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RICHARD CHOU


HI, I’m Richard. I believe that good design is interdisciplinary, that it is the product of collaboration between community stakeholders, subject-matter experts, and designers. As an urban designer and technologist, I have dedicated my work to bridge between analysis and design to create healthy, equitable, and resilient spaces. Thank you for viewing my portfolio.


RICHARD CHOU

412.352.8929 | h.chou@columbia.edu | www.richardchou.com

[Eligible for Canadian TN Visa / STEM OPT with 2-year extension]

EDUCATION Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design Columbia University, New York, NY | Degree expected May 2019 • Graduate Teaching Assistant – Urban Design Studio | 2019 - Present • Student Ambassador – Urban Design Open House | 2018 - Present Bachelor of Architecture & Minor in Psychology Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA | May 2016 • Undergraduate Teaching Assistant – Generative Modeling | 2015 - 2016 • Class Representative – School of Architecture Advisory Council | 2015 - 2016 • President – Taiwanese Students Association | 2014 - 2015

CERTIFICATION • LEED Certification – Green Associate | USGBC | 2018 • Architectural Experience Program (AXP) – 70% complete | NCARB | 2015 - Present

EXPERIENCE Digital Technologist Cannon Design, Baltimore, MD | Aug 2016 - Apr 2018 • As the office Digital Practice Leader performed Building Information Management (BIM), developed computational tools, and communicated between stakeholder, health advisory experts, and architects • Developed a parametric design tool that visualizes building program planning into 3D massing • Performed agent-based occupancy and circulation simulation for schematic designs Architect I Cannon Design, Baltimore, MD | Jul 2016 - Apr 2018 • Designated project BIM Manager for a healthcare facility over the course of three months • Detailed healthcare & academic projects through Design Development & Construction Development • Conducted research and design of various feasibility studies and project proposals Architecture Intern Ferri Design Associates, Shanghai, China | Jul 2014 - Sept 2014 • Developed Master Plan and Schematic Design (SD) for a Bio-tech Incubation Center in Shanghai • Performed series of solar exposure optimization & facade design for the incubation center

RECOGNITION • • • •

Neighborhood Design Center – Project of the Year | 2018 Mars City Design Competition – Finalist | 2016 EPIC Metals Design Competition – Second Place | 2014 NCMA Concrete Design Competition – Second Place | 2014

SKILLS COMPUTATION Grasshopper Revit Dynamo Python/ JS

ANALYTICS ArcGIS / QGIS Microsoft Excel Energy Modeling

DESIGN Adobe Creative Suite Autodesk Revit Rhinoceros

LANGUAGE English (native) Chinese (fluent)


DESIGN


RE-IMAGINING NYC WATERFRONT FOR RESILIENCE RESILIENT NYC Summer 18 Urban Design Studio HsinYi Chao, Richard Chou, Mariam Hattab, Huang Qiu, Peijou Shih The New York City Metro area receives clean water from upstate reservoirs — some more than 125 miles from the City, while outputting 1.3 billion gallons of wastewater per day. During heavy rainfall, the city releases up to 27 billion gallons of pollutant directly into its water body through Combined Sewage Outflows (CSO). With climate change and aging infrastructure, New York City must invest in a sustainable infrastructure that extends beyond the waterfront. Resilient NYC is a comprehensive system along New York City’s waterfront and properties within the 100-year floodplain. This system combines flood protection, storm water management, and grey water purification, converting these areas to high-performing and multipurpose buffer zones. In addition, site conditions and programs are incorporated to create a cohesive design that includes human and ecological programs. Through the implementation of buffer zones in urban green spaces, the city will create a resilient and sustainable future for New York City.

