128

Ryan was the only member of the co-op to win an event, but depth carried the Wildcat/Crusaders past the Cardinals Thursday, Feb. 6, at Prairie Phoenix Academy. Ryan won the vault (8.6) and took second on the

floor (8.6) and third on the balance beam (8.3). Crowley had the team’s top score on the balance beam, taking second (8.475). She also finished second in the all-around competition (32.270). Fischer led the team with a score of 8.275 on the uneven bars.

Verona/Edgewood 129.125, Madison East 104.475 The Wildcat/Crusaders won three of the four events en route to a win over the Purgolders on Thursday, Jan. 23 at Glacier Edge Elementary School in Verona. Crowley and Dohnal tied

for first in the all-around competition with a score of 36.625. Crowley won the balance beam (8.525), and Dohnal finished first on the floor (8.80). The Wildcat/Crusaders swept the top five spots in the vault and on the floor. Merrick won the vault (8.25), while Ryan placed second in the vault (8.20) and on the floor (8.60). Fischer competed in her first full dual since suffering a concussion and finished second on the uneven bars (7.850).

Middleton 134.525, Verona/Edgewood 131.150

The Cardinals swept the top three spots on the uneven bars and beam en route to a home win over the Wildcat/Crusaders on Thursday, Jan. 16. Dohnal won the vault with a score of 8.75. She finished second in the allaround competition (34) and the floor (8.850), and took fourth on the balance beam (8.7). Ryan placed third on the floor (8.80) and Crowley took fourth on the bars (8.150). Fischer finished seventh

in the vault (8.175) in her first competition since falling off the bars in practice. Noelya Jamie Janite took eighth on the beam (7.350).

Verona/Edgewood 131.40, Janesville Parker 112.45

Crowley won the vault (8.25) and the uneven bars (8.225) in a home win over the Vikings on Thursday, Jan. 9, at Glacier Edge Elementary School. The Wildcat/Crusaders swept the top three spots on the vault, uneven bars, floor and balance beam. Dohnal won the floor (9.1) and the all-around competition (33.60), eding Crowley (33.475). Ryan for the first time stuck an aerial and a three-quarter turning jump to win the balance beam (8.775). Dohnal took second on the beam (8.725). Jaime Janaite competed in her first meet after returning from a sprained ankle, finishing routines on the balance beam (7.825) and uneven bars (6.725). She stopped her floor routine after tweaking her ankle.


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February 14, 2020

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Verona prep sports

Quintet of Wildcats sign NLIs MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

Five Verona seniors signed National Letters of Intent on Wednesday, Feb. 5, to continue their athletic careers at Division I colleges. Leah Remiker (women’s track & field) and Eliot Popkewitz (men’s soccer) are staying close to home at Wisconsin, Gunnar Kilen signed to play football at Northern Iowa, Josie McCartney will swim at Seton Hall and Kasie Keyes will play softball at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis.

Remiker, Popkweitz to join Badgers

Remiker will feel right at home in Madison since both of her parents went to UW. “All of my family went there and I went on a tour and realized that was what I wanted to do,” she said. “They made such great memories there. It’s a family thing.” Remiker said it’s good to have her college decision official. She drew recruiting interest from several Division I schools and also considered Minnesota, Drake and Illinois State. “I was nervous leading up to it,” she said. “I know it wasn’t set in stone. Now that it’s actually set, it’s like this is happening and real.” Remiker is a three-time Division 1 state qualifier at Verona. Despite battling shin splints and tendinitis in her knee that sabotaged her training regimen last spring, she qualified for state in the 800-meter run and finished 14th (2:19.45). Remiker’s best time in the 800 is 2:18, three seconds away from the school record. She will look to etch her name in the school record books before becoming a middle distance runner for the Badgers. “I’m hoping to return to state,” she said, “and I would really like to get the school record in the 800.” Popkewitz’s decision capped off a standout prep career after he led the Wildcats to the Division 1 state championship in the program’s inaugural state appearance. The Badgers were on Popkewitz’s mind at an early age. He has had a Wisconsin soccer scarf hanging up in his bedroom since he was 10. “It’s always been a dream of mine to play soccer at Wisconsin,” he said. “I’m finishing that step of

