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911L WHY WAS PORSCHE’S CLASSIC LUX MODEL A ONE-OFF?

993 TURBO V TURBO S

Is the last Exclusive production Turbo S worth its huge price premium?

THE PORSCHE MAGAZINE

www.total911.com

THE RACING LEGEND IS REBORN

FULL 991 R EXPOSÉ INSIDE:

991 R DRIVEN

EXCLUSIVE PICS

911 R AT GENEVA ISSUE 138

Andreas Preuninger exclusive interview Every statistic uncovered The experts’ opinions 20 stunning pictures History of the 911R


Porsche recommends

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If history is any indication, you’re looking at the future of sports cars. The new 911. Ever ahead. For more information call 01327 438 045 or visit our Centre.

Porsche Centre Silverstone Old Tiffield Road Towcester Northamptonshire NN12 6PF info@porschesilverstone.co.uk www.porschesilverstone.co.uk

Official fuel economy figures for the 911 Carrera 4S Coupé in mpg (l/100km): urban 22.8 – 27.4 (12.4 – 10.3), extra urban 41.5 – 42.8 (6.8 – 6.6), combined 31.7 – 35.8 (8.9 – 7.9). CO2 emissions: 204 – 180 g/km. The mpg and CO2 figures quoted are sourced from official EU-regulated tests, are provided for comparability purposes and may not reflect your actual driving experience.


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Welcome

I

t would have been easy for Porsche not to make the new 911R. Immense resources, both fi nancially speaking and in terms of development hours, would have to be dedicated to a sports car that will only realise a very small production run, and whose performance figures will not break new ground over models already gracing showrooms internationally. However, data sheets and analytics were ditched in favour of that immeasurable paradox of pure human emotion, thereby creating arguably the most exhilarating 911 since the 997 GT3 RS 4.0 in 2010. The R is the 991 that we have all been waiting for. Not only is it the fi rst limited-run 911 in three years but the car also seeks to silence the purists who have decried the lack of that all-important third pedal in both the latest GT3 and GT3 RS, great though they are as lap timechopping performance machines. Designed with ‘fun’ and ‘cornering’ on the road in mind, the R is a refreshing development and a return to form for the purist pleasers at Zuffenhausen. For Porsche,

“The R is the 991 that we have all been waiting for” Facebook

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the philosophy has always been ‘It’s not how fast you go, but how you get there’ – it’s why the tachometer has always taken pride of place in the middle of the 911’s instrument panel – and, perhaps for the fi rst time in a long time, the virtues of driving ecstasy are present without the overbearing vices of technology. The 911R truly is a car for the people, even if the majority of them will never get to drive it. That’s not to bemoan the build numbers of this justifiably exclusive machine, as the production run of 991 announced by Chairman of the Board, Oliver Blume, is more than what was widely anticipated. Rumours of the car being offered to 918 owners fi rst aren’t true, though only one car will be coming to each Porsche Centre (in the UK at least) when fi rst deliveries take place in June. You’ll already know by now if you’re to be the lucky recipient of a 991R and were likely flown out to the Geneva Motor Show to take a look at it in person. If you missed out, perhaps it’s time to start acknowledging the family birthdays of your local dealer principal!

LEE SIBLEY • Editor E: lee.sibley@imagine-publishing.co.uk T: 01202 586291

www.total911.com

Visit us for up-to-date news and debate


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Geneva International Motor Show, Switzerland


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Opening As Porsche moves forward, so it looks to the past as Dr Oliver Blume, appointed last year as Chairman of the Porsche Executive Board, unveils an exciting modern-day homage to the original 911R in front of the world’s media at the 86th International Motor Show, Geneva.

Photograph by Steve Hall


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Contents

Contents 18

NEW 991R REVEALED

“This is a new 911 developed by Andreas Preuninger’s team at Weissach that comes with a traditional gearlever and a clutch pedal”


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For back issues, subscriptions and other Total 911 products visit www.

Essentials 08 Update

Exclusive Porsche news from corporate, specialist and motorsport sectors

13

Racing columnist

14

Views

British former Supercup driver Ben Barker talks about his step-up to the WEC The best of your missives from our social media, emails and Total911.com

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36 Subscriptions offers

Subscribe to Total 911 and save at least 30% on the cover price

74 81

Living the Legend

Our group of Porsche owners from around the globe give the latest on their 911 ownership experiences

Premier Porsche

Looking for your next 911? Start your search in our section of specialists

86 Data file

Every Porsche 911 model rated with stats, specs and market values

113 Coming soon

Here’s why you should already be getting excited for issue 139

30 38

114 Great Roads

We are back in the Yorkshire Dales to take on the lofty Buttertubs Pass

Features 18

New 991R revealed

We get up close to the 991R at the Geneva Motor Show before Andreas Preuninger takes us for a drive around Weissach

26 History of the 911R

The new R revives a single letter made famous by a lightweight 911 nearly 50 years ago. Here’s the story of the first R

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30 911L classic test

Like the original 911R, the 911L was a oneoff never repeated by Porsche. We test the Lux model on track to find out why

38 993 Turbo v Turbo S

Is the Exclusiv-built Turbo S worth the hefty premium over its Turbo brethren?

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46 997.1 GT3 RS buyer’s guide Everything you need to know before buying the first 997 Rennsport

54 M96/97 engine tech

Five common failures and fixes of the first two water-cooled flat six units

60 3.2 Carrera: what next? What does the future hold for the last truly ‘pure’ 911?

66 Jägermeister 934

The incredible history of this turbocharged colossal is revealed

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8

Update

LATEST NEWS, KEY DATES, STAR PRODUCTS & RACE RESULTS FROM THE WORLD OF PORSCHE

PS Autoart debut new Series 2

The Classic Touring Series 2, available in T, E or S spec, promises an absurd attention to detail The bespoke division of UK specialist Paul Stephens has launched its latest creation at the London Classic Car Show: the Classic Touring 911 Series 2. Formed in 2005, PS Autoart’s 11 years of experience creating unique backdated Porsche 911s has been put to good use building the new car, with Paul Stephens feeling that the Series 2 is “the perfect fusion of original styling and modern technology.” Externally, the Classic Touring Series 2 eschews a widebody look, PS Autoart instead choosing to backdate the 3.2 Carrera donor 911 to the pure, narrow-shell appearance of the early 1970s Neunelfers. This is done by fitting genuine period body panels and trim, with PS Autoart’s Series 2 offered in two major trim levels: 1970 or 1973. Both use panels from their respective years, the former inspired by the 2.2-litre cars, the latter by the 2.4-litre 911s. To this end,

both the 1970 and 1973 versions are available in T, E or S specification, complete with different power levels and trim options (as offered in period). Both air-cooled versions get a 1.0-litre capacity boost over their respective period engines, with T, E and S variants of the 3.2 and 3.4-litre flat sixes providing an extra 100bhp compared to the relevant 2.2 and 2.4-litre motors of 1970 and 1973. In T form, both engines get an electronic Motronic 2 engine management system and Bosch LE fuel injection, generating 235bhp/245bhp. E and S versions benefit from integrated engine management and PS Autoart’s new throttle bodies that visually mimic the original MFI systems of the early 1970s but instead provide direct fuel injection. On both 3.2 and 3.4-litre 911s this brings a power boost of 15bhp over the T, with the S gaining a 20bhp hike over the E thanks to high

profile camshafts. On all cars, the Type 915 fivespeed gearbox is standard with the option of Getrag’s more usable G50 unit, while the S models also get a lightweight flywheel and limited-slip differential (the latter an option on T and E variants). Inside, the references to the genuine 1970 and 1973 911 models continues with the former trim level getting a basket weave interior, while the latter reproduces the 2.4-litre models’ smooth door cards and dashboard. However, in true PS Autoart style, this is more than just a recreation, with the basket weave recreated in leather and all the plastic switchgear replaced with anodised aluminium items. There’s also an integrated iPhone in the dashboard of the S and even the steering wheel is a unique item to PS’s own design. All cars get an electric sunroof with electrically adjustable period style seats available as an option in a number of cloths.

O.CT Tuning 991 Turbo S

New Gemballa wheels

O.CT Tuning, the Austrian-based Porsche 911 modifiers, has announced a new package for the first-generation Porsche 991 Turbo S that boosts power to a barely believable 669hp – an increase of nearly 20 per cent over the stock figure. The Stage 2 kit includes modified engine and gearbox electronics along with new VTG turbochargers, a revised induction system, modified intercoolers and a new air filter. The kit, which allows the Turbo S to sprint to 60mph (100kph) in just 2.77

German tuning house, Gemballa, has announced its new 21-inch GForged-one alloy wheels for 991 generation Porsche 911s. The wheels, constructed in a five double-spoke design, are available in gunmetal or “Black Magic” finishes with the option of having the spoke faces diamond cut for an added aesthetic flourish. The wheels – surprisingly understated by Gemballa’s standards – are forged to ensure they are both lightweight and strong and can be used on all models of Porsche 991.

seconds is fully TÜV approved. A Stage 1 kit is also available bringing 603hp to the 991.1 Turbo and Turbo S. For more information, head to oct-tuning.com.

The front wheels are available in 8.5x21-inch fitment, with the rears measuring up 2.5-inches wider. To check them out in more detail, head to gemballa.com.


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What’s on in 2016 Porsche Museum Long Night 2 April Longer opening hours include trips to the archive and workshop Mecum Houston 14-16 April Around 1,000 cars will go under the hammer at Mecum’s latest auction in Texas

New Ruf models on display at Geneva

Acclaimed German Porsche modifier debuts three new sports cars at Swiss motor show This year’s Geneva International Motor Show wasn’t just about the new 991 R. German manufacturer Ruf – famous for its heavily modified sports cars based around the 911 – revealed four new models at the show, led by the jaw-dropping Turbo R Limited. Debuting in 1998, the original Turbo R was Ruf’s high-powered send-off to the air-cooled 911 generation with this new tribute paying homage to that car. Just seven of the 620hp 993 Turbo-based cars will be built (finished in pale grey with gold wheels), each capable of reaching 212mph.

The fastest car on Ruf’s stand was the new, bright yellow RtR Narrow (designated as a Ruf turbo Rennsport). The 3.8-litre car – based on a narrow 991 shell – uses two turbochargers and a dry sump oil system to develop 802hp. Driven through a four-wheel-drive system (although rear-wheel-drive is also available), the RtR features a number of motorsportinspired features, including large air intakes on the carbon fibre front bumper and the fixed rear wing. 152mm slimmer than the standard RtR, the new car can reach 218mph and drives through a six-speed manual gearbox.

Elsewhere, the Ruf SCR 4.2 pushes Porsche’s naturally aspirated, air-cooled engine architecture to new limits with a capacity of 4,185cc (hence the name). The new power plant develops 525hp and sits inside a heavily modified G-Series shell, just like Ruf’s original SCR 3.8, first released in 1978. Finally, the pale blue Ruf Ultimate on display at the Geneva Motor Show weighs just 1,215kg thanks to a fully carbon body that not only dramatically reduces the weight of the twin turbocharged, air-cooled car, but also helps to increase the chassis’ rigidity.

PSDS Master RSR 23-24 April The Porsche Sport Driving School holds its top level course at Leipzig Experience Centre California Mille 24-28 April The annual four-day tour takes in 1,000 miles of California’s best roads Porsche Tour Côte D’Azur 26 April – 2 May Travel along the South of France’s stunning coastline with this official Porsche tour

Brumos film secures Kickstarter funding

OPC Bolton loses RS 4.0 court case

Story of Gregg and Haywood exceeds crowdfunding target by 22%

Porsche Bolton forced to pay customer £35,000 damages over RS 4.0

Independent US documentary maker, Derek Dodge, has been successful in his quest to raise the funds for a new film about Brumos Porsche, after exceeding his Kickstarter target by 22 per cent. Dodge, who wants to produce the untold story of late Brumos founder, Peter Gregg, and race driver, Hurley Haywood, had set out to raise $35,000 via the popular crowdfunding platform. However, with the help of 222 backers, the production budget for the documentary film now stands at $42,810. Three of those backers pledged $5,000 each making them co-executive

producers of the movie and ensuring that the story of Gregg (himself a successful Porsche racer) and Haywood’s rise to fame, and Gregg’s subsequent tragic death, will come to a wider audience. The funds raised through the Kickstarter initiative have been earmarked by Dodge for archive footage, sound design and editing (among other final touches), with the documentary film – which also has the support of Haywood himself – scheduled to be released in early 2017. We will be sure to keep you up to date with the documentary’s production via Total911.com.

Porsche Centre Bolton – run by Pendragon Sabre Ltd, the UK’s largest independent car dealer group – has been forced to pay a customer £35,000 in damages after a judge at London’s Court of Appeal ruled that the dealership had broken a legally binding contract regarding the allocation of its 997 GT3 RS 4.0. On 18 March 2011, Kevin Hughes from Chorley paid a £10,000 deposit for the RS 4.0 – the first person to do so at Porsche Bolton – and was promised (via email) the first car allocated to the dealership. However, after only receiving

one RS 4.0, Porsche Bolton ignored Hughes’ deposit and sold the car to another buyer. The dealership then lied to Hughes, telling him that they had not received any cars. Preston County Court initially rejected Hughes’ legal case in 2013 before the appealed trial proceedings began at the end of 2015. Now, after over a month at court, Mr Justice Cranston ruled in Hughes’ favour, forcing Pendragon Sabre to pay out £35,000 (the difference between the RS 4.0’s list price and its current market value, as judged by the court) plus Hughes’ legal fees.


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Motorsport

THE LATEST NEWS AND RESULTS FROM RACING SERIES AROUND THE GLOBE

Ben Barker lands full-season drive in 2016 FIA WEC British Supercup ace graduates to the world endurance stage with Gulf Racing Porsche

Six Porsche 991 RSRs confirmed for Le Mans 2016 Trio of updated 991 RSRs in the GTE-Pro class at 84th 24 Hours of Le Mans No fewer than six Porsche 911 RSRs will compete in the 84th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans this year after the FIA/ACO confirmed the 2016 entry list at a press conference in Paris. On top of the no. 77 Dempsey Proton Racing 911 RSR (updated to 2016-specification and racing a full season in the FIA World Endurance Championship with Richard Lietz and Michael Christensen, as confirmed in issue 136), Porsche’s GTE-Pro class contingent will be bolstered by two extra latest evolution RSRs entered by the factory. The no. 91 car will be led by 2015 IMSA champion, Patrick Pilet, with the Frenchman joined by Nick Tandy and new factory driver, Kévin Estre. Frédéric Makowiecki has been entered as the lead driver in the second works 911 RSR – no. 92 – and will be partnered with Jörg Bergmeister and Earl Bamber (who, along with Tandy, won overall in the 919 Hybrid last year). Interestingly, contrary to previous years, the factory cars have been entered by Porsche Motorsport, seemingly confirming that Porsche Team Manthey will take a sabbatical from international competition in 2016 as Weissach’s in-house race

team from focuses on developing the new GT3-class 911 GT3 R. In the GTE-Am class, another trio of Porsche 911 RSRs (in the slower 2015-spec thanks to the rule mandating year-old cars) have been entered by three separate, independent teams, and will be led by the full-time FIA WEC entry of Gulf Racing (see right). The iconically-liveried Porsche – running as no. 86 – will be joined at Le Mans by a second Proton Racing 911 RSR (entered under the Abu Dhabi banner for Khaled Al Qubaisi) and a new entry for KCMG – who ran Nick Tandy in the LMP2 class during 2015. The Asian squad will be led by Christian Ried, the team principal of Proton Racing. A third Proton Racing entry is also listed as a reserve for the 84th edition of the famous French endurance race, however, listed at number nine, the car – earmarked under Marco Seefried’s name – is unlikely to make the grid in June. After his most successful season yet, actor Patrick Dempsey is unlikely to return to the cockpit in 2016 following his announcement at Porsche’s Night of Champions last year that he will focus on family and acting commitments this season.

Ben Barker – the top British Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup runner over the last few years – will graduate to the FIA World Endurance Championship in 2016, having secured a drive in Gulf Racing’s GTE-Am class Porsche 911 RSR. The 24-year-old driver raced for the squad in their 997 and 991 RSRs during the 2014 European Le Mans Series but was absent from the British team’s line-up last season after an FIA driver grading issue. However, with that resolved, the British ace will move up to the world stage with the squad in the evocatively-liveried, 2015-specification RSR. Barker will be joined in the no. 86 entry by team owner, Mike Wainwright, and former GP2 winner, Adam Carroll. The latter duo, partnered by Phil Keen, won their first ELMS race last year at the Four Hours of Silverstone, with Wainwright feeling the time is right to make the move to the WEC, a move that will bring the famous Gulf colours back to Le Mans on a Porsche for the first time since the legendary John Wyer Automotive 917s raced in 1971. For Barker, a Total 911 columnist and ‘one to watch’ for the past two seasons, the deal will also see him make his 24 Hours of Le Mans debut. “I’m really pumped for this season for several reasons,” the Briton explains. “I am back working with my good friends at Gulf Racing and I will be getting to race in the FIA WEC. All the credit goes to Mike Wainwright and the whole Gulf Racing team for trusting me in the seat.” Barker’s first WEC event will be his home race, the Six Hours of Silverstone on 15 to 17 April.

Motor racing in 2016 March

April

FIA WEC Prologue test

VLN Round 1

25-26 March

2 April

Blancpain Sprint Series Misano 8-10 April

IMSA Grand Prix of Long Beach 15-16 April

FIA WEC Six Hours of Silverstone

15-17 April


Higher servicing standards. Lower servicing costs. All Porsche drivers can now benefit from fixed price servicing at our Porsche Centres. Prices for 911 (997) models start from ÂŁ395.00*. Porsche-trained Technicians guarantee workmanship, Porsche Genuine Parts, the latest diagnostic equipment and, crucially, the complete peace of mind that your Porsche is in the hands of genuine experts. Having your Porsche serviced by us means you also have access to a courtesy car or the option of a collection and delivery service.** Why take your Porsche anywhere else? For more information visit www.porsche.co.uk/service

* Participating Centres only. Fixed price service tariffs may be withdrawn or varied at any time. Prices for other models available from participating Centres. ** Subject to availability, age and licence restrictions.


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Products

1 2

Lifestyle

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TOTAL 911 PRESENTS THE BEST IN OFFICE FASHION TO ENSURE YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR NEXT MEETING AS STYLISHLY AS POSSIBLE

Porsche Design Tech Flex Rollerball £310 Porsche Design’s writing instruments are almost as famous as its timepieces. This rollerball design hits the scales at 195g, with the nib casing, lid and end cap manufactured from palladium with silver-plated detailing. The real theatre comes from the interwoven 18ct gold and stainless steel strands that make up the main casing though, ensuring that every contract-signing is an event. www.porsche-design.com

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Elliot Brown Bloxworth £550 A watch will not just ensure you get to your next meeting on time. In the modern office, a watch is a statement. Elliot Brown’s Bloxworth chronograph (like their Canford pilot’s watch) is built to last thanks to their extreme product testing. The design is equally timeless too, with the sunrayblue dial and bezel providing a beautiful contrast to the stainless steel casing and bracelet, crafted with a mix of polished and brushed finishes. www.elliotbrownwatches.com

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Porsche Design Classic Tie £75

Fashion is very often cyclical and, like the 1980s, narrow ties have been very much back in the spotlight since the turn of the decade. Porsche Design’s Classic Tie measures in at 5.5cm wide and is made of 100 per cent silk for a luxurious feel. Featuring a simple, asymmetric striped design (and available in black or navy blue) this tie is a statement piece suitable for any collared shirt. www.porsche-design.com

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Porsche Design Basic Shirt £130

The shirt has been an office staple for over 100 years and, despite myriad modern options, simplicity is best when it comes to this ubiquitous piece of work wear. Porsche Design’s Basic Shirt fits this particular bill perfectly. Made from cotton poplin, it features a classic, forward-point collar, PD-branded rubberised buttons and a signature back pleat for a timeless look. www.porsche-design.com

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Pello Portfolio Case £350

Organisation is key in any modern office and, with this portfolio case from London-based design studio, Pello guarantee to keep your documents stylishly secure. Perfect for A4 paperwork or small electronic devices, the outer case is crafted from soft blue deer leather while the inner lining is in a luxurious brown fur. The case folds out to A3 size and can be worn under the arm or carried effortlessly using the side handle. www.pellolondon.com

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Ben Barker 13

Ben Barker

THE FIA WEC NEWCOMER SHARES ALL ABOUT HIS MAIDEN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CAMPAIGN

6 NIST 1 20UM L CO

Photo Copyright 2015 Nick Dungan/AdrenalMedia.com

Competing in a 911 on the biggest stage An iconic car and an iconic livery beckon ahead of Ben’s FIA World Endurance Championship debut When I last wrote in these pages three issues ago, it looked like the 2016 season would see me leave the Porsche Supercup circus. In fact, my initial plans were to take me away from the wheel of a 911 race car altogether. However, as I’ve often found in motorsport, plans can change at the drop of a hat so not only will I be driving a 911 once again this season, I will be driving the best racing 911 currently available: the 991 RSR. And in the FIA World Endurance Championship, no less. On top of the factory guys, there are only a select few drivers who ever get the chance to race an RSR, so I feel hugely privileged to be among that number. What’s going to make it even more special is the fact we are going to be the first team to run a Gulf-liveried Porsche in the World Championship since 1971. Yes, that’s right, as you’ll have seen in the motorsport news, we’re bringing the famous pale blue and orange design back to Porsche. I look forward to recreating a few of those infamous Steve McQueen poses when we get to Le Mans in June. I can’t thank Mike Wainwright – Gulf Racing’s owner/co-driver

– enough for giving me this opportunity. The deal came about off the back of my drive for the team in the 2014 European Le Mans Series so they know that I’m a safe and fast pair of hands, and was a match for team-mate Adam Carroll – a GP2 race winner – at most of the circuits we visited. The results we had that season weren’t, in all honesty, what we were hoping for, however they showed promise and throughout last season, Mike’s driving has come on a long way. I’m confident, therefore, that we will be competitive from the get go. After three seasons in the Porsche Supercup, the FIA WEC represents a new challenge for me, with plenty of new circuits to get my head around. Despite this, I’ve never had a problem learning tracks – I had to get used to that a lot in 2014 when I raced in the US – and with Gulf Racing’s ties to Position One’s simulator, its safe to say I will get plenty of time behind a virtual wheel to practice my lines and ensure that I’m ready. Talking of being ready, ever since the deal was announced I’ve been itching to get going, however, there has been a fair bit of sitting around and waiting.

Thankfully, by the time you read this the official Prologue test at Paul Ricard is just days away. But, the one saving grace of my pre-season spare time is that it’s enabled me to get some finer details organised. It always amazes me of all the little things that you need to get ready, like new moulded earplugs and a HANS device that fits the car etc. So although dead time maybe a frustration, it’s actually essential preparation time. Although the learning curve will be quite big jumping into the WEC, I’m always excited by these new challenges as a driver. Without stretching yourself you can’t improve your own performance so it’s great to get the chance to race a new car at new tracks on a reasonably regular basis. The World Championship may also help to open new doors elsewhere in the world of sports car racing. While Supercup is a great shop window, especially for Porsche, there are some GT teams in international series that don’t really place it on their radar. That’s not to say that the WEC is a more important opportunity but it definitely represents a new shop, possibly on a busier street.


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THE VERY BEST OF YOUR PORSCHE OPINIONS VIA EMAILS, LETTERS, THE WEBSITE & SOCIAL MEDIA E NC E ND O P ES R R CO

R A ST

Rennsport relief Dear Sir, I enjoyed Josh and Lee’s report on the GT3 RS battle. I agree, you need both the 997.2 and the 991. I could not let my 997.2 RS go, even after I picked up my 991 RS from Stuttgart. I have just returned to the UK after 15 years in the US and brought my 997.2 RS over with me (and subscribed to Total 911). This RS followed a 997.1 GT3 that I ran for 30,000 miles as a commuter (and was well used on the North Texas tracks). I loved the 997.1, all its critical power delivery was between 6,000-8,000rpm and, once you learned to drive it like that, you could make serious progress. It was relatively frantic, very direct and tactile, and it didn’t like bumps, which many Texas tracks suffered from. I backed it into a tyre wall after a bumpy transition once, but at least it meant I could fit a FabSpeed exhaust, which sounded awesome. It would understeer, of course, but we set the car up pretty aggressively and dialed out most of it through tyre eating camber and control bar changes, not recommended for the commute. We called it Gandalph the White, because it was truly magical. Enter the 997.2. The first thing I noticed is the power delivery is very different. Gone is the peakiness

993 Carrera 2S

991 GT3 RS

997.1 Carrera 4/4S

997.2 Carrera 4/4S

997 Carrera GTS/ C4 GTS

964 Carrera 4 Turbo-look

964 Anniversary Edition

911 Carrera 3.2 SSE

911 Carrera 3.0 RS

Some people prefer a wide-hipped Neunelfer. But which is your favourite? Here are the results:

old fashioned in comparison. This car is in your face and beautifully crafted. It’s the same and yet it’s completely different. It’s so much faster everywhere than the 997.2 that it is silly. It has more power and the PDK is insanely good (and I nearly didn’t buy it because of this). I love to listen to the hisses and clacks behind me as I change gear, it makes it more tactile and involving. The engine note at peak revs hurts my ears. It’s seriously angry. In the same way I found the 997.2 a step up in compliance over the 997.1, the 991 step up is as significant from the 997.2. I have done back-to-back thrashes and, where the 997.2 crashes into the bumps, the 991 is engaging but relatively sublime, with tons of grip. And it’s stupid fast without working hard. When you work hard, in reality the next step is jail… go to the track, please. But the 991 for me is not as engaging to drive as the 997.2. You have to work harder to go slower in the 997.2. But when I want to go fast, left foot brake, exploit everything the amazing new technologies bring to us, and be wildly entertained in the process, I’m going to drive the 991. They’re both truly awesome cars: I’m a lucky bastard. Brian Bolton

@Total911 The best of your tweets that caught our eye on this month’s Twitter newsfeed 996 Carrera 4S

What is your favourite factory widebody Porsche 911?

1. 911 Carrera 2.7 RS 1.4% 4. 911 Carrera 3.2 Speedster 2.2% 5. 964 Carrera 2 Cabriolet Turbo-look 1.4% 9. 991 Carrera 4/4S 1% 10. 991.2 Carrera 4/4S 2.2% 993 Carrera 4S

Total911.com Poll

between 6,000-8,000rpm, the torque curve is much flatter in the 3.8 than the 3.6, and the gear ratios are shorter, which means that you can pull a higher gear through a corner than you can in the 997.1. Cutting out gear shifts saves you time and the car is more settled, but the 997.2 is so much more compliant and stable than the 997.1 anyway, so that you don’t need to set it up so edgily or drive it so aggressively. Don’t underestimate the impact of the dynamic engine mounts on the 997.2’s stability, especially on a fast but bumpy entry into a corner or rapid direction changes. You have to be ready to catch the 997.1, whereas the Gen2 rides it out. It was called Gandalph the Grey, as it was a little wiser and had a great depth of magic up its sleeve. Claim to fame: Patrick Long has driven this car. I have to admit I became a fan, even if I was convinced that I was going to die in the passenger seat of my own car as we barrelled into the first bend on cold tyres; he has crazy car control! Roll on to October 2015, and my father and I turned up to Zuffenhausen to drive my shiny new Lava orange 991 RS back to Surrey. Oh god its gorgeous. Poor Gandalph the Grey looks positively drab and

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1.6% 3.2% 4.8% 2.4% 1.6% 4.8% 3.2% 4.4% 1.2% 2.4% 3.2% 6% 7.2% 8.8% 19% 18%

@Kyle_Fortune Pulled the #Porsche #993 #911 #Carrera out of the garage looking for jobs. Found one pretty quickly. @OnlyCarrera A covered up 911 Sport Classic. I bet it is dreaming of some twisty roads in the sunshine @canfordclassics #CanfordClassics restored RHD 1973 911 2.7 RS Touring ready for photo shoot today! What a beauty! #restoration #911


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Write to or email us with your Porsche opinions and the star correspondence will receive a complimentary copy of The Porsche 911 Buyer’s Guide bookazine worth £9.99!

