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My Language 2013 G9 English - Mr. Glover Friday, September 27, 13


Cultural Language Influences What is your native language? If it is a language other than English, how often do you speak it? Where? Why? If English is your native language, what type of English do you speak? How do you think these facts influence the English you use in your daily life Third Culture Kids Friday, September 27, 13


Task What’s your story? How many countries have your lived in? Do you think that you are a TCK? How do you think your travel experiences have affected the type of person you are today? If you don’t think you are a TCK, how do you think you are different from the people introduced in the video? Record your responses in about 200 words in the comment box on the TCK page on the wiki please. Friday, September 27, 13


Search For My Tongue Animation Watch and read the poem " Search For My Tongue (Sujata Bhatt) Answer the following questions

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Search For My Tongue (Sujata Bhatt) What is the importance of the question at the start of the poem? How does the speaker feel about using two languages? What is the effect of the image ‘rot and die in your mouth’? Why does the poet choose to write in symbols on lines 17,19,21,23,25,27 and 29?

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• What is the effect of the speaker’s dreams on the speaker? • How is the power of the original tongue shown? • What other imagery is used to describe the tongue? • What is the poet trying to say in this poem? • Can you relate this poem to your experiences?

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• What is the importance of the question at the start of the poem? • The poem opens with a question which deals with the theme of identity. The question says that the speaker has been asked what he means when he says he have lost his tongue. The voice/speaker in the poem responds to the question with another question: what would you do if you had two tongues in your mouth? This is perhaps asking the question, what would you do if you could speak two languages, but lost your main language (‘the other tongue’) and now could only speak the second one, the ‘foreign tongue’. Friday, September 27, 13


• How does the speaker feel about using two languages? • There is a feeling that you could not use both together, that only one can be used at any one time, even if you wanted to. • If you lived somewhere that wasn’t your home you would have to speak the ‘foreign tongue’ and the ‘mother tongue’ would rot, in other words you could not speak your own language as well anymore as you are not using it.

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• What is the effect of the image ‘rot and die in your mouth’? • The image of ‘rot and die in your mouth’ makes it seem more disgusting, like a dead thing that is left to rot away. In the end you would have to spit out the rotten tongue, as if spitting away your true, original identity.

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• Why does the poet choose to write in symbols on lines 17,19,21,23,25,27 and 29? • These are the language, Gujarati, the original tongue, which appear as symbols in a dream, perhaps. The words underneath are the sounds of the actual symbols in another tongue, Gujarati, which we don’t understand. They are there to show that we don’t understand them as they are so alien to us and show how difficult it is for those who speak more than one language to find a true sense of identity. Friday, September 27, 13


• What is the effect of the speaker’s dreams on the speaker? • The tongue, or sense of true identity grows back, as if it is still in him/her and can’t be taken completely away. • The growth is described in detail, first as ‘a stump of a shoot’ and then becoming ‘longer’ becoming fertile and usable ‘moist’ and gradually growing ‘strong veins’.

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• How is the power of the original tongue shown? • It ties the new tongue in knots, showing that it is much stronger than the new tongue or language and the person’s original language or identity is far more powerful than you think and can’t simply be replaced by a new language.

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• What other imagery is used to describe the tongue? • It is compared to a ‘bud’ as if it a flower or plant just starting to grow. The image is fertile and shows a great sense of life. It then flowers ‘the bud opens’ and the power of this ‘pushes the other tongue aside’ so it takes over. • Every time he thinks he has lost his ‘mother tongue’ it comes back and ‘blossoms’ out of his mouth, showing a real sense of true identity, it is described as blossoming to show it is alive, fertile and beautiful, as blossoms on a tree are in spring. Friday, September 27, 13


• What is the poet trying to say in this poem? • She talks about the fact that some people think they have lost the ability to talk about their culture and beliefs in their own language. The poem deals with this saying that this ability hasn’t gone, it may just be hidden or suppressed. • Losing your language or ‘tongue’ is just like losing a part of your body, here it is directly described as the loss of the actual, physical tongue. • How does this poem compare to your language situation? Friday, September 27, 13