Photo by Adam Feiner

Verona seniors (from left) Gunnar Kilen, Josie McCartney, Kasie Keyes, Eliot Popkewitz and Leah Remiker pose after signing their National Letter of Intent on Wednesday, Feb. 5, at Verona Area High School. Kilen will play football at Northern Iowa, McCartney will swim at Seton Hall, Keyes will play softball at IUPUI, Popkewitz will play soccer at Wisconsin and Remiker will compete in track & field at Wisconsin. the dream, so it feels great.” The 5-foot-8 midfielder and three-year captain became the program leader in goals (40) after finding the back of the net 14 times and dished out a single-season program record 16 assists. However, Popkewitz will make the switch to left back for UW. He played the position for his Madison 56ers club team. “I’m happy to play anywhere, but they have explicitly told me I will be playing left back,” he said. “There will definitely be a little bit of a learning curve, but I’ve already started embracing it.” Popkewitz was a first-team allBig Eight Conference selection the last two seasons. He was the Big Eight player of the year and included in the Wisconsin Soccer Coaches Association’s “Best 11” on the all-state team as a senior. He was also selected to the 2019 United Soccer Coaches Fall High School Boys All-Great Lakes Region Team.

the Missouri Valley Football Conference and advanced to the FCS quarterfinals. “I didn’t sign in December, and over time I narrowed my choices and it seemed like a no-brainer,” Kilen said. “After a while, it just made sense.” He combined with fellow senior Adam Vandervest, a Western Michigan recruit, to pave the way for a Verona rushing attack that averaged 241.5 yards per game and finished the season 7-3. Kilen received 22 Division I offers and considered Colorado State, Wyoming and Ball State. He was a defensive lineman in youth football, and didn’t make the switch to offense until 2018. “Northern Iowa had the best football program,” Kilen said. “At the end of the day, I’m going to go there for a great education and I’m going into construction management, which is a great degree. It’s a great program, it’s close to home and a great fit.”

McCartney feels A 6-foot-7, 280-pound center, like family with Pirates

Kilen finds home at UNI

Kilen was recruited as a building block along the Panthers’ offensive line. Kilen made seven visits to campus in Cedar Falls, Iowa. UNI went 10-5 last season, finished second in

McCartney was a four-time Division 1 state qualifier for the Verona Area/Mount Horeb girls swimming team. She was a member of the Wildcats’ 200-yard medley relay team that won

softball at Detroit Mercy, one of the Jaguars’ conference rivals in the Horizon League. “It’s such a relief,” Kasie Keyes said. “I didn’t know where I was going at the beginning of my senior year, so I just put all my faith in God. He led me down a path to the right school.” Keyes said she reached out to IUPUI on a “leap of faith”. She attended a softball camp in November, and at the end of that month, she made an official visit that resulted in a scholarship offer. “The campus is beautiful,” she said, “and it’s downtown Indianapolis, so what’s not to like? I’m familiar with the conference and it’s a perfect fit for me.” A slick-fielding, power-hitting shortstop for the Wildcats, Keyes was a key cog in Verona’s undefeated run through the Big Eight Conference last season. She led the Wildcats in doubles (13), walks (16) and slugging percentage (.814) on her way to three prestigious honors — firstteam all-conference, honorable Keyes follows faith to Indy mention all-state and first-team Keyes used a family connection all-district. IUPUI went 18-38 and finished to get an opportunity to continue fifth in the Horizon League last her softball career at IUPUI. Her sister, Cori Keyes, played season.

a state title with a time of 1:43.34, helping VA/MH to a fourth-place finish in the team standings. She also finished seventh in the 100 butterfly as a junior and 15th as a senior. McCartney was recruited to swim the butterfly, but said she also will swim the 100- and 200-yard freestyle. “It’s a really amazing opportunity and I’m thankful I was able to get to this point,” she said. “Looking back at my whole swimming career, it was a big thing to swim in college. When I started, it was this huge goal I always wanted to achieve. I never thought it would be possible.” McCartney also looked at Butler and other colleges in the Midwest. She made an official visit to Seton Hall in October and stayed overnight with the team. “It felt so close like a family and the coaching staff was so supportive,” McCartney said. “It’s really the college experience I want with a really close team, really strong academics and opportunities at a big university.” Seton Hall, located in South Orange, New Jersey, is a member of the Big Eight Conference.

Verona: Perfect run through conference helps in postseason seeding Continued from page 1 Haessig. Grant made 30 saves.

Verona 7, Beloit Memorial 0

Twelve different Wildcats recorded at least one point in a win over the Purple Knights on Thursday, Jan. 30, at Edwards Ice Arena in Beloit. Verona outshot Memorial 85-7, as Grant (seven saves) picked up his eighth shutout of the season.