W IN! The Por sche 9 11 B Guideuwyer’s o £9.99 rth

GT3 release

Porsche vs Audi

Dear Sir, I became a 911 owner in March 2011 with my extensive research and budget ambitions settling me into a 2004, 27,000-mile 996 C4S in Midnight blue. A purchase I will never regret and that has given me much pleasure in the last five years, including excursions to Nürburgring, Oulton Park, Goodwood and Castle Combe without any mechanical faults. Just add fuel, rubber and scheduled servicing. Depreciation has been £10,000 over that period.

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@SharkWerks How is this even possible? @harrismonkey Does today mark a change in the values of 996/997 GT Porsches? Seems to me they’re based on ‘they’ll never make a car like that again’… @RPMTechnik Refurbished calipers fitted to a #Porsche 996 today from black to red. Get in touch if you would like yours done, too @paragongb Which 964 RS would you choose?

Being a) a bloke and b) a petrolhead and c) reasonably solvent, I got the five-year itch for new metal. I test drove a Gen1 991 and was very impressed. However, I need the ravages of depreciation to bring the prices down a bit on that model and I couldn’t find a sensible price swap level from the 996 to the 997 generation. Cutting a long story short, I ended up with a 2008 Audi R8. I must say it is a beautiful car and a fast beast with forgiving manners when pressed hard. I would say the 911 holds its own in

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these departments as well. But it is in the more intangible areas where the 911 stretches its lead. The 911 is more discrete, capable of thrilling on the limit and on tour, it feels more agile and is much more of an allrounder, too (not least because of the rear seats and more space for luggage in the package). The happy ending for me is that I was fortunate enough to retain my Porsche 911. And when the R8 goes, I will not stray again. Chris Barratt

Dear Sir, I was searching for a recent news item in one of your publications about when the next GT3 might be released for sale but can’t find it. Can you help? Many thanks indeed. Hamid Fatemi There were rumours that the second-generation 991 GT3 was going to be unveiled at Geneva. However, with these rumours proving to be false, there has been no word as to when the next GT3 will be launched. But, with Porsche rattling through the 991.2 releases, we wouldn’t be surprised to see it out before the end of the year.

Total911.com:

Six reasons I bought a 996 Carrera Lee put his money where his mouth is and bought a 996. Here are your reactions: Congratulations! I like 996s a lot, great value and a much rawer driving experience than a 997. And the front lights look much more original than the boring round ones on the 997. Tobias Welt

I’ve certainly woken up to them – sold my 2015 VW daily driver and bought a 2003 996 C4S and use it every day. I’ve never been so happy on the daily commute. Barry Clarkson

The reasons for to buy a Porsche are not necessary... Angelo Melis

Nicely done, Lee Rob Mugglestone

Welcome to the 996 gang. I’ve got a 996.1 and I am amazed by the fantastic value for money it has given. As wonderful as a 964 or 993 are, the 996 is simply a better car in almost every aspect. Juha Kivekäs

Very credible rationale imho. Underrated 911, but how much longer. & keep a good relationship with your local Porsche specialist… @HardDrivers


16

Views

Spare issue 124

Dear Sir, I was interested in a letter you published in issue 136, entitled “C4S search” from Bill Van der Veen from Sydney, in which he asks if any reader has a copy of issue 124 that featured a test of his 911 model. I would be more than happy to forward him a

copy that I still have. Of interest, my wife ran a 2002 996 C4S in Seal grey, which was her pride and joy until she became unable to drive it due to back problems. It, therefore, had to go in May last year. I also own a 964 C2, which I share with my son. Indeed, you printed a letter from him – Ben Murphy – in issue 66 (way back in August 2010) headed “Totally reliable”. We still have it and it still brings a smile to my face when I get the chance to drive it. Keep up the good work with what is still the best magazine for 911 owners, by a country mile. Please pass on my details to Bill. Terry Murphy

Fuel for thought

Dear Sir, I recently had to fill up my 997.1 Carrera with standard 95 octane fuel. I was a little apprehensive as Porsche recommends only using 97 octane fuel or higher.

However, to my amazement, I actually got slightly better fuel economy (albeit by only 0.5mpg) and there wasn’t any perceptible drop-off in performance. With modern 911s’ knock-control preventing any pre-detonation issues, I was wondering why I shouldn’t be using standard unleaded petrol (95 octane fuel) more often? It is cheaper and I’m using less of it. Could you offer any advice? Graham Colton The word from esteemed Porsche specialist, Autofarm, is as follows: “It is okay to run on a good branded 95 if it is just for general motoring. For more spirited driving and trackdays it is worth buying the Super but, as this doesn’t sell as well, it hangs around in the station tanks for long and can go off. Therefore, buy from a good brand where Super is sold more often.” We hope that helps, Graham.

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International

Win a set of Rimsavers for your Porsche 911

If you’re like us, you’ll hate damaging the wheels of your Porsche 911. However, with the latest versions of the Neunelfer seeing ever larger alloy sizes – up to 21 inches at the rear of the 991 GT3 RS – it has never been easier to kerb your wheels, leading to unsightly scuffs and scars. Thankfully, there are now a number of companies offering ways of protecting your prized alloys, with UK company Rimsavers leading the way. Made from a flexible, rubberised plastic, the Rimsavers slot into the gap between the edge of each wheel and the tyre, using a high strength 3M adhesive to provide a secure, long lasting fit. Their flexibility allows them to fit around the lip shape on a wide range of alloy wheels (from both manufacturers and aftermarket companies), both protecting the edge of your alloys and helping to cover up

any damage they may have already sustained. What’s more, their lightweight construction means that the weight penalty is minimal (perfect if you’re running your Porsche 911 on a set of forged wheels) and they are available in a range of different colours, allowing them to either be colour matched to your car or blended in to the tyre’s sidewall for a more minimal look. Each kit – worth £44.99 – contains four Rimsavers plus special cleaning wipes to ensure that your wheels’ surface is perfectly prepared. Having teamed up with Total 911, Rimsavers are offering four Rimsavers kits in our latest competition. To be in with a chance of winning this great prize and protecting your alloys, all you have to do is answer the following simple question. What type of adhesive do the Rimsavers use? A) 3N B) 3M C) 3L Email your answer, along with your preferred Rimsaver colour, to competitions@total911.com with ‘Rimsaver’ in the subject line. The Editor’s decision is final, full terms and conditions can be found on the Total 911 website. The closing date is 19 April 2016. Good luck!

Total 911 is available for licensing. Contact the International department to discuss partnership opportunities Head of International Licensing Cathy Blackman +44 (0) 1202 586401 licensing@imagine-publishing.co.uk

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Disclaimer

The publisher cannot accept responsibility for any unsolicited material lost or damaged in the post. Total 911 is independent of Porsche AG. All text and layout is the copyright of Imagine Publishing Ltd. Nothing in this magazine may be reproduced in whole or part without the written permission of the publisher. All copyrights are recognised and used specifically for the purpose of criticism and review. Although the magazine has endeavoured to ensure all information is correct at time of print, prices and availability may change. This magazine is fully independent and not affiliated in any way with the companies mentioned herein. If you submit material to Imagine Publishing, you automatically grant Imagine Publishing an irrevocable, perpetual, royalty-free license to use the images across its entire portfolio and to deliver the material to existing and future clients, including but not limited to international licensees for reproduction in international, licensed editions of Imagine products. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Imagine Publishing nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for the loss or damage.

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Porsche recommends

and

If history is any indication, you’re looking at the future of sports cars. The new 911. Ever ahead. For more information call 02392 212 350 or visit our Centre.

Porsche Centre Portsmouth Lakeside Business Park Western Road Portsmouth Hampshire PO6 3PQ info@porscheportsmouth.co.uk www.porscheportsmouth.co.uk

Official fuel economy figures for the 911 Carrera 4S Coupé in mpg (l/100km): urban 22.8 – 27.4 (12.4 – 10.3), extra urban 41.5 – 42.8 (6.8 – 6.6), combined 31.7 – 35.8 (8.9 – 7.9). CO2 emissions: 204 – 180 g/km. The mpg and CO2 figures quoted are sourced from official EU-regulated tests, are provided for comparability purposes and may not reflect your actual driving experience.


18

Porsche 991 R revealed

PORSCHE 991 R REVEALED

R IS FOR


19

REVIVAL If you value purity over PDK, Andreas Preuninger’s team has set out to provide your modern 911 of choice in the shape of the new 991 R Written by Josh Barnett Photography by Porsche AG


20 Porsche 991 R revealed

I

t’s no secret that, despite the praises of the motoring press, the philosophy underpinning the latest renditions of the 911 GT3 and GT3 RS has not resonated with some of Zuffenhausen’s faithful enthusiasts. The mandatory PDK gearbox, increased weight and focus on outright lap times around the Nürburgring Nordschleife has born two phenomenally capable sports cars, but Porsche has long championed that its road-going offerings are about how you get there, not how fast. That is why, for 53 years, the tachometer has continually found itself at the centre of the iconic five-dial dashboard. The protestations of the so-called purists have not fallen on deaf ears at Porscheplatz though; it has been no secret that Weissach has been developing a pared-back Porsche 911 designed to thrill it’s propitious pilot out on the open road and, after a whirlwind 13-month development, the new Porsche 991 R is the much-coveted result. That name may ring a few bells with the Porsche cognoscenti, and for good reason too. Originally launched in 1967, the Porsche 911R was a featherweight racing version of the 2.0-litre, short wheelbase car. Fitted with the 901/20 flat six from the early 906 prototypes, the 911R’s Weber-carburetted 210bhp made it the most powerful Porsche 911 at the time by quite some margin. However, that was not the most remarkable engineering feat of the original ‘Renn’ 911. Then head of R&D in the motorsport department, Ferdinand Piëch put the 911 on a strict diet to create the 911R, using glass fibre panels, Plexiglass windows and deleting much of the interior to give the car a dry weight of just over 800kg. It remains the lightest Neunelfer of all time. So how does this new car, launched at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show, revive the R’s legacy after a 49-year hiatus? At fi rst glance it looks simply like a dewinged, stickered-up 991 GT3. However, delve underneath the lightweight bodywork (more on that in due course) and the new 991 R’s trump card should have driving enthusiasts around the world rejoicing. Unlike the latest GT3 or GT3 RS, the R’s transmission tunnel houses a manual gearbox. Yes, that’s right, this is a new Porsche 911 developed by Andreas Preuninger’s team at Weissach that comes with a traditional gearlever and a clutch pedal. There’s not even a PDK option. What’s more, unlike the manual gearboxes found in the current Carreras, the 991 R’s transmission features just six forward ratios, making for simpler navigation across each gate. The decision to pursue this path has no doubt been driven by the hugely positive feedback to Porsche’s Cayman GT4, a superbly analogue sports car that satisfied many of the purists who would previously have bought a manual

911 GT3. As you would expect, Porsche is keen to wax lyrical about the “short gearshift travel”, the action of which has apparently been tuned to be more slick than the stiff, riflebolt movement found in the 997 generation GT3s and Rennsports. The gearlever itself is also shorter than other manual 911s and is specific to the R. If there’s one reason to get excited about the 991 R, the promise of a six-speed manual with a Carrera GTS-style ergonomics already has us salivating. But, this is not the only reason why we are rejoicing. Initial rumours suggested that the 991 R would use the GT3’s high-revving flat six (complete with 9,000rpm redline). However, Porsche has exceeded most people’s expectations – including our own – by shoehorning the 500hp powerplant from the latest RS into the R’s engine bay. The engine’s output at the wheels is actually more than the 991 RS thanks to the manual transmission suffering from fewer parasitic losses. At 4.0 litres, it is twice the capacity of the original 911R’s engine, propelling the new 911 from


21 Model Year Engine

991 R 2016

Capacity 3,996cc Compression ratio 12.9:1 Maximum power 500hp @ 8,250rpm Maximum torque 460Nm @ 6,250rpm Transmission Six-speed manual gearbox

Suspension

Front Independent; MacPherson strut; coilover dampers; anti-roll bar Rear Independent; multi-link; coilover dampers; anti-roll bar

Wheels & tyres

Front 9x20-inch centre-locks; 245/30/ZR20 tyres Rear 12x20-inch centre-locks; 305/30/ZR20 tyres

Brakes Front 410mm PCCB discs with sixpiston calipers Rear 390mm PCCB discs with fourpiston calipers

Dimensions

Length 4,532mm Width 1,852mm Weight 1,370kg

Performance

0-62mph 3.8 secs

Top speed 201mph

“The promise of a six-speed manual with a Carrera GTS-style ergonomics already has us salivating�


22 Porsche 991 R revealed

Lightweight Top speed Without a fixed rear wing, the new Porsche 991 R has a drag coefficient of 0.32 – 0.02 lower than the GT3 RS with which it shares its 4.0-litre engine. This allows it to be the first naturally aspirated 911 road car to break the 200mph barrier.

Nordschleife In keeping with Porsche’s desire for the 991 R to be a car for driving pleasure (rather than a track tool), there has been no official Nürburgring Nordschleife lap time recorded.

a standstill to 62mph (100kph) in 3.8 seconds, faster than the 997 GT3 RS 4.0 by a tenth of a second. For those who want a perfectly pure driving experience, Porsche is also offering a single-mass flywheel as an option on the R, providing improved throttle response and faster gear changes. The 9A1 engine drives through a mechanical limited-slip differential (with Porsche Torque Vectoring also utilised) to aid traction. However, to ensure that the handling is suitably rear-biased, the 991 R shuns the GT3 RS’s 21-inch, 325-section rear tyres in favour of 305-section Michelin PS Cup 2 rubber, wrapped around 20-inch GT3 centre-lock wheels finished in a special matte aluminium finish. At the front, the 9-inch wide forged alloys wear 245-section tyres, giving the R an identical footprint to the current GT3 but with 25hp more power and 20Nm more torque to deal with. Combined with a suspension setup tuned for your favourite twisting blacktop, the 991 R’s power-to-grip relationship is sure to be suitably old school and entertaining. Exactly how we like it.

The Porsche 991 R’s quoted weight of 1,370kg includes a full tank of fuel, tool kit and other fluids. This means the true dry weight of the car is closer to 1,320kg.

Livery The twin, body-length stripes mimic those seen on the original Porsche 911R in October 1967 during a world record attempt at Monza. The short wheelbase car broke five longdistance records, despite using an engine that had already been used for 100 hours on the test bench.

Of course, on top of the power, the R’s driving experience will also be defined by its leichtbau philosophy. Sharing its designation with the lightest Neunelfer of all time, Preuninger’s team realised that the 991 version needed a similar ‘Renn’ diet. This means that, while using the wider-than-standard Carrera 4 bodyshell (also worn by the GT3), the revitalised 911R is the lightest 991 built, hitting the scales at 1,370kg – 10kg lighter than the first-generation 991 Carrera and a full 50kg less than the latest Rennsport variant. The manual gearbox saves 20kg over the PDK unit with further savings found on the body panels. The roof is the same scalloped magnesium item seen on the GT3 RS (saving a further 1kg) with the bonnet manufactured from carbon fibre. The front wings are also CFRP while the rear quarter windows and screen are made from Plexiglass. Porsche’s decision to use carbon ceramic brakes was also driven by a desire to save weight, rather than simply improve the braking performance of the 991 R. At the rear end, a titanium exhaust helps to reduce mass, as does the lack of a fixed

rear wing. Instead, the 991 R uses a revised version of the Carrera’s decklid (complete with R-inspired mesh grill and retro badge). Aerodynamically tuned alongside a revised front lip splitter, the rear wing opens further than on a Carrera to ensure that the car remains safely stable at high speed. Inside, the diet continues with much of the soundproofing – to the tune of 4kg – removed, along with the rear seats and the PCM and aircon units (the latter two can be specced back in, though, as no-cost options). The cockpit features a number of retro touches designed to evoke memories of the original R-badged 911, too. These include 918-style carbon bucket seats trimmed in brown leather with ‘Pepita’ houndstooth fabric centres and green number markings across the five dashboard dials. The simplified door cards feature the fabric pull cords that have become one of the hallmarks of a Weissach-fettled sports car. The new 991 R also gets a bespoke version of the 360mm “GT sport” steering wheel, complete with black – rather than silver – trim. There’s no Sport Plus mode either (the


23

First deliveries Based on the first-generation 991 platform, the new Porsche 991 R will make its debut in Porsche Centres around the world in June, hopefully before heading into the hands of true 911 enthusiasts.

PSM Weissach has specially tuned the Porsche Stability Management system on the 991 R to “tailor the car for a focused and authentic driving experience.”

Lift kit With its lower GT3-style lip splitter, the new Porsche 991 R is likely to scrape on speed bumps. To prevent this, a front lift kit is offered as an option, although it does go against the leichtbau ethos.

Sport Chrono package traditionally intended as a track tool) making for an uncluttered dashboard and centre console. The interior is finished off with carbon fibre trim – including the gearknob – to highlight the R’s lightweight legacy, though the reality is these finishing touches are unlikely to save much weight. Externally, the new R’s styling is taken predominantly from the GT3, with the front and rear bumper fasciae carried over directly. However, underneath the rear, Preuninger’s team has added some vertical strakes to create a diffuser effect that – like the more aggressive decklid rear wing angle – is intended to settle the car’s handling without the need for aesthetically obvious fixed aerodynamics. The decals (that won’t be to everyone’s taste) are intended to mimic the livery Porsche ran on two 911Rs during a successful world distance record in 1967 at Monza. Over either white or silver, the twin stripes are available in either red or green, both coming with complimentary ‘Porsche’ side script. For the most part, the revived 911R has us – and other Porsche purists – salivating.

However, there are a few details that appear at odds with the Renn philosophy, the most major of which is the decision to retain the GT3’s rear-wheel steering system. The electromechanical setup undoubtedly weighs more than a standard, passive rear axle, seemingly at odds with the work Weissach has done to reduce mass. The system also helps to mask the idiosyncratic 911 handling, although Preuninger’s reasoning behind using rearwheel steering is to create a similar feeling of agility in the 991 chassis as you would find in the original short wheelbase 911R. Although the lack of Sport Plus mode is a boon, Porsche has decided to retain an automatic throttle blip function on the R, too. Sold as a car for driving enthusiasts, this digital control seems like anathema to the concept underpinning the R’s creation so it is at least thankful that the function can be turned off via a button on the centre console. Perhaps the biggest concession to the purist mantra, though, is not to be found in the new 991 R’s hardware. Limited to 991 examples worldwide (of which a small number will be

right-hand drive), it has been rumoured that the R has been sold out for months. Combined with a list price of £136,901 (£5,605 more than the 991 GT3 RS, you will note), it seems likely that most long-term Porsche fans will never get behind the wheel of a 991 R as you can be sure that, as has happened on all of Porsche’s recent limited edition offerings, speculators will be quick to flip their new 991 R with an eye-watering premium. With such a cynical outlook, the 991 R could look no more than a wry raiding of the parts bin on Porsche’s behalf. But, despite these small provisos, the reality is that the latest Neunelfer looks like a very special piece of kit, undeniably designed (originally at least) to thrill those who value purity over performance. It is potentially the car that the 991 GT3 should always have been – and may go on to be in second-generation form – and appears to be more than a worthy revival of Weissach’s iconic ‘R’ badge. We can’t wait for first deliveries of the car in June. However, that is not the end of our introduction to the 991 R. Over to you, Mr Preuninger…


24 Andreas Preuninger drives the 991 R

A

car is a sum of a lot of technical, mechanical components and it should feel as such. This has got a little bit lost in the industry, that is my personal opinion. We are standing at a crossroads, we need a new niche, we need to make a new feel. I would say we are addressing the racers with the GT3 models but we have those purists and they have turned to the classic market. They don’t buy a modern car. And that’s why the R came about,” says Andreas Preuninger, responsible for the development of the 911 R. This is in stark contrast to 2013 and the launch of the 991 GT3, when Preuninger was repeating to us and other journalists, “It’s faster.” He was answering the inevitable barrage of questions

relating to the fitting of a PDK transmission to the GT3. There’s no question it is faster, and given the GT department’s brief is entirely based around that, the adoption of PDK was hardly surprising. It was Preuninger’s tone that was ultimately more revealing as, over one of his favourite beers from the Speidel BrauMaufaktur, he admitted that they had tested a manual GT3, though for the track rats, PDK was the only way to go. However, that manual GT3 just wouldn’t go away. Fast forward to the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, Preuninger is discussing how that car developed into the 911 R. That development GT3 was putting on some miles, being used frequently by Preuninger and his staff, simply because they loved driving it. “We found that PDK was the decision for the track, as we got it to the very best system out there in the market and for PDK, for an automatic box, it’s the most involving in my book. But still, if you’re not on track there are positive sides for a mechanical, normal manual transmission. Some people want to use their car as a motorcycle substitute for the weekend, the interaction of man and machine. So we took exactly that car, put the spoiler away and put some lightweight RS stuff on it and it kept getting better and better,” says Preuninger. Only then was the skunkworks project presented to then boss, Matthias Müller.

Even though Müller liked the project, it could have stalled. The GT department had trouble finding a slot in its schedule to build it, the opportunity arriving just 13 months ago. To allow the project to advance within that time frame it needed certain conditions, chiefly independence in the decision making process. The gearbox is fundamental to the 911 R, the casing for it coming off the shelf, the rest being entirely bespoke. The choice of six gears was, says Preuninger, all about the crispness and natural feel of the shift: “A seventh is just unnecessary, the car is so light, it accelerates like hell, six speeds are enough, we don’t need an overdrive. We would have come up with a different CO2 figure with seven, but I don’t think that’s a priority with this car.” To enjoy the 911 R at its very best, Preuninger admits you have to option the single mass flywheel, saying: “If you don’t have that flywheel you don’t hear the gearbox, the gearbox is a vital part of everything. It doesn’t shudder or clatter as much as a RS 4.0, maybe around 30 per cent less, but it gives exactly the right intonation that is a joyful and positive sound, because this is a car that informs you of what is going on. As you know, 5kg or 5.5kg less on the crankshaft means a lot because the blipping that goes along with it is a lot more explosive, it’s like bam, bam, bam. It’s just a package that’s perfect.”


25

991 R DRIVEN Written by Kyle Fortune Photography by Richard Pardon

BY ANDREAS PREUNINGER Exactly a week after the 991 R was revealed in Geneva, we arrive at Weissach for some seat time. It’s the passenger side for us today, but if we’re going to be driven in one of Porsche’s most hotly anticipated cars, then having the man responsible for creating it is a privilege, and Preuninger is only too happy to oblige. He’s keen to drive. “Five hundred horsepower is enough, after that you’re chasing diminishing returns,” he admits, and as if to demonstrate it he floors the accelerator. The response is familiar, the sound too, though there’s subtle differences. The R lacks the induction noise of the RS, its tune more mechanical in its note, the loss of nearly 5kg of sound deadening assisting here. This car has that aforementioned single mass flywheel, not only allowing the 4.0-litre to rev more freely, but bringing with it some appealing mechanical chatter from the transmission. Being lighter overall offsets some of the RS’s advantage against the clock, but the manual claws back by being more connected. It’s this, says Preuninger, that is key, the man machine interface integral to its appeal, and the R’s immediacy. There’s clearly less inertia in the entire car. Preuninger inputs, be it his feet or hands, and the 911 R responds. Mechanical grip is high, Preuninger admitting that the front axle has 20 per cent more than that of the halo 997 RS 4.0. That is largely thanks to the standard fitment of rear-wheel

steering and its calibration, something that’s kept the GT department busy for the past 13 months. That RS 4.0 comes up a lot in conversation around the R, Preuninger admitting over the shriek of that flat six engine: “If you get out of the R and get into the RS 4.0 it shows that we are five years ahead now. It doesn’t feel ancient, but the R feels better. The R is a super balanced car, but if you were running first in the R and were used to running at the speed of directional change and then you do it in the RS 4.0, you’ll keep wanting. There’s definitely a leap in what you can do. I don’t want to bash the old product, it’s a beautiful car, but in terms of driving pleasure then its best successor is the R. It addresses the same senses.” Achieving that with mechanical grip hasn’t been without its headaches. Preuninger was adamant that the R was true to the original, so clean in its look, saying they didn’t want a ducktail or suchlike, though he admits they did explore the option of a gurney flap – though the forces it generated were too much for the wing’s mechanism. The rear wing sits at the angle of the Carrera Cabriolet – its steepest angle – and there’s an extensive underbody diffuser that allowed for the downforce Preuninger was looking for without affecting exterior styling. Helping here is the standard fitment of the rearwheel steer and, more specifically, its calibration. Compared to the GT3 it is a lot different, and

transformational. It only moves around 1.5 degrees in either direction, but the way it’s connected makes the car incredibly agile. “Tests in Southern Italy with external competition, as well as our own GT4 and GT3 4.0 and all those cars from the past that are a benchmark, and the agility of the car, of the R, the eagerness to turn in is on a whole new level for a 911,” says Preuninger. “This is the special thing you can only feel with the R.” Preuninger says it’s all about the car as a whole, with no single element dominating – yet each one improved. From the suspension, which provides taut control yet a supple ride, to the steering that Preuninger suggests is superior in feel to hydraulic systems, (“It’s the best yet in a 911”). Even so, it’s impossible to not come back to that gearbox and the three pedals and what it ultimately represents. It’s clear that Preuninger is enjoying them, which is kind of the point. With just 991 being built, it’ll be a lucky few who get to experience it. Lessons have been learned though, and Preuninger admits they’re working on other stuff that he can’t as yet talk about. The R should remain special, he admits: “I think if the reaction to it is as strong as we believe will happen, then we have to think of a way to produce a car like that in higher numbers, not as exclusive, but it doesn’t necessarily have to have an R badge, but something similar to it.” Clubsport anyone?


26 History of the 911R

911R

THE TEMPLATE FOR RACING

The R was the first 911 designed specifically for competition, beginning a racing legacy that’s still the lifeblood of Porsche today Written by Kieron Fennely Photography by Total 911


27

C

onsidering that series production of the 911 began only in late 1964, it spoke much for Porsche’s reputation that by mid-1965, privateers were already racing and rallying it extensively. Porsche itself had set the ball rolling with an essentially standard 911 that achieved an unprecedented 5th place in that year’s Monte Carlo Rally, and by 1966, production 911s were winning championships in the US, Spain and Austria as well as the GT category of the European Hill climb; the factory-fit Sportpaket gave racers an offthe-shelf 150bhp. In the autumn, Porsche launched the 160bhp 911S and Elford’s Monte Carlo works 911T, homologated for Group 3, packing as many as 180 horses. But potent as these tuned 911s were, they were mere pussy cats compared to a highly modified Coupe that emerged in early 1967 from Peter Falk’s Experimental Department. Ordained by their ambitious technical and motorsport director, Ferdinand Piëch, Falk’s group laid plans for a competition 911 for a select band of customers who would race and rally it in the higher profi le Group 4 category.