Task 2 Write down a list of the main cultural factors that you think influence the type of English you speak at school. Try to think of as many as possible. Now choose the 2 most important factors. Why did you choose these 2? How do they impact on the way you use English? (Try to quote specific examples) Main cultural factors are ones that are influenced by your nationality and traditions Friday, September 27, 13


Pronunciation Accent • What is an accent? • An accent is a way of pronouncing a language. It is therefore impossible to speak without an accent. • Some people may think they do not have an accent. Or you may think that there are other people who do not have an accent. Everyone has an accent. • Samples World Samples • Accent BC Friday, September 27, 13


WHAT IS LANGUAGE? AMERICAN vs. BRITISH Accents What impression is created by each accent? Have you ever had to change your accent to be understood? What meaning is shared with one’s accent? Friday, September 27, 13


Task • Listen to your partner reading the passage on the next page for about a minute. • Try to identify the accent they use by identifying specific pronunciations etc. • Then re-read the same page using your friends accent if you can. • Reflect on the your own accent • How do you think it is interpreted by others? • Would you like to change your accent? Why/Why not? Friday, September 27, 13


Task • How do you think your accent has developed? • Do you want to speak in a certain way? • Do your parents/family want you to speak in a certain way? • Do you change your accent in different situations?

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• Is there a correct English accent? • There is not a single correct accent of English. There is no neutral accent of English. All speakers of English need to cope with many different aspects and learn how to understand them. Some accents are associated with social groups who have high prestige (the kinds of accents spoken by highly educated people, for example), but there are also many of these high prestige accents, all of them regionally based.

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• Can I change my accent? • Yes. Accents are not fixed. Our accents change over time as our needs change and as our sense of who we are changes and develops. Usually this happens naturally, and often unconsciously. Accents can be expected to change until we are in our early twenties. This is usually the time we come to some sort of decision about who we are. But even after that, if you want (and need) to change your accent, you can.

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• How do we develop our accent? • Your accent results from how, where, and when you learned the language you are speaking and it gives impressions about you to other people. People do not have a single fixed accent which is determined by their experiences. We can control the way we speak, and do, both consciously and unconsciously. Most people vary their accent depending on who they are speaking with. We change our accents, often without noticing, as we have new life experiences.

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• Anyway, if you do decide you have good reasons for changing your accent, and you want to put in some effort these are some things to do. • Identify the accent you want to speak. • Expose yourself to the accent you want as much as possible. • Try to get some friends who speak with the accent you want.

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Task • Write a short 200 word reflection on your accent and the way you think you would like to speak. • If you want to change your accent why is this the case? • If not, why are you satisfied with your accent?

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COLLOQUIAL LANGUAGE SLANG & IDIOM

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Slang • Define Slang • An informal nonstandard variety of speech characterized by newly coined and rapidly changing words and phrases. • Identify any slang words that you use in your informal speech. How many of them does your partner understand?

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WHAT IS LANGUAGE? AMERICAN vs. BRITISH What do these slang words mean? Flossing Chin wag Ba-donka-donk Chued to bits Shawty

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Rhyming Slang Pardon? Translate the following passage 'Allo me old china - wot say we pop round the Jack. I'll stand you a pig and you can rabbit on about your teapots. We can 'ave some loop and tommy and be o before the dickory hits twelve. Hello my old mate (china plate) - what do you say we pop around to the bar (Jack Tar). I'll buy you a beer (pig's ear) and you can talk (rabbit and pork) about your kids (teapot lids). We can have some soup (loop de loop) and supper (Tommy Tucker) and be gone before the clock (hickory dickory dock) strikes twelve. Friday, September 27, 13