Verona 17, Eastside Lakers 0

Sixteen different Wildcats recorded at least one point in a rout of the Madison East/Madison La Follette co-op Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Hartmeyer Ice Arena in Madison.

Verona 8, Middleton 0

The Wildcats scored five goals in the first period en route to a home win Friday, Jan. 24.

Renlund scored on a breakaway 23 seconds into the game off a stretch pass from Jurrens. Osting scored with 5:17 left in the first off a pass in front from Heinrichs. Moline also assisted on the goal. Ploc scored six seconds into a power play off assists from Ritter and Keegan Lindell with 4:20 left in the first. Ploc scored again almost three minutes later off a rebound, as Yeager and Derek Iszczyszyn picked up the assists. Moline converted on a rebound with 33 seconds before the first intermission off assists from Heinrichs and Cordray. Jurrens scored on the power play 3:21 into the second period off assists from Rufenacht and Haessig to put the running clock into effect. Calvin Moioffer scored right in front of the net 3:10 into the third period to make it 7-0. Rufenacht capped the scoring when he took

a pass from Renlund and flipped a Cordray and Moline. Rufenacht backhand into the back of the net had a power-play goal at the 8:57 with 4:15 left. mark of the first period. Grant stopped 15 shots. Cordray scored off a pass from Moline with 3:41 left in the first, Notre Dame de la Baie 3, and Rufenacht scored another Verona 2 power-play goal off assists from The Wildcats never led against Jurrens and Grant with 31 secthe Tritons in their second game onds left in the period. at the Wausau West Invitational Ploc scored 58 seconds into on Saturday, Jan. 18. the second period off a pass from Keegan Lindell and on the power Wausau West 3, Verona 0 The tournament hosts scored play at the 4:38 mark off a pass twice in the first period and again from Rufenacht. Jurrens scored in the second Friday, Jan. 17, with 7:02 left in the second off a at Marathon Park Ice Arena in pass from Osting. Ritter scored a short-handed Wausau. goal with 10:02 left in the third Verona 8, Janesville co-op 0 off a pass from Jurrens. Grant (six The Wildcats started fast with saves) and Hebgen (nine saves) four goals in the first period and combined on the shutout. three more in the second Thursday, Jan. 9, at Janesville Ice Are- Verona 8, Madison Memorial 0 na. The Wildcats broke through Jurrens started the scoring 2:20 into the game off assists from with four goals in the second

period and three more in the third Tuesday, Jan. 7, at Verona Ice Arena. Heinrichs scored on the power-play 5:57 into the second off a pass from Moline, then found the back of the net 2:29 later off assists from Cordray and Moline. Cordray scored with 5:34 left in the second off assists from Moline and Renlund. Ploc scored on the power play 1:02 later off assists from Moline and Heinrichs. Keegan Lindell scored 1:11 into the third off a pass from Rufenacht. Moline scored a little more than three minutes later off assists from Ritter and Osting. Ritter added a goal with four seconds left off assists from Renlund and Moioffer. Renlund scored with 5:41 left in the first period off assists from Rufenacht and Haessig. Grant picked up the shutout with 14 saves.


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February 14, 2020

Fitchburg Star

Schools

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Verona Area School District

Board kicks off superintendent search District to seek firm to search for candidates KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Less than three weeks after Verona Area School District superintendent Dean Gorrell announced his retirement, the school board has launched the process to find his replacement. At its Monday, Jan. 27, meeting, board members approved the wording of a

document seeking a superintendent consulting firm. Proposals are due back to the board by late February, and the board plans to interview and select a consulting firm by early April. Gorrell’s retirement is effective June 30, 2021, with a new superintendent to start the next day. Much of this year will be dedicated to selecting a search firm and then working with the consultant to collect community feedback before the job is posted, likely in October.