Piëch’s bugbear was weight and he expected this 911 to be nearer the 650kg of his 906 sports racer than the 1,000kg of a rally 911T. Falk deputed test engineer Rolf Wütherich to lighten the 911’s body and the latter drilled every possible chassis member, seat runner, pedal and panel so that the base shell looked like a honeycomb. The body was then assembled using glass fibre panels for the front and rear bumpers, doors and front wings, with thinner steel for rear panels. Also thinned was the windscreen at just 4mm thick, while other glass was replaced by Plexiglas. The front quarter lights were fi xed and had circular aviation type vents, while louvres were glued in place in the rear side windows to give some semblence of ventilation for a 911 whose cockpit would be stripped of all equipment: heating, ventilation, indeed any elements of comfort including glove box and passenger sun visor were removed, leaving just seats, harnesses, steering wheel and an instrument binnacle reduced to speedometer, rev counter and a multifunction dial. The standard Recaro-made seating of the 911 was replaced by extraordinarily light Scheel

bucket seats for driver and passenger, while much of the rest of the cabin was the starkest bare metal. The quest for lightness went to extremes: steel hinges were replaced by aluminium and simple rubber straps held down the engine cover; the minimalist rear light fittings, held in place by a specific glass fibre moulding, comprised small round trailer brake lights and indicators. Removal of the grilles at the front left ventilation apertures and tiny parking lights, and the indicators from the NSU TT replaced the stock 911 items. Finding an appropriately potent engine for this lightweight was straightforward: the 911R took the 901/20 engine of the 906. This unit had already proved itself many times, beginning its career in the 904 with second place in the 1965 Targa Florio. Renumbered 901/22 for the 911R and requiring only detail alterations, this engine differed significantly from the standard flat six. Pistons and a cylinder head, all in magnesium alloy, and specific magnesium inlet manifolds with chromed bores all contributed to a compression ratio of 10.5:1. Titanium connecting rods drove a forged crankshaft.

911R: significant competition successes Mugello (round of World Manufacturers’ Championship): 3rd in 1967 and 3rd in 1968 Monza, May 1967: World Record average speeds achieved by 911R for 15,000km, 20,000km, 10,000 miles and 96 hours Nürburgring 1967: 1st in Marathon de la Route (Sportomatic gearbox) Corsica Rally 1967: 3rd overall (Vic Elford/Gijs van Lennep) Tour de France 1969: 1st overall (with fuel injection/220bhp) (Gérard Larrousse/Maurice Gélin) Tour de France 1970: 3rd overall (winner & second: 3-litre Matra V12s)


28 History of the 911R Model

911R

Year 1967

Engine Capacity 1,991cc Compression ratio 10.5:1 Maximum power 210bhp @ 8,000rpm Maximum torque 206Nm @ 6,100rpm Transmission Five-speed gearbox; transaxle and LSD from 906

Suspension

Front & Back Standard 911 torsion bars and dampers and 911S anti-roll bars

Wheels & tyres

Front 6x15-inch magnesium Fuchs; 500x15 R5 Dunlop tyres Rear 7x15-inch magnesium Fuchs; 550x15 R5 Dunlop tyres

Exterior

Body Drilled, lightened shell with thinner gauge steel in places, glass fibre bumpers, doors, bonnet and engine cover; Plexiglas windows; fixed quarterlights; Cabin stripped of carpeting, sound deadening and all accessories except horn, now mounted on dashboard; Scheel seats for driver/ passenger; Oil tank mounted ahead of right-hand rear wheel with filler and 100-litre fuel tank Length 4,163mm Width 1,610mm Weight 820kg (average)

Performance

0-60mph 6 secs Top speed 122mph

This period colour shot shows a 911R in its bright yellow hue besides a Porsche motorsports truck in 1968

The twin-plug ignition was semi-transistorised and two electric fuel pumps fed the triple Weber 46 IDA carburettors. The result was 210bhp at 8,000rpm with maximum torque at 6,100rpm. Gearbox and transmission were direct transplants from the 906 with a clutch specific to the R. Porsche lowered the standard 911’s ride height by 50mm and, taking advantage of rapidly advancing technology, the R sported 6-inch rims at the front and 7-inches aft, widening the track and necessitating mild flaring of the rear wings. The chassis was otherwise impressively standard, torsion bars, dampers, anti-roll bars all as per series production, while brakes had larger calipers and used Girling racing fluid.

Zuffenhausen out-shopped four such 911s weighing an average of 820kg each and until a decision was made on how they could be homologated, the opportunity was taken to race them in prototype classes. Through 1967, they scored several notable successes, including averaging 130mph for 20,000km at Monza and breaking various endurance records into the bargain. A Sportomatic equipped R won the Marathon de la Route – 84 hours of lapping the Nürburgring – and at Mugello, Elford and van Lennep’s R was third behind a brace of 2.2 Porsche 910s, but ahead of two GT 40s and privately entered 906s. Clearly, the 911R was a very potent racer – Porsche even intended to develop it further

The 911R was used in competition from 1967, as seen here racing in the 1969 Tour de France

with the 230bhp, four-cam 916 engine, but torque profi le of this unit proved too extreme and it went on to be the basis for the 908’s 3-litre flat eight. Coachbuilder Karl Bauer, who was five miles away at Cannstatt, was given the order to build a further 20 911Rs. Bauer would later assemble Piëch’s masterpiece, the 917. Making a total of 24 911Rs, Porsche hoped to obtain at least restricted homologation for Group 4, especially as among Group 3’s sub 2-litre production saloons – at least until BMW came up with a turbocharged 2002 – the 911 was largely unchallenged. Group 4 would offer sharper competition. But it was not to be. The 500 unit minimum production demanded by the FIA was dissuasive to Harald Wagner and Lars Schmidt who managed Porsche’s sales: despite the usual energetic lobbying of Huschke von Hanstein, who pointed out the 911R’s body could be built for much the same cost as the 911T’s yet be pitched at a more profitable price, Porsche’s conservative salesmen remained unconvinced. So with no race series, the 911R could be sold only as a prototype, which drastically limited its appeal. Indeed, it was 1970 before the last of the Bauer-built cars were fi nally sold off. The 911R’s instigator Ferdinand Piëch could certainly have pressed Wagner harder, but the super-light R had proved his point; besides, the 911 was evolving quickly with the 2.2-litre in the wings and Piëch’s primary focus was the World Sportscar Championship and Le Mans. He knew that with or without the R, the 911’s sporting roots were already deep enough for it to flourish.


V.

Beverly Hills Car Club

Specialized dealer of classic European & American cars

1965 Porsche 911 SWB Light ivory with gold script and black interior. Matching numbers and certificate of authenticity. Chrome details, wood steering wheel and dash. Highly sought after early short-wheelbase 911.

........................................$189,500

1964 Porsche 356C Cabriolet

1972 Porsche 911T Coupe

1971 Porsche 914-6

Bahia red with black interior. Five-speed manual transmission, air conditioning and Fuchs wheels. Same owner for many years. Mechanically sound. .................$59,500

Black with tan interior. 2.0 liter manual transmission, matching numbers running gear and certificate of authenticity. .................................................$54,500

Light ivory with red leather interior. Equipped with a 1600S motor with a fourspeed manual transmission and certificate of authenticity. ........................$135,000

1987 Porsche Carrera Cabriolet

1986 Porsche Carrera Cabriolet

1966 Porsche 911

Matching numbers in nougat brown metallic with matching brown canvas soft-top and Fuchs wheels. Five-speed G50 transmission. Same owner for many years. .......$42,500

1960 Porsche 356B Super Roadster Matching numbers in black with black interior. Very clean, presentable and well maintained. Extremely collectible and sought after. ............................$167,500

Factory black with red interior. Five-speed manual transmission, air conditioning, Fuchs alloys, spare and jack. Same owner for many years. Mechanically sound. ..........$39,500

Black with brown interior. Equipped with a 2.2 liter engine with a manual transmission. Same owner for the last 40 years. Just came out of storage. ..........................$79,500

1972 Porsche 911T Targa

1973 Porsche 911S Targa

Matching numbers in red with black interior. Five-speed manual transmission, air conditioning, Fuchs alloys and 1 year external oil flap. ........................$46,500

Matching numbers in gold metallic with brown interior and black trim. 2.4 liter, mechanical fuel injection and five-speed manual transmission. ...............$129,500

1977 Porsche 3.0 Euro Carrera Bitter chocolate with black interior and velvet inserts. Four-speed manual transmission, power windows, Fuchs wheels, air conditioning. .............$69,500

1969 Porsche 912 Soft Window Targa Original Polo red with black interior. Believed to be one of nine 912 Targas built in 1969 with soft window special order option. Great investment. ...........$39,500

1979 Porsche 930 Turbo Coupe Black metallic with tan interior. Four-speed manual transmission, air conditioning, factory sunroof and power windows. Mechanically sound. ..................$67,500

Looking for classic or luxury sports cars?

• We buy and pick up from any USA location • Worldwide shipping Please check our website as we have cars being delivered daily Alex Manos, BEVERLY HILLS CAR CLUB 4576 1/2 Worth St., Los Angeles, CA 90063 T: +1 (310) 975-0272 http://www.BeverlyHillsCarClub.com E: sales@beverlyhillscarclub.com


30 911L


31

LUX The 911L was produced as a one-off series; we drive a fine example and delve into why its production life was so short Written by Wilhelm Lutjeharms Photography by Rob Till


32 911L

L

must be one of the least exhilarating letters in the automotive world – and especially for those who appreciate Porsche 911s. After all, ‘L’ usually refers to long-wheelbase models, but letters such as S, R, RS, GT or GTS, well, enthusiasts pay more notice to those! There has been one L in the 911 range and, as it happens, it adorned a car with pride of place in the 911 lineage. In the days leading up to our drive in the 911L, social media was abuzz as the world’s motoring media descended on the new, improved Kyalami circuit in Johannesburg, South Africa, to attend the international launch of the 991.2 Turbo and Turbo S (see issue 137). This morning, before Porsche’s fastest production 911s set off on their hot laps, the track’s management allowed us to grace the newly laid tarmac with a special 911 from the 1960s – a model never before featured in the pages of this magazine – the 911L from 1968. As is the case today, back at the start of the 911’s production life, Porsche didn’t wait too long

to update the range. By the end of 1966, the firm introduced the 911S for the 1967 model year. By the end of that year, Porsche changed the 911’s range again, adding the T (Touring) as well as the L. The L featured several of the S’s features, but not its more powerful engine (the former still offered 130bhp at 6,100rpm). This was partly owing to US regulations but it did, however, feature the S’s ventilated disc brakes. By 1968 the 911 range comprised of the T, L and S. But, even though Porsche had little experience in terms of its customers’ demands, the firm was learning quickly with every passing year. The L was another chapter, albeit a very short one, with the company testing the proverbial waters in the European and US markets. For the American market, Porsche made a few changes to the engine to comply with the emission requirements. Compared with the European engines, these US-specification units featured a V-belt driven air pump, which blows air into the exhaust manifolds when the throttle is closed. In line with Porsche’s

aim to offer a luxury version of the 911 with a softer ride, the front anti-roll diameter was also reduced from 13mm to 11mm. The current owner purchased this 911L around three years ago. In other words, at exactly the right time before the air-cooled market exploded. There was little interest in the car at the auction where he bought it; as a result, he bought it for a bargain price. Since then, he has spent a significant sum on the car to restore certain elements of it. One of the highlights includes an engine-out detail job, which has left the flat six in near-pristine condition. The owner explains: “It’s just such a fun car to drive but I have to admit, it handles like a dog!” The only nonstandard items on the car are the headlights, but he is hoping to source and fit true-to-original items in the future. Our location for the drive and shoot of the L couldn’t be more appropriate. As I paged through a few of my Porsche books before this drive, I was surprised to find that 911Ls participated in a few race events all those years ago. In 1968 an L took part in the GDR Rally and in the same year, Helmut Kelleners and Jürgen Neuhaus competed in a touring car race at the Nürburgring. As the sun rises over the 911L’s small dimensions, its Polo red colour becomes even brighter, as does the run-off area painted in the colour of the South African flag. If it wasn’t for the gold-coloured Porsche and 911L lettering on the engine cover, the car could easily be mistaken for one of any short-wheelbase 911s. Aside from the notorious handling woes of these early models, the 911L has near-perfect design and stance and its proportions are flawless. It is quite understandable why some enthusiasts prefer these cars to the later long-wheelbase versions. The elegant simplicity of this early design is also reflected in the car’s minimalistic steel wheels, which have chrome hubs and centre Porsche


33

Other ‘one off’ 911s 3.2 Clubsport

The impact-bumper series never featured an RS model, but the Clubsport was the closest model to it. It tips the scales at around 50kg less than a standard Carrera. Porsche hasn’t re-used Clubsport as a specific model name since, only as an option to indicate equipment level.

930 Turbo Targa

As a car’s body structure suffers a loss of rigidity when its roof is removed, it is understandable why Porsche only once produced a Targa version of its turbocharged 911. It still remains one of the most provocative designs, replete with those wide hips.

964 C4 Lightweight

As featured in issue 131, the C4 Lightweight is a special car for numerous reasons. We associate Porsche’s lightweight approach with rear-wheel-drive 911 derivatives only, but here Porsche gave some of this focus on its first series production all-wheel-drive Carrera model.

997 Sport Classic

One of the most sought-after 997s, the Sport Classic lured customers to purchase one of just 250 with high specifications and a high output version of the 3.8-litre flat six. Highlights include part-cloth/partleather seats, pseudo Fuchs and a modern interpretation of the famous 1970s ducktail.


34 911L

“In terms of design and stance, these short-wheelbase models’ proportions are flawless”

Thanks Special thanks to Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit for allowing Total 911 to use the excellent facilities.

crests. They complement the polished aluminium window frames with aplomb. Unlike the doors of later 911s, the L features redesigned door handles with recessed buttons. There were also several other updates to the L including, to name a few, black windscreen wipers and a larger door mirror. On the inside, there is a black, as opposed to wood-trimmed, steering wheel. The door swings open with ease and I get seated behind the large steering wheel. My 1.87-metre frame allows my head to just fit in below the roof lining, while there is also the option to open the sunroof for the added pleasure of fresh air and that flat-six engine sound, or to invite some sunlight into the cabin… depending on the outside air temperature, of course. However, the sunlight does help to illuminate the otherwise very dark interior. The condition of the black vinyl attests to how well the artificial material withstands the ravages of time compared to leather. Judging by the seats’ appearance, the L could have rolled off the production line 20 years ago, rather than 48. The seats were not developed to be particularly supportive, but they are sufficiently comfortable

thanks to generous padding. The pattern on the seats is replicated on the fascia, as well as the black strip that stretches from the left of the steering wheel to the far right where the “911L” lettering reminds you which version of the iconic car you are driving. In the centre of the four-spoke steering wheel, the perfectly aged Porsche crest is encircled by a round piece of wood – isn’t that a neat touch? The black-circled dials, especially compared to those of the 911s from the 1970s, are more simplistic, but still feature the legendary five-dial layout. They are also basic in their design and therefore extremely easy to read. Compared to the busy, and at times confusing, interior layout and design of some modern cars – including Porsches – it is refreshing to drive a car equipped with only the bare essentials. The basic, two-knob radio unit affords some cheery on-road entertainment, but switching it on will prove disappointing in that it will broadcast news and music from 2015, not from 1968! I turn the key in the ignition barrel positioned to the left of the steering wheel (where else!) and with a light prod of the accelerator pedal,

the 2.0-litre, flat-six engine catches and settles into an even idle. After selecting the dog-leg first gear, I release the clutch pedal and the L pulls away. I quickly ease my foot off the floor-mounted throttle pedal, as the engine reacts quicker to my input than I anticipated. Second gear is across the gate and up and as I lean on the throttle, the engine reacts with a surprising level of conviction, even below 3,000rpm. This time I keep the throttle pinned and the revs climb past 4,000 and 5,000rpm. If I’m honest, the engine sounds like a typical flat six, but I deduce that the engine is probably working hard. Still, for a near 50-year-old engine it pulls stronger than I thought it would. The ride quality is good, and it soon becomes evident that the L is quite suitable to be driven every day, but the handling does require a fair degree of familiarisation. There is more play on the steering wheel than in later 911s, but when your speed picks up, the car reacts to steering inputs with more zeal, but at the same time you have to anticipate the slight delay in the rack. While pushing the L through some corners, I need to hang on to the steering wheel, as you tend to move around in the seat under those


35

Left: The 911L featured several of the 911S’s features but aimed to offer a luxury version of the iconic 911 with a softer ride height and black vinyl interior

circumstances. It is, however, rather fun to experience how the car dips into corners, followed by the modest grip on offer from the suspension and tyres. It is especially apparent when we look at the photographs and see that the 911L cocked one of its front wheels over the rumble strips (without all that much effort!). It instantly reminds me of all those images of 911 racing cars of the era that were photographed with one of their wheels catching some air. As with all pre-G50 gearboxes, shifts can’t be rushed, but I rarely struggle to guide the gear lever in the right direction; only shifting to second from first is a bit time consuming. By virtue of tipping the scales at only 1,080 kilograms, the L allows you to make brisk progress. Compared to larger European sedans of the time, not to mention over-thetop American cars, the 911L, even without the added performance of the S model, must have felt refreshingly quick, nimble and a joy to drive. Being produced only as a 1968 model year, only 449 L Coupes were built for the US, of which some featured the Sportomatic transmission, and another 720 were produced mainly for the

European markets. However, there were also a few Targa Ls produced, but their numbers are even smaller. No wonder we had to search long and hard to find a car to feature in Total 911. Even though the L was meant to offer a slightly more luxurious feel, it was still marketed as a pure sports car. A 911L sales catalogue of the time features a racing 911 in action with the words ‘Racing: the ultimate proof’ in big letters. The L was priced at DM 21,450 in 1968; compare that to the full-on race car from the same year, the limited 911R, which cost a substantial DM 45,000. The L’s limited production makes the model desirable as a collector’s item. However, that is the case with most 911s produced in the 1960s! Today, Porsche doesn’t really focus on producing a 911 that offers a different level of luxury compared with one of its sibling models. Models differ because of the focus on higher engine or optional performance-oriented equipment. So, as our morning with the L draws to an end, there is one question that I need to ask the owner, would he ever sell it? He sums it up in one word: “Never”. If it were my car, I would have probably said the same.

Model 911L Year 1968 Engine Capacity 1,991cc Compression ratio 9.0:1 Maximum power 130bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque 173Nm @ 4,600rpm Transmission Five-speed manual

Suspension Front MacPherson strut and longitudinal torsion bar Rear Semi trailing arm and transverse torsion bar

Wheels & tyres

Front 5.5x15-inch Fuchs; 195/65 R15 Rear 5.5x15-inch Fuchs; 195/65 R15

Brakes

Front 282mm discs Rear 285mm discs

Dimensions Length 4,163mm Width 1,610mm Weight 1,080kg

Performance 0-62mph 8.4 secs Top speed 132mph


38 993 Turbo v Turbo S

O B R U T 3 9 9 BO S R U T

VS

ev i s u l xc E s es t l i p h t m i e w rfect exa r a p com two pe o b r Tu ves Till i 3 r 9 d 9 1 dard Total 91 ography by Rob n a t s the ethren? tjeharms Phot s e o d u r How Turbo S bitten by Wilhelm L built d out Wr to fin


39

I

sn’t it remarkable how associations of certain cars and specific events in our lives become etched into our memories? The more impressive the car is, based on your experience of it at the time, the more vividly you remember it. My fi rst experience of an air-cooled 993 Turbo was during the fi rst year after I fi nished high school. I joined the Porsche Club in the Western Cape, South Africa (without having owned a car of any kind, whatsoever), and I recollect that I turned up at the national event in my parents’ 1977 Volkswagen Kombi. Fortunately, I shared a passion for air-cooled motors – and, at the very least, the Kombi’s engine position and layout, albeit a flat four, was reasonably the same as that of the 911’s! The highlight of the entire event for me was a passenger ride in a 993 Turbo, when its owner (who is now a good friend of mine) achieved an indicated top speed of 174mph. Up to that point in my life, I hadn’t travelled in an even

moderately fast car, so the performance and speed of the 993 Turbo impressed me beyond my wildest imagination. The memory might be all of 16 years old but back then the car looked devastatingly fast – it certainly felt that fast and, for its day, it was rapid. So I was eager to fi nd out how the car would stack up today, especially in comparison with its more powerful and much more sought-after sibling, the 993 Turbo S. Porsche’s model range has advanced a lot since those days. With the recent introduction of the 991.2 Turbo, 911s with two turbochargers, replete with safe and secure all-weather ability availed by all-wheel drive are the norm, but their lineage can be traced back to none other than the 993 Turbo. Released in model year 1996 (although a few were produced earlier), it was the fi rst 911 Turbo to feature four-wheel traction. It was well received by the media and buyers, and even when the 996 Turbo arrived, some


40 993 Turbo v Turbo S

The 993 Turbo S interior is lavished with carbon trim, which is found around the steering wheel and along the dashboard (complete with ‘Turbo S’ script in front of the passenger). Door card inserts were also carbon fibre

The 993 Turbo’s interior is no less luxurious, even without the presence of carbon fibre. The 993 Turbo lacks the front spoiler of an S and sits 15mm higher, too. Brake cooling ducts in the front bumper are also deemed not necessary


41

Above main: Many body tweaks to Turbo S give it visual appeal over its sleek, simple Turbo brethren Above right: Corners are enjoyed more in the Turbo S thanks to its lower ride height and front strut brace

212,040

304,650

When opening the doors to both cars, the carpet inserts on the cars’ door cards definitely add to the level of luxury. However, if it is a high equipment level you desire, the S ticks a few more boxes. Carbon fibre is used for the inside door handles, door cards, fascia, around the instrumentation cluster and on the steering wheel. On this specific Turbo, the lightweight material (optional at the time) features only on the handbrake lever and gearknob. The seats are of the same design on both cars, although for some reason I feel like I sit lower in the S, which could be attributed to the difference in how the cars’ seats have worn over the years. Both cars’ steering wheels are slightly off-centre to the left (the case with most early right-hand drive 911s), and the pedals even more so, but you soon get used to their positions. Further changes to the S include instrument dials in aluminium with inner rings in chrome, standard coloured seat belts, carpet

300bhp per tonne TURBO S

272bhp per tonne TURBO

POWER TO PRICE NEW W E I G H T

TURBOX 5,937 TURBO S X345

VALUE TODAY

incorporated a revised design with a lower lip spoiler. The rear wheel arches featured those soft and rounded air intakes, the rear wing was also different with two small side air inlets, while the two exhaust pipes featured a quartet of outlets instead of two. The wheels, which covered yellow (instead of red) calipers were shinier, while most notably the car was lowered by 15mm, resulting in a visible hunkered down stance with the wheels filling the arches more than ever before. As could be expected, there was a power increase to complement the exterior modifications. The Turbo S’s engine was based on that of the Turbo, but was simply coded with an S or RS after the engine code (depending on if you had the 430bhp or 450bhp version). The most notable changes were upgraded turbochargers and the addition of an oil cooler. Porsche evidently succeeded in its aim to offer a special run-out model of its last air-cooled 911 Turbo…

DM

unofficial in-gear tests showed that the 993 Turbo still rained supreme in some aspects. After all, when the US publication Motor Trend tested the 993 Turbo, they achieved a scarcely believable 0-60mph time of 3.7 seconds and summed up the car as follows: “The bottom line of the new 911 Turbo states, unequivocally, that this is the greatest road-going Porsche ever created.” Lofty praise indeed. Based on the 3.6-litre engine from the Carrera, the new engine (M64/60) featured twin turbos for the first time. The 993 Turbo also introduced several new technologies to the 911 range. These included electronic boost control, an exhaust monitoring system, a hot-film mass air flow sensor and aluminium hollow-spoke wheels – the latter was a first for a production car and reduced the weight at each corner, by 23 per cent at the front and 20 per cent at the rear. Shortly before the 993 Turbo’s production ended in model year 1998, Porsche launched its Turbo S derivative – unlike today where both models are launched at the same time. Offering the same principle of a near-perfect combination of performance and luxury, the S featured a host of updates that partially justified a near 45 per cent higher price tag than that of the standard model. The exterior of the S featured a new front bumper that

TURBO

£90,000£150,000

993 993 TURBO TURBO S 120mm

105mm

TURBO S

£250,000£280,000

RIDE HEIGHT in mm


42 993 Turbo v Turbo S

“Motor Trend tested the 993 Turbo and achieved a scarcely believable 0-60mph time of 3.7 seconds”

behind the rear seats with neat “Turbo S” logos, roof liner in leather, a self-dimming rear view mirror and, if something is not covered in carbon fibre, it is likely covered in leather. Its current owner bought this Turbo from new in 1995 and it was one of the fi rst models to arrive in South Africa. Since then, he has covered an exciting 53,000 miles with the car. By contrast, he bought the Turbo S, which has 31,000 miles on the odometer, only two years ago, as he thought it would make a perfect addition to his collection – we are in full agreement on that score. None of these cars are trailer queens, as both cars have been driven extensively to the tune of return trips of over 500 miles apiece. With most of the photography done and the track surface quite wet, I was eager to see how the Turbo behaves. It was, after all, labelled Porsche’s fi rst all-weather production supercar, following the limited run of the 959. The engine catches the moment you turn the key and sounds only slightly subdued, compared with those of the Turbo’s naturally aspirated contemporaries. I pull away, short shift to

second gear and lean on the throttle pedal. The turbos take a brief moment to spool up, and then above 3,000rpm the needle immediately starts swinging zestfully towards 6,000rpm. Moments later, I shift into third, and the blowing noise mixed with that characteristic flat-six note fi lls the cabin once more. Red Star Raceway outside Johannesburg is a compact circuit. Even though the track measures 4km, its 13 corners are notoriously tight. As I approach the fi rst corner, the centre pedal feels fi rm, and the braking system confidently scrubs off speed. I take it easy through the wet corners, but I have slightly more trust in the car’s grip than I would have in a rear-wheel-drive 911. The gearshift action is relatively precise and you are never in doubt about which gear you’ve selected or into which slot you should guide the gearlever next. The steering is notably heavier than today’s cars, but not to such an extent that you couldn’t drive the Turbo every day. After all, the 911 was, and still is, designed to be used daily. A further testament to this is the fact that, compared with its predecessor, the car’s clutch


43

pedal travel was reduced by 15 per cent, while pedal effort decreased by 25 per cent thanks to a hydraulically-assisted clutch. I park the Turbo next to the S and, shortly after, climb in behind the latter’s partial carbon fibre steering wheel. It’s immediately apparent that the S has a slightly deeper exhaust note than the Turbo and, as I did with the latter, I plant my right foot in second gear. Suddenly there is a quicker and more forceful urge from the engine. It feels as if the throttle pedal is more sensitive than the Turbo’s, although that could simply be attributed to the additional power and torque delivered by virtue of the S’s mechanical improvements. The moment I turn the wheel the S ducks into the corner with more confidence than its sibling, which is a result of the car’s lowered chassis and the front strut brace. I immediately trust and enjoy every corner ever so slightly more than with the standard car, and marvel at the additional push from the engine in (what feels like) every part of the rev range. After I pull in next to the Turbo, the owner urges me to drive the S some more. However, common

sense prevails and I decide to call it a day on a successful track outing with two supercar heroes from the 1990s. What a privilege it was to have driven them back-to-back on a track. Fortunately, there is still some 40 miles of driving to be enjoyed on the highway that leads to Johannesburg. Because I drove the Turbo to the track, I opt to return home at the wheel of the S. As the sun begins to set and the traffic begins to clear, there is, luckily for me, ample space to stretch the S’s legs. I select to view the boost indicator in the information screen below the rev counter, and watch as each time I put my foot down how it climbs from 0 to 0.8 bar. Even by today’s standards it feels fast. I survey the wide body of the Turbo through the windscreen and when I cast my gaze slightly lower, I appreciate the smooth bonnet and front wings associated with any 993. The S’s firmer chassis setup feels fairly pliant on the highway (and the track, for that matter), but its stiffness is apparent in the car’s interior – the cabin of the ultimate 993 emits a few more trim creaks than that of the Turbo. After handing the S’s key back to its kind

owner, I reflect on the two cars’ qualities. After a few laps on the track and, having driven the respective cars either to, or from, the track, I realise there are clear differences between them. In terms of outright collectability, the S is undoubtedly the model to have. However, taking the current market prices of both models into consideration, the S is defi nitely not twice the car the Turbo is. Interestingly, the price difference in the 1990s was also quite significant, and so it remains to this day. The fact that this is a right-hand-drive version makes it even rarer, as only around 25 of these are said to have been built. We must also keep in mind that Porsche’s Exclusive department offered Turbo S engines with 450bhp, and many customers chose this specification for their standard 993 Turbos. However, Porsche successfully delivered an overall package that does justice to the S badge on the rear of the 993 Turbo. In terms of performance, design and driving experience, it pips the Turbo for the ultimate air-cooled 911 Turbo experience, but for half the money, the latter seems a veritable bargain.