N 6


POTABLE WATER

CLEAN WATER LANDFILL OMNI SYSTEM

BUFFER ZONE

WASTE

TOXIC BLACK WATER

TREATED WATER

USABLE WATER

NON-TOXIC

PURIFY

USABLE WATER GREY WATER RECLAIM

PURIFY

ROOF TOP COLLECTION

CLEANED WATER

STREET SPACE

RAIN WATER

NATURAL PURIFICATION SYSTEM

RUN OFF SURFACE FLOOD

WATERFRONT

WATER BODY

RECREATION COMMERCIAL

OPEN SPACE

RESERVOIR BREAK WATER

FLOOD WATER

RETENTION TANK

STORAGE

COMBINED SEWER INFLOW WWTP

Multi-system storm and flood water management system, utilizing existing infrastructure and integrated passive systems

Neighborhood Wastewaster Purification System Residential & Small Business Zone

Pervious Parking Lot

NYCHA Bioswale Purification System Thomas Jefferson Park

Residential & Commercial Area

Isaac Newton Middle School For Math & Science

Pervious Parking Lot

Pervious Road Network

Bioswale Purification System Ecological Science Teaching Center Elevated Highway Deployable Flood Barrier Extended Riparian Zone

Bioswale Purification System

Breakwater

Pervious Parking Lot

RESIDENTIAL STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

TRANSIT INFRASTRUCTURE AS TIDAL DEFENSE

Mix-use Housing Development Affordable Housing Development

Industrial Business Zone

Bay Street Commercial Corridor Pervious Parking Converted Railroad Levee

Extended Riparian Zone Maritime & Riparian Ecology Center Marine Ecology Zone (Billion Oyster Project)

Retrofit Commercial Space Rain Water Collection Industrial Business Zone

Elevated Railroad

Breakwater

Deployable Flood Barrier Preservation Zone (Brownfield Treatment) Breakwater

INDUSTRIAL LIVING RIPARIAN ZONE

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NEW TOWN CREEK RESILIENCE STRATEGIC PLAN

8

Coastal Breakwater Waterfront Extention Extended Riparian Zone Stormwater Retention Vegetated Bioswales Flood Resilient Buildings Roof-top Water Collection Pervious Road Network


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CREATING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ALONG THE UPPER HUDSON VALLEY ALBANY-HUDSON GROWTH CORRIDOR Fall 18 - Urban Design Studio Lorena Galvao, Richard Chou, Peijou Shih, Jinsook Lee

Rensselaer County

Albany Albany County

Hudson Greene County

Columbia County

The Albany-Hudson Growth Corridor concentrates the future and currently dispersed growth in the Upper Hudson Valley. Today, the Hudson Valley is losing farmland, forests and open space that support the regional food systems as well as its value as a rural and pastoral landscape. The growing and expanding population in the Albany metropolitan region threatens to worsen land use pattern cause by sprawl. Thus, the Upper Hudson Valley must adopt effective ways to protect its ecosystem while strengthening existing communities.

New York City

“How do we create a balance between healthy and productive growth and healthy and productive communities?� ALBANY



With the Growth Corridor in place, the Upper Hudson Valley region will grow sustainably in the next few decades, concentrating new housing and social life along the corridors while preserving open space and farmland outside the Corridor. The Albany-Hudson Growth Corridor enables better connections to the Albany metropolitan region, focusing development, and maintaining the rural character of the region.

ALBANY

  

URBAN GROWTH CORRIDOR

     

LEGEND Amtrak (Public Transportation) Hospitals (Health Care Services) Walmarts (Market Areas) Catchment Areas Post Offices Amenities Significant Biodiversity Areas Flood Zone by 2100 (6ft Sea Level Rise)