The consulting firm will then find candidates that align with the goals identified by the district and community. The board plans to interview candidates in November and December and make their selection before the year is up. The request for proposals, or RFP, the district approved Monday provides interested consulting firms information about the district’s demographics, its leadership design and other characteristics of the district, such as the board’s

strategic plan and the successful 2017 referendum that provided $180 million of funding for a new high school. The document emphasizes the district’s desire to engage as many people as possible and connect with diverse populations. Parts of it were written vaguely enough in order to require a consulting firm to do its research on the district before submitting proposals, explained consultant Roger Price who helped the board’s Policy

A space of their own Black Girls Circles of Support gives students a chance to share experiences, be themselves

What: Badger Ridge and Core Knowledge Black History Month showcase When: All-day, Friday, March 6 Where: Badger Ridge Middle School, 740 N. Main St. Info: verona.k12.wi.us

Unified Newspaper Group

Photo by Kimberly Wethal

From left, Badger Ridge Middle School teacher Shayla Glass-Thompson, Gayla Bullocks, Aster Gitchel and Acaliana Greenfield talk about what it means for people of color to wear their hair without it being policed during a Black Girls Circles of Support group session on Thursday, Jan. 9. “It started with black students – (they) could have a safe space where they had mentorship, can kind of talk through their experiences in school, set goals, work through academic stuff,” Glass-Thompson said. She now works with seventh and eighth grade girls as part of their Circle, with fellow BRMS teacher Andrea High working with sixth grade students. For student Asther Gitchel, the Circle is one of the few places she has the opportunity to get “the black experience.” At home, her parents and the majority of her family (with the exception of two siblings) aren’t black, so outside of the Circle, there’s not many people she can connect with that understand her experiences, she said. The Circle has taught her that being black is something that she should celebrate. “It has changed my life because I’ve gotten closer with my friends, I got to know the teachers more and I got to understand black culture more,” she said. “Even though we h ave a d a r ke r p i g m e n t than other people, (I’ve learned) that we can still get a career, we just have to work hard, if we work hard, we’re going to have a successful life.” S t u d e n t Te r r i a n a Musgray said her confidence level has increased

since joining the group because of the people she’s grown closer to and what she’s learned. “We talk about things we don’t usually talk about in school,” she said. “We talk about the stuff we don’t really learn, a lot of history … I learned how to speak up more.” Student Elonie Williams joined the Circle because she wanted to have a space where she could talk to other students who are black and go through some of the same things she does. Williams said she knew most of her peers before joining, but being a part of the group allows her to have a space where she

feels comfortable being herself. “It just seemed fun because there was other black people in there that I could relate to,” she said. “We do fun stuff in there, and we talk about things we need to talk about as black girls.” Student Cali Salzman said the Circle makes her feel more comfortable in her own skin, and makes dealing with the hard aspects of being a person of color easier. Salzman said that often she’s followed around in grocery stores near her home when she’s alone. “Basically, being a person of color, especially being a girl of color, it’s really hard … going out in the store or driving in a car and getting pulled over or getting followed in the store,” she said. “Especially if you have white parents, you get extra looks.”

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Board wants to set metrics to measure progress

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On an early Thursday morning last month, an office right off of the quiet, sleepy library at Badger Ridge Middle School was full of laughter and music. That room, occupied by BRMS teacher Shayla Glass-Thompson and her seventh and eighth grade Black Girls Circles of Support students, are working on their projects for the upcoming Black History Month Showcase on March 6 and connecting with one another over their commonalities with one another as teenage black girls. They’re making TikToks for the showcase and researching black culture, and talking about the importance of black women to wear their natural hair without judgement. It’s a space where the girls can be themselves and talk about their shared experiences as young women of color, Glass-Thompson said. “Just knowing that there is a space that they can go to, with girls who are like them, and be able to hang out in a space where their language isn’t going to be policed, or just their way of being isn’t policed, I think that they appreciate that the most about this group,” she said. Glass-Thompson started a Black Girls Circles of Support group with sixth graders in 2017 after working with Dr. Jeffrey Lewis, the project director for Natural Circles of Support, Inc. Lewis’ project, which started in 2011, works to provide support for K-12 African American and other students of color by building on their strengths and aspirations, according to the Circles of Support website.

deputy superintendents, directors of elementary and secondary education and a family, staff and community engagement liaison. While the deputy superintendent of business services position will stay vacant until after the new superintendent is hired, the district is seeking applications for the director of elementary education for the start of the 2020-21 school year, as well as principal positions for Country View Elementary School and Savanna Oaks Middle School.

Goodbyes are never easy – especially when they’re for buildings with decades of education history in their walls. In three-and-a-half months, it will be a permanent goodbye for the Sugar Creek Elementary School and New Century School buildings when students walk out the doors for the last time. In the meantime, staff are working on ways to give the schools a proper send-off.