44 993 Turbo v Turbo S 993 Turbo

1996

3,600cc 8.0:1

Model Year Engine

Capacity Compression ratio

993 Turbo S 1998

3,600cc 8.0:1

408bhp @ 5,750rpm

Maximum power

450bhp @ 5,750rpm

540Nm @ 4,500rpm

Maximum torque

585Nm @ 4,500rpm

Six-speed manual MacPherson struts; coil springs; anti-roll bar Multi-link with telescopic; coil springs; anti-roll bar 8x18-inches; 225/40 ZR18 10x18-inches; 285/30 ZR18 4,245mm

Transmission

Suspension

Six-speed manual

Front

MacPherson struts; coil springs; anti-roll bar

Rear

Multi-link with telescopic; coil springs; anti-roll bar

Wheels & tyres Front

8x18-inches; 225/40 ZR18

Rear

10x18-inches; 285/30 ZR18

Dimensions Length

4,245mm

1,795mm

Width

1,795mm

1,500kg

Weight

1,500kg

Performance 4.3 secs

0-62mph

4.1 secs

180mph

Top speed

186mph


46

Ultimate GUIDE THE

THE SECOND-GEN 997 RENNSPORT Given the desirability of the car you see here, it’s no real surprise that the second-generation 997 range would include a GT3 RS. It was no mild refresh though, as the new model would receive some substantial changes, not least of which was a 3.8-litre motor that sat on active engine mounts. With power and torque both increased – to 450hp and 430Nm respectively – the 0-62mph time was cut by 0.2 seconds to 4.0 seconds dead, and both response and mid-range shove were boosted. VarioCam Plus and a higher 8,500rpm redline also featured. Further revisions included gorgeous new centre-lock wheels and suspension that featured stiffer spring rates and tweaks to the anti-roll bars. Externally, the new model boasted various subtle changes, including redesigned air intakes, and there was a new aero package to improve downforce. 1,500 examples were produced before the 997 disappeared in 2012.


47

997.1 GT3 RS Just in case the standard GT3 wasn’t quite enough, Porsche added the fabled Rennsport tag to this special 911. When it comes to buying one, Total 911 is on hand to advise

Written by Chris Randall Photography by Phil Steinhardt

WATER-COOLED RS TIMELINE 2004

The 996 GT3 is the first water-cooled Neunelfer to get the RS treatment. The 3.6-litre engine produces 381bhp, enough to despatch the 0-62mph sprint in just 4.4 seconds. 682 produced

2006

Porsche follow up with the 997 GT3 RS, with essentially the same engine as the 996. Power is raised to 415bhp though, and a weight-saving regime saves 20kg. 1,106 produced

2009

It’s the turn of the Gen 2 997, this time the RS getting a larger 3.8-litre engine with 450bhp that cuts the 0-62mph time to just 4.0 seconds. Aero tweaks and dynamic engine mounts feature. 1,500 produced

2010

A sure-fire future classic arrives in the shape of the 997 GT3 RS 4.0. Boasting a stunning 500bhp, it’s the quickest RS yet. 600 produced

2010

It’s the 997 GT2 that gets the RS treatment. There’s 620bhp from the 3.6-litre engine, a 205mph top speed, and plenty of tasty carbon fibre bits. 500 produced

2015

Huge road presence marks out the RS in 991 GT3 form. Substantially lighter than Turbo variants, the 4.0-litre engine makes 500bhp. 42 sold in the UK last year


48

Ultimate GUIDE THE

Y

ou have to head back a little over a decade, to 2004 in fact, to find the first GT3 to benefit from the legendary RS suffix. Then, it was attached to the rump of the 996 with around 680 lucky buyers getting to experience the delights of a 381bhp flat six allied to a useful weight reduction. It would hardly come as a surprise, then, when Porsche announced that the 997 GT3 would also get the Rennsport treatment, although this time both models would arrive together in August 2006. 996 buyers had to wait five years or so for the same development. Even with an eye-watering £94,280 price tag, this new generation would prove immediately popular, so much so that 1,106

examples would leave the production line before the Gen2 version arrived three years later. Like the 996 incarnation, the first 997 GT3 RS was all about weight saving. The first-generation GT3 RS featured the wider rear bodyshell of the Carrera 4 and Porsche shaved a healthy 20kg off the weight of the Gen1 GT3. The diet was assisted by using carbon fibre for the adjustable rear wing and engine cover, and plastic instead of glass for the rear screen (saving almost 3kg) and, given the cost, it’s worth ensuring parts are undamaged on the example you’re looking at. At a gulp-inducing £5,900 for the rear wing, the need for care is obvious. The ten year anti-corrosion warranty means that rust shouldn’t be a concern, but it’s worth checking whether a previous owner has added

“It certainly looked the part, but it’s what was hidden beneath that composite engine cover that really captured the imagination” Model

997.1 GT3 RS

Year 2006-2007 Engine Capacity Compression ratio Maximum power Maximum torque Transmission

Suspension

3,600cc 12.0:1 415bhp @ 7,600rpm 405Nm @ 5,500rpm Six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive

Front MacPherson struts with coil springs and anti-roll bar Rear Multi-link with telescopic dampers; coil springs; antiroll bar

Wheels & tyres

Front 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear 12x19-inch; 305/30/R19

Dimensions

Length 4,460mm Width 1,808mm Weight 1,375kg

Performance

0-62mph 4.2 secs Top speed 194mph

paint protection film to the front end as the nose is susceptible to stone chips. If not, ask whether there has been any paint rectification work to the panels and bumper. Far more important, though, is whether an RS has seen action on the track and while soaring values make it a little less likely today, that wasn’t always the case. Aside from the fact that pounding over kerbs can prematurely age the bodyshell – listen out for unusual creaks – there’s the risk that trips through the gravel trap has resulted in damage to the underside panelling. A specialist will check for this, of course, but otherwise it’s worth a thorough examination of the undertrays and front splitter for grazing. And it goes without saying that you need to be sure of the car’s history, looking for any evidence of


49

PARTS PRICE CHECK

The 997.1 GT3 RS standard specification included 350mm steel discs clamped by six piston monoblock aluminium calipers at the front, and four piston items at the rear. Customary front bonnet vents and carbon rear wing aids downforce

• Front bumper

£4,458.70

• Rear wing blade (carbon)

£5,921.53

• Exhaust system (exc. Cats)

£5,712.16

• Front damper

£480.60

• Brake disc set (steel)

£1,179.24

• Front wheel

£1,835.57

Prices are inclusive of VAT and come courtesy of Paragon Porsche

997.1 RS VALUES As mentioned, prices for the RS have slowed recently, marking an end to a period of strong growth for the model. That’s not to say they aren’t going to rise in the future, of course (as they almost certainly will), but it’s likely to be slower this time around. Left-hand-drive examples are worth a little less than the values quoted here. • Project • Good • Concours

£140,000 £150,000+ £190,000


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Ultimate GUIDE THE

“An over-rev check is an important indicator of past use and especially vital on track-focused 911s” major accident repair. It’s also worth mentioning that the RS was available in some pretty extrovert colours, so you might want to consider whether you’d be happier with black or silver rather than the Orange or Viper green! That said, it seems buyers are happy to pay a small premium for their RS to stand out. It certainly looked the part, then, but it’s what was hidden beneath that composite engine cover that really captured the imagination. A revised version of the unit found in the 996 GT3, the 3.6-litre engine produced 415bhp at 7,600rpm and 405Nm of torque at 5,500rpm, and could safely rev to a stratospheric 8,400rpm. Featuring VarioCam variable inlet valve timing, titanium connecting

rods, and a revised dry sump lubrication system, it shoved the RS from 0-62mph in 4.2 seconds and on to 194mph. The good news for buyers is a depth of engineering that rendered it bulletproof in the eyes of most specialists, although it pays to undertake some careful checks before taking the plunge. Oil and filter changes were at 12,000 miles, and while particularly careful owners may well have shortened the interval, you certainly don’t want to find any gaps in the service history. And, while regular maintenance is slightly higher than for the GT3, it’s not by a great deal, so budget around £370 and £800 for a minor and major check respectively at a specialists such as RPM Technik.

More crucial, though, is an over-rev check, something that a reputable specialist will already have done. It’s an important indicator of past use – and especially vital on track-focused 911s – as you’ll want to know how often the motor has nudged that lofty redline. A cylinder leakage test will provide further reassurance that nothing serious is awry within the flat six. Otherwise, it’s just a case of examining the unit for any signs of oil leaks from the cam chain covers and between the engine and transmission, the latter indicating a weeping Rear Main Seal; expect to pay around £1,100 to have this rectified at a specialist such as Parr Motorsports. The RS used a single mass flywheel, so that’s one less thing to worry about, but expect to reach around 30,000 miles before the clutch requires replacement, an engine-out job that will cost in the region of £1,300. A noticeably high biting point is a sign that renewal isn’t far away, so haggle accordingly. The six-speed transmission is strong, though, benefitting from beefier internals and an


51

additional oil cooler, and it would take particularly ham-fisted track use to cause any issues. Likewise for the limited-slip differential, although an obstructive gearshift or any odd noises from either unit would need further investigation as replacement is extremely costly. You certainly shouldn’t have any problems hauling the RS down from speed, though, thanks to the impressively powerful brakes. The standard specification was 350mm steel discs clamped by six piston monoblock aluminium calipers at the front and four piston items at the rear, and they are more than adequate for road use. Any problems are likely to be a result of overheating, so examine the discs for any sign of cracks appearing around the crossdrilling. A replacement set costs around £1,200 but a previous owner may have gone down the aftermarket route for replacements, so check what’s fitted. The alternative option was the PCCB carbon items, identified by yellow calipers. While they might have saved a substantial amount

Lightweight carbon-shelled seats in flame retardant fabric came as standard and saved around 10kg compared to the GT3 items. Despite having a trackfocused interior, luxury Alcantara covered the surfaces and steering wheel


52

Ultimate GUIDE THE

BUYING TIPS With the earliest examples barely seven years old, it’s reasonable to expect that any car you find should be in good shape, both bodily and mechanically. There are no guarantees, of course, so tread carefully, but strong build quality ensures that this is one of the easier 911s to inspect. • History: A track-focused nature means that extra care is needed. Diligence is crucial to ensure you’re not looking at a tired or crashed trackday warrior. • Bodywork: Corrosion isn’t a concern, so spend time examining the panels for any sign of previous repair or replacement. Ensure there’s no damage to the RSspecific carbon fibre parts, and look for evidence of damage to the undertrays, which points to circuit-offs. • Engines: If it’s been religiously maintained, there’s little to worry about. Check for oil leaks and make sure you see the results of a recent over-rev check. • Transmission: The gearbox is tough and shouldn’t be suffering from weak synchromesh unless abused. More likely is clutch wear, so check the history to see if it’s already been done as it’s not a cheap job. • Brakes/suspension: Hard use will take its toll on the brakes, so be sure to check their condition carefully; extensive cracking around the cross-drillings indicate a hard life and imminent replacement. Adjustable suspension may have been fiddled with, so an alignment check is advisable. • Interiors: Aside from being sure you can live with the Clubsport arrangement, the interior wears well. Just look for scuffed trim and overly-smooth Alcantara.

SPECIALIST VIEW “Any 911 with an RS badge is highly sought after, and the same definitely applies to the 997.1 GT3 RS. They’ve got a strong following, which is to be expected given their ability and the fact that they are reliable, too. Prices have settled a bit of late, which given their meteoric rise in the past three years is no surprise. Ultimately, an RS like this one will still represent a really good purchase as a machine to get in and enjoy, as well as its investment potential.”

Greig Daly, RPM Technik

in unsprung weight – they were around 50 per cent lighter according to Porsche – replacing them costs in excess of £10,000. As we’ve said before in these guides, think long and hard about whether you really need them. Suspension-wise, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) was standard and the RS benefitted from a five-millimetre increase in wheelbase and the fitment of split rear wishbones to allow greater camber adjustability. Owners could also make changes to the ride height, toe angle, and anti-roll bar settings, but inexpert tinkering could have resulted in a less than optimum setup. Any doubts about how the car feels on the road, or evidence of uneven tyre wear, points to the need for a specialist alignment check; RPM Technik charges £264 for this, so it’s an inexpensive way of ensuring all is well. There are no issues with the hydraulically-assisted steering, but do check the condition of the 19inch wheels. Refurbishment isn’t too pricey, but replacing them is around £1,800 for a front one. Head inside and you’re left in no doubt about where this 911 was intended to spend time. The RS came with the Clubsport package as standard, which bought a roll cage in the rear, fire extinguisher prep, a six-point harness, and wiring for a battery master switch. Also standard were a pair of lightweight, carbon-shelled seats that

saved around 10kg compared to the GT3 items and they were covered in flame-retardant fabric. It’s a pretty hardcore arrangement for regular use, so you’ll want to be sure you can live with it before committing. Despite the track-focused specification, there was luxury on offer, too, with plenty of Alcantara covering the surfaces and steering wheel (which got a straight ahead marker at the top of the rim). Significant wear isn’t very common but it’s worth checking that a clumsy previous owner hasn’t scuffed the seat or door cards. Porsche didn’t skimp on the standard kit with the RS, and there was a lengthy options list to dip into, so make sure you establish the specification of the example you’re looking at, although everything should work. Also, ensure the air-conditioning is blowing cold as corrosion could attack the nose-mounted condensers, although the system could be deleted entirely which saved a further 20kg. Ultimately, the 997 generation is renowned for its usable, reliable nature and the GT3 RS does nothing to dispel that view. Yes, it was designed for the ultimate in thrills on road or track but the quality of its construction means there’s little to worry about if you’re considering buying one today. Find one that has been maintained regardless of cost and it’ll prove an immensely rewarding experience.


53

OWNING A 997.1 GT3 RS • Price new: £94,280 • Total numbers sold: 1,106 • Service intervals: One-year/12,000 miles • Service costs minor: £368.49 • Service costs major: £798.64 (Figures are courtesy of RPM Technik)

Thanks The 997.1 GT3 RS seen in our pictures is currently for sale at RPM Technik. For more information call (+44) 1296 663824 or visit www.rpmtechnik.co.uk.


54 M96 & M97: five failures and fixes

M96 & M97: FIVE FAILURES AND FIXES Porsche’s necessary leap from air to water-cooling was seemingly dogged by critical engineering flaws. With the help of leading industry figures, Total 911 looks at five shortcomings of the M96 and M97 flat six, with accompanying solutions to ensure prolonged, joyous driving of your 911 Written by Kieron Fennely Photography by Phil Steinhardt


55

1. Rear main seal The RMS is situated between the crankcase and the clutch housing. On most mass production engines, where crankshaft and crankcase are cast and machined together, the RMS rarely causes problems. However, as its new water-cooled engine was very high power by 1997 standards (300bhp from 3.4-litres), Porsche employed a much higher-tech approach by basing the crankshaft in special alloy inserts to give the crankcase greater rigidity. This entailed machining the case and the crank individually, rather than together,

which meant that alignment of the bolt threads was not always micron-perfect. Distortion of the rubber seal over time could then cause an oil leak. Both RPM Technik’s Darren Anderson and Hartech’s Barry Hart emphasise this is not serious and provided the leak does not worsen, it can often be left until the clutch is due for replacement. RMS failure became less common on later M96/97 engines as Porsche moved to a new seal made from a compound of rubber and plastic, whose inherent elasticity made it self realigning.

This solves the problem, says Hart, who has rebuilt “about 2,000” engines from the M96 family, but he is not necessarily critical of this aspect of its bottom end construction: “Mounting the crankshaft on a base is admirable in a performance engine – the Japanese pioneered it on their racing bikes, and it’s the sort of advanced engineering we expect with Porsche – but manufacture requires perfect alignment, which not all engines had. Unfortunately, an RMS weep, though not important in itself, could mask a failing IMS.”

2. Cylinder lining cracks A crack in the cylinder lining means that compression is escaping from the cylinder into the water jacket. The engine will show signs of being down on power

and coolant will be forced out with subsequent overheating. Unlike the air-cooled head, which was built with individual cylinders, the new water-cooled unit was cast and if one cylinder bore failed, Porsche deemed it unrepairable, again presenting owners with cars outside of the warranty and with potentially having to buy a new engine. The cause has been attributed to inadequacies in the cooling system, but Hartech’s Barry Hart explains that the reason is actually more complex: “When Porsche designed the 986, it established overall dimensions of the engine space with the 2.5-litre flat six, so for the engine to grow in capacity, it could increase only its internal dimensions, so a bigger bore was the only straightforward route. “There was enough material to go to the 93mm bore, as used on the 3.2-litre Boxster S, but the 96mm bore of the 996 3.4 meant that there was not enough metal

for the top of the cylinder liner to retain its integrity and survive the degree of flexing given the additional power of the 3.4-litre engine; for the 3.6-litre air-cooled engine, Porsche had used alusil rather than aluminium, a very strong alloy and a lot harder to machine, which tolerated engine flexing. The switch to aluminium, probably taken for economic reasons, did not cause difficulties until Porsche took the bore out to 96mm.” The solution is precision machining of the head to fit an alloy ring at the top of the liner. Imagine the ring round a traditional wooden keg: this gives the strength of the more usual closed-deck head design – one supported by metal on all sides. If bore wear is present, Hartech will re-sleeve it, using a precision-made liner incorporating the strengthening ring at the top. This is the solution used by Porsche for the subsequent 9A1 engines – a vindication, Hart thinks, of Hartech’s repair method.


56 M96 & M97: five failures and fixes

3. Intermediate shaft (IMS) In Porsche’s M96 and M97 engines, the intermediate shaft is situated below the crankshaft and operates the flat six’s camshafts via chains. The IMS also operates the oil pump. With the air-cooled engines and water-cooled engines using the 964-993 crankcase (GT3 and Turbo only for water-cooled), the IMS is relatively short and supported at each end by a split plain bearing (like a crankshaft bearing), which is fed by pressurised oil, a proven and reliable design. However, with the M96 series, Porsche modified the IMS significantly so that it now ran the length of the engine, driving a camshaft at each of its ends and was supported at its more heavily loaded clutch end by a sealed bearing. The failure of this bearing, which occurs when its internal lubrication dries out and the ball race disintegrates, is the root of the IMS problem: it can occur with no warning and once play has developed in the shaft, the cam timing goes awry, bringing valves into contact with pistons, usually resulting in terminal damage. In some cases, identifiable swarf picked up

by the oil filter will be an indication that the bearing is breaking up, but owners are lucky if they get this warning because at this stage total failure is imminent. The problem is well known (indeed, it remains a source of anger for owners who had to pay out for an entirely new engine as the failure often occurred outside Porsche’s two year warranty). Today, a significant aftermarket exists in replacement bearings for the IMS and perhaps the best known exponent is LN Engineering of Momence, Illinois. Proprietor Charles Navarro says that the firm has sold almost 25,000 of its replacement bearings since 2008. Porsche, he says, never completely resolved the problem: “Its third revision of the bearing appeared in 2006 and, statistically, this fails less often than the two earlier versions, but it does fail so the 997.1 is also implicated, though less than the 996.” LN Engineering’s replacement IMS is imported to the UK and fitted by RPM Technik, a specialist well known to readers of Total 911. The process to fit a new IMS at RPM Technik can be broken down as follows:

01

02

The first step is a diagnostic check for camshaft variance. If the reading is within tolerance (less than 7 degrees), the engine is put at TDC to prevent it turning and the cams are locked. Engine oil is then drained and the gearbox and clutch housing are separated from the engine. The oil, sump pan and filter are inspected for debris.

Providing the oil, sump pan and filter are free of detritus, the IMS chain tensioner together with the hub flange is removed. This flange must not be forced and if the centre hub support is broken, LN Engineering’s special tool is used to extract it (LN says its IMS must be fitted by an authorised dealer so not to void its 30-day warranty).

IMS install: the details IMS bearing fitted to Total 911 demo car: IMS Solution for single row (MY ‘00-’05) Cost of part from LN Engineering: $1,795 (LN Engineering also offer a Retrofit ceramic bearing for £450 +VAT) Fitting time: 9 hours Fitting cost: £585 +VAT

03

Once the bearing is off, the entire shaft can be drawn out. The bearing could be either a single ball race or the double race introduced in 2004. Before fitting the new bearing, the original should be checked for signs of movement on the outer race. If this is the case, its housing should be checked for ovality.


57

04

Loctite ensures the new item fits without moving in the housing (causing wear) and the new bearing has to go in straight – if off-centred it will not be reusable. Again, LN Engineering recommends using its specially developed tool. The new hub flange is fitted again, ensuring there are no imperfections that might cause it to leak, or that its seals have been damaged.

05

The hub flange’s 12-point nut is torqued to the factory reading, and an application of Loctite should prevent any new leaks occurring. New bolts are used during reassembly and the cam tensioners are given new seals. LN Engineering’s spin-on oil filter adapter is then fitted and the filtered, pressurised oil feed connected to the flange assembly.

06

For good measure, new cam plugs are fitted in the cylinder head valve covers and a new RMS fitted. Engine timing should be verified after installation and if cam timing has slipped, the cams are re-timed according to factory workshop instructions. The engine is refilled with new oil and put back together: obviously, reusing oil or using the wrong grade will void LN Engineering’s warranty.

CSR lightweight flywheel by RPM Technik While many opt to upgrade their IMS bearing at the same time as having a clutch replaced (or vice versa), having the gearbox removed from the car can also offer an ideal opportunity for a performance upgrade for your M96 or M97, such as a lightweight flywheel. The lightweight flywheel being installed in our pictures comes from RPM Technik’s revered CSR range. Darren Anderson, RPM Technik’s

commercial director, explains the advantages: “The lightweight flywheel imposes much less inertia on the engine so that it responds more quickly to throttle openings. There isn’t a measurable horsepower gain as such but the engine does not have to work as hard to turn the lighter-weight flywheel, meaning more power is available at the wheels. You particularly notice this on heel and toe shifts. A drawback to this modification is ‘chatter’ through the gearlever and we minimise this by fitting a sprung hub friction plate, which acts to dampen any vibration.” The lighter, UK-made flywheel from RPM Technik’s CSR range is half the weight of the standard steel item. Machined from special chrome molybdenum and then subject to very careful balancing, such precise engineering obviously does not come cheap, so the cost of £690 (plus around £50 for new flywheel bolts, o-rings and seals) is hardly a surprise. Changing

a flywheel is a seven-hour job on its own so combining with a clutch and/or IMS bearing at the same time obviously incurs more parts costs (around £1,650), but little additional labour. RPM has a special rate of £65 (+VAT) per hour for this.


58 M96 & M97: five failures and fixes

4. Cylinder bore scoring Bore scoring, effectively visible wear of the cylinder liners, is manifested by smoke on start up, a sooty left side exhaust and visibly increased oil consumption. It affects the 3.6-litre and 3.8-litre M96/97 engines as well as the post-2000 996’s 3.4-litre. For environmental reasons, from 2001 Porsche had to give up using ferrous coated pistons and instead switched to a plasticised coat. Hartech’s Barry Hart thinks that this replacement, specifically developed for Porsche, could not sustain mileages of 40,000-50,000 without wearing: the plasticised coating was neither as

strong nor as reliable as the ferrous compound item because it softened at very high temperatures. Moreover, the M96/97 used Lokasil rather than the Nikasil alloy cylinders, which Porsche had used on the 993 and 968. Lokasil particles would detach themselves from the cylinder walls and were of sufficient size to disturb the pistons’ surface. As the plastic coating broke down, scoring of the cylinder bores would occur. Ferrous-coated pistons resisted this wear, which is why the first 996s and early Boxsters were unaffected. Hartech tried various alternative

piston coatings to avoid the expense for customers of having to re-machine cylinder bores, before concluding that the solution was to revert to Nikasil pistons, which incidentally Porsche had continued to use for the 996 GT3 and Turbo (models that did not suffer from bore scoring). These cars coincidentally also used essentially the bottom end of the 964-993 engine. Hart believes the decision to use Lokasil on the M96/97 was cost driven and it is significant that the pistons of the 9A1 (997.2) engine have a different coating, which appears, again, to use a ferrous element.

5. Crank shell scoring As you push the pedal of a bicycle, your leg is exerting its maximum force from about 25 degrees from TDC (top dead centre) to 110 Degrees. So it is with a piston in a combustion engine. This means that part of the crank shell roughly corresponding with these angles is subject to higher force than the rest of the bearing run. On the M96/97 series, the same bearing journal is used so the far more powerful 3.6 and 3.8-litre engines will exhibit more crank shell wear than a 204hp 2.5-litre Boxster. Another feature of the M96/97 is that unlike most engines where the camshaft drive is off the front

of the engine, the M96/97 runs camshaft chains off both ends. This means the normal large bearing at the clutch end of the crankshaft has to be placed slightly further back (to allow room for the cam pulley) with the effect that a critical length of the crankshaft is less supported and so prone to flexing and premature wear. Hartech’s Barry Hart explains: “Crank shell wear affects oil supply to the big end bearings and if a shell becomes sufficiently oval, a connecting rod can even seize.” Hartech’s solution is a routine service intervention at 40,000-50,000 miles to replace the crank shells,

which might have lasted many more miles, to prevent the catastrophic failure of the crankshaft: this cannot be machined and a replacement is £2,500, plus labour. Hart also observes that the coolant route begins at the cylinder head on the M96/97 meaning that the crank receives already hot coolant. Combined with Porsche’s predilection for low viscosity oils, he believes the bottom end runs too hot and the already thin oil provides insufficient lubrication. Therefore Hartech also improves the cooling system so that the block, too, is supplied with coolant direct from the radiator; a lower temperature thermostat also ensures the engine runs cooler, and above all it specifies a thicker grade of oil, less likely to be squeezed out. “Continued use of thin oils will wear crank shells,” asserts Hart.


60 3.2 Carrera: what next?

Thanks Thanks to Paul Stephens for their collaboration in our feature. Paul Stephens have a wide variety of Porsche 911s currently for sale. For more information on their stocklist and services visit www.paul-stephens.com or call (+44) 1440 714 884.


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3.2 CARRERA WHAT NEX T?

For many, it ’s for the 3.2 C the last ‘pure’ 911, but w a h through the rrera? Total 911 finds o at does the future hold ut with a spi countryside rited drive … Written by L ee Sibley P hotography b y Steve Ha ll


62 3.2 Carrera: what next?

