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school of art, design & technology, bangalore, india

richa sarin SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


INDEX ACKNOWLEDGMENT INTRODUCTION

SYNOPSIS

METHODOLOGY

LITERATURE REVIEW NANYANG SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN ,MEDIA, SINGAPORE EWHA CAMPUS, SEOUL ZERO ENERGY WALL BION CASE STUDIES NIFT CEPT, AHEMDABAD NID, BANGALORE NID, AHEMDABAD ADITI MALLYA SCHOOL, BANGALORE MIRAMBIKA INFERENCES AREA ANALYSIS DESIGN CRITERIA

CONCEPT FORMULATION PHOTOS - MODEL

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT · First of all, am so lucky to have Deepika Ma’am as my thesis guide. She’s a true guide.

· ·

· · · ·

· · · ·

To begin with, the selection of the thesis topic was a formidable task. Thanks to Kanwar Surjit Singh for sensitizing me about socio- cultural part of life. Thanks to Bibek for the project information. I got an early start from Manit Rastogi, Vikram Aditya Prakash and Jaspreet Takher. Thanks Mankotia Sir for the effort. Thanks to you too, Sujay Sir and Shailesh Patel. Am absolutely thankful to Vikas Katoch Sir for his rigorous and amazing moral support and generous help. He gave me all the clues to the site that solved a lot of my problems. Thanks to Harinder Sir for leading me to him. He was great to 'hangout' with and chat with, about CCA, something I'm already getting nostalgic about, can't believe I'll be an alumni soon. I had the best time in Alliance F de Bangalore with Vikas sir. Am an absolute fan of Mr Arvind Lodaya, Dean, for his unrestrained conversation about Srishti. I couldn’t have found a more lucid client brief. His clarity was my good luck. My Bangalore visit would have been plain dull without my good friend Amit. I had the best seven days of my life. Not only did I enjoy his company, the places we went to, the music we shared, but I also learnt about life from him. He's as big an inspiration as good as a friend: for letting me be the best of me. Am lucky to find such a rare friend indeed. I want to thank Sanjana and Gaurav for leading us to the best views of Bangalore: Ebony on th the 13 floor was great! Sanjana you're plain amazing a person. Ar. Moses, for his informative chit chat on professional practice and site information despite being so busy. My warrior of a mother, the best friend, she's someone I can count on and just be myself with. One day, I hope to become at least half as wise as her. Thanks, in fact to Vijay too, for pushing me into the deep end else it wouldn't have been such a struggle. But am glad I did everything, absolutely on my own. Now, I do see the wisdom in your ways. I learnt about professional ethics from you. DJ Neil, Ivan, DJ Naved- you are so going to the top one day. Big fan. Vineet from Google, wow! You're a sweet genius. Ranjit Konkar from NID is an inspiration. Thanks to Harshang in NID. Thanks to Manjula, GCA for sharing with an artist's expectations and desires from a campus. Thanks to Tanvi, the rock star with sun board and Stuti the motherly Photoshoper. Thanks to Shilpa Ahuja, Anish Sir, Anuj Sir and Vinod Sir too. JT, Saumya, Anu, Aditi- thanks for the shoulder when I needed it. One can never be thankful enough. Thanks dad for your short but relevant observations. Thanks Dexter for buying the computer for me! More than an academic process, my thesis has been about making the right choices, recovering from professional setbacks, overcoming hurdles, managing my time, getting inspired, making new friends and thinking in new directions. Its been a process of self discovery. I hope that this compilation adds to your intellectual and creative stimulation. RICHA SARIN

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SYNOPSIS

INTRODUCTION “Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers”. Voltaire EVOLUTION IN EDUCATION Educational institutions are indicators of the direction in which a culture intends to be headed in. Built in anticipation of market trends; they represent the value that a community attaches to learning. Education, as a process, can be effective only if it constantly evolves with the society and mirrors its aspirations. This fact is of vital significance in India, which is fast catching up with the world as technological advancement is revolutionizing the content and process of its education. The challenge for educational facilities is to keep up with this evolution. In an inter-connected and multi-ethnic environment like that of India, the challenge extends beyond technological integration/upgradation of the education system into addressing the innate contradictions that arise within it.

ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS It is in this light that the need for a School for Art, Design and Technology emerges. Essentially, it is a setup which “encourages a culture of thinking, questioning and experimenting that harnesses the artistic and intellectual potential of each individual”. Not only to counter sterile, over simplified courses, but also encourage hands on work by providing a course so involving that it is in direct contrast to the distant mode of learning (which is also a by-product of technology). The emergence of such a facility caters to the generation that has been brought up in a cosmopolitan society. It is a think tank for young individuals who are aware of the dichotomy of the Indian culture with the western and are eager to find answers with open minds. The school houses various departments that are very contemporary and overlap each other.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS PROPOSED PROJECT: SRISHTI SCHOOL OF ART DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY Type: Ownership: Promoters: Sponsored by:

Educational Campus, 10 acres area Private Vijay Mallya and Aditi Group Ratan Tata Trust

The proposed project is to be an educational campus that houses self motivated, talented individuals who are highly aware of the inconsistencies of the world they live in. The curriculum is built on a broad based liberal arts foundation. It has an 'inter-disciplinary approach helps promote self-initiated learning and independent thinking, while expanding perceptual perspectives and developing artistic vocabularies.' DEPARTMENTS: VISUAL COMMUNICATION TEXTILE AND CRAFT FOUNDATION INDEPENDENT MEDIA INTERACTIVITY ANIMATION GAMING WELLNESS ARTS CENTER INNOVATION CENTER COURSES: · · · · · · · · · ·

Visual Communication and Design Digital Video Production Furniture & Interior Design Textiles Design Product Design Animation & Visual Effects Experimental Media Arts Design in Education Animation and Visual Effects Game Design

These departments have been structured into courses which are then transformed into the building program. The school is different from a conventional institute. It is 'a permanent center that is ever evolving in its functions as the creative quotient grows within it'. It embodies the spirit of informed minds who choose to apply their sensitivities and skills to bring about intrinsic change in the world around them. Owing to the culture responsive nature of the teaching philosophy, the courses are bound to go through constant change. The aim, thus, is to anticipate those changes and multiply the possibilities of flexible usage.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS FUNCTIONAL COMPONENTS Architectural progress of educational buildings does not imply quantitative massificiation. It implies more robust, flexible, adaptable buildings for a diversified range of courses . The success of such a setup depends on the balance between the managerial and physical combinations. The department is a unit for administering a defined block of courses. The departments for this proposed projects have respective courses cut out for themselves. The yearly intake and time tabling determines the building program i.e. the nature and number of rooms needed for each activity. The building provides and limits the activities that are to be performed in it. Thus, it becomes vital to determine what the building doesn’t do. Functionally, the building should provide room for change.

Keyword : PLIABILITY NOT ANONYMITY BASED ON NATURE OF PLANNING SPECIALIST ROOM: Planned layout and fixed equipment.

GENERAL ROOM: Layout to ascertained by the user. › Classroom › Demonstration › Drawing Office

› Workshops › Studios › Labs - Heavy Light

CATEGORIES BASED ON USAGE (also used for cost analysis) TEACHING

LEARNING

› Whole Group Instruction Space

› Self Directed Learning Space

› Small Group Instruction Space

› Resource Center › Library

› Informal Instructional Space › Lecture Theater/ Auditorium

› Computer Lab › Media Center

NON TEACHING

BALANCE

› Conference Area

› Game Room

› Office Space

› Reception

› Common Room

› Circulation Space

› Main Hall

› Student Common Room

› Exhibition Area

› Lockers

› Faculty Spaces

› Cafeteria

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS LOCATION :

WHY IN

BANGALORE?