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Farmlands Greenlands



HUDSON

CATSKILL



HUDSON

CATSKILL


ALBANY URBAN AREA

ALBANY Albany

FOOTPRINT: 22 sq mi POPULATION: 98,251

15.4 TONS CO2 /PERSON

ALBANY POPULATION: 98,251

RENSSELAER POPULATION: 9,264 RENSSELAER Rensselaer

CLINTON HEIGHTS

POPULATION: 16,473 EAST GREENBUSH East Greenbush

ALBANY METRO REGION FOOTPRINT: 242 sq mi POPULATION: 864,012

EAST SCHODACK East Schodack

NASSAU Nassau

NASSAU

POPULATION: 4,789

NORTH CHATHAM North Chatham

KINDERHOOK LAKE Kinderhook Lake NIVERVILLE Niverville

KINDERHOOK Kinderhook

VALATIE Valatie

KINDERHOOK LAKE NIVERVILLE

POPULATION: 1,662

VALATIE

POPULATION: 1,878

STUYVESANT FALLS POPULATION: 251

STUYVESANT Stuyvesant FallsFALLS

STOCKPORT Stockport

34.8 TONS CO2 /PERSON

COLUMBIA & RENSSELAER SUBURBAN AREA FOOTPRINT: 22 sq mi POPULATION: 98,251

STOTTVILLE Stottville

LORENZ PARK

BIG RETAIL Big BOX Box Retails

LORENZ PARK Lorenz Park COLUMBIA MEMORIAL HEALTH Columbia Memorial Hospital

POPULATION: 2,053

HUDSON

POPULATION: 6,239

HUDSON Hudson Catskill CATSKILL

CATSKILL

POPULATION: 5,141

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Mobile Services Institutions

Partnership

Mix Used Building Development

Pavement

Health Care

Commuting through the urban growth corridor via Route 9

2 Family Houses

Building Height Regulation

Groceries

1 Family Houses

Moving along the greenway across the hamlets Affordable Housing

Building Height Regulation

Amazon

Park

Providing services at civic centers to the community

Public Spaces

Building Height Regulation Libraries Park

Affordable Housing

Public Spaces

Public Spaces

The Growth Corridor better connects the region, and provides better services through mobile programs, while creating civic spaces along the hamlets. It strengthens the Upper Hudson Valley counties by connecting to Albany metropolitan region. 12

0,5 Mile - 10 minute walkable distance Most Vibrant Diversity Most Concentrated Area New Buildings


COLUMBIAVILLE COLUMBIAVILLE

2020

HUDSON RIVER HUDSON RIVER

The Albany Hudson Greenway completes construction, connecting the hamlets and bringing mobile programs along the way.

STUYVESANT FALLS STUYVESANT FALLS

CONSERVATION LAND CONSERVATION FARMLAND FARM LAND

ROUTE 9 ROUTE 9

VALATIE VALATIE

CHAIN STORES

CHAIN STORES PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

SECONDARY ROADS

SECONDARY ROADS

CONSERVATION FARMLAND

NEW CIVIC CENTER

NEW CIVIC CENTER

2050

New Civic Centers become hubs for the residents within these hamlets to host community activities. Mobile services will come periodically introducing a new urban/suburban lifestyle as residents can access all living amenities and services within walkable distance.

NIVERVILLE NIVERVILLE

KINDERHOOK LAKELAKE KINDERHOOK NEW CIVIC CENTER NEW CIVIC CENTER

GREENWAY GREENWAY CONSERVATION LAND CONSERVATION

NEW DEVELOPMENT

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

2100

Kinderhook Lake becomes a recreational destination within the region, stimulating development and urban growth along the greenway. The once disconnected hamlets transform into well-connected vibrant neighborhoods.

KINDERHOOK LAKE - GREENWAY EXPERIENTIAL VIEW

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RESTORING NEIGHBORHOOD IDENTITY THROUGH PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT AND DESIGN PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN CannonDesign Openhand Studio & The Neighborhood Design Center

Community Design Works

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street NDC Project #3188 500-2700 Pennsylvania Avenue, Baltimore, MD 3/22/2018

As the volunteer coordinator of CannonDesign Baltimore’s Openhand Studio, I led a pro bono project in partnership with Baltimore’s chapter of the Neighborhood Design Center (NDC), a nonprofit organization facilitating the development of healthy, equitable neighborhoods. The mission of the project was to redesign storefront and street scape guidelines for Pennsylvania Avenue. This corridor holds historical and cultural significance to everyone, ranging from public interest due to the 2015 protests to the most important constituents – the residents and property owners. The ULI Technical Assistant Panel titled their report of suggestions “Restoring the Glory” as a reminder of the prominent Pennsylvania Avenue that was in multiple points of history. The final guideline was delivered in April 2018, through a stakeholder design review of our proposal, where we received positive acclaim and a great deal of constructive feedback. Our project was selected by NDC as the volunteer project of the year. We were happy to have left our mark in Pennsylvania Avenue’s history, and more importantly, see improvements to the health of these neighborhoods.