Slang Examples

Slang Slang 2 Rhyming Slang

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Wiki Task Can you identify any slang words that you use when you talk? Do your friends always understand what you are saying? Do adults always understand what you are saying when you use slang? In the second video the presenter states that the slang you use helps listeners to understand something about where you have grown up and your social class. With this in mind, how can slang use help to connect you with a group of people or friends? How can the slang you use create barriers between you and the people you are talking to? What advice would you give to someone who uses a lot of slang in their everyday speech? Friday, September 27, 13


Discussion-Task The actress Emma Thompson has spoken out against the use of sloppy language saying that people who did not speak properly made her feel "insane". Do you agree? • On a visit to her old school, Ms Thompson told pupils not to use slang words "because it makes you sound stupid, and you're not stupid". She went on to say "There is the necessity to have two languages - one that you use with your mates and the other that you need in any official capacity." • Her concerns echo those of some linguists who have said some young people's language is becoming saturated by slang, leaving them ill-equipped to communicate in the wider world. Friday, September 27, 13


•Does the use of

slang words make you sound less intelligent? •Has the use of sloppy language gone too far? •Should slang be banned in schools? •Do you have two versions of the language that you use?

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Reading Exercise Task Articles • Teen Slang • Emma Thompson Article • Slanguage

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Idiom • Can you define an Idiom? • An idiom is a group of words which, when used together, has a different meaning from the one which the individual words have. For example: • It’s raining cats and dogs. • I am feeling sick.

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• We use idioms to express something that other words do not express as clearly or as cleverly. • We often use an image or symbol to describe something as clearly as possible and thus make our point as effectively as possible. For example, "in a nutshell" suggests the idea of having all the information contained within very few words. • Idioms tend to be informal and are best used in spoken rather than written English.

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• Idioms: the good news • Sometimes idioms are very easy for learners to understand because there are similar expressions in the speakers' mother tongue. For example: • He always goes at things like a bull in a china shop! • (In German: ein Elefant in einem Porzellangeschäft.)

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Sometimes you can guess the meaning of new idioms from context. For example, what do you think these idioms mean? • He was on the carpet last week for being late for

work three times.

• She made a marvelous speech to the conference.

She took the delegates by storm.

• It was an extremely long report. It took me

three hours to wade through.

• I believe we should talk openly and frankly

about the project - warts and all.

• Let's call it a day. I am very tired and we have

covered the main points of the meeting I think.

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• Idioms: the bad news • However, idioms can often be very difficult to understand. You may be able to guess the meaning from context but if not, it is not easy to know the meaning. Many idioms, for instance, come from favourite traditional British activities such as fighting, sailing, hunting and playing games. As well as being quite specialist in meaning, some of the words in idioms were used two or three hundred years ago, or longer, and can be a little obscure. Friday, September 27, 13


• Now that the Prime Minister has been elected there will be a lot of jockeying for position to get the key posts in his administration. • I finally ran the book to earth in a second-hand bookshop in Wales. I had been searching for it for three years. • They took her ideas on board and decided to increase the budget. • You should fall in with our arrangements; we can't make alternative plans for you. • We saw the boss at the bar but we gave him a wide berth. We did not want to talk to him then. Friday, September 27, 13


Learning Idioms • It is best to learn idioms as you do vocabulary. In other words, select and actively learn idioms which will be useful to you. Write the idiom in a relevant and practical sentence so that you will be able to remember its meaning easily. If you can, record the idioms in your file and on a card along with other words and idioms which have similar meanings.

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Task • Think of a list of idioms that you use in your everyday speech or that your parents use. • Write down 5 of them • Choose the five best in your group for a short class quiz. • For homework, explain the origins of a few of the idioms you use in everyday conversation. Explain how your past experiences may have impacted on the idioms you use in everyday English. Friday, September 27, 13


What is language?

Stephen Fry Two Babies Parrot

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Social Networks and Language What are social networks? Social Networking Social Media Usage How do you think social networks are impacting on the language you use?