Demographically diverse city ð ð Major economic hub ð Fastest growing major metropolis in India. ð Home to some of the most well-recognized colleges and research institutions in India. ð Numerous public sector heavy industries, software companies, aerospace, telecommunications, and defense organizations are located in the city. ð Silicon Valley of India because of its preeminent position as the nation's leading IT employer and exporter. SITE VALIDITY ð Population : 5,281,927 in the year 2007, third most populous city in India , 27th most populous city in the world. ð Decadal growth rate of 38%, ð Rs 260,260 crore (US$ 100 billion) economy (200203 Net District Income) . With an economic growth of 10.3% ð The city is the third largest hub for high net worth individuals and is home to over 10,000 dollar millionaires and about 60,000 super-rich people who have an investable surplus of Rs. 4.5 crore (US$ 1 million) and Rs. 50 lakh (US$ 116,000) respectively. ð The growth of Information Technology has presented the city with unique challenges.

Ideological clashes

sometimes occur between the city's IT moguls, who demand an improvement in the city's infrastructure and the state government, whose electoral base is primarily the people in rural Karnataka. ð The first printing-press was established in Bangalore in the year 1840.Bangalore got its first radio station All India Radio, the official broadcaster for the Indian Government in 1955. Bangalore has only 48% of local population (i.e.Kannadigas) .Hence a true cosmopolitan with around 25% Tamilians, 14% Telugites, 10% Keralites, 8% Europeans, and 6% a mixture of all races. Thus, a developing community that yearns to achieve a balance between all its components, is the ideal breeding ground and absorber of multi-faceted careers that are created by the School.

City Of Contrasts

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

‘ Bangalore, City of Paradox Since last ten years Bangalore is facing a socio-economical crisis: population explosion, increase in buying power and inflation. Highly proud of being part of the Indian influence on the world, Bangalore likes to show off as a modern and westernized city simultaneously respectful towards Indian traditional values. Let us consider the auto rickshaw as a constant element throughout the country. By comparison with rest of the country we can try to understand the lifestyle we are to point out: here in Bangalore, the rickshaw driver speaks fluent English, drives with an earphone linked to his mobile and smokes cigarette rather than bidie. Rampant race toward modernity put Bangalore in an ambiguous and paradoxical situation: it seems to have mortgaged its multiple heritages for this dream of techno city, which it seems unable to realize. At present, Bangalore is definitely trapped into an inbetween situation offering neither the vivacity of the traditional city nor the efficiency of a modern one.’

Excerpts by Douchan Palacios lfrom: www.archidev.org/article.php3?id_article=1035

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

THESIS VALIDITY 1. The campus is the first tangible indication to future pupils about the intentions of the organization and often becomes the most important subconscious reason for their getting enrolled . The success of a new, upcoming institution depends on how well it is able to transform its ideology into the building. It is a major responsibility of administrative authorities to provide a quality campus. 2.Increased awareness and open mindedness of clients allows for great opportunities to make educational campuses the testing grounds for contemporary architectural ideas and experimentation. 3. Creative handling is needed between the varied functions which range from specialized to general to informal and often contrast in the environments they generate. 4. The repute of an educational Institute is intended to grow with time and the school building tends to command a heritage status as time proceeds. The feelings of nostalgia for the ‘Alma mater’ become the most vivid memory a professional carries throughout his life. 5. The campus for such a system that relies on live projects needs to initiate and attract visitor

participation from all walks of life. Project partners vary from hi-tech firms to low budgeted communal projects. 6. The design has to address variation in occupancy duration ranging from decades for a teacher to years for a student and much less time for short term visitors. 7. Being a creative institution, the informal spaces play a major role in becoming ‘places’ for origin of new ideas. The environment plays a crucial role. 8.The creation of informal spaces that encourage interaction and reflect student teacher visitor relationships becomes a prime focus.

JUSTIFICATION OF SUCH A STUDY 1. Foreseen demand in the future for similar setups. 2. Lack of precedents for campuses with similar alternate approach to education . 3. Studying a building typology while it is in its transformation.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT 1. The educational sector is undergoing a rapid transformation and adopting multi pronged approach to education. More and more universities are proposing to set up inter disciplinary institutes. 2. Moreover, as a building typology the college campus is undergoing major organ transplants. New means of education are upgrading the three Systems of informational exchange- Video, Voice, Data. 3. This thesis addresses this phenomenon of change of the educational institute both in terms of the educational program and the building program. 4. Development is the single preoccupation of all civilizations after survival. It is on an insightful level that the needs of specialized further education can be addressed. This school is a project that deals with intellectual resources and canalizing it towards the development of the community. It is a lateral method of injecting creative fluids into the society.

5. This school becomes a tangible icon of this wave of change that is sweeping the society. Architecturally, it shall stand for all the ideologies that are of core importance to this organization.

ARCHITECTURAL CHALLENGES 1. Recognizing the magnitude of incorporation of technology into the education institute that will take place in the future generation and provide scope for it. 2. Addressing issues of flexibility and adaptability and creating an environment that is ‘pliable but not anonymous’. 3. Evolving an architectural vocabulary for departments like Interactivity and wellness that are both contemporary in origin but diametrically opposite in their approach while solving all the prevalent issues of Campus designs. 4. Experimenting with the paradox between energy consciousness and interactivity. 5. Addressing questions of identity and place making.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

AIM: to develop sensitivity towards campus planning for tangential educational strategies while incorporating concepts of interactivity within it.

MAJOR OBJECTIVES: 1. Understanding the ideology of the school and translating it into the built form. 2. Studying site and climate responsive design methods to find context specific solutions. 3. Focus on aspects of site planning. 4. Evolving an architectural vocabulary wrt form, materials, shape and scale of the project. 5. Undertake a spatial analysis and detail out the building design. 5. Integrating infrastructure with the building program. 6. Integrating technology with the building program.

MINOR OBJECTIVES: 1. Addressing issues of Identity, familiarity and place making in the design. .2. Studying the role of Space Conditioning in architectural environments. The keywords being Healthy, Safe, Clean and with thermal, visual and auditory comfort.

ADVANCED OBJECTIVE: Studying the scope of Interactivity in Architecture through contemporary materials and techniques and translating the sensory experiences- warmth, excitement, repose into recognizable building aspects that promote real user response. Interactivity is the means through which a user can become fully immersed in an interactive experience and can control the product. The Internet has become the prime model of an interactive system. Interactivity can occur at many different levels and it is the degrees of engagement that differentiate between these levels: - USE-TO-USER INTERACTION VIA THE INTERNET- para-social interaction, where new forms of media are generated online; - USER-TO-SYSTEM INTERACTIVITY which is the way devices can be engaged with by a user. This new technological achievement is changing in the mere definition of experience and perception. Thereby, sending conventional architectural definitions of space and sensory experiences for a spin. The objective will be to study the consequences of this paradigm shift.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

SCOPE OF WORK: 1. Understanding the design process and role of architecture in the design of education institutions. 2. Studying and experiencing the working of an institution. 3. Understanding the nuances of campus designs wrt site planning. 4. Evolving an architectural vocabulary for each department 5. Finding the best solution in terms of site and context responsive architecture. 6. Understanding spatial implications of specialized activities. 7. Translating the vision of the institute into architectural solution 8. Experimenting with new approaches towards architecture - interactivity. 9. Touching upon issues of imageabilty and place making. 10. The economics of development are not included in the scope of this thesis.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


SYNOPSIS

NATURE AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION AT EACH STAGE DATA COLLECTION- CLIENT, CONCERNED AUTHORITIES, INTERNET SYNOPSIS- books referred to - The Dissertation- Borden &Reudi - Technical Colleges & Colleges Of Further Education Barbara Price - CCA Thesis Numbers - 1060, 1075, 1126, 1132, 1089, 747 - The Architects’ Handbook - Quentin Pickard