NDC Staff Laura Wheaton, Johnny Macon

NDC Volunteers Richard Chou, Alec Dumond, Ellen Fowlkes, Richard Jean-Baptiste, Briana Jones, Christina LoConte, Adam Louie, James Marsh, Anthony Vischansky

TABLE OF CONTENT PROJECT OVERVIEW

5

DESIGN PROCESS

11

STOREFRONT GUIDELINE

19

STREETSCPE GUIDELINE

37

REFERENCE

67

For conceptual purposes only. Not for regulatory approval, permitting, or construction. NDC and its volunteers assume no responsibility or liability for its technical accuracy nor for any unauthorized use.

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street

#3188 | 03/22/2018 page 3 of 67

Completed Design Guideline published by NDC and distributed to community leaders antd business owners

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TAILORED AMENITIES VEGETATION IDENTITY

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

PHASING

The design guidelines revolve around the defining of Pennsylvania Avenue’s urban character. The survey and community conversations found that along with the region’s reputable history in the arts and entertainment, property owners need the ability and incentive to customize their properties. Public spaces must follow as well to promote activity and habitation.

As we learned the challenges and opportunities in reestablishing Pennsylvania Avenue into a vibrant district, we also understand that some of these issues require coordination and patience. Hoping to address these design opportunities while maintaining an forseeable near-future, we created short-term/ long term recommendations and sepearted more permanent streetscape features into different phases.

COMMUNITY WORKSHOP street cleaning

light

street repair

HIGH IMPACT

event space

business diversity community

historic murals interior grates

SHORT TERM

colored banners

LONG TERM

window display

design

plants

DESIGN PRIORITY MAPPING For conceptual purposes only. Not for regulatory approval, permitting, or construction. NDC and its volunteers assume no responsibility or liability for its technical accuracy nor for any unauthorized use.

LOW IMPACT

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street

#3188 | 03/22/2018 page 15 of 67

KEY STAKEHOLDER REVIEW

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STOREFRONT OVERVIEW

CORNICE Important unifying element of the face. Preserve historical elements and do not cover with signage.

FACADE WINDOWS Avoid boarded windows or tinted glass. Security screens and grills should be as inconspicuous as possible to avoid distraction. See page 30.

COLOR Coordinated facade colors help create consistency along Pennsylvania Avenue.

LIGHTING

MURALS

Adequate lighting brings attention to your store, and provides excitement as well as security to the street. See page 24.

Murals brings color to the neighborhood. They also and signify the arrival of Pennsylvania Avenue and celebrate the mainstreet's heritage. See page 26.

SIGNAGE Business signage along the corridor should be consistent. See page 22.

AWNING/ GATEBOX Awning provides weather protection as well promotes your business. However, remember that less is more, and avoid overcrowding with texts. See page 34.

DISPLAY WINDOWS Openness, light, and visual connection to the street enhances the pedestrian experience and promote your products. Maintain at least 60% openness. See page 32.

ALLEY GATES Alley gates placed across residential alleyways help deter loitering and illegal activities. See page 35.

For conceptual purposes only. Not for regulatory approval, permitting, or construction. NDC and its volunteers assume no responsibility or liability for its technical accuracy nor for any unauthorized use.

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PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street

#3188 | 03/22/2018 page 21 of 67


STREETSCAPE STRATEGIES Our approach to the streetscape of Penn Avenue is to enhance the already existing features to create an environment that is conducive to pedestrians, encourages visitation to local NATIVE + ADAPTIVE PLANT SPECIES businesses, and promotes a unique and unified neighborhood identity. At each block we propose adding STORMWATER MANAGEMENT curb extensions to enhance pedestrian visibility, calm traffic, and create a more walkable streetscape. Light poles inter-spaced throughout the streetscape offer opportunity to hang banners that promote neighborhood events or hang lights during holiday seasons. Each light post will NATIVE +for ADAPTIVE PLANT SPECIES Lowinclude space for more permanent signage that will reinforce an identity the neighborhood. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT maintenance indigenous vegetation introduces nature into the built environment, while creating a relief in paved areas to mitigate storm water. CURB EXTENSIONS

CURB EXTENSIONS

LIGHT POLE BANNERS

LIGHT POLE BANNERS

ALLOWABLE SPACE FOR OUTDOOR SEATING

ALLOWABLE SPACE FOR OUTDOOR SEATING

FESTIVAL LIGHTS + BANNERS FESTIVAL LIGHTS + BANNERS OVERSTREET OVERSTREET

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & GUIDELINES | 03/22/2018 STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES #3188page #3188 | 03/22/2018 41 of 67 page 41 of 67 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE STOREFRONT & STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES #3188 | 03/22/2018