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The default answer to the above is surely "making it worse." When it comes to social networks, grammar, syntax, spelling, and all the rest of it give way to decomposed bites of, hopefully, meaning. If meaning is sustained, what dierence do the materials make? Just the other day my dad was ripping on me for using bad grammar in a text message (note: it wasn't that bad), with my reply being something along the lines of, it's just a text message. Texting Friday, September 27, 13


2b? Nt2b? What doe the above mean? Translate the following: “2 slp, prchnc 2 drm� 'if msc b da fd ov luv ply on' "O rmo rmo were4 art thou rmo." "dny thy father n rfse thy name, or if u wilt nt, be bt swrn my luv, I'll no lngr be a cpult."

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Task Translate a passage from standard English into a texted equivalent How do you think social network usage, tweeting, and text messaging are impacting on your language usage? Referring to the media links above, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of social media and texting on your language usage.

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THE MASS MEDIA

How many types of media do you use each day?

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How do you think media influence the language that you speak? In pairs, identify as many words as you can that have come from the media...

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Other Media Influences How much TV do you watch? How much time do you spend on the internet? How is this influencing the language you use the issues you discuss your views and opinions about issues...

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INFLUENCES OF THE MEDIA The media influence us in many ways... The words we use. Discuss How we view the world. Discuss How we view each other. Discuss How we view our roles in the world. Discuss Mass Media Influences

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Friday, September 27, 13


Task • How much media do you think you are exposed to each week? • What forms does this media come in? • How do you think this constant exposure to media is impacting on the English you use daily? Evaluate both the positive and negative impacts please. • Do you think we should be attempting to limit our continual exposure to mass-media? Discuss?

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Gender in Language How does your gender influence your language?

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Language in action

List as many examples as you can What do you think this difference in language says about the way different genders see themselves and their roles in society? Friday, September 27, 13


Task • How do you think your gender influences the language you use? • What do you think has influenced the way you view your role in the communication process? • How “should” boys behave? • How “should” girls behave? • Are you more or less forceful with your opinions and ideas? • Are you more or less likely to listen to a person of the opposite gender? • How does the language you use with someone of your gender differ when you are talking to someone of a different gender?

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NEOLOGISMS What is a Neologism? A neologism is a new word or meaning to a word that has been included in your language, but does not necessarily appear in dictionaries yet. These words come from a variety of sources including:

•

science, technology, media, culture and many more

•

How many neologisms can you identify in your everyday speech?

Some Neologisms

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• Our mental world is far richer than our vocabulary. • Can you think of any feelings or thoughts for which there aren’t any words in English? • How about in your mother tongue? • If you are multilingual are there any words in one of your languages which do not exist in your other language? • Identify some mental ideas for which there should be words. • Why is this difficult to do? Friday, September 27, 13


Examples - From

The meaning of Liff

Douglas Adams

• ELBONICS (n) The actions of two people maneuvering for an armrest in a cinema. • ELECELLERATION (n) The mistaken notion that the more often, or the harder, you press an elevator button, the faster it will arrive. Friday, September 27, 13


The Washington Post's Mensa invitational askes readers to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and supply a new definition. Here are the 2009 winners: • Giraffiti: Vandalism spray-painted very, very high. • Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it. • Karmageddon: It's like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer. • Decafalon (n.): The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you. • Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly. • Arachnoleptic Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you’ve accidentally walked through a spider web. • Coffee, n. The person upon whom one coughs. • Frisbeetarianism, n. The belief that, after death, the soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there. Friday, September 27, 13


TASK With your partner, design an ad campaign that uses a Neologism that you invent. Write a paragraph promoting your product using this word, but not explaining it. You are going to read your paragraph to the class and see if anyone can work out what your word means. Think about the neologisms you have added to your language but remember not to confuse neologisms with jargon, slang etc. Neologism Dictionary Friday, September 27, 13

My Language: Course Notes 2013  
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