LIBRARY STUDIES- Journals, Books, Theses, Time Saver Standards Leeds, Hudderford Central college of Art and Technology Websites: http://www.art-design.umich.edu/careers.php?aud=e&menucat=cr http://www.art.uiuc.edu/ Http://www.artcenter.edu/accd/index.jsp

CASE STUDIESNEW DELHI- NIFT College of Arts AHEMDABAD- NID CEPT BANGALORE- EXISTING CAMPUSES (SRISHTI) BANGALORE UNIVERSITY DESIGN STAGETOPICS/BOOKS TO BE READSite Responsive Architecture and Planning Architecture And Arts Genova 2004 Interdisciplinary Approach to Architecture Climate Responsive Architecture AD 4D Environmental Psychology Hybrid Architecture

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


LITERATURE REVIEW

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SYNOPSIS

SCOPE OF WORK: 1. Understanding the design process and role of architecture in the design of education institutions. 2. Studying and experiencing the working of an institution. 3. Understanding the nuances of campus designs wrt site planning. 4. Evolving an architectural vocabulary for each department 5. Finding the best solution in terms of site and context responsive architecture. 6. Understanding spatial implications of specialized activities. 7. Translating the vision of the institute into architectural solution 8. Experimenting with new approaches towards architecture - interactivity. 9. Touching upon issues of imageabilty and place making. 10. The economics of development are not included in the scope of this thesis.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA


LITERATURE REVIEW AIM OF THESIS: understanding nuances of creative environments and understanding interactivity in architecture through their simultaneous application in an up-to-date, state-of-the- art campus for a progressive educational/social research organization.

AIM OF LIBRARY STUDY : STUDYING VARIOUS PROTOTYPES FOR THEIR: + CONTEMPORARY APPROACH + RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENT + ARCHITECTURAL RESPONSE TO VISION OF THE SCHOOL - AESTHETIC AND FUNCTIONAL + CONNECTION TO ARCHITECTURE TO STUDY THEIR SCOPE ( INTERACTIVE INSTALLATION AND INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE) + SUCCESS IN CREATION OF GROUND BREAKING ‘CREATIVITY FOSTERING’ ENVIRONMENTS

SEQUENCE OF STUDY

UNDERSTANDING CREATIVITY AND ITS

UNDERSTANDING THE VISION AND PROCESSES OF THE INSTITUTE IDENTIFYING METAPHORS FOR INTERPRETING THE SPIRIT OF THE PROGRAM UNDERSTANDING STATUS OF INTERACTIVITY IN ARCHITECTURE

STUDYING ARCHITECTURAL CONDITIONS NEEDED TO CREATE STIMULATING ENVIRONMENTS

RESEARCHING NEW MATERIALS, VOCABULARY TO BE USED

ADDRESSING ISSUE OF TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN ARCHITECTURE

DERIVING DESIGN PARAMETERS FOR CONCEPT FORMATION

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW © VISION

OF THE INSTITUTE (SRISHTI)

‘ The vision is to build a teachable and learnable transparent body of knowledge for the extended art and design community based on a collaborative learning platform, which can be referenced and made freely accessible. The facilitative mode of instruction shall be based on the instructors' personal passions and missions and not on craft and vocational expertise, the latter can and will be provided on a course to course basis according to requirement. Course locations for this reason may or may not be always in house and a group of students may have to travel for a part or whole or a number of courses sometimes almost in a spirit of an internship. Certain inputs may even be provided online. Reason for this is to provide for the students the best that is available regardless of location.’ © OBJECTIVE OF SRISHTI: providing art and design education in an environment of creativity and

maximizing individual potential. © ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE: a “community of learners” © APPROACH: inter-disciplinary approach to promote self-initiated learning, independent

thinking, while expanding perceptual perspectives & developing artistic vocabularies.

© CULTURE: highly interactive culture of thinking, questioning & experimenting.

DEPARTMENTS:

COURSES: ·

Culture & Humanities Visual Communication Textile And Craft Foundation Independent Media Interactivity Animation Gaming Wellness Arts Center Innovation Center

· · · · · · · ·

Visual Communication & Design Digital Video Production Furniture & Interior Design Textiles Design Product Design Animation & Visual Effects Experimental Media Arts Design in Education Animation and Visual Effects

The learning environment would embody the spirit of the program and foster creativity. Owing to the culture responsive nature of the teaching philosophy, the courses are bound to go through constant change. The aim, thus, would be to anticipate changes and multiply the possibilities of flexible usage.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW © UNDERSTANDING CREATIVITY MEANING OF CREATIVITY : essentially an "assumptions-breaking process." ASPECTS OF CREATIVITY © FLUENCY. The total number of interpretable, meaningful, and relevant Ideas generated in response to the stimulus. © FLEXIBILITY. The number of different categories of relevant responses © ORIGINALITY. The statistical rarity of the responses among the test subjects. © ELABORATION. The amount of detail in the responses.

MEASURE OF CREATIVITY : SOCIAL-PERSONALITY © Independence Of Judgement © Self-confidence © Attraction To Complexity © Aesthetic Orientation © Risk-taking © Openness To Experience RANDOM ENTRY

APPROACH

PROVOCATION

IMPROVISATION

CREATIVITY

CHALLENGE

SUSPENDING

GENERATING

ROLE OF MOOD IN CREATIVITY ‘Positive emotions such as joy broaden a person's available repertoire of cognitions and actions, thus enhancing creativity’ proven by Broaden and Build Model by Fredrickson. ‘ Particularly strong links have been identified between creativity and mood disorders, particularly manic-depressive disorder.’ Proven by Arnold Ludwig of the University of Kentucky. FOUR PATTERNS BETWEEN AFFECT & CREATIVITY: © Antecedent To Creativity © Direct Consequence Of Creativity © As An Indirect Consequence Of Creativity © Simultaneously With Creative Activity. Research has proven that ‘Feelings and creative cognition are interwoven in several distinct ways within the complex fabric of daily work lives.’

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW © IDENTIFYING METAPHORS FOR INTERPRETING THE SPIRIT OF THE PROGRAM

KEYWORDS GENERATED SO FAR: *

COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS TRANSPARENT BODY OF KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT FOR MAXIMIZING CREATIVITY ARCHITECTURAL TRANSLATION

LEARNING PLATFORM UNUSUAL USE OF ORDINARY

ORIGINALITY

OLVED ARTISTICALLY EV

NEW BUILDING MATERIALS & CREATIVE EXPRESSION

AESTHETICALLY ORIENTATED RISK-TAKING

L TERIA E, MA C A P S ALE, N SC ON I

Y, NOLOG GE TECH D E G IN CUTT ATI VARI

ATTRACTION TO COMPLEXITY CHANGE IN PERCEPTION

OPEN TO NEW EXPERIENCE

INTERACTIVITY IN ARCHITECTURE

NC E N G E O F AM BIE F SPACE, CHA O Y H C R A R , E I H

MOOD VARIATION

PHY

S

L, ICA

VIS

UA

L

HIGHLY INTERACTIVE METHODS GROWTH & FLEXIBILITY

FU TUR E EX P ANS IO N ,

REC

SELF INITIATED & INDEPENDENT INFR

NERG YCLE E

RU AST

CTU

RE

HIGH DEGREE OF AWARENESS INDEPENDENCE OF JUDGEMENT

NE

W

FO

RM

Y

,M

AT

IA ER

LR

E

E ND

R IN

G

TECHNOLOGICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS (INFRASTRUCTURE

* TO BE DONE AT CONCEPT STAGE

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW

Š PROTOTYPE STUDY-

Nanyang School of Art, Design & Media, Singapore

The school curriculum is developed around Interdisciplinary learning in Design & Media and offers majors in - Visual Communication; Product Design, Interactive Media; Digital Filmmaking; Digital Photography and Imaging; Emotive Robotics and Digital Animation. Students are encouraged to explore and inter-disciplinary experience across multiple domains even in connection with engineering disciplines. + The 5 story facility sweeps a wooded corner of the campus with an organic, vegetated form that blends landscape and structure, nature and high-tech and symbolizes the creativity it houses.