For conceptual purposes For conceptual purposes only. only. Not Not for regulatory approval, permitting, or for regulatory approval, permitting, or construction. NDC and its volunteers construction. NDC and its volunteers assume no responsibility or liability assume for noits responsibility or liability technical accuracy nor for any for its technical accuracy unauthorized use. nor for any Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street unauthorized use. Pennsylvania Avenue Main Street For conceptual purposes only. Not for regulatory approval, permitting, or construction. NDC and its volunteers assume no responsibility or liability for its technical accuracy nor for any unauthorized use. Pennsylvania Avenue

Main Street

page 40 of 67

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COMPUTATION


EXPLORING MANHATTEN LAND USE VIA DATA VISUALIZATION NYC BUILDIND CLASS SANKEY DIAGRAM Summer 18 - Digital Techniques Richard Chou This data visualization exercise explores the NYC PLUTO dataset. Land parcels are tabulated into containers based on land use type showing the distribution of residential and commercial properties in lower to mid Manhattan. Each property is then linked to its address, presenting the information geospatially. A custom visualization work flow is created for this exercise using GIS, Grasshopper, and Illustrator, which was later developed into a step-by-step tutorial as part of the final project of the class. LAND USE ANALYSIS IN LOWER MANHATTAN

20


21


DESIGNING FOR USER EXPERIENCE THROUGH AGENT-BASED SIMULATION CIRCULATION & OCCUPANCY ANALYSIS CannonDesign Digital Practice Richard Chou, Steven Stafford CannonDesign was hired to create the design for the expansion and renovation of the Virginia Tech War Memorial Hall and evolve the facility into a multipurpose student wellness center. One major goal of the design team is to fit the four major departments that will reside in the building, and most importantly create prominent circulation spaces that alleviate the traffic that plagues the facility and to An agent-based circulation simulation analyzed the spatial performance of the expansion design. Agents are defined based on building occupancy data and students ID card logs. Though analysis, the team is able to evaluate circulation space decisions based on the compiled traffic heat map.

Building occupancy heat map compiled from building class schedule & hourly fitness center ID card swipe counts

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Agent-based simulation combines student occupancy schedule (previous) with traffic pattern provided by the University to simulate traffic across multiple days and identify possible congestion zones. GROSS SQUARE FOOTAGE Name

MECHANICAL ROOM 744 SF

LEVEL 02 1972 70165 SF

LEVEL 00 LEVEL 00

3517 SF

LEVEL 01 LEVEL 01

102657 SF

LEVEL 02 LEVEL 02

9802 SF

LEVEL 02 1972 LEVEL 02 1972

70165 SF

LEVEL 03 LEVEL 03

7867 SF

LEVEL 03 1972 MECHANICAL ROOM LEVEL 03 1972

744 SF 37414 SF

LEVEL 04 LEVEL 04

9149 SF

LEVEL 05 LEVEL 05 MECHANICAL PENTHOUSE LEVEL 06 LEVEL 06 Grand total

UP

Area

ST SERV

3310 SF 4225 SF

1315 SF 250164 SF

19 Bl

3

LEVEL 02 GROSS AREA 1/32" = 1'-0"

The analysis informed the redesign of the atrium, opting for a larger confluence space. The relocation of the facility’s vertical circulation and control desk also created a more natural walking path.

TTI E

1253 p 856-84

23

C


OPTIMIZING PATIENT COMFORT THROUGH DAYLIGHTING ANALYSIS DAYLIGHT ANALYSIS & MATERIAL ESTIMATION CannonDesign Digital Practice Richard Chou, James Marsh, Adam Louie Patient wellness is always a primary focus in healthcare architecture. For the design of the Shepard Pratt Behavioral Health, the team is challenged by the client’s request for a terracotta facade and the designer’s desire to maximize daylight exposure into the building. The need to manage the cost of these facade materials added yet another layer to the envelope design challenge. The project combines multiple interoperability work-flows, starting from daylight analysis and generative facade design via Grasshopper, to Revit material scheduling, and to Excel cost estimation. This demonstrates the need for fluidity across digital platforms for designers to carry design idea across project phases.

