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Rice County Habitat for Humanity Mission Statement Rice County Habitat for Humanity partners with families who otherwise may be unable to achieve the dream of home ownership by establishing partnerships among God’s people to build simple, decent, affordable homes.

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The History of Habitat Habitat for Humanity International was founded in 1976 by Millard and Linda Fuller. Today, Habitat for Humanity is a true world leader in addressing the issues of poverty housing.

Koinonia Farm The concept that grew into Habitat for Humanity International was born at Koinonia Farm, a small, interracial, Christian community outside of Americus, Georgia. Koinonia Farm was founded in 1942 by farmer and biblical scholar Clarence Jordan. The Fullers first visited Koinonia in 1965. They had recently left a successful business and an affluent lifestyle in Montgomery, Alabama to begin a new life of Christian service. At Koinonia, Jordan and Fuller developed the concept of "partnership housing." The concept centered on those in need of adequate shelter working side by side with volunteers to build simple, decent houses.

The Fund for Humanity The houses would be built at no profit and interest would not be charged on the loans. Building costs would be financed by a revolving fund called “The Fund for Humanity.” The fund's money would come from the new homeowners' house payments, no-interest loans provided by supporters and money earned by fundraising activities. The monies in the Fund for Humanity would be used to build more houses.

The Fund for Humanity’s mission statement The Fund for Humanity will meet both of these needs. Money for the fund will come from shared gifts by those who feel they have more than they need and from non-interest bearing loans from those who cannot afford to make a gift but who do want to provide working capital for the disinherited . . . The fund will give away no money. It is not a handout.

What the poor need is not charity but capital, not caseworkers but co-workers. And what the rich need is a wise, honorable and just way of divesting themselves of their overabundance.

Inception of Habitat for Humanity In 1968, Koinonia laid out 42 half-acre house sites with four acres reserved as a community park and recreational area. Capital was donated from around the country to start the work. Homes were built and sold to families in need at no profit and no interest. The basic model of Habitat for Humanity was begun.

Expansion into Habitat for Humanity International In September 1976, Millard and Linda called together a group of supporters to discuss the future of their dream. Habitat for Humanity International as an organization was born at this meeting. The eight years that followed, vividly described in Millard Fuller's book, “Love in the Mortar Joints,” proved that the vision of a housing ministry was workable. Faith, hard work and direction set HFHI on its successful course.

Phenomenal growth In 1984, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalynn took their first Habitat work trip, the Jimmy Carter Work Project, to New York City. Their personal involvement in Habitat's ministry brought the organization national visibility and sparked interest in Habitat's work across the nation. HFHI experienced a dramatic increase in the number of new affiliates around the country.

Today, Habitat for Humanity has built more than 400,000 houses, sheltering more than 2 million people worldwide. 3


Is Affordable Housing Really Needed in Rice County? Rice County Household Income According to 2010 Census 22,321 Households Income

#

Cum #

%

Cum %

Hourly Wage = Income for Full Timer Workers: <$10,000

1,406

1,406

6.3%

6.3%

$10,000 – 14,999

798

2,204

3.6%

9.9%

$15,000 – 24,999

2,272

4,476

10.2%

20.1%

$25,000 – 34,999

2,205

6,681

9.9%

Hourly

Weekly

Monthly

Annually

$

7.25

$ 290.00

$ 1,256.67

$ 15,080.00

$

9.50

$ 380.00

$ 1,646.67

$ 19,760.00

$

10.10

$ 404.00

$ 1,750.67

$ 21,008.00

$

12.00

$ 480.00

$ 2,080.00

$ 24,960.00

$

13.00

$ 520.00

$ 2,253.33

$ 27,040.00

$

15.00

$ 600.00

$ 2,600.00

$ 31,200.00

30%

$35,000 – 49,999

2,782

9,463

12.5%

42.5%

$50,000 – 74,999

4,647

14,110

20.8%

63.3%

$75,000 – 99,999

3,151

17,261

14.1%

77.4%

$100,000 – 149,999

3,406

20,667

15.3%

92.7%

$

20.00

$ 800.00

$ 3,466.67

$ 41,600.00

$150,000 – 199,999

1,090

21,757

4.9%

97.6%

$

22.00

$ 880.00

$ 3,813.33

$ 45,760.00

$200,000 or more

564

22,321

2.4%

100% 4


BASIC MONTHLY BUDGET

What it’s like to be low-income

Not including housing Car Payment

$

250

Car Insurance

$

80

Gas

$

100

Food

$

400

Utilities

$

150

Phone

$

80

What this budget does NOT include:         