Aerial view of the school

+ The curving green roofs distinguish the building from among the other structures; the line between landscape and building is blurred. + The roofs serve as informal gathering spaces challenging linear ideas and stirring perception. + The roofs create open space, insulate the building, cool the surrounding air and harvest rainwater for landscaping irrigation. + Planted grasses mix with native greenery to colonize the building and bind it to the setting.

Plan PROTOTYPE STUDY SOURCE: NTU WEBSITE, PICASA

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW

This design seems to offer a new experience at every elevation or perspective fulfilling the intent that a “school for art should inspire creativity.” Glass Façade: + high performance building envelope + reduces solar gain and heat load + allows the benefits of natural views and daylight into creative spaces. The glass walls provide a visual exchange between indoors and out allowing students and teachers to experience the building, the surrounding landscape and the interior plaza as fluid spaces. + Diffused natural daylight is abundant throughout studios and classrooms, filtered through the surrounding foliage. + Finishes are intentionally raw to act as a backdrop for the art, media and design projects. Concrete walls and columns, cement-sand screeded floors, timber railings and a neutral palette define the interior spaces which vary in shape and size. The vison of the School ‘to change rigid perception’ has been translated directly into a form with ever changing perspectives. The form becomes the metaphor of change as if to facilitate the flow of creative ideas.

PROTOTYPE STUDY SOURCE: NTU WEBSITE, PICASA

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW PROTOTYPE study - EWHA CAMPUS CENTRE, SEOUL, KOREA © SITE AREA : 19 000 M2 , BUILT-UP AREA : 70 000 M2 , LANDSCAPE SETTING UP : 31 000 M2 © LOCAL ARCHITECT : BAUM ARCHITECTS, SÉOUL © ENGINEERS : PERRAULT PROJETS, PARIS : ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING © BUILDING COSTS : 80 574 000 € BT VALUE 2004The campus center caters about 20 000 students: © - academic program: learning and sport-term project space, libraries, cafeteria © - administration - commercial area: cinema, theatre, shops as well as external sporting spaces and

car parks (20 000 m²). © The campus centre is designed to offer a new sense of direction for higher education in the 21st century. © It will establish organic relations between the centre and surrounding areas of campus as well as between above ground and underground spaces. © The design essentially is about movement, connectivity, strong axial orientation, experimental lighting. © The variation in levels has been used perfectly to create ‘enclosure’ and ‘places’. © The high point of the design concept is multi-use of spaces which directly relates to multi-dimensional

problem solving approach.

AERIAL VIEW, CROSS SECTION,OTHER IMAGES

The design essentially is about movement, connectivity, strong axial orientation. The variation in levels has been used perfectly to create ‘enclosure’ and ‘places’.

PROTOTYPE STUDY SOURCE: PERRAULT WEBSITE

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW © INTERACTIVITY IN ARCHITECTURE

Summary CAUSE of Origin : Static information is dead INTERACTVITY: © FOCUSES ON: Permeable cultural threshold of perception and being © FOSTERS social exchange and dissemination of local information © IS MORE THAN: Call n response b/w man machine, responsive communication © UNDERSTATED by designers- allows more modification by present participants © ALLOWS upload of texture and mood into environment © ALLOWS user to have a hand in constructing their own experience process. © Bring people together in a spontaneous physical way and intellectual/ sensory stimulation © Based on gaming sometimes art © FACILITATES the sensing of a space as a kinesphere. © HIGHLIGHTS local factors and adds context and subjectivity to information that has become too universal, in order to make it ‘special’ © PROTOTYPE STUDY - ZERO

ENERGY MEDIA WALLgreenPIX greenPIX, 'the Zero Energy Media Wall,' uses architecture and technology to absorb, store, amplify, translate, and display data, both natural and manmade, in an organic system that responds dynamically to the local environment. © Creative programming adds even more layers to the already rich stream of data being

presented and allows passersby to experience the site in terms of space and time through both their own eyes or the minds of the selected artists. © © Media is displayed on a gigantic screen which uses 2,292 pixels of LED lights and translucent glass. The entire presentation comes with a zero net consuming energy footprint thanks to a glazing-integrated system of perforated photovoltaic cells and a battery storage system. The result is a public art installation that creates awareness of the local environment in both appearance and functionality; sustainability is more than facade dee.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW FACTS © Designed by Brooklyn based Simone Giostra & Partners Architects in collaboration with ARUP © LOCATION: Xicui Entertainment Complex,Beijing © largest LED display in the world building facade integrated PV system. © Design brief- 'enliven the building's opaque, boxlike presence and connect it to its environs' all using only one facade. © Media displayed on the large format low-res screen can be presented in both film and still image formats. © designers develop a special software for artists to test their creations on a virtual facade before loading it into the media wall. The software makes it possible to view the wall from many angles and distances to test the resolution. © EX: artists created an infrared heat map generated solely by locating all the occupants of the building and showing their position in relation to one another. The resulting animation is a dynamic representation of real-time events linking the building and its occupants to the environs. The entire facade display is roughly 24,000 squaure feet. © Each of the 2,292 glass panels has a color changing LED fixture mounted behind it and is a 'pixel' in the large format low-res display. © © Integrated photovoltaic cells mean that the panels both emit and absorb energy in the form of LED and sun light, thus reinforcing Giostra's vision of 'technological self sufficiency.’ © During the daytime however, when sun obscures the LED light, Giostra had to make the passive elements of the facade appear dynamic. He accomplished this by varying opacity and mounting angle (5°) of the glass panels as well as by carefully arranging the integrated PV cells to form a dynamic pattern. The result is a facade that appears to undulate with the rhythm of the environment day and night. © Interestingly, the entire system is a total of seven feet thick including glass panels, structure, power and data infrastructure, LED lighting fixtures and a maintenance access space.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


LITERATURE REVIEW

PROTOYPE STUDY- BION Adam Brown and Andrew Fagg Bion is an interactive installation that explores the relationship between humans and artificial life. “Bion” makes reference to an individual element of primordial biological energy identified as orgone by the scientist Wilhelm Reich. The installation is composed of hundreds of mass-produced, 3-dimensional glowing and chirping sculptural forms. Each bion, measuring approximately 4×3×2 ½ inches is an synthetic “life-form” fitted with an audio speaker, blue lights (LED's), and multiple sensors. The bions are suspended by fine gage wire connected to panels that are attached to the ceiling. When installed the panels form clusters of bions arranged at different elevations. Each bion has the ability to communicate with the others and with viewers that enter the space. When a viewer approaches the installation space she will witness a dynamic array of blips of sound and blue light emanating in cloud like patterns from all parts of the room. She notices that the source of the light and sound come from hundreds of small organic shaped forms called bions . The bions are communicating, unaware of the approaching visitor.One of the bions is alerted to the presence of a stranger and quickly communicates the information to the swarm of bions . One by one, in rapid succession, bions signal other bions of the stranger and in a wave like pattern become silent. The bions eventually become accustomed to her presence and begin to respond to her as if she was part of their ecosystem. They become attracted to her and glow more intensely when she nears. Eventually, she is incorporated into the dynamic array she once witnessed.

ROOF INSTALLATION- BION

INDIVIDUAL BIONS

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MATERIALS

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CASE STUDIES

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CASE STUDY

NIFT, N.DELHI Designed by Ar B V Doshi, NIFT campus is buzzing with activity. REASONS FOR SELECTION - Reputed design Institute in Capital city - To study relation of Indoor with the outdoor spaces. - To see how culture is reflected in building usage - To understand complication in a compact design with functions for textile and craft department

SITE PLAN

CIRCULATION- High Activity LIFT/STAIRS LIGHTING WITHIN

CIRCULATION WITHIN THE CAMPUS • Walkways • Staircase • Bridge connecting administration and academic blocks

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

NIFT, N.DELHI- inferences QUESTION

Where is it that students like to sit? What makes a space suitable to be occupied, ‘informally?