I

t’s the archetypal classic Porsche, isn’t it? Think ‘911’ and, for many, an image will duly be conjured in one’s mind of a striking pre-impact bumper 3.2 Carrera – in Guards red, of course – resplendent in Fuchs wheels (with black painted centres) and that stupendous whaletail rear wing. The 3.2 Carrera’s flowing silhouette is a timeless classic of automotive design and, for many, the very staple of a ‘proper’ Porsche. However, that aforementioned image of the quintessential people’s 911 may never have come into being, had it not been for the exceptional foresight and steely determination of a certain Peter Schutz. With no plans in place to continue production of the 911 beyond 1981, the story of Porsche’s then-new CEO duly walking into the Zuffenhausen offices in January of that year and signalling his intent to reverse that decision (and quickly) by taking a pencil to the wall-mounted timeline of the 911 and extending it past 1982, off

the chart and even around the corner, is the stuff of legend. His wishes soon became reality: after continuing the SC’s production into 1982 and 1983 (creating the first-ever 911 Cabriolet in the process), a new 911 era was formally anointed in 1984. This car, keeping the 95mm bore of its SC predecessor, adopted the Turbo’s increased stroke of 74.4mm, giving an increased engine capacity of 3,164cc. The 3.2 was suitably born, also adopting the ‘Carrera’ name for the second time in the 911’s history. Fittingly, this name has never left the decklid of a Porsche 911 since. More than 70,000 examples of the 3.2 Carrera left Zuffenhausen in the space of six short years, an improvement of some 16 per cent compared to SC production over an identical time frame. Available in the form of narrow-body Coupe, Cabriolet, Targa or widebody, the numbers tell us the 3.2 Carrera is the most popular 911 ever – and for good reason. The fact remains that the 3.2 Carrera is the last truly ‘pure’ 911. While it was the last era to retain that original 911 silhouette, the 3.2 Carrera’s classic appeal is boosted further by its lack of any real driver aids: there’s no ABS and no power-assisted steering, and there were no options available to have four-wheel-drive either. With a 3.2 Carrera it truly is just you, the car and the wide-open road. It is perhaps no surprise therefore that the humble 3.2 Carrera found itself on a crest of a wave as prestige Porsche prices ballooned significantly in 2014. Before then, buyers with relatively elementary money to spend had either a 3.2 or 996 Carrera to

choose from if they wished to enter the realms of the 911 ownership legend (as testified by our headto-head test in issue 98). Post 2014, the air-cooled 3.2 has left the water-cooled 996 and even Gen1 997 long behind, with values now starting at around £30,000 for a ‘well used’ example. However, the 3.2 Carrera now finds itself at something of a crossroads. While values of the older, pre-impact bumper cars have truly rocketed (you’ll need to part with far north of £150,000 for an E or S model in palatable condition), the 3.2 finds itself keeping company in the marketplace with the likes of the 964 and 993 Carrera, cars with more favourable build numbers (for the collector), more power and more modern comforts, while still boasting a flat six cooled by air. The question, then, is where to next for Porsche’s last true 911 icon? “The good cars will continue to carry on in terms of values,” says Paul Stephens, owner of the eponymous independent specialists based in Halstead, Essex. “The best of the breed are still commanding strong money. However, as with the SC and 964, there are some poor examples out there. I think there’s a correction coming in the market to weed out the bad cars. Sure, even a bad 3.2 will still get you ‘on the ladder’, but you should expect it to have corrosion issues.” Find a good one, as we’ve found here for our test through the Essex countryside, and the rewards are sure to be highly satisfying. Settling quickly to idle from start up, the flat six emits that beautiful, mechanical rumble identifiable with 911s right


63

Model 3.2 Carrera Year 1984-1989 Engine Capacity 3,164cc Compression ratio 10.3:1 Maximum power 231bhp @ 5,900rpm Clockwise from top right: 930/20 engine is widely considered bulletproof; interior represents quiet evolution over earlier SC; 3.2 Carrera was the last 911 before impact bumpers were worked into the car’s silhouette; whaletail on decklid was a popular option

Maximum torque 284Nm @ 4,800rpm Transmission Six-speed manual

Suspension Front Twin longitudinal torsion bar springs; dampers; anti-roll bar Rear Semi-trailing arms with torsion bar springs; dampers; anti-roll bar

Wheels & tyres

Front 7x15-inch; 195/65/VR15 Rear 8x15-inch; 215/60/VR15

Dimensions Length 4,291mm Width 1,652mm Weight 1,210kg

Performance 0-62mph 5.6 secs Top speed 152mph

“With a 3.2 Carrera it truly is just you, the car and the wide-open road”


64 3.2 Carrera: what next?

3.2 Carrera: did you know? - The underbody was galvanised, with a rust warranty of six years - Vents in the 3.2 Carrera’s dashboard were larger than SC equivalents - The seat is positioned 20mm lower than the SC to allow taller drivers more headroom - Chrome trim was ditched by designer Tony Lapine in favour of a matte black finish - Fog lamps were incorporated into the front bumper as standard equipment - The Cabriolet variant gained an electrically powered hood in 1985 - The Carrera Clubsport arrived in 1987, followed by the Speedster and factory SSE (Turbo-look) in 1988

back to 1963. On the move, progress is surprisingly swift, the rpm needle climbing around the tacho with haste through each gear change – even if the Type 930/20 engine with Bosch LE-Jetronic fuel injection lacks that final thrust at peak revolutions that the 911 is famous for. Speaking of gearboxes, the 3.2 Carrera’s weapon of choice was a Porsche 915 unit for pre-1987 cars, thereafter adopting the coveted Getrag G50. Both gearboxes were five-speed, easily identifiable by the location of reverse: ‘far right and down’ on the shifter for 915 models and ‘far left and up’ on

the later G50. The G50, as fitted to our Velvet red metallic test car, is the preferred gearbox, mainly for its palatability at changing gears when cold, thereafter possessing an impressively neat snick through the gate both up and down for each new ratio. Though the 915 can be equally rewarding, this largely depends on its condition. Get a pristine or recently reconditioned example and joyous, long throws are met with a smooth cog swap, but a tired gearbox will dog the driver with vague shifts a result of play in the shift rod. Steering is most impressive in the 3.2 Carrera, its unassisted wheel gently twitching through the driver’s fingertips as the car’s front axle tracks over the asphalt. Information from the road surface is completely unfiltered, a sensation not felt so keenly on a 911 Carrera since. Stopping is a confidenceinspiring exercise, those two-piston alloy calipers clamping to those ventilated discs and scrubbing speed in a progressive manner with a firm prod of the middle pedal. Sure, damping is soft by modern-day standards and there’s a fair bit of body roll as the 3.2 Carrera is pointed through each corner, but it’s not so much

as to thwart a spirited Sunday drive through the countryside – if anything, it only adds to its charm. As a driver it’s a great, classic 911, but owning a Porsche of this vintage is very different to merely driving one for a day. So, what of the ownership experience? “If you buy a good one they can be an amazing car,” says Jamie Tyler, respected salesman of more than 20 years at Paragon Porsche. “There are a number of things to look out for though, the main one being corrosion. There are a few key areas that they go: check kidney bowls, front wings, and around the headlights and scuttle. They also had no under wheel arch protection like the 964 so there are certain areas where muck sits, leading to corrosion in the long term. 3.2 Carreras can also suffer from corrosion on the bumper: they are aluminium so to treat it properly, it will ideally need to be shot-blasted prior to being painted.” Those sentiments can seem daunting to a novice but there’s no denying that paying close attention to bodywork will pay dividends in the long term. However, there seems to be better news regarding the longevity of the car’s mechanicals, as Tyler explains: “Mechanically, they are somewhat simple


65

Sport vs non-Sport Buyers of the 3.2 Carrera could choose between Sport or non-Sport options. Plenty went for the former, but how can you tell between the two? Sport: Sport models boasted firmer dampers, a deeper front splitter and that iconic whaletail rear wing as well as 16-inch Fuchs alloys (6-inches at the front and 7-inches at the rear, though 1989 cars were upgraded to 8 at the back). “You’ll never see a Sport model without that front splitter,” Paul Stephens tells us. “If a car has the Sport front splitter and 16-inch Fuchs then it’s had its whaletail removed at some point, so be sure to check.”

in comparison to modern cars so they’re pretty reliable. There are a few key things to look out for: oil leaks are common, generally on rocker covers, and heat exchangers are of the age that if they haven’t been done they may require replacing. Checking the exhaust system in general is advisable as replacement of the complete system can be costly, though generally a lot that have already been done have been replaced with stainless systems.” The 911 of the 1980s enjoys a reputation as being incredibly durable though, with a bottom end that’s said to be virtually indestructible. “Top end rebuilds tend to be more prolific on later cars,” confirms Paul Stephens, “though the biggest factor to condition is how they’ve been used. There are some high mileage examples out there that will go on forever, however short, sharp journeys will do the car no good.” Cars in need of a rebuild are relatively easy to spot, with Stephens assuring us that any example will momentarily smoke on start-up if it’s not been used in a while. If the smoke continues, then the engine will need attention: “Get a specialist to do a leak down test to determine the condition of the top end of the engine. It may

cost £250 but for peace of mind it’s priceless,” says Stephens. The simple mechanical design of the 3.2 Carrera makes servicing a straightforward affair, though a number of specialists advise changing the plugs every 12,000 miles, which is a little more regularly than more modern 911 equivalents. However – and crucially for the discerning prospective owner – the 3.2 Carrera is comfortably cheaper to maintain than its 964 and 993 brethren occupying similar territory in the used market. Paul Stephens, again, sums this up neatly: “Simply put, the 964 and 993 utilised more technology, so there’s more that can go wrong.” So it seems we need not be worried when it comes to the plight of the 3.2 Carrera moving forward. Its older siblings may have accelerated away in terms of values but there’s much that’s captivating about the 3.2 Carrera, offering its owner archetypal 911 styling, a thrilling drive and, if well chosen, relatively pain-free maintenance. Prices may have inflated from the entry-level fees of just 24 months ago but against that backdrop, even £50,000 for a splendid example makes the 3.2 Carrera still look like a bargain.

Non-Sport: Non-Sport models came with a ‘flat back’ decklid design, ‘Teledial’ styled alloy wheels and standard dampers. However, the upgrades list was expansive and many opted for Fuchs alloy wheels and the four-spoke Sport steering wheel, for example.


66 Jägermeister 934

ORANGE

CRUSH

Total 911 gets up close and personal with an iconically liveried 934 that has raced at Le Mans, Nürburgring, Daytona and Sebring Written by Josh Barnett Photography by Phil Steinhardt

D

uring the 1974 and 1975 seasons, Porsche’s 3.0-litre 911 Carrera RSR reigned supreme in international GT competitions, helping Weissach to titles on both sides of the Atlantic. During each year of its tenure as the top racing 911, the 3.0 RSR secured both World Championship and European GT honours, while Stateside a similar feat was achieved in the Trans-Am and IMSA GT series. The naturally aspirated car was, therefore, no slouch in the hands of both seasoned professionals and the numerous privateers who campaigned them around the world. However, for the 1976 season, Porsche had a new ace up its sleeve: the 934. In January, Weissach’s valued customers were invited to the Nürburgring to watch Porsche’s latest GT contender in action. At the helm of the prototype was test driver, Manfred Schurti, a man no stranger to success behind the wheel of 911s having won the GT class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans just six months prior. When Schurti stopped the stopwatch, the order books opened with most of the established teams switching to the new car. Why? The Liechtensteiner had lapped the Nürburgring 15 seconds faster than the outgoing 3.0 RSR.

The CSI’s decision to delay the introduction of the revised Group 4, 5 and 6 regulations, originally planned for 1975, until the start of the following season had allowed Porsche to use the newly introduced 930 road car as the basis for its latest GT racer, with the 911 Turbo’s production figures more than satisfying the Group 4 rule book’s stipulation that at least 400 examples needed to have been built in a two-year period. The 934 (so named because it was a Porsche 930 built to Group 4 specification) was more closely related to the road car than its silhouettestyle brother, the 935. Led by Wolfgang Berger – the man who oversaw the 2.7 RS project – development of the 934 began in earnest in May 1975 and they soon found the restrictive rule book a problem. The larger-than-standard KKK turbocharger in the 934’s 930/71 flat-six engine generated a lot of heat, especially when run at the maximum boost pressure of 1.4 bar. At these speeds, the red-hot turbo would heat the inducted air to around 150 degrees Celsius (300 degrees Fahrenheit), reducing the charge’s power and increasing the likelihood of the fuel pre-detonating. What was needed was an intercooler but, unlike the Group 5 rules,


67


68 Jägermeister 934

Model 934 Year 1976 Engine Capacity 2,994cc Compression ratio 6.5:1 Maximum power 530bhp @ 7,000rpm (with 1.35 bar boost) Maximum torque 588Nm @ 5,400rpm Transmission 915 four-speed syncromesh manual

Suspension

Front Independent; MacPherson strut; wishbones; coilover Bilstein dampers; longitudinal torsion bars; anti-roll bar Rear Independent; semi-trailing arm; coilover Bilstein dampers; transverse torsion bars; antiroll bar

Wheels & tyres

Front 10.5x16-inch BBS three-piece wheels Rear 12.5x16-inch BBS three-piece wheels

Brakes

Front Drilled and ventilated 917 discs, finned four-piston calipers Rear Drilled and ventilated 917 discs, finned four-piston calipers

Dimensions

Length 4,235mm Width 1,775mm Weight 1,120kg

Performance

0-62mph Unknown Top speed Unknown

the limitations on aerodynamic development in Group 4 required Porsche to use the standard decklid from the road car. While the whaletail wing may have looked cool (and provided more downforce than the old ducktail design), it didn’t leave enough space for the large air-to-air intercooler used on the Carrera RSR Turbo 2.1 in 1974. Weissach’s engineers went back to the drawing board to see what could be done and soon found a way of mounting two Behr air-to-water intercoolers (one for each bank of cylinders). Unlike the 935 – which was soon fitted with those sloping flatnose fenders – the

934 had to use the idiosyncratic upright front wings, yet under the centre line of the front wheels there was more freedom, allowing an aggressive air dam chin splitter to be fitted (although the impact bumpers, complete with concertinas, had to be retained). The intercoolers improved the charge density drastically, reducing the intake temperature to 50 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit). The design also improved front downforce and helped to feed fresh, cooling air to the brakes, as well as accommodating an oil cooler. Inside the 2,994cc flat six, the rule book again dictated much of the specification. The crankcase, crankshaft, con-rods and cylinder heads were identical to the 930/50 engine used in the 911 Turbo, the car used to homologate the 934. Although new pistons were fitted, the compression ratio remained at 6.5:1, but Hans Mezger and Valentin Schäffer were able to fit larger intake and exhaust valves (seated above 41mm ports). The talented engineers were also allowed to fit more aggressive camshafts and a revised Bosch K-Jetronic electronic injection system. Compared to the 260hp road car, the changes were good for a mighty 485hp in the

930/71’s initial configuration. A reworked camshaft soon saw that figure jump beyond the 500-mark though, with 530bhp on tap at 1.35 bar of boost, fed through a reinforced version of the 930’s four-speed 915 gearbox (complete with three different sets of ratios). The actual output was adjustable via a knurled metal knob mounted in the cockpit where the radio unit would normally sit, allowing each driver to tailor the levels of insanity to the track conditions. Slowing the 934 from 170mph-plus were a full set of 917-style brakes, comprising drilled and internally vented discs and four-piston, finned calipers. At each corner, these were housed behind centre locking, 16-inch BBS split-rim wheels (10.5-inches wide at the front, 12.5-inches wide at the rear) suspended with adjustable Bilstein coilover dampers front and rear, complete with stiffer bushings. The MacPherson struts at the front were stabilised with an aluminium cross brace, while front and rear antiroll bars helped to control the car’s side-to-side weight transfer. The bodyshell itself had to be taken from the 930 production line and, with the rule books determining minimum weights based on engine


69

capacity, the 934 fell into the over 4.0-litre category once the turbocharging coefficient of 1.4 was taken into consideration. This meant a fairly conservative weight limit of 1,120kg was achieved, which was just 75kg less than a 1976 model year Turbo. Lightening the car to the levels of the previous RSR would have been an unnecessary hassle for Berger’s team (although Norbet Singer still wanted to prepare the cars to a level suitable of a Porsche race car, so the sound-deadening, rear seats and much of the interior trim was removed). An aluminium roll cage was bolted in – along with the rest of the required safety equipment – widened, glass fibre arches were riveted on and a huge, 144-litre fuel tank occupied much of the space under the bonnet. But, despite these additions, the racer hit the scales at 40kg under the weight limit. This allowed Berger to position ballast in the nose of the 934 (which was not a new trick on 911s), helping the weight distribution of the rear-engined car. It also meant that, inside, the standard door trims and even the electric windows (still completely operational) were retained, unheard of in almost any racing GT car.

In the metal, the 934 is truly captivating (maybe more so than a 935 because its 911 DNA is even more evident). Seeing one chasing you down in your mirrors must have been an intimidating experience, with the beautifully blistered arches, deep chin splitter and nosedown stance lending the Group 4 contender real menace. It’s outrageous but it just looks right. And it looks even better in the legendary, bright orange Jägermeister livery as sported here by chassis no. 0158 (‘930 670 0158’ to give it its full 934 name), one of just three Porsche 934’s to race in the iconic auburn hue in period. Sportingly (as it had done with the 3.0-litre RSRs), Porsche chose not to run a works team in the Group 4 category, instead focusing on Groups 5 and 6 with the Martini-striped 935s and 936s respectively. This meant that independent outfits were free to campaign the 934s without fear of being beaten by the better-funded Weissach factory. It also meant that Porsche’s ‘entry level’ turbo racer would wear a number of unique liveries during its life. None captured the imagination quite like the simple, striking Jägermeister cars, stag head proudly adorning the bonnet and doors.

For the 934’s debut season, two Jägermeistersponsored cars ran – chassis nos. 0167 and no. 0168 – under the Max Moritz Porsche banner, a Porsche dealer just south of Stuttgart. Driven by Reinhart Stenzel and Helmet Kelleners, the two cars achieved modest success in the Deutsche Rennsport Meisterschaft (Germany’s premier national racing championship). With a handful of podiums between them, the Max Moritz duo finished the 1976 DRM season in seventh and eighth (Kelleners leading Stenzel in the standings). Both cars would forego backing from the drinks maker in 1977, before no. 0168 returned to the colours in 1978 for a handful of DRM and World Sportscar outings. Meanwhile, chassis no. 0158 was delivered to the Cologne-based Kremer brothers, Erwin and Manfred (who had run Clemen Schickentanz to Porsche Cup success in 1973) ahead of the 1976 season. The 934’s purchase was bankrolled by wealthy amateur, Gerhard Holup, who chose to predominantly campaign the car in the Deutsche Rundstreckenpokal (the German Race Trophy, a second tier national series) and the DRM, with it painted predominantly in white. Holup’s agreement with Kremer enabled the team


70 Jägermeister 934

to use the car in a number of high profile events with other drivers, though. The first such event for chassis no. 0158 happened to be the 1976 24 Hours of Le Mans, where Kremer’s entry, running race number 65, was bedecked with large red ‘Elf’ decals, one of France’s largest oil companies and the main source of funding for a number of upand-coming French drivers, including Didier Pironi (who would go on to be a Grand Prix winner for Ferrari in the early 1980s). Pironi was teamed with countryman, Bob Wollek (a Porsche stalwart) and Marie-Claude Beaumont, a member of Elf’s roster of female racers. Having qualified 20th overall, the French trio had a solid if unspectacular run to fourth in class. Pironi had obviously shown something though; for the next season it was racing Renault-Alpine’s Group 6 prototype with which he would win Le Mans outright in 1978, beating

the factory Porsche 936s. Wollek would race the car again at the ADAC Norisring Trophy (where transmission failure would keep him from finishing) before teaming up with factory aces Reinhold Joest and Jürgen Barth to win the GT class at the Six Hours of Dijon, the final round of the 1976 World Championship for Makes. 1977, once again, saw the car bereft of Jägermeister sponsorship as Dieter Schornstein purchased 0158 and partially updated it to 934.5 specification, including a large, 935-style rear wing. The highlight of Schornstein’s year was a fifth place finish at the Nürburgring 1,000km in the blue-and-white Sekurit-sponsored car. However, when Holup bought the chassis back for the 1978 season, the future for this 934 was very much orange. After starting the season in the hands of Max Moritz, Holup and codriver Edgar Dören (who was using 0158 in the DRM) returned to Kremer

Horizontal fans – the how and why You will have noticed that on any air-cooled Porsche 911 road car, at the back of the engine bay is a vertically mounted fan. Driven off the crankshaft via a belt, the sole function of this fan is to draw air into the back of the car and cool the engine. However, look under the decklid of a 934 or 935 and you will notice that the cooling fan is mounted horizontally, directly above the flat-six engine. Porsche’s horizontal fan design was first seen in the 2.2-litre, flat-eight version of the 907 sports prototype, before becoming famous atop the flat-12 motor of the Le Mans conquering 917. Like any air-cooled 911, the fan in the 934 still takes its initial drive from the crankshaft via a belt and pulley setup but Porsche had to transfer this drive up to a gearbox using a shaft-driven set of bevel gears to turn the motion through 90 degrees. The hideously complex system robs the 930/71 engine of around 15-30bhp. So why did Porsche use it? Compared to the vertical fans in the road cars, the horizontal design provided more equal cooling

of the cylinders (with reports showing that cylinder temperatures varied by less than six degrees Celsius/ 43 degrees Fahrenheit). By controlling temperatures more efficiently, Porsche could run higher levels of boost without the risk of pre-detonating the fuel, improving reliability and increasing the power output.

Porsche in time for the 24 Hours of Le Mans, bringing Dören’s Jägermeister backing with them. Teamed with Frenchman, Hervé Poulain, and Luxembourg-based driver, Romain Feitler, the bright orange Porsche didn’t finish after another bout of gearbox gremlins at La Sarthe. However, the Jägermeister colours would remain for the rest of 1978 as the German duo finished either first or second in the GT class at seven other international sports car events. 0158’s brief soirée in orange was over by 1979, with Dören’s new sponsors, Weralit, bringing in a new white design with bold green and red stripes. The year turned out to be perhaps the 934’s most successful, though, with Dören winning four times in the DRM to take the overall title against the faster Group 5 machines. By the end of the year though, the 934’s competitiveness in European competition was coming to an end, leading Holup to sell the car to American privateer, Jack Refenning. Now Stateside, 0158’s stay of execution was extended and led to the car competing at the 24 Hours of Daytona twice (in 1980 and 1981, finishing ninth in the latter) and the 1981 12 Hours of Sebring. With its racing career finally over, no. 0158 resurfaced at the turn of the millennium in the hands of renowned Porsche racing specialist, Manfred Freisinger, whose eponymous concern completed a nut-and-bolt rebuild of the car in 2011, returning the chassis to its 1976 Le Mans livery. After being brought to the UK, and entrusted to the care of Maxted-Page, chassis no. 0158 was soon after repainted in its famous Jägermeister livery before going on sale. However, if you want to secure this iconic car for your own collection, you’re already too late. After an inspection by Jürgen Barth himself, this eye-catching 934 is already on its way to a new owner in the US. For now, you’ll just have to make do with these photos like the rest of us.


Left: At first glance the 934’s stripped out interior is typical of any 911 racer, until you notice the standard door cards and electric window switch Top right: The 934’s widebody – courtesy of fibreglass arches riveted to the shell – makes for a captivating sight

Bottom left: The original welded aluminium X-brace under the bonnet of the 934 is a rare piece of standard equipment Bottom right: The ‘centre console’ is dominated by a VDO boost gauge and knurled adjustment knob

Thanks Thanks to Lee Maxted-Page for access to the Jägermeister 934. To see the full selection of historically-important racing Porsches on sale at Maxted-Page, visit Maxted-page.co.uk or call (+44) 1787 477749


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74 Living the Legend – 911 owner reports

Legend Living the

2013 991 Carrera

Ben Przekop Georgia, USA

Date acquired: January 2016

I

bought a new car! Before I tell you about my latest 911, a few words about why I made the decision to trade in my beloved 997.1 GT3. When I bought the GT3 over three years ago, I was starting to get serious about my on-track driving, and this incredible track-focused car fulfilled all of my expectations brilliantly. But after three years of intense trackdays, I was now driving at some very serious speeds among purpose-built race cars, and if I was to continue I would need to add important safety equipment to my car (roll bar, race seats, five-point harness, HANS device), which would involve significant expense as well as a reduction in the resale potential of my streetlegal GT3. As I came to this fork in the road, I asked myself, “Are you going to take this track thing to the next level, or are you ready (at least for now) to hang up your helmet?” Amazingly, I found myself saying, “I’m ready!”

Our band of contributors from around the world share their real-life experiences with their Porsche 911s

I realised that I had reached the point of diminishing returns with my on-track driving: I was still having fun and getting marginally better each weekend, but the rewards were getting smaller as the expenses and the risks were getting much bigger. At the same time, I longed for a more street-oriented 991 with all of the creature comforts it could provide, and so my decision to move on became surprisingly easy. I also wanted to stick to a reasonable budget, so I started searching for a pre-owned standard Carrera that had the right colours and options. I checked the Hennessy Porsche website regularly (okay, daily) and when I saw this particular Guards red over black 991 Carrera, I felt that I might have found my next car. I loved the colour combination and, better yet, it had all the features I wanted, which was reflected in the original MSRP of $105,000 (approximately £72,600), which included over

$20,000 (approximately £14,000) in options! On the performance side, these included a seven-speed manual transmission, Sport PASM, Porsche Torque Vectoring, and Sport Chrono including Dynamic Engine Mounts. It also had all of the 991 electronic goodies I had long desired: a Bose stereo package with satellite and HD radio, navigation, Bluetooth iPhone integration, a six disc CD changer, ventilated and heated 14-way seats with memory, a heated steering wheel, and Porsche Comfort Drive (keyless entry). On paper it was perfect, but would the driving experience live up to expectations? When I arrived at Hennessy on the sunny Saturday morning of 16 January (a lucky omen I thought), I told my good friend and Porsche sales rep Mike McPherson: “I think I’ve found my dream 991, but I need two things: a thorough test drive and a fair trade-in value for my GT3.” As I inspected the car prior


75

1994 993 Carrera 2

Kyle Fortune

Warwickshire, UK

Date acquired: December 2014

L

ots of rain, but the mild winter has ensured that the gritters remain in their depots, so there are no excuses for not using our cars. I still SORNed the 993 for the start of the year, simply because a week alone with my kids – my wife is away celebrating her sister’s birthday abroad – and then the rest of the month with myself on planes off to Detroit, South Africa and Palm Springs for various jobs, all meant I simply wouldn’t have time to use it. That’s not to say my month has been free of Porsches though. The South Africa trip was to drive the new 991.2 Turbo and C4, C4S and Targa, which you’ll have read about in issue 137. The week my wife was away also gave me the opportunity to build the Tamiya one-tenth scale 911 Carrera RSR RC car that was sent to me by Porsche UK to bring to the above Turbo launch. They suggested I ‘engineer’ the car as they might, so in the best tradition of Porsche’s GT department, I added some ball bearings and an aluminium propshaft. Resisting the temptation to correct the technical inaccuracy and make it rear-wheel drive, instead I concentrated on the build (and painting), it taking way longer than it did when building RC cars as a kid. Long story short, it was raced at the Turbo launch, Total 911’s honour intact with the race win, though What Car? sneaked a win on a hastily organised

drag race after the main event. Anyway, if future electric full-scale Porsches are half as entertaining then bring it on… With all that time lavished on the RC 911, I did, rather guiltily, pull the 993 out of the garage later in the month looking for jobs to do. There are a few, not least I spotted a hole in the fan shroud that wasn’t there previously. Along with the bonnet and engine cover struts that have long been in need of replacement, I’ll get ordering some parts soon, though looking at my next month that SORN might be staying in place. Still, if you’re looking for some Porsche fun when the nights are dark, then it doesn’t have to be full-sized…

2003 996 Turbo

to the test drive, I was pleased to see that the first owner had installed protective film on the front of the car, so the paint was in excellent condition, as was the interior. Mike and I then took the car out for a spirited drive while preowned manager, Drew Borges, drew up the financial paperwork. The test drive went even better than expected: this car was a total blast to drive, and I absolutely loved it! The manual transmission was excellent. The 350bhp was plenty powerful for my intended purposes and I was blown away by the outstanding handling, which I attributed to the improved 991 chassis and this car’s Sport PASM and PTV. When we got back, a quick and cordial negotiation with Drew resulted in a “win/win” deal being struck, and after signing all the paperwork I was soon driving home in my beautiful new 991. I can’t wait to tell you more about it after I really put it through its paces in the coming weeks!