TV/internet

$

50

TOTAL

$

1,110

Annual Gross

monthly gross

30% of gross for housing

children’s activities child care clothes Health Care/Insurance Savings/investments pets hobbies charitable giving life insurance

Here’s the big picture when you’re low-income AVERAGE Credit Card payment

AVERAGE Student Loan payment

What's left to live on?

minus Basic Monthly Budget

$

22,000

$

1,833

$

550

$

255

$

240

$

788

$

(322)

$

25,000

$

2,083

$

625

$

255

$

240

$

963

$

(147)

$

27,000

$

2,250

$

675

$

255

$

240

$

1,080

$

(30)

$

30,000

$

2,500

$

750

$

255

$

240

$

1,255

$

145

$

32,000

$

2,667

$

800

$

255

$

240

$

1,372

$

262

$

35,000

$

2,917

$

875

$

255

$

240

$

1,547

$

437

Market Rate Rent in Rice County Efficiency 1 Bedroom 2 Bedroom 3 Bedroom 4 Bedroom

$505 $628 $849 $1,231 $1,237 5


1995

1993

Kleeberger Family (1) 315 S. Poplar, Northfield

Berg Family (2) 304 7 Ave NW, Faribault th

1997

1999

Irwin Family (3) 208 Forest Ave. S., Dundas

Cavin Family (4) 815 Central Ave., Faribault

2000

2001

2002

2003

Palmquist Family (5) 754 Sibley Dr, Northfield

Noel (Morales) Family (6) 309 2nd Ave, SW, Faribault

Patzner Family (7) 601 Bunker Dr., Northfield

Hardie Family (8) 320 20th St. NW, Faribault

2004

Warring Family (9) 404 Bunker Dr., Northfield

2005

Huffstutter Family (10) 17210 Lamb Ave., Nerstrand

2006

2006

Avalos Family (11) 17208 Lamb Ave., Nerstrand Thrivent Builds

Blake Family (12) 6 17206 Lamb Ave., Nerstrand


2007

Cook Family (13) 17204 Lamb Ave., Nerstrand Thrivent Builds

2007

2008

Simonson Family (14) 900 W. 2nd St., Northfield

2008

Olson Family (16) 321 4th Street, Lonsdale

Juarez Family (15) 314 Erblang Ave., Faribault Thrivent Builds

2009

2009

2009

Rosas Family (17) 118 Miller Lane, Dundas

Keilen Family (18) 106 Miller Lane, Dundas Thrivent Builds

Erickson Family (19) 222 Irving Ave., Faribault

2010

Reynolds Family (20) 127 Elm Street, Lonsdale Thrivent Builds

2010

Dolal Family (21) 22nd Street, Faribault

2010

2010

Mazurek Family (22) Spring Wheat Drive, Dundas

Zoubek Family (23) 15 5th Ave., Faribault 7


2011

2011

2011

2011

Curci Family (24) 1209 Superior Drive, Northfield Thrivent Builds

Manderfeld Family (25) 1213 Superior Drive, Northfield

Ali Family (26) 317 23rd St NW, Faribault

Abukaff Family (27) 406 Sidney Street, Morristown

Voegele Family (28) 22865 Dalton Avenue, Faribault Thrivent Builds

2013

2013

2012

2012

Stanton Family (29) 130 Miller Lane, Dundas

2013

2014

Coy Family (30) 1168 Highland Ave. Nfld

2013

Weed Family (31) 214 Spring Wheat Drive, Dundas Thrivent Builds

2014

Schwartz Family, Nfld Partner Family 34, ABWK 2

Dalaska Family (32) 1016 1st Avenue NW, Faribault

Zubia Family, Odd Fellows Ln, Nfld Partner Family 33, ABWK 1

2014

Dominick Family (Partner Family 36, Build 34) 408 Thruen Street, Morristown

2014

Benson Family (Partner Family 35, Build 33) 218 Spring Wheat Drive, Dundas Thrivent Builds

Boettcher Family (Partner Family 37, Build 35)

551 4 Avenue, Lonsdale th

8

Swenson Family (Partner Family 38, Build 36)