If You Go

KIMBERLY WETHAL

and Personnel committee design the request. “Our intent was to be detailed, but still leave it open for individual consultants to demonstrate their capacity,” he said. In his written announcement on Jan. 8, Gorrell stated he was giving the board advance notice so there would be “ample time” to get feedback from staff, students, families and community members. Before then, the district will restructure its administration team, with three

Board members are looking for a way to measure the district’s success with its five strategic plan pillars. Those pillars, part of a five-year plan approved in July 2018, are authentic relationships; a safe, inclusive learning environment; high expectations for every student; supporting and empowering staff; and equitable allocation of resources.

Facility use rules

As the district prepares to open a new high school in September, it has updated its rules for public use of its facilities. The school board approved new facility usage guidelines at its Monday, Feb. 3, meeting with only one change from its Jan. 28 review of the documentation.

‘Paint Night’ at Stoner Prairie

The Stoner Prairie Elementary School PTO held its fourth annual Paint Night on Thursday, Feb. 6. Art teacher Tina Christenson and Madison-based artists Andrew Illene and Danielle Box Hampton, led families and students in creating a mystic sky or giraffe painting.

NOW HIRING!

Dairyfood USA, one of the largest specialty cheesemakers in North America, has immediate 1st and 3rd shift openings at our production facility in Blue Mounds. Sanitation Associate (3rd shift) – cleans and sanitizes production equipment and the associated processing areas. Minimum starting wage - $16.60/hr. Quality Assurance Technician (1st shift) – ensures that all products are being produced to acceptable standards by performing line checks, lab tests on product samples and related administrative tasks. Minimum starting wage $15.40/hr. Maintenance Technician (1st shift) – performs complex mechanical, electrical and technical tasks related to troubleshooting, maintenance and repair of food processing and packaging equipment. Ideal candidates will have a minimum of 5 years of related experience in a role requiring a high degree of mechanical aptitude. Minimum starting wage - $19.85/hr. Experience in a food processing facility is highly desired. We offer a $500 signing bonus, attendance bonus, and a comprehensive benefit package. Apply online, in-person, or email HR to request an application or to submit your resume. Dairyfood USA, Inc. 2819 County Road F Blue Mounds, WI 53517 (Corner of 18/151 & County Road F) 608-437-5598 humanresources@dairyfoodusa.com www.dairyfoodusa.com Equal Opportunity Employer.

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Schools

ConnectFitchburg.com

Read about this and more Oregon School District stories at ConnectFitchburg.com:

District open enrollment to dip

With a district growing so quickly it’s become challenging to predict, OSD officials are reducing open enrollment seats to students outside the district. The seats allotted for the 2020-21 school year are smaller than previous years, 643 for residents, 99 for non-residents.

Students show support, gain awareness

A group of middle schoolers at RCI are showing their support and allyship for their peers in a newly minted Gay Straight Alliance club. The club meets from 3:20-3:40 p.m. every Wednesday, with the band and choir teacher Samuel Cutter overseeing the group.

Ebert heading to China through math grant

OHS math teacher Dave Ebert is one of 53 educators in the United States who is getting a travel grant to attend the 14th International Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME) in Shanghai, China, in July. Educators from around 100 countries will be involved.

2 earn educator certifications

OHS teachers Angela Schmidt and Kyle Oksiuta earned National Geographic Educator Certification last fall, and are now bringing those lessons learned into their classrooms, from biology to psychology.

Fitchburg Star

7

OHS art gallery continues to expand MACKENZIE KRUMME Unified Newspaper Group

Gallery hours

At Oregon High School’s art gallery, Gwen Maitzen displayed 54 framed sticky notes on the south facing wall. Each was decorated with a different creation, like a life-like basketball player, drawings of winter birch trees or a written statement, “expectant space,” — a nod to the silent spaces of art, similar to the silence in musical composition, she said, when no one plays but are essential to the art. On Friday, Jan. 30, Maitzen, a former long-time OHS art teacher, held her exhibition opening at the school. She, like other community artists, display their work at the gallery, which has floor to ceiling windows and 640 feet of display space. The gallery is in its second season and invites faculty, students and community to exhibit — a permanent space dedicated to the visual arts. For 25 years, OHS art teacher Mike Derrick has been waiting for a space for his students to display their work they create in his classroom. With the exception of businesses that open up their doors to artists, there is really no other gallery space in Oregon, he said. For most of his career, students displayed in the school’s Performing Arts Center, using Styrofoam boards and temporary displays. Maitzen organizes her artistic creations into themes, she said. The sticky-note exhibit, which has 120 framed pieces, and the pencil sketches of students and watercolor bird calendar were displayed in the gallery for roughly a month. She said she enjoys

Although the Oregon High School gallery is open to the public, the hours vary. To arrange a visit, contact art teacher Mike Derrick to set up an appointment during school hours, generally 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Guests during the school day should bring a valid identification card and check into the office. Other hours for the gallery vary — but it is generally opening during exhibitions and special events at OHS such as basketball games and musical performances. Derrick is also available during after school hours with enough advance notice. For information and to visit the gallery, email him at mjd@oregonsd. net.