Joel Newman London, UK

Date acquired: April 2014

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ome wonderful news this month, for the first time in a rather long time, my Turbo is pretty much perfect! As you may remember, last month I mentioned a little knock I’d sustained as my pushbike fell over and dented my rear quarter panel! It pained me every time I looked at the car, amplified by the positioning, which caught and shot off light in all directions at the point of contact, making the damage immediately obvious. I also had a scratch on the D-pillar from the rear wiper (if you pull it up to clean the window it drops and scratches the car, a design fault on these easily fixed with a cable tie). Fool me once as they say... I’ve done this twice now. Instead of having the entire rear quarter resprayed at mega expense, I decided to

return to a chap I found online a few years back from Chips Away. Now, I know many may curl up and shriek at the thought of a spot repair, and perhaps I would have too, had I not worked with this chap before. But I know what a great job he can do, so don’t be put off unless you’ve reason to (just make sure to avoid mobile technicians and opt for someone who has their own workshop, as I’m told the job is always better). Anyway, as ever, I’ll let the pictures do the talking, but the repair of both sides cost under £300, and you would never know the owner is an idiot. That is some of the best money I’ve ever spent; at least I can walk over to my car now without the shame. I also had my engine warning light turned off – as suspected, one of my race cats sets it off once in a blue moon, so all in all I could not be happier.


76 Living the Legend – 911 owner reports

2004 996.2 Carrera 4

NEW COLUMNIST

Lee Sibley

Bournemouth, UK Date acquired: February 2016

1967 912 & 1979 911 SC

Sean Parr

Harpenden, UK Dates acquired: November 2014 & May 2015

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t’s no secret that I’d been harbouring ambitions to get myself into a Gen2 996 since the end of 2015. Somewhat intrigued by the vociferous accusations and judgements forever levied at the 996, I found I was becoming increasingly partial to the first water-cooled 911 era. Partiality soon gave way to full-blown desire by the turn of the new year. My first selfappointed assignment of 2016 was to conduct the 996 Carrera Gen1 v Gen2 head-to-head in issue 136, and I came away positively amazed by the value for money a 996 Carrera holds – so much so that I decided I had to have one. I eventually bought a 996.2 C4 as my own ‘project 996’ from specialists RPM Technik, who had taken one in as part exchange and gave me a trade deal in light of the fact the car needed some attention to be considered ‘ready to retail’. As such, it didn’t come with a warranty, IMS upgrade or G-Techniq paint protection, which are customary traits of a 996 sale from RPM (where applicable). However, the car did have RPM Technik’s 110-point inspection and boroscope and I’ve since had a major service and IMS upgrade, also opting for a lightweight flywheel from RPM’s revered CSR range (more on the flywheel on page 57). So, I was good to go, and collected the car in early February. Why a C4? Well, I never looked at getting into a rear-driven Carrera 2 as a necessity. My only stipulation was to have a Gen2 with a manual gearbox and black leather interior. The rest, by way of spec, was immaterial. I quickly also realised I’d rather pay a little more to buy from a specialist rather than buy

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n interesting month in the world of Parr Porsche, but not one, unfortunately, that has involved much driving, and definitely not one that has led to much progress in the world’s slowest respray of my 1979 911 SC. I am assured that they now have everything to finish putting the car back together, it is at the point where all that is remaining is a door frame, one quarter glass, headlight ring and some strips for the door aperture and then it’s all done. Then all that is left is sorting the heating and the steering rack, and that is it – I can actually drive the car for the first time in eight months. I’m sure I’ll be excited when I start it up and actually drive it, but at the moment, I just feel worn out by the amount of effort and energy that I have had to put in to the refurbishment of the car. I am an incredibly patient guy, but even my patience has run out. I have barely lifted a spanner to this car but I feel like I have pushed it to Lands End and back again on my own. It’s been

from a private seller. Simply put, there’s too much at stake with a 996 to buy without really knowing anything about the car. Paperwork only ever tells half the story and bodywork is far less expensive than the mechanicals it cloaks! With a specialist, the car will have been comprehensively checked for over-revs, mileage verification, boroscoped, and any remedial work will have been done. In the end, my choice was narrowed down to a Basalt black C2 or RPM’s C4. Buying from a specialist (and a good one at that, RPM finishing runners-up to Paragon in the 2015 Total 911 Awards for Best Independent Specialist for Sales) swung it for me, as they – and therefore I – were able to uncover more information about the mechanicals hidden beneath that famous silhouette. As such, I know the car’s had a full bottom-end rebuild including six new pistons from Porsche Centre Belfast in 2010 due to severe bore scoring, the RMS has been replaced, and an air-oil separator issue has previously been seen to.

a pretty exhausting and not very enjoyable experience for me. On a much happier note, I had the immense pleasure of accompanying our illustrious leader Lee Sibley to RPM Technik to go and collect his gorgeous 996 C4. Let me tell you, I was impressed with the car, it’s stunning, easy to drive and fast! Lee was kind enough to put up with me blabbing the whole way through the Chiltern hills to RPM Technik, and put up with the somewhat rudimentary safety systems (a very Heath Robinson lap belt set up) in the 912, but it seems he loved my little car, he even complimented it on Instagram! High praise indeed. It was like watching a kid at Christmas; Lee looked like

As mentioned the IMS is also now done so, to my mind, if the car does lunch itself, at this point I’ll be very unlucky indeed. I’m a month (and 1,700 miles!) into 911 ownership as I write and so far, so good. Corroded rear silencers will soon be replaced with a new Milltek system, and I’m also going to trial a ‘fast road’ aftermarket brake setup, as my factory discs are near the end of their life. In a bizarre way, long-term 996 ownership fascinates me, so I’ll be reporting in detail on my experiences right here in Living the Legend – warts and all.

he’d won the lottery and in lots of ways he has. Welcome (finally) to the Porsche fold, Lee. I hope that you have as many stories as us Living The Legend contributors and readers have and may they all be happy ones. Thanks for letting me play a part in your big day – it was brilliant!


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2011 997.2 GT3 RS & 2015 991 GT3

Tony McGuiness

San Diego, USA

Dates acquired: February 2011 & December 2014

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mentioned in a column last year that I had spent so much time driving my new 991 GT3 that I had hardly driven my GT3 RS. At the time, I was breaking in the new GT3 and wanted to give it my full attention. I fell in love and was amazed by the 991 GT3. However, not driving the RS made me appreciate how extraordinarily special my Rennsport is. I bought the 997.2 GT3 RS brand new in 2011. After five years of ownership, it has become even more clear why this 911 is a legend. Everything you have read about this car is true. Some people said the GT3 RS was “the last of a special breed,” or, “the last of the analogues.” Half a decade later, I now realise these were not hollow statements. The journalists who penned those words at the launch of this generation of Porsche’s street legal race car were spot on. Which brings me to a question other GT3 RS owners are starting to wonder: do I still drive the RS or do I leave it in the garage and protect it? Wouldn’t it be better to keep the mileage low? My answer is a resounding, “No!” I purchased this 911 to drive it. The RS is meant to be driven. To leave it in the garage in a plastic bubble not only goes against everything the RS badge stands for, it prevents others enjoying this magnificent work of engineering. Every time I take this car out, it

attracts attention and gains more fans. At Cars and Coffee events, the GT3 RS is the star of the show. And why wouldn’t it be? It sounds incredible and with its Grey-black colour and white gold accents, it looks stunning. On a recent drive, I noticed a person hanging out of a nearby car taking photos of my GT3 RS so I put the car in positions to allow him to safely photograph it. As we came to a red light, he smiled, gave me the thumbs up, and asked if I would like copies. Over the loud idle of the engine, I shouted my number to him. Later that day he sent the photos of the RS in motion. This chance meeting made me think... if we are to make sure others enjoy these amazing 911s, we need to drive them. A massive thank you to Michael Megna for providing the terrific photos of my RS in action for all 911 admirers to enjoy.

1985 3.2 Carrera

Greg James

Mercer Island, Washington

Date acquired: 2008

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ne of the things that comes with age is a bit of wisdom (hopefully). After consulting with a well-respected Seattle upholstery shop owner who has repaired dozens of 911 soft tops, I decided to wait on the repair. The shop owner’s reasoning was simple: if I’m going to replace the liner, it’s quite likely that the top could tear in the process and need a complete replacement. That route would be $2,000 and, in his opinion, is not worth it right now. He also let me know that the manual tops are much easier to work on and far less expensive to repair. That’s good. I’ve learned over the years – often the hard way – to listen to people who know their stuff with cars. So, the decision was made to leave the top alone for now and leave the 30-year-old original unmolested, which is fine with me as it still looks great (except for the annoying little tears), and functions just fine.

On another note, I’ve been looking for a nice air-cooled Turbo. After much thought, I initially decided to go with a 964. I’ve owned ten plus 911s over the years, but never a Turbo and never a 964. I figured that the 1991/92 964 Turbo was the way to go: 80 per cent of the 993’s power for half the price. Settled, right? Wrong. As much as I love the classic look of the 964 Turbo, I couldn’t stop thinking of the 993TT’s vastly improved handling, power, and drivability. What to do? I’m still not 100 per cent settled on which car to get, but for now I’m being rational and spending more time looking at 993 Turbos. Hopefully in the next month or two I’ll find the right car and jump on it. In the meantime, just to complicate things, my friend Nathan Merz, who is a well-known local source of top quality cars, sent me photos of an immaculate 1996 Guards red 993. Maybe I could create a 993 RS clone just for the fun of it… stay tuned.

1999 996 Carrera 4 Rob Clarke Bristol, UK

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Date acquired: February 2014

ometimes a sequence of events will trigger things to happen, for me this month that was the commitment to spend cash. The first of these triggers was after being a passenger at Donington Park in an Ariel Atom and after a session at the Porsche Experience Centre (PEC), I have a desire to get my car on track, (possibly under the guidance of the PEC for my first track experience). Since there is always that concern of an incident on track, I have found an insurance policy that will insure the car third party for on-track use for a recognised event. This has increased my policy by £200 and a big increase of excess on track, but overall this gives me the peace of mind that if the worst was to happen, I can get the car fixed. Combined with this policy, I got an agreed value. The process to get the agreed value involved a questionnaire and a series of high-quality pictures to confirm that the car’s description was correct, and to be honest, when you stand back and look at it; I had forgotten how good it looks! The valuation came back positively reinforcing that the 996 is continuing to climb in value. The second trigger event was my MOT! The MOT itself was fine but there was an advisory for replacing the rear tyres. I have been considering a set of winter tyres for a while and this was, again, reinforced while at the Porsche Experience Centre, as Brian (our Porsche Driving Consultant) for the session identified the difference that the all-weather tyres made on the Macan and how well it gripped on the kicker. That, coupled with the fact I had my first surprise trademark 911 rear-end moment the other weekend on a very wet roundabout, I thought maybe a set of winter wheels and tyres would be good. I have found a company in Holland and I am in the process of sorting out shipping, and if it all goes well there will be pictures of them next issue! So, this has triggered the next change and that is to get my ‘summer’ rims refurbished and give them some well-deserved TLC.


78 Living the Legend – 911 owner reports

997 Cup David Grover Harpenden, UK

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1972 911T Targa; 1972 911E; 1977 930 3.3; 1977 930 3.3; 1981 SC; 1986 3.2 Carrera; 1988 3.2 Carrera; 1994 964 Carrera 4; 1996 993 Carrera 4S

Date acquired: July 2015

e’ve had a busy start to the year with a complete strip down of the car to refresh the gearbox and put in a new clutch for the season ahead. The suspension has also been off for an overhaul, and the car is having new brake discs and pads fitted all around. We are running Porsche products on the front and Brembo discs for the rear. The picture shows a very bare looking shell, with some missing essential components receiving a late night deep clean. Unfortunately, we have discovered major issues with the gearbox so have had to embark on some serious expenditure to fix it. Top-level race cars certainly aren’t cheap to run, you can easily buy a road 911 for the price of some of the parts we have had to buy! The first test day however was booked for 28 February at Silverstone, so the car should be box-fresh for that event. The first race dates are booked and paid for at Donington for April and then Brands Hatch in May, where we will be support to the Blancpain series and, by the look of it, some big crowds, which is exciting and somewhat daunting. These comprise the opening six rounds of the GT Cup, with two 25-minute sprint races on the Saturday and warm up, qualifying, and a 50-minute pit stop race on the Sunday. Some teams run a proper ProAm combination to share the 50-minute race but I will be doing the whole thing myself. If anybody is interested in watching it you can see all of the rounds on Motors TV, I will be the one at the back being lapped by the 458 Ferraris! Hopefully not more than once though. Also, positive progress on the 911 front. I’ve secured a 2015 991 C2S Cabriolet in Agate grey with two-tone grey and black interior and a few thousand miles on the clock. It’s well specced with adaptive seats, grey wheels, a black soft top and the Sports exhaust for a bit more roar. We haven’t got it yet, but we’re looking forward to driving it as the weather gets better.

James McArthur

Houston, Texas

Dates acquired: (in same order as above ) 2013; 2014; 2014; 2015;2015; 2015; 2015; 2016; 2016

1979 930 3.3

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hen I’m looking for the next 911 for the collection, it’s not some random affair, there is a little bit of method to the madness. My hope is to secure one of every air-cooled 911 generation from 1964 to 1998. And I adore 911 models with the factory Turbo look and the naturally-aspirated flat six. I enjoy and own all original, well-documented one-owner Porsches but sometimes it’s nice to have the freedom to change it up without worrying about the consequences of those changes. I love to modify both the cosmetic and mechanical aspects to suit my personal taste and driving style. Last year, I was incredibly lucky to purchase a really nice IROC tribute. Originally a 1986 Carrera 3.2 in Guards red, one of the previous owners had converted

I

think manual transmission is much more exciting than automatic – and it’s the healthier lifestyle choice! For those who love driving and do not have time to exercise, opening a window with the handle, stepping on the clutch and manoeuvering without Richard hydraulic assistance at the Klevenhusen steering wheel can make a Rio de Janeiro, Brazil beautiful difference. Manoeuvering with unassisted Date acquired: May 2012 steering burns seven to ten calories per minute. By doing the same manoeuver with power steering, you would burn two calories per minute. In changing gear, with a manual you burn around five calories per minute, compared to just one calorie per minute in an automatic. If you think four calories per minute is nothing, calculate how much time you spend in your car. If you spend an hour a day in traffic, you’re using 240 calories a day to change gear. In one year, that’s 87,600 calories. But aside from that, I just think manual is more exciting than automatic!

it into a race car. The last owner, Charles from South Carolina, rescued it and converted it into a stunning Mexico blue IROC tribute. The IROC is a great starting point for me, it’s well sorted and runs great but there is always room for minor modifications. After putting a few hundred miles on the clock and getting to know the car, I decided to start with a few of my preferred modifications; a short shift kit that I adore (it works incredibly with the 915 transmission); new steering wheel; new period style tartan bucket seats; black aluminium perforated floorboards; custom shift gearknob; and I deleted some modern race features for a more period street look. In terms of the exterior, I’m going for a less period IROC style and something a bit more unique. Warning, it’s hard to stop once you start modifying!

1982 SC & 1989 964 Carrera 4

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olfi the 964 is booked in, to follow in Steffi the SC’s path, to visit Centre Gravity for a total suspension health check. Given the transformation of my SC’s handling, I’m looking forward to experiencing a sharper version of what a C4 can give. Wolfi also needs a new passenger door check strap; the Gina Purcell offending item opening in two stiff Oxford, UK stages with accompanying creaks Dates acquired: and groans. Meanwhile, Steffi April 2014 & is sitting-out the winter blues, September 2004 hibernating safely in storage. To appease my inner 911-nerd, I applied to the DVLA for the entire paper trail on Steffi’s previous owners. Prior to this, her fully stamped service history indicated ‘missing’ owners and a period of mystery. It took the DVLA three months, but 60 pages of information arrived in January and it has given me Steffi’s entire 34-year timeline. I still don’t know which owner was allegedly Ayrton Senna’s mechanic though!


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2010 997.2 Turbo

NEW COLUMNIST

Joe Croser

Northamptonshire, UK Date acquired: December 2015

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am a subscriber to Total 911 and am delighted to be joining this prestigious list of Living The Legend Authors. I am on my sixth Porsche, my fourth 911 and my first Turbo, which also just happens to be car number 40 at 46 years old. Not bad going! My love of Porsche started in my teenage years during the mid-1980s when whaletails were de-rigour. A few years later in 1990, I remember the time I followed a 964 for the first time through a Northumberland village’s 30mph zone, only to see it take off like a scalded cat once the national speed limit sign showed its face. As it stretched the gap between us, its James Bond-like rear wing rose up into position. I nearly screamed with delight. It wasn’t until the summer of 2002 that I bought my first Porsche; a Boxster 2.7, ex-demo from Porsche East London. It was amazing. So torquey and so well made. I felt like the dogs danglies. Six months later, I ordered a new face-lifted 3.2 Boxster S from Porsche Park Lane. I kept that car for a year before upgrading to my first 911, a 996 C4S Cabriolet in Midnight blue. It was a cancelled order so it came to me at six weeks old with 400 miles. My 997 story started back in 2004 (or was it 2005?) when I first saw the all-new 997 Coupe in London. At the time, I still had my 996 C4S Cabriolet, which I loved, but that first 997 just moved the game on. With its 993-like front end and chunkier, less fussy rear when

compared to the 996 Coupe, the 997 was a sight to behold. In September 2005 I moved to the United States to start a new job. My 14-month-old C4S was sold with just 7,000 miles on the clock and a new 997 C2S Cabriolet was ordered Stateside. Unlike my previous Porsches, my 997 was to be a daily drive. For a year thereafter, I enjoyed it every day on my twisty-road commute of 7.2 miles. Nevertheless, after a year and with our little girl on the way, I traded it in for something larger with four proper seats and a proper boot. Fast forward nine years and I have rejoined the 997 fold with the purchase of a gorgeous 997.2 Turbo Coupe. It’s in Meteor grey with black leather inside, Torque Vectoring, a sunroof,

PCM3, PDK, etc. With 28,000 miles on the clock it is still a baby really and it’s in lovely nick. Sandwiched between the two 997s, I enjoyed a 964 C2 Coupe for a few years. It was my first and last air-cooled Porsche and it was a stunner. I won a PCGB concourse event in 2014 and participated in the 2015 Carrera Parade at the Classics at the Castle event in Hedingham. But with rising values and while living in the sticks surrounded by muddy wet roads in winter, I became progressively disinclined to take the car out on anything but the sunniest days. That seemed like a terrible shame, so I sold it and bought the 997.2 Turbo. I’m looking forward to taking you on my journey of 997.2 Turbo ownership over the coming issues!

I had previously driven the road a couple of times in the 997 last year but the weather at the time hadn’t been the best – wet on both occasions. So with not a cloud in the sky and dry roads I seized the opportunity. The road cuts through some of the most beautiful landscapes in Britain and once you pass through the small town of Pickering the drive really begins. As the road winds upwards,

the view just gets better and better as it reveals the yellow and green moorland. After a couple of fast straights and a hairpin, we made our descent back down the moorland, which revealed an almost surreal view of the Whitby coast, it was stunning! If you live in the UK and happen to be passing near to this area, I thoroughly recommend you give the A169 a try.

2005 997.1 Carrera S

Chris Wallbank Leeds, UK

Dates acquired: November 2012

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eeing as I’d just had a brand new set of Pirelli P Zeros fitted all round last month, I decided to take the 997 out for its first road trip of the year to the seaside town of Whitby. This would mean taking the famous A169 route over the top of the North Yorkshire Moors, which starts at Malton just off the A64 (home to Malton Specialist cars).


From £600 to 600 hp, we are here for you Founded in 1961, our mission is to enhance the Porsche-owning experience of our 14,000 members. We do this by embracing all models of the marque, from the earliest 356 to the very latest 991 Gen2. Whether it is £600 or 600 hp, Porsche Club Great Britain is here for you.

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We are proud to be the only officially Porsche AG recognised Porsche Club in the UK and we would love to welcome you as a member.

To become a Porsche Club member visit www.porscheclubgb.com or call the Clubhouse on 01608 652 911

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PREMIER PORSCHE

81

JZM

Behind the scenes at one of the UK’s leading independent Porsche specialists

Everything you need for your 911

Data file

Plus 094 098

Full specs, ratings and market values of every 911, including the 993 Turbo and Turbo S, can be found beginning on page 86

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111

Servicing & tuning

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82 JZM

JZM

Bigger is most definitely better for one of the UK’s most decorated Porsche sales, service and tuning specialists, as Total 911 investigates‌

Written by Lee Sibley Photography by Phil Steinhardt


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JZM recently expanded its Kings Langley premises, renovating the vacant warehouse next door to create a lavish new showroom. The balcony offers an idyllic view of the Porsche exotica on display

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f I were a dealer principal at an Official Porsche Centre, I would find it hard not to feel at least a modicum of envy when glancing over at the operations of independent Porsche specialist JZM. Even from afar, it seems like the perfect setup: a modern, expansive showroom brimming to the max with ‘hot’ 911s (from a 2.7 Carrera RS right up to a smallmiles 991 GT3 RS) sits next to a large workshop boasting the very latest technology for both Porsche service and tuning. Zuffenhausen’s historical icon is well looked after here then, but there’s also a revolutionary approach to business at Kings Langley, too. JZM has its own app, available to download on iTunes, for those who want instant access to the latest sales and service developments direct to their smartphone, and there’s even a sister enterprise for Porsche in Abu Dhabi, JZM Gulf. So, how and where exactly did this main dealer-rivaling independent Porsche empire begin? “We actually formed as part of a merger deal in 1999”, says Steve McHale, the company’s founding director. “My original company, MachtechTuning, joined with the previous owner of JAZ Porsche, now run and owned by Steve Winter, and together we made JZM.” The idea was to set up an independent specialist to rival the services on offer at OPCs and, 17 years on, it would be hard to argue that hasn’t been achieved. Today the company is run by Steve Mchale and Sales Director, Russ Rosenthal, who brought his many

years of Porsche sales experience to the fold when joining the company in August 2009. As such, the sales department at JZM has developed into one of the most desirable in the country, with a plethora of exotic cars from throughout the 911’s 53-year heritage on display in the showroom – but such cars never hang around for long. “We’ve a very good percentage of returning customers to JZM,” explains Rosenthal, who highlights the usefulness of the company’s Porsche Connect service (offering personalised sales, MOT and service alerts to customers via email) in ensuring customers come back to JZM. Russ is clearly well connected within the Porsche industry, too, the presence of that aforementioned right-hand-drive 991 GT3 RS as well as a 981 Boxster Spyder and Cayman GT4 – all with delivery miles on the clock – for sale in his showroom being a case in point. This all means that the calibre of Porsche exotica courted by readers of this very publication is likely to be found at JZM, regardless of whether it left the factory in 2016 or 1963. That said, JZM do favour the water-cooled cars, as Rosenthal explains: “We’re very picky over the cars we sell. We focus on Rennsport models where possible and are also renowned for being GT3 tuning specialists, which obviously means that only the best examples are sold here, too. We’ll only accept the cars if they are right, so they’ll need to be in a good condition or have been rebuilt well.” Serendipitously, a stunning 997.2 GT3 example in Guards red duly arrives for a pre-SOR (sale or

return) inspection during our visit. In the presence of its owner, the car is elevated into the air using new inspection ramps installed in the showroom floor, before a thorough check involving paint depths and DME readings (to verify mileage and hours of use, and look for any fault codes or overrevs) is carried out. If an inspection is successful, as this one was, all information garnered here is assigned to a data sheet, which is then attached to the car when it reaches the showroom floor for interested parties to freely inspect. Speaking of that new inspection ramp, it’s just the start of a recently completed overhaul. While JZM may have expanded its enterprise, the company’s spiritual home in Kings Langley, just north of London’s M25, hasn’t been ignored. This year, JZM has invested heavily in an expansion of its premises, renovating the vacant warehouse between its front-of-house and service areas, giving rise to a spacious new building that’s more than doubled the previous showroom’s size. “Our business is expanding and we simply needed more physical space to handle the increase in cars we’re dealing with,” says Rosenthal. As a result, JZM now boasts a vastly expansive showroom bathed in brilliant bright lights, creating a celestial environment more befitting of the cars sitting proudly under its roof. At the back of the showroom there’s a new staircase leading to a deep-set balcony, offering an idyllic view of the plethora of shining Porsche on display. It makes for some environment in which to finalise


84 JZM

Most work is done in-house, with the independent specialist offering servicing and tuning of the highest calibre for every 911 from 1963-2016. JZM also has its own app for customers to access the latest sales and service developments

“Our aim is to create more of a ‘destination’ for Porsche enthusiasts, rather than merely a sales room” the terms of a purchase, made possible by the large desk and accompanying seats at its far side. “We’d like to bring in some racing simulators for up here, too,” says Rosenthal. “Our aim is to create more of a ‘destination’ for Porsche enthusiasts, rather than merely a sales room.” If a stellar sales experience wasn’t reason enough to pay JZM and its 17-strong staff a visit, then the company’s service and tuning setup should suitably excite. Situated next door to that lavish new showroom, it is perhaps more than coincidental that the flooring and general decorations around JZM’s large workshop evoke connotations of an Official Porsche Centre’s main workroom. There are four in-ground Maha two-poster ramps in constant use here, with a five-ton Maha scissor lift reserved for Hunter HawkEye alignment at the far side (chassis set up is a large part of JZM’s business, the company investing in the best equipment available to ensure optimum accuracy). Next to the alignment equipment is an expansive library of Porsche service manuals for every model, too. The presence of a 996 Turbo, 991 C4S and 3.2 Clubsport aptly demonstrates the depth and

breadth of 911s regularly attended to by JZM’s knowledgeable technicians, many of whom have previous experience working at OPCs themselves. A vast majority of work is all done in-house, including complete engine rebuilds, with only some machining carried out at reputable local businesses. This ensures a consistency to JZM’s work, the result of an ethos instilled by Steve McHale’s unwavering eye for detail. Servicing may represent bread and butter business for JZM but Porsche tuning is a notable passion – and it comes right from the top. Steve has been involved in motorsport from the beginning of his career. As a driver and tuner he trained with Bosch for over 20 years, becoming one of only a few Bosch systems technicians, and as such JZM are able to diagnose and repair Bosch fuel and ignition systems from the 1960s onward. Today the company continues its training program with Porsche GB and continues to invest in the very latest Porsche systems testers. Steve’s notable dealings with Nürburgring specialists Manthey Racing is also particularly impressive. This means that owners wanting to get even more out

Company profile • Founders: Steve McHale and Jonas Zambakides • First opened: 1999 • Location: Kings Langley, UK • Best 911 tuning project: “A 600hp modified 997 GT2 Clubsport used by Mike Wilds”

Contact • Website: www.jzmporsche.com • Telephone: (+44) 1923 269 788

of their 911’s performance on-track can do little wrong with a visit to JZM, who have an enviable list of aftermarket partners: just take your pick from Manthey Racing, Akrapovic exhausts, KW Suspension, Fuchs wheels and Surface Transforms lightweight ceramic brake discs and clutch specialists, to name but a few. As you can see, the company’s repertoire is as impressive as it is expansive. Adept at getting you into a Porsche of the very highest repute, JZM will then service and even tune your beloved 911 to ensure you have an ownership experience of the very highest class. Perhaps those envious glances from the management teams at various Official Porsche Centres are justified after all.


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86 Data file in association with

(0 series)

(0 & A series)

(A series)

(A & B series)

The 911 that started it all off when the prototype appeared in 1963, this is the car that set the style for all 911s to follow. Developed to replace the 356, a four-pot 912 was also made.