545 4th Avenue, Lonsdale


2015

2015

Weaver Family (Partner Family 39, Build 37) 216 1st Avenue SW, Faribault

Morris Family (Partner Family 40, Build 38) 408 Thruen Street, Morristown

2016 Kolterman Family (Partner Family 41, Build 39) 501 Short Street, Faribault

2016 Alexander Family (Partner Family 42, Build 40) 805 1st Street NW, Northfield

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Continuing the Affordability… Affordability in housing is more than the purchase price; the home must be efficient in the long term, both in energy and health We build to the Enterprise Green Communities Criteria, meeting and exceeding Energy Star Standards. Our homes are built to the Builders Option Package (BOP) for climate zone six, and have completed all mandatory site visits and diagnostic testing required by the BOP. As a result of our efforts in working with BOP, we have achieved a HERS index of 64 which meets the Five Star Plus category of Energy Star, the highest that the rating system currently tracks. Our Energy Star features include: • All appliances and fixtures rated Energy Star and water conservation fixtures • • Attic insulation at r-50 and • Window u-value at 0.30 • Verified performance of only 1.1 Air Changes per Hour (1.1 ACH), around 75% better than Energy Star requirement of 5 ACH. In addition to meeting the energy benchmarks required by Energy Star, our homes incorporate health standards such as: • Active-ready radon resistance system • Low-allergen flooring The average monthly cost • Low-VOC paints and primers to heat a Habitat home in • Exterior ducted range hoods • Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRVs) Rice County • Energy Star bath fans = $45! 10


Our standard house design includes three bedrooms and one finished bathroom. The basement is left unfinished but prepped for future bedrooms and a bathroom.

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HOW HABITAT WORKS Families are selected based on 1. Need Families must demonstrate that they currently live in inadequate or substandard conditions, in overcrowded units, or pay an excessive percentage of monthly wages for housing.

2. Ability to Repay Habitat houses are sold to families with a 0% interest loan. Families cannot earn more than 50% of the local median income to qualify for a Habitat home. For a family of four this is $36,500. They must have a history of making current payments on time.

3. Willingness to Partner Families must put in 350 hours of sweat equity into their home and be willing to be spokespeople for the organization.

Additionally,  

All household members must be documented citizens/residents Families must currently live in Rice County and have lived here for at least one year

Families receive support to help them succeed We don’t just turn over the keys and wish the family luck once the build is done. We have a system of support that continues to nurture our relationship with all of our Partner Families. 12


TITHING Our affiliate tithes 10% of our unrestricted donations to Habitat for Humanity International. This contribution goes to building houses worldwide. Habitat for Humanity International builds in 90 countries around the world! Since 1991 our affiliate has tithed over $134,299 which has built 34 homes for families worldwide.

That means that as of July, 2015, the efforts of Rice County Habitat for Humanity have made it possible for 76 families (42 locally and 34 internationally) around the world to have simple, decent and affordable housing. 13


How does the financing work? The costs of building a new Habitat home are put forth by our organization. This is done through cash (raised from donations and events) and in kind supplies. The selling price to the Partner Family is based on the out of pocket expenses, land costs and administration.

THANKS to 1st United Bank in Faribault who services all of our loans and manages all of the escrow accounts. Their support is priceless!

Rice County Habitat for Humanity holds the following mortgages: The first mortgage is made affordable by ensuring the household will pay no more than 30% of their gross income on their house payment. The second mortgage is the difference between the appraised value of the house and the 1st Mortgage. This is a 0% interest, deferred mortgage. This mortgage will be paid to Habitat when the homeowner transfers the title (if they sell, if they deed it to their children). This is to prevent homeowners from acquiring their home and immediately selling it. This 2nd mortgage protects our organizations efforts of cash, in kind supplies and sweat equity.

INCOME Partner Family Mortgages Contributions Grants Special Events Rural Development Mortgage Pledging

20% 18% 15% 10% 13% 24%

EXPENSES Construction and Program 63% Operating 27% Loans 10%

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HOW A HABITAT HOME MAKES A DIFFERENCE When a hardworking family moves into a Habitat home their lives change for the better in countless ways. Having a simple, decent and affordable place to live puts the whole family on a path to success and helps strengthen the community.

Children’s chance for success improve From a study (Homeownership Alliance of Nonprofit Downpayment Providers) cited from the New York Habitat for Humanity Affiliate:

 

Homeowners’ Children vs. Renters’ Children Math Achievement Scores Reading Achievement Scores High School Graduation Rate College Graduation Rate Be homeowners in 10 years Quality of Home Environment Behavioral Problems Give Birth as Unmarried Teen Idle at age 20 and Rely on Welfare

9 percent higher 7 percent higher 25 percent higher 116 percent higher 59 percent higher 13 to 23 percent higher 1 to 3 percent lower 40 percent lower 50 percent lower

Children do better in school, earn higher math and reading scores and achieve a higher educational level Children of homeowners have fewer truancy and behavioral problems Grown children are more likely to own their own homes

Parent’s self-esteem and level of accomplishment increase   

Contributing the required 350 hours of sweat equity builds parents’ pride and confidence Parents learn sound budgeting principles through classes Parents often go back to school and/or get better jobs because their homes are consistent and safe