Photo by Mackenzie Krumme

Sue McGrath and Ann Kleckner admire Gwendolynn Maitzen’s artwork which is hung on the walls of the Oregon High School art gallery on Thursday, Jan. 30. drawing people in a single moment, when they are caught in time. Maitzen was on the school board for three years, and pushed for a gallery at the high school. “We were the only district in the Badger Conference that didn’t have a visual art space,” she said. Derrick said the art department is proud of how far the gallery has come. He said students in shop classes helped build some of the display mounts, and OHS alumni donate permanent pieces like the 5-foot by, 6-foot dinosaur, so the gallery is never bare. The first exhibition was held there in September 2018. The majority of the art teachers in the district displayed their work, including ceramics, drawings and watercolors. Another memorable display was in 2019, when each student class level was given a color, and hundreds of students and faculty created 6 inch by 6 inch pieces that were hung

in the gallery in a rainbow display. “It was pretty neat,” Derrick said. He and the other OHS art teacher Heidi Coutre, hope to create more regularity with the space. Right now, there are no set hours, with the exception of being open during the school day. Derrick said during school eve n t s , l i ke b a s ke t b a l l games, he will unlock the doors to let visitors wander. In the future, the art department is planning to have two well known artists, David Stluka and Mark Hersche, display again in the gallery. Stluka, an Oregon resident, is a

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL for Superintendent Search Consultant

WELL-BEING

professional photographer for the Wisconsin Badgers and has photographed Green Bay Packers games. Hersche, also a photographer, gained national attention a few years ago when he created the “That Tree” a picture book about the life of a Bur oak tree not far from his home. The art teachers would like all the displaying artists to have an interactive experience with the students and the community, and hope they will give public presentations and walk visitors and students through their artistic process. For Maitzen, it took nearly two days to hang the

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DEVELOPMENT

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pieces of art on the gallery walls, but it was worth it, she said. “To have my work on the gallery walls that I advocated for was kinda like the icing on the cake of a very good and respectable professional career,” Maitzen said.

TEAMWORK

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Account Executive-Outside Sales

The Verona Area School District, located in south central Wisconsin, is seeking an executive search consultant to conduct a comprehensive national search for the District’s new superintendent. Interested consultants will make it a major priority to work with key stakeholders who comprise our diverse community. The new Superintendent will have a start date of July 1, 2021. The Request for Proposal (RFP) is being issued by the Verona Area School District to solicit proposals from qualified search consultants to partner with the District in conducting the search. Interested consultants may obtain a copy of the RFP document by contacting: Tamera Stanley VASD Executive Assistant to the Board of Education stanleyt@verona.k12.wi.us To enable the District to conduct a uniform review process of all responses to this solicitation, components of the proposal shall be submitted as set forth in the RFP. The district reserves the right to reject submittals that do not follow the requested format. Interested consultants will provide 10 hard copies and a digital copy (flash drive) of their proposal to be delivered no later than 2:00 PM CST, Tuesday, February 25th, 2020 to: Verona Area School District, District Offices, (attn Search Proposals), 700 North Main Street, Verona, WI 53593 adno=138462

Retail Advertising Oregon, Wisconsin Our accomplished Account Executives know that success is measured through solid, customer relationships. If you will enjoy a career where your own rewards are a direct result of your business community’s success, retail advertising sales can be a satisfying career. We are the Unified Newspaper Group, and we offer award-winning, community-oriented digital and print products in Oregon, Fitchburg, Verona and Stoughton, Wisconsin. Reaching readers makes our advertisers successful. Are you ready for a change? We have an established account list and an abundance of new business potential to get you started right from the start. Account Executives are eligible for a comprehensive benefits package, employee ownership in our company, competitive compensation, flexibility to balance family, life and career, and an environment that encourages entrepreneurial spirit. Make 2020 your year to soar. adno=137047

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February 14, 2020

To learn more about this opportunity, submit your application and resume today at www.wcinet.com/careers Woodward Communications, Inc., is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