Live Cost Estimator of facade material based on data extracted from Revit wall-schedule from the architecture model

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50%+

0%

DAYLIGHT ANALYSIS BALTIMORE MD 1 MAY 1:00 - 31 AUG 24:00

Series of daylighting analysis informed the placement of patient room windows and facade material. The geometry of the interior courtyard is derived from running the optimizing process via Grasshopper

Image showing different wall types differentiated by color. As wall surface area is automatically updated in the cost-estimator, good modeling practice becomes crucial to the accuracy of this workflow. 25


CREATING INTEROPERABILITY THROUGH CUSTOMIZED USER-FRIENDLY WORK FLOW REVIT-EXCEL DATA FLOW CannonDesign Digital Practice Richard Chou, Garrett Marini, Charu McDermott The process of transferring these data from Excel into Revit is a time-consuming and errorprone task, where designers place each Revit family instance and enter its parameter values manually. The disconnection between the two platform furthers the complexity of this task by essentially creating two separate databases of the same information.

REVIT MODEL

REVIT MODEL

BI-DIRECTIONAL LINK

BI-DIRECTIONAL LINK

EXCEL DATABASE

In this project, the digital practice team worked CONTAINS “LIVE” DATA TABLE MANUAL REVISION with subject-matter experts within the firm EXCEL DATABASE to create a series of Dynamo scripts with customized UI importing Equipment/Room CONTAINS “LIVE” DATA TABLE schedules from planners directly to the Revit model. UN-LINKED INTERNAL

When the computational power of Dynamo becomes more accessible to users, it allows cross-platform communication between and INTERNAL automation of error-prone tasks. REVIEW

EXPORT REVIEW

MANUAL REVISION

UN-LINKED EXPORT

CLIENT-FACING PRESENTATION

ALLOWS SHARING/ EDIT HISTORY-TRACKING

CLIENT-FACING PRESENTATION

ALLOWS SHARING/ EDIT HISTORY-TRACKING

26

This work flow connects Revit and Excel data through Dynamo, allowing bi-directional data flow between the and automating the generation smart Revit family instances. The complex nature of large institutional facilities require rigorous management of large amount of different forms of data, such as rooms, equipment, hardware, etc. These information are created via Excel and developed through client demands and subjectmatter experts recommendation.

The process of transferring these data from Excel into Revit is a time-consuming and error-prone task, where designers place each Revit family instance and enter its


Custom interfaces provide non-Dynamo users access to these scripts through Dynamo Player. The UI includes instructions to guide users through the work flow and clearly-defined inputs required to operate. ( UI created via opensourced package by Data Shapes)

20 Figure 2

20

Figure 3

Custom interfaces provide non-Dynamo users access to these scripts through Dynamo Player. The UI includes instructions to guide users through the work flow and clearly-defined inputs required to operate. ( UI created via opensourced package by Data Shapes)

Generated instances retain Excel information as shared parameter values and dimensions. Each instance is assigned an Unique ID, allowing reading and writing from Revit to Excel. The output is sorted and categorized based on user-chosen parameters.

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The output is sorted and categorized based on user-chosen parameters (columns in Excel). Image above sorted in Category, Sub-Category, & Sorting-

Figure 2

Generated instances retain Excel information as shared parameter values and dimensions. Each instance is assigned an Unique ID, allowing reading and writing information from Revit to Excel.

Custom interfaces provide non-Dynamo users access to these scripts through Dynamo Player. The UI includes instructions to guide users through the work flow and clearly-defined inputs required to operate. ( UI created via open-sourced package by Data Shapes)


CREATING MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT THROUGH PARTICIPATORY DESIGN PLAYLAB.CITY Fall 18 - Datamining the City Richard Chou, Ashley Louie, David Mauricio In order for public engagement to be more meaningful to urban designers, participatory methods using agent-based simulations can allow stakeholders to intuitively play within design constraints. playLab.City provides a platform, situated between urban design participation and agent based simulation, where stakeholders have a greater opportunity to exercise their right to the city. As the experts who hold the power to change cities, urban designers are limited by their participatory methods to receive directed input from stakeholders. These processes are often limited to surveys, verbal conversations, and pins on a printed map, which can easily conclude in fantasy wish lists from stakeholders who do not fully understand the complex constraints that designers must consider . PlayLab.City aims to achieve greater design insight through participatory design and more informed conversation where stakeholders understand design constraints. The interface becomes both a learning tool for the user and helps designers receive more informed feedback.