OAT - LARGE GROUPS COLUMN AS BACKREST

ESSENTIALS OF THE INFORMAL SPACE - Suitable for physical/postural improvisation - Shaded - View - people watching- lookout point with less probability of being noticed - Distanced from passerby- undisturbed, away from earshot - Usually in a 4 feet dia for interaction- steps. The JUNCTION of two different spaces - an edge - Can be a physical edge like the ‘cliff edge’ where there is a change of level - Can be a sun and shade edge - Can be a doorway- change of nature of space- indoor vs outdoors

STEEP EDGE

STEPPED SEATING

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

NIFT, N.DELHI- inferences

LEANING POSTURES - IMPROVISATIONS WITH A RAILING

LEANING POSTURES ON REGULAR STAIRS T= 230

SEATING ON BRIDGEGOOD VIEW

POSTURE ON LANDINGMUCH PREFERRED

LEANING POSTURES ON REGULAR STAIRS T= 300

OCCUPANCY OF STEPS, PORCH, DOORWAYS, EDGES Seems random because these are not really meant to be used/ occupied.

SEATING ON LANDINGPREFERRED

Students prefer to occupy ‘unofficial’ places, where ‘faculty is not expected to interrupt.’ THESE AREAS HAVE TO BE DESIGNED FOR THIS PURPOSE AS WELL.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

TINTED, PROJECTED SHADED LOOKOUTBACK TO THE

SUN+ SHADE

CROWD AT THE EDGE

‘CLIFF RAMP USED

OCCUPANCY in the kund

OCCUPANCY in formal OAT

- CAVE- LIKE STAIR FOYER -ACTIVITY ON BRIDGE

OCCUPANCY on the bridge

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

CEPT, AHEMDABAD Q. WHAT MAKES CEPT CAMPUS effective? A. The role reversal of the domain of the student and teacher as compared to average schools. Its interpretation of definition of indoors vs outdoors. Holding a lecture on the mound stretches the comfort zone of the teachers to the outdoors which is rarely the case in most campuses. The indoor studios are cubicle like space pockets where every student is allowed to customize their space down to the light fixture. This facility allows students to feel free, ironically, in a very small space. The spaces are more like dens where students love to spend time. Q. HOW HAS THIS BEEN ACHIEVED ARCHITECTURALLY? A. 1. WALLS = DOORS= WINDOWS The facade consists of pivoted doors that open up, so that the enclosure looks like a pocket created by three walls, not the conventional four.

2. UNLOADED CORRIDORS Which is to mean that the corridor is not bound by walls on either side but is a thoroughfare that cuts through the heart of each studio- a deliberate step to encourage peeping and work top interaction.

Brick adds intimacy of scale Massive load bearing walls- ideal display space Punctures in the building Coupled with level changes- keep all distances very intimate.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

CEPT, AHEMDABAD

CAMPUS PLAN

VIEW FROM A DRAFTING TABLE

Campus has an art / exhibition gallery that brings aware minds to the site and the cafeteria is open to visitors throughout the day.

SECTION Deep inset space used as a classroom

HIERARCHY OF VOLUMES 1. SEMI OPEN VOLUME- SUNLIT 2, SEMI OPEN- SHADED 3. INSET SHADED COOL AREA 4. GRADUALLY SLOPING MOUND 5. HIERARCHY IN VEGETATION

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

CEPT, AHEMDABAD STRUCTURAL SYSTEM & FACIAL RECOGNITION The sensitive use of space allows for framed out views of alternating enclosure and openness, of light and shade . All distances have been anticipated to lie within the facial recognition limit.

FRAMES : Solid mass framing the landscape Massive load bearing walls lend freedom from the predictability of a framed structure and allow for articulation of spaces of varying hierarchies. PERSPECTIVES: Perspectives are reinforced by the running exposed beam

ALTERNATION OF LIGHT & SHADE, A STUDENTS CUSTOMIZED WORKPLACE

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

NID, BANGALORE

Peripheral road

DG etc

Lib

Interactive

TRANQUIL not dull

Café Admn

OAT Wrkshp

Waiting NIDUS

Q. 4

Interface Conf

INTROSPECTIVE not introverted CREATIVE USE OF COLOUR CIRCULAR PLAN

Store

WHAT SHOULD A DESIGN SCHOOL BE?

Main road

AV

Entry Ar Karan Grover

part of the change in the society

4 arranging Spontaneous experiments with the community 4 encourage Seemingly random interaction 4 Design school should set precedent - beautiful social space 4 demonstrate to the society - designers do something useful; not merely beautify.

4 Climate conscious architecture

‘ Ans by Mamta Rao- Head of Dept, NIDRnD- Creative Thinking, User Experience

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

NID, BANGALORE 1. When the ramps or circulation does not become break out spaces, the only space that is left is the café which has been designed consciously and successfully to be the hub of informal activity; A place where students and teachers can co exist peacefully. 2. The circular planning caters to the students need of ‘tracking’ the teacher- from all points in the campus the teacher can be located. The faculty lounge was glass clad for the same reason. 3. Plastered corridor walls discourage display as question of maintenance arises. More so if the walls are curved.

FACULTY LOUNGE - good view of entire campus - glare problem - overheating due to fixed glazing

ESSENTIALS FOR DESIGN ENVIRONMENT

Dust free

non A/C spatially stimulating- ADAPTABLE

adjustable lighting wi-fi boards projectors

touchscreen light spacious lockers

unrestricted display surfaces, volumes VIEW SITTING AT THE CAFÉ’ TABLE

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

NID, BANGALORE

STIMULATING

WHAT DO THE STUDENTS WANT? “...FREEDOM IN EVERYTHING”Jai, Girish, Avik, etc- students at NID BRAINSTORMING

PRESENTATION

DEVELOPMENT/APPL

TESTING

OPEN SPACES

RESEARCH NEEDS SPACES FOR: § DISCUSSION § DEVELOPMENT § PRESENTATION § TESTING

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

LIBRARY CLASS ROOM PHOTO SOUND

PRINT

METAL

FILM

LIBRARY LAB

WOOD

LAB

WRKSHP

WORKSHOP STUDIO LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Use of colour, creative signage, light & shade variation, views opening into greens, ETC

COMMUNAL METHODS of design need brainstorming areas within studios which are intimate in scale and stimulating with ample display space.

INTERACTION Rigid planning discourages interaction. Pockets of space - open/semi open should be created for peer interaction which is essential. Seemingly Random Display of Design Work should be positioned to evoke spontaneous response. Display in Glass Cases - too formal to work.

STUDIOS should provide for mutiple display spaces. Connection with outdoors is essential. SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

FILM Areas need complete comfort conditioning sound, noise, dust proof. Space needed for placing footwear outside. Interaction with exterior can only be through double glazed windows. Can be located as a dark room in the plan.

PHOTOGRAPHY needs A/c in addition to all this.

Film studio

Textile Unit produces vibration and BLOCKING Play of volumes with mature landscaping adds vitality to the campus- and is necessary. Semi Open terraces adjoining workspaces provide ideal relaxing environments.

sound. It requires ample daylight for colour study. Option for openable windows should be provided. Dyeing produces excessive fumes and steam & requires shaded outdoor space.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

WOOD & METAL & THERMOCOL WORKSHOP Produce Noise, Vibration, Splinters, Shavings and thermocol dust. Workshop are can be clubbed into one noisy zone, but location of each should correspond to logic of individual design processes. Layout should follow sequence of execution & allow for extra demonstration space - joint teacher learner use Special electric and mechanical services need to be provided Safety, Lighting, Saw Dust collecting systems, overhead hoist system, Heavy duty flooring, Allow for large supplies in & out

Presentation/ display - needs intimate scale and lighting. Wall surfaces should be maintenace free & tolerate use of adhesive, tape, paints. Projector & Screen vital. Circulation should facilitate process of display.