8 Fitchburg Star - February 14, 2020

Ask the Fitchburg

ONLINE SALES

INSURANCE

Q. Why Should I consider Selling on eBay? A. Selling on eBay allows you to reach a broader market, rather than just a local

Patti Cardarelle

608-535-3075 • Fax: 603-430-1970 Patricia.cardarelle@libertymutual.com

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DENTIST

105 N. Main St., Verona • MainStreetDentists.com

REALTOR

Q. Do we have a “Seller’s Market” or “Buyer’s Market” in Fitchburg? A. The terms “seller’s” and “buyer’s market” are common especially now in Fitchburg’s hot real estate market. There are many factors - supply and demand, interest rates, employment, economic growth, new construction and regulatory policies - that effect our local real estate market to determine what type of market it is. A “buyer’s market” means there are more homes for sale than there are buyers because of high unemployment, fear of increased interest rates or other factors that may cause hesitation in purchasing a new home. Fitchburg is a “seller’s market” because there are a lot of buyers and a low inventory of active listings (currently there Shawn Pfaff are only 30 active homes with\average on market of just over just one month), high employment, lower interest rates and continued economic growth. There is no better time than now in Fitchburg to sell your home. Please contact me at pfaffs@firstweber.com to take advantage of Fitchburg’s «seller›s market. As a Fitchburg Realtor, I can provide you with a no obligation market appraisal of your home. I look forward to hearing from you soon at pfaffs@firstweber.com

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2985 Triverton Pike Dr., Ste. 200, Fitchburg, WI 53711 pfaffs@firstweber.com • www.shawnpfaff.firstweber.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Q. I slipped and fell on the ice getting out of my car and now I am having a hard time moving my shoulder. Is there anything that can be done for me?

A. Falls happen so quickly, that it may be difficult to tell how or what was injured. A visit to your

Comprehensive Therapy Services 1049 N. Edge Trail • Prairie Oaks (608) 845-2100 • Verona, WI 53593 • www.stellarrehab.com

VETERINARIAN

Q. One of my friends brought their happy, healthy puppy in for a routine surgery and the vet recommended doing bloodwork beforehand—why would a healthy animal need bloodwork done?

A. This situation highlights a critical misconception:

that healthy animals shouldn’t have bloodwork performed regularly, too. In addition to a physical exam, your friend’s puppy should have its internal health status assessed prior to surgery—making sure its liver and kidneys can handle the anesthetic drugs, to uncover underlying disease not seen upon physical exam, to check blood values to determine the level of healthy, efficient healing to expect, and to highlight necessary adjustments to the treatment plan to ensure a safe, unremarkable procedure. Bloodwork isn’t just a pre-surgical measure, either (though, that is incredibly important!). If administered as part of your pet’s regular preventative care it can help us monitor their health over time, from kitten/puppyhood all the way to becoming a senior animal citizen. It can inform us of general health patterns and trends and can even warn us about early signs of disease before they progress. And, in the event we aren’t lucky enough to see it coming, bloodwork can tell us what we might be able to expect from disease, but it will also show us how your pet is healing. Bloodwork truly is for all animals, at all life stages, in sickness and in health—with just a little bit of blood we can learn so much. Make an appointment with your local veterinarian today and find out which blood panels are right for your pets, wherever they may be in life.

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physician with possible imaging and testing will allow for an initial assessment to determine the extent and area of damage. If you fell on an outstretched hand, as is often the case, then the rotator cuff may be a part of the injury. A Physical Therapist (PT) is skilled in evaluating and treating the shoulder with a thorough assessment of the shoulder’s joints, muscles, tendons, and nerves, and will determine an appropriate treatment plan for the injury. Initial treatment may include modalities to heal the injured muscle, tendon, and/or connective tissue (infrared therapy, ultrasound, cryotherapy, Susan Armstrong, MPT etc.), hands-on healing techniques to assist with decreasing pain (myofascial release, muscle energy, Physical Therapist manual edema control, etc.), use of kinesiotape to stabilize and support the injured tissues and a functional exercise program to promote strength and mobility. Stellar Rehab offers one-on-one, innovative, skilled Physical Therapy services that will assist your body with the healing/recovery process. Visit www.stellarrehab.com or call 845-2100 with any questions - the sooner, the better!

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Q. How can I spot depression in elders? A. We all have days in which we are sad or have thoughts of hopelessness – but for many, it goes beyond that.