28

The playLab.City python canvas allows designers to receive more informed feedback from their engagement with stakeholders by serving as a tool for communication.


29


Early phase user-testing. User-observation allowed us to better design the interface

Stakeholder decision tree used to encode agent behaviors for simulation. The agent’s behavior is largely simplified and are used to provide instant feedback instead of an accurate simulation of human behavior.

30


COST

5

NECCESSITY

8

FREQUENCY

4

DAY/NIGHT

VIEW RESIDENT - HIGH INCOME

14 RESIDENT - LOW INCOME

15 VISITOR

30

CREATE ! COST

5 NECCESSITY

6 FREQUENCY

3

PUBLIC SEATING

BIKE SHARE

POP-UP ART

COMMUNITY CENTR

PLAZA

LIBRARY

RESTAURANT

TRASH

RESET

Functional prototype from Processing.py. Agents respond to user-placed programs on canvas

PUBLIC SEATING Cost: 0.0 Neccessity: 7.0 Frequency: 8.0 COMMUNITY CENTER Cost: 0.0 Neccessity: 8.0 Frequency: 6.0

ANALYTICAL PROCESS

PARTICIPATORY PROCESS

RESTAURANT Cost: 10.0 Neccessity: 2.0 Frequency: 4.0

Default program with distinct attributes as well as program creation sliders on the sidebar allow users to create customized programs to allow users to engage in the conversation about the nature of these programs, as well as its impacts.

31


RESEARCH


DRAWING RELATIONSHIPS THROUGH BIVARIATE CHOROPLETH MAPPING ECOMETRICS Fall 18 - Graphics Information Systems Richard Chou, HsinYi Chao, Angela Cristomono

34

HIGH

D

EN

C BR

EA K

EV

ENVIRONMENTAL DEBTOR

We used the Hudson Valley Region as a case study to test these methods. Through GIS, we developed a methodology to display the EF and BC in a single map by combining two sets of color ramps. Data classification and graphic representation of classified data played a big role in the development of the methodology. The resulting bivariate map enabled us to draw more meaningful evaluations at a regional scale, to compare the ecometrics of Hudson Valley sub counties against New York City.

ENVIRONMENTAL CREDITOR

BIO-CAPACITY LOW

Ecometrics perform quantitative analysis to evaluate whether certain activities or features contribute to a more sustainable system of production and consumption. In the context of ongoing climate change and discourse on sustainable development, these metrics are in common use as tools to build policy and advocacy. Our project tests the robustness of two common Ecometrics - Ecological Footprint (EF) and Biocapacity (BC) as regional planning and design tools to critique their applications and limits.

B A 1

2

LOW ECO-FOOTPRINT

3

4

HIGH


BIOCAPACITY (gha) PER CAPITA ECO FOOTPRINT PER CAPITA

TOTAL POPULATION BY SUB COUNTY

TOTAL ECO FOOTPRINT

CENSUS 2010 POPULATION BY BLOCK

ECO-FOOTPRINT (gha) PER CAPITA

INTERSECTED BOUNDARIES

HUDSON VALLEY SUB COUNTY BOUNDARIES

CARBON FOOTPRINT PER CAPITA BY ZIP CODE

Through geo-processing we obtained the Biocapcity and EcoFootprint per capita by sub counties within the Hudson Valley. The two values were classified into univariate cholrepeth then processed through the developed method to create the 4x4 bivariate matrix.

35


IN ORDER TO SERIOUSLY REDUCE OUR IMPACT ON THE PLANET, WE HAVE TO CONSIDER WHERE WE LIVE AND HOW WE MOVE.