COMPUTER LABS Neutral palette should act as the backdrop for often very colorful display. Interior should not compete with the design work. Lighting control is essential. Adjoining green terrace would be ideal place for taking breaks.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


Plaster, regular glass, careful use of colour on ceiling

Earthy

Brick, RCC,

Circular, mutli levelled, intriguing

Compact,

contrast ‘to

MIRAMBIKA blocks of

Orthogonal

Knit in, SRISHTI minimal ground

proflie punctured

CEPT Massive

CIRCULATION

PLANNING

The backbonetwo stairs

Depts spread out on site with skewered plan with

Wide junctions of

Used for furniture

Corridors pass through

Beautifull

Striking volumetri

Hidden but First volume encounter

VISIBILITY FROM ENTRANCE

None needed

None desired

High trees create

The high point of the design - in

High point of ground

Abundant,

Peripheral. inadequat

LANDSCAPING

Eye focused Made on by large green principles-

Roof truss visible. Less

provided for Long buffer individual of trees,

Hung from ceilings-

No corridors-

Corridorless plan Every floor behaves Like a semi

Wall mounted,

Cannot be used for display, not

Level separation

Use of waste From one Orthogonal marble orthogonal modules strips, stone, courtyard to with

Stone Plastered, natural light

Earthy materialsBrick, RCC,

Depts connected

Efficient circulation

SIGNAGE Wall mounted,

CORRIDORS

Wide, Well lit/shaded

Plaster, tinted Efficient V & V Stacking glassH circulation of depts. Discourages with no Around well

MATERIAL

NID A massive, in materials-

NID B

NIFT

Generated enclosure, visibility, encouraged interaction

FORM

CASE STUDY

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DEPARTMENTS

VISUAL COMMUNICATION is the conveyance of ideas and information in forms that can be read or looked upon. SCOPE: ·Advertising · Visual Culture · Graphic Design, Art · Art Direction · Illustration · Typography ·illustrations Web Design Communication - business, political, institutional, Educational, economical, intercultural Audiovisual, Computer Assisted Translation press and Public Relations Offices Publishing: Craft, Art and Business Local, Regional and Social Photo Journalism Psychocreativity- Thinking Contemporary Art Writing for Television and Cinema Proofreading and language quality control Strategy and Interactive Creativity

DESIGN IN EDUCATION AIM: to innovate new solutions that can transform elementary education with rich input from artists, designers, teachers, educators, researchers, animators, technologists and film makers and combine it with live field experience to create new thinking, practices, material in education.

ANIMATION ·Edutainment - The intersection space between gaming/entertainment and education. ·Mobile/location based gaming - Using location-aware mobile phones to bring games into the real world. History of Animation, Fundamentals of Motion, Life Drawing, Composition, Character Design, Storyboarding, Lighting, Cameras and Art Direction, 2D / 3D animation and VFX Output for Production.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


DEPARTMENTS

INTERACTION DESIGN the discipline of defining the behavior of products and systems that a user can interact with. The practice typically centers around complex technology systems such as software, mobile devices and other electronic devices. It also relates to new media art technologies where humans are able to interact with and change the course of an artwork. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY USED Mental models, Mapping, Interface metaphors, Affordances SCOPE: Software interfaces, (business) information systems, Internet, Physical products, Environments, services Graphic design, Programming, Psychology, User testing, P roduct design

INDEPENDENT MEDIA The Independent Media Center (Indymedia or IMC) is a global participatory network of journalists that reports on political and social issues. Indymedia was founded as an alternative to government and mainstream media, and seeks to facilitate people being able to publish their media as directly as possible. PRINT MEDIA - Newspapers, Books, Magazines, Pamphlets ELECTRONIC MEDIA- Internet, Radio, TV, Cinema

WELLNESS An active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a more successful existence with a shift in focus away from illness in viewing human health and is similar to "homeostasis". ASPECTS STUDIED : Nutrition Alternative methods of healing Health Clubs Sport Non electronic means of recreation

TEXTILE&CRAFT FOUNDATION MAJOR ACTIVITIES: Weaving, Block printing table, Dyeing Tracing, Fitting , Stitching

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY ADITI SCHOOL, BANGALORE by Kumar n Swamy CURRENTLY running its activities in three campus buildings 1. A block in Mallya Aditi School (old campus) 2. Two acquired apartment buildings which have been adapted for computer labs ( new campus) 3. Workshops and library are in old campus The need is to come up with a new campus that clubs all the existing departments.

EXISTING PROGRAM

BASEMENT

GROUND FLOOR

UPPER FLOOR

OLD CAMPUS COMPUTER LAB TEXTILE WORKSHOP TOY DVLPMNT CENTER WOOD WORKSHOP RECEPTION ADMIN LIBRARY COMPUTER LAB CLASSROOMS BLOCK PRINTING DYEING DARK ROOMS CLASSROOMS CAFÉ’

CEMA CAMPUS

SECURITY ADMIN COMMON ROOM LOCKERS EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA DESIGN IN EDUCATION INNOVATION CENTER ANIMATION LAB

CAFÉ’ STAFF ROOM PANTRY

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY ADITI SCHOOL, BANGALORE by Kumar n Swamy

REQUIREMENTS UNCONVENTIONAL WOOD

TEXTILE

PROJECT ORIENTED METAL THERMOCOL

PRINTING

CLAY FILIMING DYEING

NO CURRICULUM SELF MOTIVATED MATURE BUT INSPIRED POROUS INSTITUTE FREE FLOW OF IDEAS &CONVERSATION

FINE ART

LAB

DISPLAY

INFORMAL - ALONG CORRIDORS- STIMULATES INTERACTION

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

MIRAMBIKA, N DELHI BY Ar SANJAY PRAKASH

GREEN SCREENS VOLUMES built to be screened from natural elements without the use of glass. NO DOORS NO WINDOWS

CLIMATE CONDITIONING

COURTYARDS LANDSCAPED at every levelPlays major role in climate conditioning Removes dust from the air Relaxes the environment

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE Use of waste material Marble strips Highlights labour intensive methods Creates visually intimate scale

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

MIRAMBIKA, N DELHI BY Ar SANJAY PRAKASH

NON - ELEVATION The design principles of this school building represent theIdeology behind its program. The permeability, freedom from doors and glass and windows, with only nature as the screen sends out a subconscious message. The ideology can be read as being more coherent with the world view and it only screens out undesirable elements through the use of basic principles. More fundamental in their approach, not a victim of consumerism. Tranquil not rushed. Do not feel the need to ‘label’ anythingmakes it meditative.

POETICS Poetic gesture - building becomes a part of the child’s play ORTHOGONAL PLAN Repititve modules, varying in height can be repeated over and over to create an acceptable plan for future growth as well.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CASE STUDY

INTERVIEW WITH Mr Arvind Lodaya, Dean of Projects, Srishti ON THE INTAKEWe pick students who are emotionally mature to handle fuzziness, who are self motivated and can deal with lack of structure. Our aim is to create visionaries- It is the job of our school to cull it out and not constrain it in terms of discipline. ON DISPLAY We encourage display of not only the product but also the process as peer learning is often more meaningful. ON A NEW CAMPUS Everyone wants constant interplay with the natural elements. No A/c, No fixed glass. Natural materials: Rich in texture and sensations - like to hear the rain fall outside, Like the shade of a plant on my window. Building should serve as the backdrop, not be the highlight in itself Some spaces can and should be dramatic for provocation. More than visual connectivity we need mental connectivity. We don’t particularly like the dark room ambience where eye contact is not possible. On Location We would like to be at the heart of the community- maybe through art and cultural center, a center where people can walk in & out. In fact we want it to be POROUS, someone even coined the term Permeable Institute to describe our aspirations. Keywords would have to be- new, fresh, interesting, fascinating, it would have to keep on changing responsively. It should have low env impact We like the jhopad patti concept that is built as per need and is essentially organic. ON DESIGN PROPERTYWe encourage the students to contribute to the flow- and tell them ‘nothing is yours anyways’. We believe in communal design where ideas flow in and out from one mind to another. The new campus would have to depict that.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


INFERENCES CORRIDOR

1. Doubly loaded corridors- will force students to ‘hang out’ in undefined spaces- conversation will rarely be about work. 2. Singly loaded wide corridor with formal display space- will encourage individual students ( whose work is on display) and adds ‘pride’ or value to the product. But adds the sense of looking ‘down’ upon something that has been ‘encased’ and conversation will tend to be opinionated.