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Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is, by definition, a medical illness characterized by a chronic sense of sadness and loss of interest in activities. Depression can often dictate the way in which you feel, think, and act – and if not treated, it can lead to everything from alcohol and drug abuse to attempted suicide. It’s estimated that 350 million people worldwide suffer from depression. More than two million adults 65 years of age and older are faced with depression of some kind. Signs of depression are easy to overlook in older adults, as they’re often mistaken for other signs of aging. Studies show that when depressed, seniors may not clearly display typical signs of sadness such as crying. Instead, they tend to withdraw from the people they care about and the things they once loved to do. Signs to watch for: Irritability, withdraw, decrease in cognitive ability, increased pain and digestive problems. If you recognize any of these signs in your senior loved one, talk to him or her about what he or she is feeling. Although you may receive some resistance initially, it’s important to let him or her know that you’re there to help. From there, it’s vital that you inform his or her primary health care provider or mental health expert to have symptoms assessed professionally.

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MORTGAGE BANKING

CHIROPRACTOR

Q. : I’ve been getting headaches at least once a week and my medical doctor has ruled out any underlying condition. Is there anything a chiropractor can do that will have a lasting effect?

A. 95% of headaches are primary headaches, meaning they are tension or migraine headaches and are not caused by disease but originate from muscle tension in the head and neck. Chiropractic adjustments restore normal spinal function which helps to alleviate tension and increase Jill Unwin, Lee Unwin, circulation to these areas. Chiropractors will also guide you in correcting DC, CCEP BCMT, CSCS common causes of headaches such as stress reduction, ergonomics, and diet. As far as long-term effects, a report released in 2001 by researchers at Duke University Evidence-Based Practice Center in Durham, NC, found that spinal adjustments resulted in almost immediate improvement for those headaches that originate in the neck, and had significantly fewer side effects and longer lasting relief of tension-type headache than a commonly prescribed medication. To find out if we can help with your headaches, call us today for a complimentary consultation.

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SENIOR CARE

CREMATION SERVICES

Jodi Johnston • 1-608-438-7437 E-Mail: jjohnston_4@charter.net

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A. Our front teeth are the most noticeable teeth in our smile. People with whom we interact notice these teeth first, so we want to be sure they look the best! If only one tooth needs a crown, and the other is in good condition, there is no need to place a crown on the “good” tooth. It is possible to match Drs. Kate & John your new crown to the other tooth, both in color and shape. On the other Schacherl, D.D.S. hand, if the tooth next to the tooth needing the crown is in poor condition, it will make sense to crown both teeth at the same time. At Main Street Dentists, most of the crowns we do are CEREC 1-Day Crowns. This means that your crown or crowns can be completed in just one office visit.

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Sales Representative

info@jonahsonlinesales.com • www.jonahsonlinesales.com www.facebook.com/JonahsOnlineSales • 608-598-9226

Q. I need a crown on my front tooth. Do I need to put crowns on both of my front teeth at the same time?

A. Yes, liberty mutual insurance does have accident forgiveness and violation forgiveness. We also provide new car replacement, so when you purchase a new car and it gets totaled you will get a year newer car with 15,000 less miles. It is a great benefit that Liberty Mutual provides that some carriers do not offer. If you would like to discuss these kinds of coverages in more detail, please give me a call.

Q. How can I improve my credit score? A. Having a balance of at least half of your credit card limit can reduce your credit scores from 10-15 points. If you max out your credit cards you can expect a 60-100 point drop. The best rule of thumb in regards to revolving credit cards is to carry a balance less than 30% of your limit. Also, don’t close your credit cards as it reduces your total spending limit, which can also drop your scores. Kathleen C. Aiken

To apply online, go to: associatedbank.com/kaiken

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Tim & Laura Meade

market, allowing in most cases a higher payout for your valuables. There is no need to have people walk through your home, have a garage sale, or a local auction that may only attract a handful of buyers. We can expose your items to millions of potential buyers. Selling online allows for a 24-hour presence where people can shop with a phone or computer anywhere in the world at any time. We at Jonah’s have 15 years of experience. We have 99.8% positive feedback so our customers buy with confidence. Use our experience to go through your items to determine what would be good for online sales, or you can drop off at our Verona location. We photograph and design the listings, and once sold, we collect the money and ship it out. Let us do the work for you and put extra money in your pocket. We help clients with single items, large collections, downsizing, estates, and even liquidating businesses.

Q. Do I have accident forgiveness?

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2-14-2020 Fitchburg Star  

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