NATURAL NY STATE EF: 15.20 BC: 3.50

EF: 108.5 BC: 44.7

HUDSON VALLEY EF: 18.70 BC: 0.68

AGRICULTURAL EF: 2.50 BC: 20.5

NYC EF: 14.01 BC: 0.01

SUBURBAN EF: 1.50 BC: 37.6

Urban Area / Open S

108.5

Urban Area / Low In

Urban Area / Mediu

Agricultural Distric

Biocapcity(gha)/Person

BIO-CAPACITY (gha)/

Urban Area / High In

URBAN

EF: 0.32 BC: 18.8Pasture / Hay

2.75 1.03

Crop Land / Soy Bea

0.32

Crop Land / Corns Crop Land / Alfalfa Crop Land / Oats

0.00

13.34 18.8 22.42

44.76

ECO-FOOTPRINT (gha)/ PERSON

36

The following map shows the relative performance of EcoFootprint and Biocapacity per capita by sub county within the Hudson Valley, displayed in a bivariance choropleth map.


ASHOKAN RESEVOIR CATSKILLS, NY POPULATION: 0

FARMLANDS WARWICK, NY POLULATION: 32,065

MT. KISCO BEDFORD, NY POPULATION: 10,877

MANHATTAN NEW YORK, NY POPULATION: 1,665,000

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IMAGINING A DISTRIBUTED RESILIENT SETTLEMENT NETWORK ON MARS ALVARIUM Undergraduate Thesis - Mars City Richard Chou Alvarium is a computational exploration in Architecture and urban design. The project took inspiration from biological/ computational concept of “collective intelligence”, and explored a Martian city as an organism/ system. The city sustains through a resource-distributing system, benefiting from the resiliency of a network. The project draws inspiration from METACITY/DATATOWN (MVRDV): a self-supporting city build upon data. It pushes boundaries of human habitation through creative assumptions and asking the ‘what-ifs’. Alvarium envisioned a city built on the specific needs of Martian settlers, where prosperity relies on codependence. This project aim to make broader implications on current practices of urban planning and crisis management, and made the argument for evidence-based, socio-economic resilient city design.

38

City as network: diagrams referencing technology systems to urban fabric typologies.


LIVING MODULE 1

ETFE PANELING

2 STRUCTURAL FRAME

7

3 SINTERED REGOLITH WALL 4 TROMBE WALL SYSTEM 5 AIRLOCK (TO SEV) 6 COMMUNAL SPACE 7 PRIVATE SPACE 8 VORTEX TURBINE

4 3 2 1

7

WASTE TREATMENT

6

1 LIFTING STATION 2 SEPERATION TANK 3 PRIMARY SETTLING BASIN

5

4 FERTILIZER TANK 5 BIO-REACTOR 6 SECONDARY CLARIFIER 7 CLEAN WATER TANK

WATER PROCESSING 1

7

2 3 4 5 6 7

5 6 3

1

WATER SUPPLY ICE MOUNDS ELECTROLYSIS CEL ELETRICAL BALANCE MECHANICAL BALANCE OXYGEN TANK HYDROGEN TANK

4

3 2 5

7 4 2

6 1

39


ANCHORED AGENTS ACT AS POINTS OF REFERENCE, CREATING AN ENVIRONMENTALLY AWARE SYSTEM

PATH

DELAUNAY

VORONOI

SIM. 1

SIM.1

SIM. 1

SIM. 2

SIM. 2

SIM. 2

SIM. 3

SIM. 3

SIM. 3

STABILIZED

STABILIZED

STABILIZED

Series of agent based simulation of autonomous exploration rovers where agents search for locations of high favorability 40


WATER DEPOSIT

WATER RESERVOIR

ATMOSPHERE

HUMAN SETTLEMENT

COMBINED DECISION MAP

THERMAL INERTIA

AGRICULTURE

SOLAR EXPOSURE

ENERGY PRODUCTION

WIND FLOW

ENERGY PRODUCTION

Evolutionary Optimization performed through Grasshopper Galapagos explored an equalized distribution of land-use zones. Fitness scores were assigned to allocated area, resource utilization, & adjacent zoning type. Optimization tool offered the opportunity to receive instant feedback of zoning decisions made, and the capability of running thousands of different scenario in search for the theoretically “fittest” zoning plan.

DECISION LANDSCAPE

41


Profile for Richard Chou

Richard Chou Work Sample 2019  

Richard Chou Work Sample 2019