3. Singly loaded corridor connected with informal display- will encourage more and more students to display it, it is more democratic, sets the tone of the conversation. And allows the observer to really experience the display without mental prejudice.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


INFERENCES

CLASSROOM For an unstructured teaching method, the classroom has to be ‘an envelope’ ready to serve, be customized as needed and cannot be laid out formally. The light in the classroom effects state of mental alertness and should allow for all kinds of permutations and combinations

STUDIO A customizable den/ nest for every student creates sense of belonging and encourages students to work. Visual connectivity to the landscaped/ relaxed environment is indicative of freedom of thought. Desired- Customizable light fixture, Ample storage, strategically located electric points.

LAB 1. Interior has to comply with regulations, but adjoining area has to have some lounge like space connected to an outdoor green relaxation are with fresh air or the café itself. 2. Space for placing bags, footwear is an eyesore and creative handling is needed. 3. View of outdoor not easily permissible due to light control needed.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


INFERENCES

PARAMETERS FOR THE HI TECH CLASSROOM

SPATIAL CHARACTER Planning that creates visual interest in the outdoor will be preferred. Visual interest can be created in three waysIntrospective spaces with landscaping

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


INFERENCES Focusing the eye on art work - which will become the

Watching movement and activities of people

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


INFERENCES

COMPARATIVE AREAS FROM CASE STUDIES

AREA

STUDIO

CLASSROOM

WORKSHOP

LIBRARY

NIFT

40sqm/ 35 FTE = 1.14 INSUFFICIENT

CEPT

NID BANGLORE

135/40 FTE= 3.37

128sqm/ 30 FTE = 4.27

CONGESTED

EXCESSIVE

67.5/ 35 FTE = 1.92

56 sqm/ 30 FTE = 1.86

OPTIMUM

SUFFICIENT

18sqm/ 35FTE= 8.4

EXCESSIVE

105sqm/ 30 FTE = 3.50 SUFFICIENT FOR R&D

300sq/80 FTE= 3.75

216sqm/ 200 FTE

250sqm/ 60 FTE

INSUFFICIENT READING AREA

INSUFFICIENT

OPTIMUM

90sqm,

OUTDOOR SEATING

60sqm/60 FTE

SPACIOUS, KIOSKS PULL CROWDS

NO INDOOR SEATING

INSUFFICIENT

50 sqm/ 35 FTE = 1.43 INSUFFICIENT

100 sqm/ 35 FTE = 2.86 INSUFFICIENT

CAFETERIA

FTE = FULL TIME EQUIVALENT = STUDENT STAYING FOR THE ENTIRE DURATION OF THE COURSE. standards referred to - Architect’s handbook by Pickard, Educational facilities design by UNESCO, Technical colleges and collegw of further education.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


AREA CALCULATIONS DEPT

CLASSRM (no. x area x FTE)

STUDIO (no. x area x FTE)

LAB (no. x area x FTE)

PRACTICAL WORK

TOTAL

CULTURE & HUMANITIES

1*2*35 = 70

(1*5.6*35) *1.4= 196

COMMON LAB

-

266

VISUAL COMMUNICATI ON

A/V RM (1*2.3*35)= 80.5

(2*5.6*35) *1.4= 548.80

(4*3.2*35) =448 + MEDIA CEN

ART CENTER

1077.3

(2*4.6*35)= 322

COMMON LAB

(1*5.85*35)= 204.75 (1*7.2*35)=

778.75

TEXTILE CRAFT

252

INDP MEDIA

A/V RM (1*2.3*35)= 80.5

(1*5.6*35)*1.4 +(5*6)= 196+ 30 = 226

(2*3.2*35)= 224

MEDIA CENTER

530.5

ANIMTN GAMNG

LCT RM

(2*5.6*35)*1.4 = 548.8

(2*3.2*35) + 1 SDL = 224

ART CENTER

772.8

INTERCTVITY IN NEW MEDIA

LCT RM

(1*5.6*35)*1.4 = 196

ELCTRNIC + IT LAB= (1*4.6*20)= 92

MEDIA CENTRE

288.8

WELLNESS

(1*2.3* 35)= 80.5

(1*5.6*35)*1.4 = 196

COMMON LAB

INDUSTRY

276.5

MEDIA CENTER

DVP= 1*3.2*35= 112 SOUND= 2*4*5=40 PRINT= 4*7*2= 56 PHOTO=8*12 =96

ART CENTER

INNOVATION CENTER

(1*2.3*20)= 46 (1*1.85*35) = 64.75

(1*5.6*35)*1.4 = 196

(2*3.2*20)= 128

310

GRAPHICS(1*1 2.2*40)= 488 CLAY (1*6*20)= 120 CRAFTS(1*5.6* 20)= 112

720

(1*4.7*35) w= 164.5 (1*5.3*35)m= 185.5

784.75

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


AREA CALCULATIONS LECTURE ROOM

1* 1.66* 70 = 116.2 1*1.2 *200= 240

LIBRARY – (2.5MTSQ/FTE) – 1570MTSQ COOMOM IT LAB- 1*3.2*35= 112 COMMON ROOM GEN – 1*2*150= 300 GIRLS – 1*2*100= 200 MPH – 1*0.8*1000= 800 AUDI – 1* 1.2* 1000 *(1.4)= 1200*1.4 = 1680 GYM- 18* 9= 162 CAFETERIA – (1*1.4*500) + (1.4x) SEGR FOR STAFF= 700*1.4 = 980 FACULTY CAFÉ’ – (1*1.4*30) = 42 FACUTLY LOUNGE- 2*4*5= 40 FACULTY-

HOD= 25*8= 200 PROF= 18*8= 144 ASSTT= 15*8= 120 SECT= 10*2 = 20

ADM – 400MTSQ +STORE =50MTSQ= 450 MEDICAL- 30MTSQ= 30

TOILETS = CIRCULATION= 15% ANCILL.= SERVICES PARKING 1CAR/100MTSQ= 405 CARS

TOTAL SITE AREA= 10 ACRE DESIRED COVERAGE= 3 ACRE= 12138MTSQ= 30% SITE AREA UNBUILT AREA = 7 ACRE= 70% SITE AREA

TOTAL REQD BUILT AREA = 5810+ 7212= 16022 + (20%) 3204.4= 19226.4/4046=

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


AREA CALCULATIONS

FINAL AREAS CULTURE HUMANITIES = 270 sqm VISUAL COMMUNICATION = 1100sqm TEXTILE CRAFT = 780sqm INDEPENDENT MEDIA = 530sqm ANIMATION GAMING = 780sqm INTERACTIVITY IN NEW MEDIA = 300sqm WELLNESS = 280sqm MEDIA CENTER = 310sqm ART CENTER = 720sqm INNOVATION CENTER = 790sqm LIBRARY = 1500sqm COMPUTER LAB = 120sqm MPH = 400sqm AUDITORIUM = 1680sqm ADMINISTRATION = 500sqm