Homeowners vs. Renters Overall Voter Participation Able to identify Congress Member Work to Solve Local Problems Garden Contribute to Church

25 percent higher 10 percent higher 6 percent higher 12 percent higher $150 more per year

Habitat homeownership strengthens communities  

Habitat homes are well kept and attractive, reflecting the pride of the homeowners Neighborhood members support the construction efforts and 15 build relationships with the new homeowners


Helping one family at a time… Our local food shelves, clothes closets and social service agencies help HUNDREDS of families every year. Their work is valued in our community. Habitat for Humanity, is different – we don’t help hundreds of families a year – we help one family at a time.

Why?

Homeownership significantly changes the lives of families for GENERATIONS! Once families are in a safe, decent, affordable and steady place to live they can predict their housing costs. They know their monthly payment is not going to increase and they know they won’t be evicted by a landlord in the future. Having a controlled house payment allows them to budget for food, utilities, transportation, health care. Habitat for Humanity helps families over their lifetime with a “hand up” as opposed to a one time “hand out”.

Habitat for Humanity creates relationships

that add to the vitality of neighborhoods and communities. When people come together there is a spirit and a bond that is created that lasts for years. Our goal is to help one family at a time by creating homeownership, but the benefits spread throughout the community that lasts for generations!

HUNDREDS of VOLUNTEERS add to the richness of the Habitat for Humanity experience. It takes 2,500 volunteer hours to build one house! We average over 200 volunteers on each build site! THANKS volunteers!

Habitat for Humanity provides a “hand up” and not a “hand out”. Homeowners learn skills they never dreamed they could have!!

“Because of our Habitat home our health has improved, my whole attitude has changed. I’m more cheerful and I have more energy. I get a good nights’ sleep and I have a reason to get things done. Because of Habitat we have a future. We have hope”

~ Habitat homeowner~ 16


VOLUNTEER: YOUR TIME MAKES A DIFFERENCE     

Join us on the build site Organize a group of friends or co-workers to build Bring a meal to the build site Be a Site Host Consider being on a Team, Committee or Board o Teams meet on an as needed basis o Committees require a regular time commitment to meetings and activities o Board Members take on larger responsibilities for accomplishing the mission of Habitat

DONATE: YOUR GIFT MAKES A DIFFERENCE Please consider:  Giving a monthly gift on-line (www.habitatricecounty.org, Donate tab)  Give a gift in honor of a birthday, anniversary or other special occasion  Do a fundraiser at your business, have a rummage sale and give the proceeds to Habitat, designate a day at your business as a “Habitat Day” and give a percentage of the proceeds to Habitat. Priceless Contributions that happen year round: 1st United Bank, Faribault Gary Voegele, P.A., Faribault R & L Woodcraft, Lonsdale Frandsen Bank, Lonsdale 17


LEAVING A LEGACY Join OPAL WOLF in leaving a legacy with Rice County Habitat for Humanity. Opal owned land in Nerstrand. She wasn’t going to build on it and she wasn’t going to farm it. So she donated some and sold at a reduced cost some to Habitat. Now, four families live in “Opal’s Backyard”. Opal has become like a grandma to the kids growing up in those homes. She bakes cookies and even tutors them with school work.

JOIN OPAL in LEAVING A LEGACY!

To the volunteers may God bless you all. For without you our dream of owning a home would not be possible. Thanks for making this family’s dream come true. ~ Rosas Family, 2009 18


Thanks to a partnership with Thrivent Financial for Lutherans and Habitat for Humanity we have increased the number of families served. Since 2006 Thrivent Builds has contributed over $545,000 to Rice County Habitat!

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Rice County Habitat is proud to have over one hundred in kind suppliers. The support from these businesses is crucial in increasing the number of homes we can build. In Kind suppliers provide professional labor and supplies needed for our builds.

THANK YOU In Kind Suppliers!

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I have come so that you may have life… life to the full. John 10:10

204 7th Street West, PMB 128 Northfield, MN 55057 www.habitatricecounty.org Office: 507-323-5167 Executive Director Dayna Norvold habitatricecounty@gmail.com

Life to the full means… Having a safe place to live. A place where your children can play in the yard. A space they’re proud to invite their friends. Not worrying about rising rent prices or where you’re going to live next month. Life to the full means… being part of a community where people work together – partner families and volunteers – to provide simple, decent and affordable housing.

WON’T YOU HELP BUILD AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN OUR COMMUNITY?

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Habitat for Humanity, Rice County Story  
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