Porsche soon produced more powerful variants. The first of these was the 911S – for Super – which had a higher compression engine and twin Weber 40IDS carburettors.

In 1967, the 911 was updated and the range expanded: the 911L (Lux) was standard and sat alongside the high-performance 911S and entrylevel 911T.

To save money, the 911T’s engine used cast-iron cylinder heads, unlike the Biral aluminium/iron items, which gave more efficient cooling, and carbs instead of fuel injection.

Production numbers: 9,250 Issue featured: 123 Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 9.0:1 Maximum power: 130bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 149Nm @ 5,200rpm 0-62mph: 8.3sec Top speed: 131mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,075kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 285mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 4.5x15-inch; 165/80/R15 Rear: 4.5x15-inch; 165/80/R15

Production numbers: 4,015 Issue featured: 114 Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 160bhp @ 6,600rpm Maximum torque: 179Nm @ 5,200rpm 0-62mph: 8.0sec Top speed: 137mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,030kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 285mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 4.5x15-inch; 165/80/R15 Rear: 4.5x15-inch; 165/80/R15

Production numbers: 1,603 Issue featured: 138 Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 9.0:1 Maximum power: 130bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 173Nm @ 4,600rpm 0-62mph: 8.4sec Top speed: 132mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,080kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 285mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR

Production numbers: 6,318 Issue featured: 127 Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 8.6:1 Maximum power: 110bhp @ 5,800rpm Maximum torque: 156Nm @ 4,200rpm 0-62mph: 8.8sec (est) Top speed: 124mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,020kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 285mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR

911 2.0-litre 1964-67

Definitive facts and figures for every 911 model from 1964 to the present day

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Ratings: H H H H H

Each model is rated out of five in our half-star system according to their performance, handling, appearance and desirability.

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(F series)

(F series)

A lower compression ratio and the inclusion of Zenith 40 TIN triple-choke carburettors led to the relatively lower power output of 130bhp despite the new 2,341cc engine size.

A 2.4-litre engine increased torque. The mostly chrome brightwork had a black decklid grille with a ‘2.4’ badge. External oil filler on right rear wing confused some.

The RS had a 2,687cc engine that developed 210bhp. The body was lightened and fitted with flared rear arches and an optional ducktail spoiler. Sport and Touring versions available.

After incidents of people filling E series 911s with petrol via the external oil-filler, the filler returned to under the engine decklid. Fitted with the front spoiler of the 911S.

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

Production numbers: 1,590 Issue featured: 106 Engine capacity: 2,687cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 210bhp @ 6,300rpm Maximum torque: 255Nm @ 5,100rpm 0-62mph: 5.8sec Top speed: 152mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 975kg (Sport) Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15 Rear: 7x15-inch; 215/60/R15

Production numbers:

(I & J series)

This reflects the general market trend for a model’s used value compared to the previous financial quarter. The next review will be June 2016. The last was for March 2016.

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911T 1967-69

(E series)

911T 1972

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General valuations:

911L 1967-68

(E series)

16,933 (including F series) Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 7.5:1 Maximum power: 130bhp @ 5,600rpm Maximum torque: 197Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 7.6sec Top speed: 128mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,077kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR Rear: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR

911s in the data file are organised in rows according to release date, beginning with the very first model in 1964. Many models were available in Coupe, Targa and Cabriolet forms, with the option of automatic transmission. Here, data has been provided from the Coupe variants unless stated. All data here has been compiled, where possible, from Porsche’s own figures.

911S 1967-68

911S 1972

5,054 (including 1973) Issue featured: 120 Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 190bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 211Nm @ 5,200rpm 0-62mph: 6.6sec Top speed: 140mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,077kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15 Rear: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15

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Carrera 2.7 RS 1973

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911E 1973

4,406 (including E series) Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Maximum power: 165bhp @ 6,200rpm Maximum torque: 206Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 7.5sec Top speed: 137mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,077kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch ATS; 185HR Rear: 6x15-inch ATS; 185HR

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911 Carrera 3.0 1976-77

930 3.0 1975-77

930 3.3 1978-83

911 SC 1978-83

Not sold in the US, the Carrera 3.0 was basically the same model as the previous Carrera, only fitted with a new 2,994cc engine, essentially from the 911 Turbo.

Fitted with a KKK turbo, this was the world’s first production Porsche to be turbocharged. Flared arches, whaletail spoiler and four-speed gearbox were standard.

Larger engine resulted in an extra 40bhp, and an intercooler on top of the engine led to the adoption of a new ‘tea tray’ spoiler. Brakes were upgraded from 917 racer.

From 1978, the SC was the only normally aspirated 911. Developed from the Carrera 3.0, but produced less power to suit all markets. Upgraded Sport options were available.

Production numbers: 3,687 Issue featured: 125 Engine capacity: 2,994cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 197bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 255Nm @ 4,200rpm 0-62mph: 6.3sec Top speed: 145mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,093kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/VR15 Rear: 7x15-inch; 215/60/VR15

Production numbers: 2,850 Issue featured: 116 Engine capacity: 2,994cc Compression ratio: 6.5:1 Maximum power: 260bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 343Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.5sec Top speed: 155mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,140kg (1,195kg from ’76) Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x15-inch; 185/70/VR15 Rear: 8x15-inch; 215/60/VR15

Production numbers: 5,807 (plus ’78-’79 Cali cars) Issue featured: 116 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 412Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.4sec Top speed: 160mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,300kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 309mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/VR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 225/50/VR16

Production numbers: 60,740 Issue featured: 127 Engine capacity: 2,994cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1/8.6:1/9.8:1 Maximum power: 180/188/204bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 265/265/267Nm 0-62mph: 6.5sec Top speed: 141/146mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,626mm Weight: 1,160kg (1978) Brakes: Front: 287mm discs Rear: 295mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/VR15 Rear: 7x15-inch; 215/60

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87

(B series)

911S 1968-69

(C & D series)

911E 1969-71

911S 1969-71

(C & D series)

(E series)

911E 1968-69

911T 1969-71

911E 1972

The 911 received its first major update, evolving into what is known as the B series. The 911E replaced the 911L as the ‘standard’ car. The ‘E’ stood for ‘Einspritz’ (injection).

Like the E, the S gained a fuel injection, boosting power to 170bhp. To help cope with the extra demands on the engine, an additional oil cooler was fitted in the front right wing.

Engine improvements included revised cylinder heads, larger valves and stronger con rods. 1970 ‘D’ series cars had hot-zinc coated undersides.

An upgrade in engine size gave the 911S 180bhp. Unlike the 911E, the S didn’t gain improved low-down power and torque, so you had to keep the revs up for good power.

Like the E, the 911T’s torque curve was now flatter, making the car more driveable. Ventilated discs from the S were fitted and a five-speed gearbox became standard.

2,341cc was achieved by increasing the stroke from 66mm to 70.4mm while at the same time leaving the bore unchanged. The new 915 transmission was stronger.

Production numbers: 2,826 Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 9.1:1 Maximum power: 140bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 175Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 7.6sec Top speed: 130mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,020kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 5.5x15-inch; 185HR

Production numbers: 2,106 Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 1,991cc Compression ratio: 9.9:1 Maximum power: 170bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 183Nm @ 5,500rpm 0-62mph: 7.0sec (est) Top speed: 140mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 995kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15 Rear: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15

Production numbers: 4,927 Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 2,195cc Compression ratio: 9.1:1 Maximum power: 155bhp @ 6,200rpm Maximum torque: 196Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 7.0sec Top speed: 137mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,020kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 6x15-inch; 185HR

Production numbers: 4,691 Issue featured: 120 Engine capacity: 2,195cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 180bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 199Nm @ 5,200rpm 0-62mph: 6.6sec Top speed: 145mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,020kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 6x15-inch; 185HR

Production numbers: 15,082 Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 2,195cc Compression ratio: 8.6:1 Maximum power: 125bhp @ 5,800rpm Maximum torque: 169Nm @ 4,200rpm 0-62mph: 7.0sec (est) Top speed: 127mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,020kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR Rear: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR

Production numbers:

(B series)

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(C & D series)

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4,406 (including F series) Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Maximum power: 165bhp @ 6,200rpm Maximum torque: 206Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 7.5sec Top speed: 137mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,077kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185HR Rear: 6x15-inch; 185HR

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(F series)

(F series)

(G, H, I, J series)

(G, H, I, J series)

(G, H, I, J series)

(G & H series)

The 911S had the same upgrades as the 911E, including deletion of the external oil filler. It also adopted black trim around the front and rear lights and black front quarter grilles.

US-bound F series 911Ts were the first 911s to have Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, improving emissions. This was mainly mechanical, with some electronic sensors.

Updated version of the 1973 2.7 RS, complete with impact bumpers and Turbo-spec whaletail rear spoiler. Steel arches added by hand at the factory, with 917 brakes.

‘911’ was now the entry level. Bumpers were added to conform to US regs. From 1976, all 911s were hotdip coated and fitted with ‘elephant ear’ mirrors.

911S was now a mid-range model comparable to the previous 911E. It had the same body changes as the base model, and came as standard with ‘Cookie Cutter’ rims.

From 1974, Carrera name was given to range-topping 911. Essentially the same engine as previous year’s RS for all markets except USA. Whaletail available from ’75.

Production numbers: 5,054 Issue featured: 56 Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 190bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 211Nm @ 5,200rpm 0-62mph: 6.6sec Top speed: 140mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,075kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15 Rear: 6x15-inch; 185/70/R15

Production numbers:

Production numbers: 109 Issue featured: 102 Engine capacity: 2,994cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 230bhp @ 6,200rpm Maximum torque: 275Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.3sec Top speed: 152mph Length: 4,135mm Width: 1,680mm Weight: 900kg Brakes: Front: 300mm discs Rear: 300m discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x15-inch; 215/60/VR15 Rear: 11x15-inch; 235/60/VR15

Production numbers: 9,320 Issue featured: 121 Engine capacity: 2,687cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Max power: 148bhp @ 5,700rpm (165bhp from ’76) Max torque: 235Nm @ 3,800rpm (4,000 from ’76) 0-62mph: 8.5sec Top speed: 130mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,075kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front & rear: 6x15-inch; 185VR

Production numbers: 17,124 Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 2,687cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 173bhp @ 5,800rpm Maximum torque: 235Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-60mph: 7.0sec Top speed: 142mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,080kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185VR Rear: 6x15-inch; 185VR

Production numbers: 1,667 Issue featured: 104, 134 Engine capacity: 2,687cc Compression ratio: 8.5:1 Maximum power: 210bhp @ 6,300rpm Maximum torque: 255Nm @ 5,100rpm 0-62mph: 6.3sec Top speed: 148mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,075kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x15-inch; 185VR Rear: 7x15-inch; 205VR

911S 1973

911T 1973

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Carrera 3.0 RS 1974

16,933 (including E series) Issue featured: 127 Engine capacity: 2,341cc Compression ratio: 7.5:1 Maximum power: 130bhp @ 5,600rpm Maximum torque: 197Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 7.6sec Top speed: 128mph Length: 4,163mm Width: 1,610mm Weight: 1,077kg Brakes: Front: 282mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR Rear: 5.5x15-inch; 165HR

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911 1974-77

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911S 1974-77

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911 Carrera 2.7 1974-76

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TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

SC RS 1984

930 3.3 1984-89

Carrera 3.2 1984-89

930 SE 1986-89

959 1986-1988

Speedster 1989

True homologation special built so Porsche could go Group B rallying. Turbo body used lightweight fibreglass panels, while tuned 3.0-litre engine had its basis in 930’s crankcase.

Revised engine added more power and torque in 1984, while in 1987 Motronic engine management improved efficiency and emissions upon its return to the US market.

Almost the same galvanised body as the SC. Engine was claimed to be 80 per cent new, and the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control ignition and fuel systems.

Slantnosed and based on 935 race cars, with pop-up headlamps. Front spoiler made deeper to accommodate extra oil cooler, rear intakes fed air to brakes.

Had tech later used on 911s including 4WD, ABS and twin turbos. A 959S was also available, featuring lighter cloth Sport seats, five-point harnesses and a roll cage.

Carrera 3.2 with a chopped, steeply raked windscreen and hood and stripped-out interior. Porsche insisted the simple hood was not designed to be 100 per cent watertight.

Production numbers: 22 Issue featured: 109 Engine capacity: 2,994cc Compression ratio: 10.3:1 Maximum power: 255bhp @ 7,000rpm Maximum torque: 250Nm @ 6,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.9sec Top speed: 153mph Length: 4,235mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 940kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 309mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/VR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 225/50/VR16

Production numbers: 11,135 Issue featured: 116 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 432Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.4sec Top speed: 161mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,300kg (1,335kg from ’86) Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 309mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/VR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 225/50/VR16

Production numbers: 70,044 Issue featured: 114 Engine capacity: 3,164cc Compression ratio: 10.3:1 Maximum power: 231bhp @ 5,900rpm Maximum torque: 284Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.6sec Top speed: 152mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,652mm Weight: 1,210kg Brakes: Front: 286mm discs Rear: 294mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x15-inch; 195/65/VR15 Rear: 8x15-inch, 215/60/VR15 (16 inches for ’89)

Production numbers: 50 (UK only) Issue featured: 99 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 330bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 432Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 173mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,335kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 309mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/VR16 Rear: 9x16-inch; 245/45/VR16

Production numbers: 337 Issue featured: 108 Engine capacity: 2,850cc Compression ratio: 8.3:1 Maximum power: 450bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 500Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-60mph: 3.9sec Top speed: 196mph Length: 4,260mm Width: 1,840mm Weight: 1,450kg Brakes: Front and rear: Ventilated drilled discs; 4-piston aluminium calipers Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x17-inch; 235/45/ZR17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/ZR17

Production numbers: 2,274 (for both wide and narrow-bodied) Issue featured: 128 Engine capacity: 3,164cc Compression ratio: 10.3:1 Maximum power: 231bhp @ 5,900rpm Maximum torque: 284Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-60mph: 6.0sec Top speed: 148mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,220kg Brakes: Front: 286mm discs Rear: 294mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x16-inch; 205/45/VR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 245/60/VR16

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HHHHH TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

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88 Data file in association with TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

930 LE 1989

3.2 Clubsport 1987-89

964 Carrera 4 1989-93

Essentially an SE without a slantnose front, the LE had the same engine, front spoiler, sill extensions and rear air intakes. One made for every OPC of the time.

Removing ‘luxuries’ sliced off around 40kg of weight. Revised engine management gave a higher rev limit of 6,840rpm. Suspension uprated and LSD standard.

Heavily revised bodywork, deformable bumpers over coilspring suspension and four-wheeldrive marked this radical overhaul of the “87 per cent new” 911.

Production numbers: 50 Issue featured: 110 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 330bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 432Nm @ 4,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 173mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,335kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 309mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/VR16 Rear: 9x16-inch; 245/45/VR16

Production numbers: 340 Issue featured: 126 Engine capacity: 3,164cc Compression ratio: 10.3:1 Maximum power: 231bhp @ 5,900rpm Maximum torque: 284Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-60mph: 5.1sec Top speed: 152mph Length: 4,291mm Width: 1,650mm Weight: 1,160kg Brakes: Front: 286mm discs Rear: 294mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x16-inch, 205/55/VR16; Rear: 7x16-inch, 225/55/VR16

Production numbers: 13,353 (Coupe) Issue featured: 111 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 250bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.7sec Top speed: 162mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,652mm Weight: 1,450kg Brakes: Front: 298mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x16-inch; 205/55/ZR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 225/50/ZR16

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964 C2 Speedster 1993-94

964 Turbo 3.6 1993-94

964 Anniversary 1993-94

Combined the 964 bodyshell with the hood and windscreen of the Carrera 3.2 Speedster, plus RS interior. It is thought Porsche planned to build 3,000, but demand fell.

Engine based on modified 3.6-litre 964 unit. Distinctive 18-inch split-rim Speedline wheels covered the big-red brake callipers. Suspension lowered by 20mm.

’30 Jahre’ anniversary 964 utilised a ‘Turbo’ wide body melded to the four-wheel-drive Carrera running gear. Available in Viola metallic, Polar silver or Amethyst.

Production numbers: 936 Issue featured: 128 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 250bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.5sec Top speed: 161mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,652mm Weight: 1,340kg Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/ZR17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/ZR17

Production numbers: 1,437 Issue featured: 120 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 7.5:1 Maximum power: 360bhp @ 5,500rpm Maximum torque: 520Nm @ 4,200rpm 0-62mph: 4.8sec Top speed: 174mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,470kg Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/ZR18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 265/35/ZR18

Production numbers: 911 Issue featured: 112 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 250bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.7sec Top speed: 162mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,470kg Brakes: Front: 298mm discs Rear:299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/17

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993 Turbo 1996-98

993 Carrera S 1997-98

993 Turbo S 1998

Fitted with two KKK turbochargers in order to reduce lag. Power went to all four wheels using the Carrera 4’s transmission system. Brakes were ‘Big Reds’.

The features that come with the Carrera S are similar to the Carrera 4S’s, only this time in rear-wheel drive. Sought after for its superb handling and wide-body looks.

The final hurrah for the last air-cooled 911. With 450bhp for UK models, it was the fastest and most luxurious road-going model Stuttgart had ever produced. Manual only.

Production numbers: 5,937 Issue featured: 112 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Maximum power: 408bhp @ 5,750rpm Maximum torque: 540Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.3sec Top speed: 180mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,795mm Weight: 1,500kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 322mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/ZR18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/ZR18

Production numbers: 3,714 Issue featured: 118 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 285bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 340Nm @ 5,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.4sec Top speed: 168mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,795mm Weight: 1,450kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 322mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/ZR18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/ZR18

Production numbers: 345 Issue featured: 115 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Maximum power: 450bhp @ 5,750rpm Maximum torque: 585Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.1sec Top speed: 186mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,795mm Weight: 1,583kg Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 322mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/18

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89

964 Carrera 2 1990-93

964 Turbo 1991-92

964 C4 Lightweight 1991

964 RS 1991-92

964 Turbo S 1992-93

964 3.8 RS 1993

Rear-drive Carrera 2 offered an emphatically more traditional 911 experience, and was 100kg lighter, but looked identical to the Carrera 4. Tiptronic was a new option.

This used the revised 964 bodyshell, extended arches and ‘tea tray’ wing. The engine was essentially the 3.3-litre unit from the previous model, but updated.

964 Leichtbau made use of surplus parts from 953 Paris-Dakar project. Highlights include four-way adjustable differential, short-ratio gearbox and stripped interior.

Around 120kg saved by deleting ‘luxuries’ and fitting magnesium Cup wheels. Power was boosted by 10bhp, suspension lowered by 40mm and uprated, as were brakes.

180kg lighter than Turbo. Intakes in the rear arches funnelled air to the brakes, while the engine power was boosted by 61bhp. RS-spec uprated suspension.

Identifiable by a lightweight Turbo bodyshell, large rear spoiler and 18inch Speedline wheels. Power came from a new 3.8-litre unit with hot-film air sensor and twin exhaust.

Production numbers: 19,484 Issue featured: 119 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 250bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.6sec Top speed: 162mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,652mm Weight: 1,350kg Brakes: Front: 298mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 6x16-inch; 205/55/ZR16 Rear: 8x16-inch; 225/50/ZR16

Production numbers: 3,660 Issue featured: 116 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 320bhp @ 5,750rpm Maximum torque: 450Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 5.4sec Top speed: 168mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,470kg Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/ZR17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/ZR17

Production numbers: 22 Issue featured: 131 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 265bhp @ 6,720rpm Maximum torque: 304Nm @ 6,720rpm 0-62mph: 4.5sec Top speed: 125mph Length: 4,275mm Width: 1,652mm Weight: 1,100kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/ZR16 Rear: 9x16-inch; 245/55/ZR16

Production numbers: 2,405 Issue featured: 131 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 260bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.4sec Top speed: 162mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,650mm Weight: 1,230kg (Sport) Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7.5x17-inch; 205/50/ZR17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/ZR17

Production numbers: 81 Issue featured: 108 Engine capacity: 3,299cc Compression ratio: 7.0:1 Maximum power: 381bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 490Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 180mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,290kg Brakes: Front: 320mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/ZR18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 265/35/ZR18

Production numbers: 55 Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 3,746cc Compression ratio: 11.6:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 359Nm @ 5,250rpm 0-62mph: 4.9sec Top speed: 169mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,775mm Weight: 1,210kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 290mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x18-inch; 235/40/ZR18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 285/35/ZR18

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964 RS America 1993-94

993 Carrera 1993-97

993 Carrera 4 1994-97

993 Carrera 4S 1995-96

993 Carrera RS 1995-96

993 GT2 1995-96

Offered in five colours, fixed whaletail wing and two cloth sports seats, with just four options: air-con, sunroof, 90 per cent locking rear differential and stereo.

Restyled bodywork had swept-back headlamps, curvaceous wings and blended-in bumpers. Engine revised, with VarioRam available from 1996.

As per the 993-model Carrera, but with four-wheel-drive. Transmission was half the weight of the previous Carrera 4, and was designed to give a more rear-drive feel.

The 4S was effectively a C4 with a Turbo wide bodyshell, albeit lacking a fixed rear wing. Also boasted Turbo suspension, brakes and Turbo-look wheels.

Lightweight body as per RS tradition, teamed with a 3.8-litre engine, VarioRam intake system and remapped ECU to create 300bhp, fed to the rear wheels only.

911 Turbo, but with reduced equipment. Also included rear-wheeldrive, making it a better track car. Fitted with huge front and rear wings and bolt-on arch extensions.

Production numbers: 701 Issue featured: 102 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 250bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 310Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 5.5sec Top speed: 164mph Length: 4,250mm Width: 1,650mm Weight: 1,340kg Brakes: Front: 298mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/ZR17 Rear: 8x17-inch; 255/40/ZR17

Production numbers: 38,626 Issue featured: 110 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 272bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 330Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.6sec Top speed: 168mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,735mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/ZR16 Rear: 9x17-inch; 245/45/ZR16

Production numbers: 2,884 (Coupe) Issue featured: 111 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 272bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 330Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 5.8sec Top speed: 166mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,735mm Weight: 1,420kg Brakes: Front: 304mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x16-inch; 205/55/ZR16 Rear: 9x16-inch; 245/45/ZR16

Production numbers: 6,948 Issue featured: 109 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 285bhp @ 6,100rpm Maximum torque: 340Nm @ 5,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.3sec Top speed: 168mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,795mm Weight: 1,520kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 322mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/ZR18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/ZR18

Production numbers: 1,014 Issue featured: 119 Engine capacity: 3,746cc Compression ratio: 11.5:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 355Nm @ 5,400rpm 0-62mph: 5.0sec Top speed: 172mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,735mm Weight: 1,279kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 18x8J, 225/40ZR18; Rear: 18x10J, 265/35ZR18

Production numbers: 173 Issue featured: 131 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 8.0:1 Maximum power: 430bhp @ 5,750rpm Maximum torque: 540Nm @ 4,500rpm 0-62mph: 3.9sec Top speed: 189mph Length: 4,245mm Width: 1,855mm Weight: 1,290kg Brakes: Front: 322mm discs; == Rear: 322mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x18-inch; 235/40/ZR18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 285/35/ZR18

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996 Carrera 1998-2001

996 Carrera 4 1998-2001

996 GT3 1998-2000

996 Turbo 2001-05

996 Carrera 4S 2001-05

996 GT2 2001-03

An all-new 911 with larger, restyled bodywork and a water-cooled engine. Interior was redesigned in order to enable better ergonomic efficiency and more room.

Four-wheel drive transmission fed five per cent of power in normal driving, increasing to 40 per cent when required. PSM used for first time, rolled out across the range in 2001.

Commonly called the Gen1 GT3, this was a lightweight 996 with power driving the rear wheels. Suspension was lowered by 30mm and brakes were uprated.

Distinguished by wide rear arches, air intakes and deep front wing, plus part-fixed, part-retractable rear wing. Different engine to naturally aspirated 3.6-litre 996 unit.

Basically a Carrera 4 featuring a Turbo bodyshell, without rear air intakes, but with a full-width rear reflector panel. Suspension and brakes were similar to the Turbo spec.

A lightweight, Turbo-bodied 996 with uprated turbocharged engine and suspension. PCCB was standard. Revised ECU later gave an extra 21bhp.

Production numbers: 56,733 Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 3,387cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 350Nm @ 4,600rpm 0-62mph: 5.2sec Top speed: 174mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,765mm Weight: 1,320kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/R17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/R17

Production numbers: 22,054 Issue featured: 111 Engine capacity: 3,387cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 300bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 350Nm @ 4,600rpm 0-62mph: 5.2sec Top speed: 174mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,765mm Weight: 1,375kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/R17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/R17

Production numbers: 1,858 Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.7:1 Maximum power: 360bhp @ 7,200rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.8sec Top speed: 188mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,765mm Weight: 1,350kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 300mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/R18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/R18

Production numbers: 20,499 Issue featured: 114 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.4:1 Maximum power: 420bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 560Nm @ 2,700-4,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.2sec Top speed: 189mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,830mm Weight: 1,540kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/R18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/30R18

Production numbers: 23,055 Issue featured: 124 Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 320bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.1sec Top speed: 174mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,830mm Weight: 1,495kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/R18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/30/R18

Production numbers: 1,287 Issue featured: 127 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.4:1 Maximum power: 462bhp @ 5,700rpm Maximum torque: 620Nm @ 3,500-4,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.1sec Top speed: 196mph Length: 4,450mm Width: 1,830mm Weight: 1,440kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 235/40/R18 Rear: 12x18-inch; 315/30/R18

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90 Data file in association with

Sales debate:

Are investors good for the Porsche 911 market?

Over the last few years, the stratospheric rise of the Porsche 911 market has been driven predominantly by the influx of investors choosing to buy classic cars rather than keeping their money in the bank. Greig Daly, sales director of RPM Technik explains how collectors often “make the market”, pointing out that “if there is a car that is priced a little more expensively than anything else and they buy it, that then dictates what that car is worth.” Surely, these blue-chip buyers are good news for specialists? Both Daly and Mikey Wastie of Autofarm believe that the situation is not that simple. At a simplistic level, collectors are good for the sales side of the business because, as Daly bluntly puts it, “they buy cars.” Wastie agrees, explaining that these buyers have been good for Autofarm: “Originality is key and specialists such as our own, Josh Sadler, are in demand and are vital in determining provenance and correct specification,” says the esteemed independent specialist’s co-owner. Collectors are not just good for the sales side of Porsche specialists’ businesses though, with both Daly and Wastie agreeing that investors’ penchant for perfection often means that their cars are well looked after. What’s more, the price hikes driven by collectors’ involvement in the market means that even enthusiasts with 911s are now more willing to carry out major mechanical work. “You’ve got these lads that paid £8,000 for 3.2s 15 years ago and now they see them up at £40,000, they’re quite happy to invest in the car, which, besides the business, is good for these cars. In 100 years’ time, that will have been done properly and will keep the cars on the road,” RPM’s sales director explains. Daly does concede that these price rises can also negatively affect true 911 enthusiasts, pointing out that they know of many GT3 owners who originally bought cars to use on track but are now put off using the cars “as Porsche intended” because “they didn’t want to have what was a car they could never afford being chucked around on track.” Wastie agrees that it is a shame that many cars (both enthusiast-owned and bought by collectors) are being kept in their garages away from the eyes of specialists and the general public. However, the proprietor of Autofarm does end optimistically. While those investing in cars at the very highest levels do tend to ferry cars out of sight, many of those looking to tie their money up in Porsches “tend to be buying more usable 911s,” in Wastie’s experience. With these investors actually using their cars, “this has got to be positive for the Porsche market as they, hopefully, will enjoy the ownership experience and look to upgrade or buy another car.”