ESSENTIALS

WORKSHOP Good Ventilation Adjacent To Open Workspace Noise Control Vibration Control Fumes Exhaust Visibilty- Demonstration Maintenance Free Heavy Duty Surfaces

STUDIO

LECTURE ROOM

Lighting Control Display- Multiple Options Lockers Comfort Conditioned Laptop Wifi Friendly Stimulate Interaction

Lighting Control Noise Proof Comfort Conditioned

LAB Dust free Temp control Comfort Conditioned

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

BANGALORE - MASTER PLAN 2015 Three rings of development

PLANNING DISTRICT- KENGERI

CIRCULATION - MYSORE ROAD PROPOSED LAND USE

KENGERI region is a green hinterland which includes the MAJOR ECONOMIC CORRIDOR of mysore road. Jnana Bharathi Railway Station -

Proposed Transportation Interchange Hub PROPOSED international cricket stadium Pproposed housing, hostels

many vacant layouts are expected to serve the future housing needs of the city.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

MY S ORE

M UT ROA AT high ION COR D RID w ay SH-1 OR- 6 la 7 ne

Stta e

SITE SURROUNDINGS

Railway station Bus stand Ut ta rah alli Roa d

AVERAGE TEMP S: 38C W: 16C - 20 C

GREEN CORRIDOR

Cold- Dec To Feb Hot- March To May Sw MonsOON- July To Sept Post Monsoon- Oct To Nov

Road Width 18.20 Mt l Reserved For Open Space- 10% l Reserved For Parking 5% l Area For Development- 90% l FAR Allowed- 2 l Coverage Allowed50% l Setback All Around5mt l Car Parking Needed 200 Cars

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

TO MYSORE ROAD UTTARAHALLI ROAD- 18MT WIDE

KRA

DRA IN

AB

VIEW

AG E

AR EA

N

DRAI NAG E

NE- WINTERS

SW - SUMMERS

SUN MOVEMENT

WIND

S-E VIEW SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

APARTMENTS

NOISY, EASY ACCESS, FRONT FACE APARTMENTS

QUIET ZONE, BEST VIEW

UNDISTURBE D ACCESSIBLE

WORK ZONE, GOOD ACCESS NO VIEW

APARTMENTS

ENGINEERING COLLEGE

QUIET ZONE,

UNDISTURBED QUIET ZONE, GOOD VIEW, SURROUNDED BY GREENERY

N SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

ZONING OF SITE

PUBLIC ZONE OUTSIDERS

PUBLIC ZONE FREQUENT VISITORS

FACULTY, ADMIN, TEACHING ZONE

STUDENT ZONE, HEALTH & RECREATION

N

CONNECTIVITY- Suitable degree of connectivity will be ensured between different zones and between different floor levels. Overhead bridges will be provided over the street.

IDENTITY of each zone will be established through architectural accents but overall vocabulary will be constant.

Intermediate spaces between different building blocks will be designed for the needs of students that are expected to occupy that specific area.

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


SITE ANALYSIS

STREET PLANNING URBAN CHARACTER - large built masses overlooking main Piazza - Vehicular Access - Metalled Surfaces - Geometric Landscaping - Spaces for use of technology - Service ramps - Loading/Unloading Docks -canopied seating

AUDI

ARTIST

OAT

CANTEEN ADMN

NATURAL CHARACTER

WRSHP

- Pedestrian Access - Paved Surfaces - Organic landscaping - Spaces for artists - Earth Mound - Lotus Pond - Shaded terraces -

MEDIA

ART CRAFT

ANIMATION INTERACTIVITY

TEXTILE

LABS

STUDENT COMMON ROOM

VIEWS- The site is surrounded by trees on three sides and this view has to be exploited.

N

DESIGN STREETPEDESTRIAN WALKWAY ‘for spontaneous interaction with passerbys’

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


DESIGN EVOLUTION

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CONCEPT GENERATION

Famous Streets of the world = Varying the street cross sections that create sense of progression and balance sense of enclosure.

Single sided section

Section with overhead projections

Section encasing a balcony

Section with volumes overhead

Section with pockets of space, overhead volumes and terraces

Sections with terraces overlooking open spaces

Sections with complete sense of enclosure

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CONCEPT GENERATION

DESIGN CRITERIA - To create SENSE OF PROGRESSION through a series of varying cross sections of the streetboth spatially and functionally.

PERCEPTION FIELD - 15 DEGREE

- To articulate volumes through creative use of material which will be indicative of the functions within - To create spatial levels that facilitate spontaneous conversations

SENSE OF CONNECTION 30 - 50 cm

SENSE OF SEPARATION 150 cm

- To keep all viewing distances within facial recognition limits - To consciously CREATE AND DESIGN JUNCTIONS b/w indoor and outdoor as they are strategic gathering points - To CREATE VARIOUS DEGREES OF ENCLOSURE

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CONCEPT GENERATION

MAIN FUNCTIONAL SPINE

CONNECTIVITY DIAGRAMS SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


DESIGN EVOLUTION

SITING OF FUNCTIONS Auditorium located close to entrance for ease of access

AUDI

Artists located in most introspective area of site ARTIST

OAT

CANTEEN ADMN WRSHP MEDIA

ART CRAFT

ANIMATION INTERACTIVITY

LABS

STUDENT COMMON ROOM

TEXTILE

Activity Hub/Peformance Area Noisy workshops are located near parking for easy loading of stock; sunken, structurally separate from Labs Media Labs Located centrally with self shaded Dark labs on GF Textile Block separated Art craft on ground Floor to add interest while moving down the street Labs on GF and Studio and classrooms on upper floor to get North Light Student Zone with health and recreation facilities amidst dense green surroundings

DESIGN INTENTION : to create a ‘community’ through site planning, with a ‘street’ piercing through it.

EXPRESSION of the building will be like a canvas with only the initial strokes with ‘accents’ of experimental materials that will also indicate the function that is concealed behind the skin.

N

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


CONCEPT GENERATION

Main building blocks AUDI

ARTIST

OAT

ADMN WRSHP MEDIA

ART CRAFT

ANIMATION INTERACTIVITY

LABS

Building mass ‘pulled out’ to create Piazza

Transparent Building Mass Building Blocks recede to let be dominated by the greenery.

TEXTILE

Street forming the main Axis of circulation Diversion Creating a Node

STUDENT COMMON ROOM

EXPRESSION of the building will be like a canvas with only the initial strokes with ‘accents’ of experimental materials that will also indicate the function that is concealed behind the skin.

N

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


STUDY MODELS

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


STUDY MODELS

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Excerpts by Douchan Palacios lfrom: www.archidev.org/article.php3?id_article=1035

SYNOPSIS- books referred to - The Dissertation- Borden & Reudi - Technical Colleges & Colleges Of Further Education Barbara Price - CCA Thesis Numbers - 1060, 1075, 1126, 1132, 1089, 747 - The Architects’ Handbook - Quentin Pickard LIBRARY STUDIES- Journals, Books, Theses, Time Saver Standards Leeds, Hudderford Central college of Art and Technology

Websites:

http://www.art-design.umich.edu/careers.php?aud=e&menucat=cr http://www.art.uiuc.edu/ Http://www.artcenter.edu/accd/index.jsp HTTP://www.worldarchitecture.com

Design Stage Site Responsive Architecture and Planning Architecture And Arts Genova 2004 Interdisciplinary Approach to Architecture Climate Responsive Architecture AD 4D Environmental Psychology Hybrid Architecture 25 BY TASCHEN Landscape Architecture The Art of Japanese Gardens Contemporary Vernacular Architecture Colleges for Technical Education and Further Education The Urban School Landscape Architecture by J O Simonds Education Facilities Design The Architect’s Handbook by Quentin Pickard TSS for Building Types by Joseph de Chaira

SCHOOL OF ART, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE, INDIA srishti


Thesis Report: School of Art, Design and Technology