Gen2 996 C2 2002-04

Gen2 996 C4 2002-04

996 Anniversary 2003-04

Gen2 996 GT3 2003-05

Facelifted with Turbo-style headlamps and revised front and rear bumpers, fitted with more powerful 3.6-litre engine and VarioCam Plus. Manual and Tiptronic ’boxes updated.

Facelifted in line with rear-drive Carrera, though the all-wheel-drive version drives very much like its reardriven brethren. Cabin received minor updates over Gen1.

Available in GT silver, and included a Turbo front bumper and chrome Carrera wheels. Powerkit, -10mm sports suspension and mechanical LSD standard.

Based on facelifted 996 Carrera, but with new wings. Suspension lowered and uprated, PCCB optional . Fullspec interior unless Clubsport option was ordered.

Production numbers: 29,389 Issue featured: n/a Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 320bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.0sec Top speed: 177mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,770mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/R17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/R17

Production numbers: 10,386 Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 320bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.0sec Top speed: 177mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,770mm Weight: 1,430kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 7x17-inch; 205/50/R17 Rear: 9x17-inch; 255/40/R17

Production numbers: 1,963 Issue featured: 112 Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 345bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,800rpm 0-62mph: 4.9sec Top speed: 175mph Length: 4,430mm Width: 1,770mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/R18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 285/30/R18

Production numbers: 2,313 Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.7:1 Maximum power: 381bhp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 385Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.5sec Top speed: 190mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,770mm Weight: 1,380kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x18-inch; 235/40/R18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/30/R18

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997 Carrera S 2004-08

997 Carrera 4 2005-08

997 Carrera 4S 2005-08

997 Turbo 2005-10

As per the 997 Carrera, but with more powerful 3.8-litre engine and PASM. 19-inch wheels as standard, with bigger ventilated brakes. Quad exhaust tailpipes.

Like the 997 Carrera, but with drive to all four wheels via a multi-disc viscous coupling, transferring between five and 40 per cent of traction to the front. 44mm wider at rear.

The same 3.8-litre, 355bhp engine as the Carrera S, with four-wheeldrive system on C4. 44mm wider than Carrera S to accommodate for wider rear wheels and tyres.

Similar to the 997 C4S body, but with extra intakes at the front and sides. Essentially the 996 Turbo engine, but with all-new twin turbos. VTG gave the best of small and large turbos.

Production numbers: 41,059 Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 3,824cc Compression ratio: 11.8:1 Maximum power: 355bhp @ 6,600rpm Maximum torque: 400Nm @ 4,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.8sec Top speed: 182mph Length: 4,427mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,420kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 295/30/R19

Production numbers: 8,533 Issue featured: 3 Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 325bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.1sec Top speed: 174mph Length: 4,427mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,450kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 235/40/R18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 295/35/R18

Production numbers: 30,973 Issue featured: 111 Engine capacity: 3,824cc Compression ratio: 11.8:1 Maximum power: 355bhp @ 6,600rpm Maximum torque: 400Nm @ 4,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.8sec Top speed: 179mph Length: 4,427mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,475kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 295/30/R19

Production numbers: 19,201 (up to 2008) Issue featured: 107 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 480bhp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 620Nm @ 1,950-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.9sec Top speed: 193mph Length: 4,450mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,585kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/R19

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Gen2 997 C2 2008-12

Gen2 997 C2 S 2008-12

Gen2 997 C4 2008-12

Gen2 997 C4S 2008-12

Revised with restyled LED rear lights and front driving lights. M97 engine replaced with a 91 DFI unit, using fewer parts – with no problematic Intermediate Shaft.

Altered as per the Carrera, but with larger 3.8-litre engine – again using fewer components and Direct Fuel Injection. Had seven-speed PDK optional, like the Carrera.

Numerous engine and body changes as per the Carrera, but with a wider rear end plus full-width rear reflector. New all-wheel drive was initiated from the 997 Turbo.

Bodywork as per C4, but with larger engine. Utilised the 997 Turbo’s fourwheel drive and PTM. Viscous coupling gives way to electromagnetically controlled multi-plate clutch.

Production numbers: 10,500 Issue featured: 89 Engine capacity: 3,614cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 345hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 390Nm @ 4,400rpm 0-62mph: 4.9sec Top speed: 179mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,415kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 235/40/ZR18 Rear: 10.5x18-inch; 265/40/ZR18

Production numbers: 15,000 Issue featured: 61 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 385hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,400rpm 0-62mph: 4.7sec Top speed: 187mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,425kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 295/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 1,384 (Coupe) Issue featured: 41 Engine capacity: 3,614cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 345hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 390Nm @ 4,400rpm 0-62mph: 5.0sec Top speed: 176mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,470kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 235/40/ZR18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/35/ZR18

Production numbers: 7,910 (Coupe) Issue featured: 111 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 385hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,400rpm 0-62mph: 4.7sec Top speed: 185mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,480kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

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91

996 GT3 RS 2004-05

996 Turbo S 2004-05

997 Carrera 2004-08

Same 3,600cc engine as in GT3, but with weight saving, offering 280bhp per ton – an improvement of four per cent over the 996 GT3 Clubsport. PCCB optional.

A 911 Turbo with the previously optional 30bhp power upgrade, with larger turbochargers, uprated intercoolers and a revised ECU. PCCB standard.

Fully revised 911 with 993-influenced bodywork and a new interior. Engine was like 996, but refined for more power. Six-speed Tiptronic option available.

Production numbers: 682 Issue featured: 118 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 11.7:1 Maximum power: 381bhp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 385Nm @ 5,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.4sec Top speed: 190mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,770mm Weight: 1,360kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x18-inch; 235/40/R18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/30/R18

Production numbers: 1,563 Issue featured: 62 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.4:1 Maximum power: 450bhp @ 5,700rpm Maximum torque: 620Nm @ 3,500-4,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.2sec Top speed: 191mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,830mm Weight: 1,590kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 225/40/R18 Rear: 11x18-inch; 295/30/R18

Production numbers: 25,788 Issue featured: 112 Engine capacity: 3,596cc Compression ratio: 11.3:1 Maximum power: 325bhp @ 6,800rpm Maximum torque: 370Nm @ 4,250rpm 0-62mph: 5.0sec Top speed: 177mph Length: 4,427mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,395kg Brakes: Front: 318mm discs Rear: 299mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8x18-inch; 235/40/R18 Rear: 10x18-inch; 265/40/R18

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Porsche Specialists

We carry out a full range of Porsche servicing and Porsche repair projects on all popular and classic models including diagnostics and body repair work. Porsche Torque are able to undertake all types of mechanical, cosmetic and restoration work to your complete satisfaction. Fully Equipped Workshop Bodywork and Restorations Diagnostics and Tuning Free Estimates Engine & Gearbox Rebuild Specialists Collection & Delivery Service Alignment and Geometry Facilities Audio & Alarm Fitting 50 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE FROM EX OPC MASTER TECHNICIANS

(AFN, RUF & HATFIELD)

997 GT3 2006-07

997 GT3 RS 2006-07

997 GT2 2007-09

Track-focused, but based on narrowbodied Carrera with reworked 996 GT3 engine. PASM standard, revs to 8,400rpm, 200 higher than the Gen2 996 GT3.

Similar to GT3, with inclusion of wider rear bodyshell of the Carrera S. 20kg of weight saved from GT3 thanks to carbon engine cover and rear wing, and plastic rear window.

Essentially the 997 Turbo, but with rear-wheel drive only. Enjoyed a more track-orientated suspension and brake setup, with GT3-style interior and extra power.

Production numbers: 2,378 Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 12.0:1 Maximum power: 415bhp @ 7,600rpm Maximum torque: 405Nm @ 5,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.3sec Top speed: 192mph Length: 4,445mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,395kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 305/30/R19

Production numbers: 1,106 Issue featured: 110 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 12.0:1 Maximum power: 415bhp @ 7,600rpm Maximum torque: 405Nm @ 5,500rpm 0-62mph: 4.2sec Top speed: 194mph Length: 4,460mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,375kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/R19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 305/30/R19

Production numbers: 1,242 Issue featured: 127 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.0:1 Maximum power: 530bhp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 680Nm @ 2,200-4,500rpm 0-62mph: 3.7sec Top speed: 204mph Length: 4,469mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,440kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 325/30/ZR19

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TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

Gen2 997 GT3 2009-12

Gen2 997 Turbo 2009-13

Gen2 997 GT3 RS 2009-12

Updated as per the Carrera, but with a unique front and rear wing, revised PASM, centre-lock wheels and better brakes. 2010 MY GT3s recalled to fix rear hubs.

Same as the original 997 Turbo, but with new LED tail-lights and driver lights up front. Larger tailpipes and DFI engine, with fuel consumption cut by 16 per cent.

Wider front arches and a larger wing. Dynamic engine mounts and PASM are standard. Air-con is optional, with no door handles, wheel brace or sound proofing.

Production numbers: 2,200 Issue featured: 117 Engine capacity: 3,797cc Compression ratio: 12.2.:1 Maximum power: 435hp @ 7,900rpm Maximum torque: 430Nm @6, 250rpm 0-62mph: 4.1sec Top speed: 194mph Length: 4,460mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,395kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 12x19-inch;305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 3,800 Issue featured: 116 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 500hp @ 6,000rpm Maximum torque: 650Nm @ 1,950-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.4sec Top speed: 194mph Length: 4,450mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,570kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 1,500 Issue featured: 125 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.2:1 Maximum power: 450hp @ 7,900rpm Maximum torque: 430Nm @ 6,750rpm 0-62mph: 4.0sec Top speed: 192mph Length: 4,460mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 380mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x19-inch; 245/35/ZR19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 325/30/ZR19

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HHHHH TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

DISTRIBUTORS FOR

01895 814446 07507 623997

all major credit cards are accepted

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92 Data file in association with

997 Speedster 2010

997 Sport Classic 2010

997 GT3 RS 4.0 2010

Built to mark Porsche Exclusive’s 25th anniversary. Shorter windscreen, but rake angle same as 997 Carrera. Wide body with 19-inch Fuchs wheels. Rear-wheel drive.

Based on a 3.8-litre Powerkit, rear-wheel-drive Carrera S, but with 44mm wider rear arches. Retro styling including iconic ducktail wing and large Fuchs wheels.

The engine was upgraded and aerodynamically tweaked too, with the angle of the rear wing increased and dive planes on either side of the front nose. A future collectors’ gem.

Production numbers: 356 Issue featured: 128 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 408hp @ 7,300rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,400-5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.4sec Top speed: 190mph Length: 4,440mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,540kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 250 Issue featured: 57 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 408hp @ 7,300rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,200-5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 187mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,425kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 600 Issue featured: 125 Engine capacity: 3,996cc Compression ratio: 12.6:1 Maximum power: 500hp @ 8,250rpm Maximum torque: 460Nm @ 5,750rpm 0-62mph: 3.9sec Top speed: 193mph Length: 4,460mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,360kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 380mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x19-inch; 245/35/ZR19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 325/30/ZR19

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991.1 Carrera S 2011-2015

991.1 Carrera 4 2012-2015

991.1 Carrera 4S 2012-2015

Same as Carrera, including sevenspeed manual ’box, but utilising bigger engine. Slightly larger front brakes than the standard Carrera, PASM as standard equipment.

22mm wider body than C2, with 10mm wider tyres and connecting rear tale light as standard. Also features a torque distribution indicator on the digital dash clock.

Same wider body styling as Carrera 4, coupled to 3.8-litre 400bhp engine. Also features six-piston brake calipers at front, as opposed to four. PTV spread torque more evenly.

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 114 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 400hp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.5sec Top speed: 188.9mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,395kg Brakes: Front: 340mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11x20-inch; 295/30/ZR20

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 98 Engine capacity: 3,436cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 350hp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 390Nm @ 5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.9sec Top speed: 177mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,430kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/40/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch;305/35/ZR19

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 118 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 400hp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.5sec Top speed: 185mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,445kg Brakes: Front: 340mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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TO VIEW CALL: 07522 911 911

N/A

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The new turbo marks the introduction of rear axle steering, plus PDK-only transmission to forced induction 991 models. Rear fenders 28mm wider than C4.

Facelift model is substantially changed underneath with power now coming from completely new 3.0-litre 9A2 turbocharged engine. PASM now standard.

Shares same 3.0-litre turbocharged 9A2 engine as Carrera, with revised turbos, exhaust and engine management to produce an extra 50hp. Rear axle steering now an option.

Production numbers: 42 (UK) Issue featured: 136 Engine capacity: 3,996cc Compression ratio: 12.9:1 Maximum power: 500hp @ 8,250rpm Maximum torque: 460Nm @ 6,250rpm 0-62mph: 3.3sec Top speed: 193mph Length: 4,545mm Width: 1,880mm Weight: 1,420kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 380mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9.5x20-inch; 265/35/ZR20 Rear: 12.5x21-inch; 325/30/ZR21

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

991 GT3 RS 2015-

• Servicing • Restoration

• Repair • Rebuild

• MOT testing station • 4 wheel alignment

www.brauntonengineering.co.uk 01271 814144

Porsche Specialist

DEVON EX33 2JP

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991.2 Carrera 2015-

991.2 Carrera S 2015-

Currently in production Issue featured: 137 Engine capacity: 2,981cc Compression ratio: 10.0:1 Maximum power: 370hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 450Nm @ 1,700-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.2sec Top speed: 183mph Length: 4,499mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,430kg Brakes: Front & Rear: 330mm discs; Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/40/ZR19 Rear: 11.5x19-inch; 295/35/ZR19

Currently in production Issue featured: 132 Engine capacity: 2,981cc Compression ratio: 10.0:1 Maximum power: 420hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 500Nm@1,700-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.9sec Top speed: 191mph Length: 4,499mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,440kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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93

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997 918 Edition 2010

997 GT2 RS 2010-11

997 C2 GTS 2010-12

997 C4 GTS 2011-12

997 Turbo S 2011-13

991.1 Carrera 2011-2015

These exclusive 997 Turbo S-spec 911s were only available to those who had paid a deposit for a 918 Spyder. Acid green badging and brake calipers.

The GT2 went back to its roots with lightweight body and interior, plus extra power. Recognisable over standard GT2 thanks to carbon fibre bonnet, air intake and mirrors.

Features the C4’s wider rear body, and powered by the 3.8-litre Carrera S engine, with a Powerkit producing an extra 25bhp. The GTS is laden with Porsche options.

Like the C2 997 GTS, but slightly heavier and with four-wheel drive. In either C2 or C4 form, it represented a great saving over optioning up a 997 Carrera counterpart.

As standard 997 Turbo but more power and higher level of standard equipment including PCCB, centrelock wheels, crested sports seats and Sport Chrono Plus.

The first of the newest and latest Gen7 911, it takes styling hues from the 993. A redesigned chassis with lengthened wheelbase reduces overhang of the engine.

Production numbers: 121 Issue featured: 74 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 530hp@6,250-6,750rpm Maximum torque: 700Nm @ 2,100-4,250rpm 0-62mph: 3.3sec Top speed: 195mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,585kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 500 Issue featured: 114 Engine capacity: 3,600cc Compression ratio: 9.0:1 Maximum power: 620hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 700Nm @ 2,500-5,500rpm 0-62mph: 3.5sec Top speed: 205mph Length: 4,460mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x19-inch; 245/35/ZR19 Rear: 12x19-inch; 325/30/ZR19

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 118 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 408hp @ 7,300rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,200-5,600rpm 0-60mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 190mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,420kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/19

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 125 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 408hp @7,300rpm Maximum torque: 420Nm @ 4,200-5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.6sec Top speed: 188mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,480kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: 2,000 Issue featured: 123 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 530hp@6,250-6,750rpm Maximum torque: 700Nm @ 2,100-4,250rpm 0-62mph: 3.3sec Top speed: 195mph Length: 4,435mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,585kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 350mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/35/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 305/30/ZR19

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 137 Engine capacity: 3,436cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 350hp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 390Nm @ 5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.8sec Top speed: 179.6mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,808mm Weight: 1,380kg Brakes: Front: 330mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/40/ZR19 Rear: 11x19-inch; 285/35/ZR19

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991 GT3 2013-

991 Turbo 2013-2015

991 Turbo S 2013-2015

991 Anniversary 2013-14

991 Carrera GTS 2014-

991 C4 GTS 2014-

Wide body from 991 Carrera 4 was used for the first time. Mezger engine from previous GT3s replaced with revamped DFI version of Carrera S engine. PDK only.

The new Turbo marks the introduction of rear axle steering, plus PDK-only transmission to forced induction 991 models. Rear fenders 28mm wider than C4.

Same dimensions as 991 Turbo, but with a tweaked map to provide an extra 40bhp. Usual Turbo options as standard, including centre-lock wheels, PCCB, PDCC and Bose sound.

Exuberantly styled Carrera S with wide body and generous spec. Many styling cues inside and out taken from original 901. Powerkit only came as standard spec in US.

Big-spec GTS utilises wide body and a host of good options including Powerkit, PASM, Sport chrono, Sport exhaust to name a few, all for ÂŁ7,000 more than Carrera S.

Almost the same as the C2 GTS, but with additional traction offered by four-wheel-drive. As a result, performance times are altered slightly over its rear-driven variant.

Production numbers: Currently in production Issue featured: 124 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.9:1 Maximum power: 475hp @ 8,250rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 6,250rpm 0-62mph: 3.5sec Top speed: 196mph Length: 4,545mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,430kg Brakes: Front: 380mm discs Rear: 380mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 12x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

Production numbers: 1,963 Issue featured: 112 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 400hp @ 7,400rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 5,600rpm 0-62mph: 4.5sec Top speed: 188mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,420kg Brakes: Front: 340mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 121 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 430hp @ 7,500rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 5,750rpm 0-62mph: 4.0sec Top speed: 190mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,425kg Brakes: Front: 340mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

Production numbers: Unknown Issue featured: 125 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 12.5:1 Maximum power: 430hp @ 7,500rpm Maximum torque: 440Nm @ 5,750rpm 0-62mph: 4.4sec Top speed: 188mph Length: 4,491mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,470kg Brakes: Front: 340mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

Currently in production Issue featured: 109 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 520hp@6,000-6,500rpm Maximum torque: 660Nm @ 1,950-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.4sec Top speed: 195mph Length: 4,506mm Width: 1,880mm Weight: 1,595kg Brakes: Front & Rear: 380mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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Currently in production Issue featured: 115 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 560hp@6,500-6,750rpm Maximum torque: 700Nm @ 2,100-4,250 0-62mph: 3.1sec Top speed: 197mph Length: 4,506mm Width: 1,880mm Weight: 1,605kg Brakes: Front: 410mm discs Rear: 390mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11x20-inch, 305/30/ZR20

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991.2 Carrera 4 2016-

991.2 Carrera 4S 2016-

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New 9A2 turbocharged engine fused with all-wheel-drive running gear, now electro-hydraulically controlled. Distinguishable by wider body and full-width rear brake light.

As per the Carrera 4 but utilising revised turbos, exhaust and engine management from the C2S to produce an extra 50hp. Faster 0-62mph than C2S for first time.

It features a revised 9A1 engine from 991.1 now producing 540hp thanks to modified inlet ports in the cylinder head, new injection nozzles and higher fuel pressure.

As per 991.2 Turbo but with power boosted to 580hp thanks to new turbochargers with larger compressors. Fastest ever Porsche 911 from 0-62mph.

991 GT3 RS engine mated to speciallyrevised six-speed manual gearbox. Features Carrera Cabriolet active rear wing with diffuser aiding downforce. Lightweight flywheel optional.

Coming soon!

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

Production numbers:

Production numbers: 991 Issue featured: 138 Engine capacity: 3,996cc Compression ratio: 12.9:1 Maximum power: 500hp @ 8,250rpm Maximum torque: 460Nm @ 6,250rpm 0-62mph: 3.8sec Top speed: 201mph Length: 4,532mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,370kg Brakes: Front: 410mm discs Rear: 390mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 12x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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Currently in production Issue featured: 133 Engine capacity: 2,981cc Compression ratio: 10.0:1 Maximum power: 370hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 450Nm @ 1,700-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 4.1sec Top speed: 181mph Length: 4,499mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,480kg Brakes: Front & Rear: 330mm discs; Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x19-inch; 235/40/ZR19 Rear: 11.5x19-inch; 295/35/ZR19

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Currently in production Issue featured: 137 Engine capacity: 2,981cc Compression ratio: 10.0:1 Maximum power: 420hp @ 6,500rpm Maximum torque: 500Nm@ 1,700-5,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.8sec Top speed: 189mph Length: 4,499mm Width: 1,852mm Weight: 1,490kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 8.5x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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991.2 Turbo 2016-

Currently in production Issue featured: 135 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 540hp @ 6,400rpm Maximum torque: 710Nm @ 2,250-4,000rpm 0-62mph: 3.1sec Top speed: 199mph Length: 4,507mm Width: 1,880mm Weight: 1,595kg Brakes: Front & Rear: 330mm discs; Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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991.2 Turbo S 2016-

Currently in production Issue featured: 137 Engine capacity: 3,800cc Compression ratio: 9.8:1 Maximum power: 580hp @ 6,750rpm Maximum torque: 750Nm @ 2,250-4,000rpm 0-62mph: 2.9sec Top speed: 205mph Length: 4,507mm Width: 1,880mm Weight: 1,600kg Brakes: Front: 350mm discs Rear: 330mm discs Wheels & tyres: Front: 9x20-inch; 245/35/ZR20 Rear: 11.5x20-inch; 305/30/ZR20

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991 R 2016-

991.2 GT3 2016-

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PREMIER PORSCHE

SHOWROOM


PREMIER PORSCHE

SHOWROOM 01825 830424

The Natural Choice for Porsche

911 Carrera RS (993 LHD)

911 Carrera RS (964 LHD)

911 Carrera RS (964 LHD)

911 2.0 S (LHD)

Grand Prix White • Black/Grey Dual Tone Leather Bucket Seats • Manual Gearbox • 18” Split Rim Wheels 58,240 km (36,400 miles) • 1995 (N)

Maritime Blue • Triple Tone Leather Bucket Seats • Manual Gearbox 17” Magnesium Cup Wheels 93,656 km (58,195 miles) • 1992 (J)

Rubystone Red • Triple Tone Leather Bucket Seats • Manual Gearbox 17” Magnesium Cup Wheels 79,487 km (49,390 miles) • 1992 (J)

Silver Metallic • Black Half Leather Sport Seats • Manual Gearbox • 15” Fuchs Wheels • Rare Short Wheelbase Model 1968 (F)

911 Carrera 3.2 Speedster

911 GT2 (996)

911 Carrera 4 S (991)

911 Carrera 2 S (997 GEN ll)

Silver Metallic • Burgundy Leather Sport Seats • Manual Gearbox • 16” Fuchs Wheels • Turbo Body • 29,334 miles 1989 (G)

Arctic Silver • Black Leather Bucket Seats Manual Gearbox • Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes • Rear Roll Cage 48,992 miles • 2002 (02)

Basalt Black • Black Leather Sport Seats PDK Gearbox • Touchscreen Satellite Navigation • 20” Carrera III Wheels 9,226 miles • 2013 (63)

GT Silver • Cocoa Leather Seats Manual Gearbox • 19” Carrera Sport Wheels • Touchscreen Satellite Navigation • 32,015 miles • 2010 (10)

911 Carrera 4 S Targa (997)

911 Carrera 2 (997 GEN II)

911 Carrera 2 S (997)

911 Carrera 4 S (996)

Basalt Black • Black Leather Seats Tiptronic ‘S’ Gearbox • 19” Carrera Classic Wheels • Satellite Navigation 28,490 miles • 2008 (08)

Arctic Silver • Black Leather Seats Manual Gearbox • Touchscreen Satellite Navigation • 19” Carrera Classic Wheels 46,323 miles • 2008 (58)

Basalt Black • Black Leather Seats Manual Gearbox • Satellite Navigation Switchable Sports Exhaust • 56,690 miles 2007 (07)

Seal Grey • Black Leather Seats Manual Gearbox • Satellite Navigation 18” Turbo II Wheels • 50,992 miles 2004 (04)

£249,995

£139,995

£42,995

£209,995

£119,995

£36,995

£199,995

£79,995

£32,995

£174,995

£47,995

£27,995

At Paragon, we have superb in-house workshop and preparation facilities. Each car is supplied fully serviced with a new MOT and our 12-month/12,000-mile comprehensive parts and labour warranty.

See more of our current stock at paragongb.com PARAGON GB LTD FIVE ASHES EAST SUSSEX TN20 6HY

01825 830424


PREMIER PORSCHE

SHOWROOM 1998 PORSCHE 993 TURBO S

- SPEED YELLOW - 61K MILES


PREMIER PORSCHE

SHOWROOM

Time for a change? A call to Paul Stephens will ensure that you get to share over two decades of experience and help you make the right decisions if you are contemplating buying or selling an excellent example of the iconic Porsche marque.

Paul Stephens. Specialist in original and bespoke Porsche Classic and Modern Sales Service and Performance Upgrades Restoration and Bespoke Builds

Sudbury Road Little Maplestead, Halstead Essex, CO9 2SE

paul-stephens.com 01440 714884

997 Turbo 3.6 Tip (2007 - 07) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 36k miles…......................................£55,000

997 Turbo 3.6 Tip (2008 - 57) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 46k miles .....................................…£53,000

997 “2S” Gen 2 3.8 PDK (2011 - 61) Platinum Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 25k miles..........................................£53,000

997 “2S” Gen 2 3.8 PDK (2009 - 59) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 17k miles......................................…£48,000

997 “4S” Gen 2 3.8 (2010 - 10) GT Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 43k miles......................................…£46,000

997 “2S” Gen 2 3.8 PDK (2009 - 09) Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 51k miles......................................…£41,000

997 “C2” Gen 2 3.6 PDK (2009 - 09) Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 33k miles..........................................£40,000

997 “C2” Gen 2 3.6 PDK (2008 - 58) Midnight Blue with Ocean Blue Leather, Sat Nav, 28k miles..........................£40,000

996 Turbo 3.6 Tip (2002 - 52) Seal Grey with Cinnamon Leather, Sat Nav, 70k miles..........................................£40,000

997 “4S” 3.8 Tip Cab (2007 - 57) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 46k miles..........................................£38,000

997 “C2” Gen 2 3.6 PDK (2008 - 58) Meteor Grey with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 53k miles.........................................£37,000

997 Targa “4S” 3.8 (2006 - 56) Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 49k miles..........................................£36,000

997 “4S” 3.8 (2007 - 07) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 36k miles..........................................£36,000

997 “4S” 3.8 Tip (2007 - 57) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 44k miles.........................................£36,000

997 “4S” 3.8 (2007 - 57) Meteor Grey with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 41k miles..........................................£36,000

STS House, Bristol Way, Slough, Berkshire, SL1 3QE 997 “4S” 3.8 (2008 - 08) Silver with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 51k miles..........................................£35,000

997 “4S” 3.8 Tip (2006 - 06) Basalt Black with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 36k miles..........................................£34,000

997 “4S” 3.8 (2007 - 07) Meteor Grey with Black Leather, Sat Nav, 47k miles..........................................£34,000

997 “2S” 3.8 (2008 - 08) Meteor Grey with Grey Leather, Sat Nav, 44k miles.........................................£34,000

PORSCHES WANTED (2003 TO 2012)

01753 553 969 www.rsjsportscars.com


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SHOWROOM SERVICING & TUNING

PORSCHE

TITANIUM LUGS FREE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE When ordered from WORLD-MOTORSPORTS.com

AEROSPACE

QUALITY

ALSO AVAILABLE FOR: VW, Audi, BMW, Lamborghini,

McLaren, Nissan, Mercedes and more. See website for full list.

PORSCHE Water-Cooled Lug Bolts

PORSCHE Air-Cooled Open Ended Lug Nuts

PORSCHE Air-Cooled Closed End Lug Nuts

$275.00

$260.00

$260.00

WORLD-MOTORSPORTS.com


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PORSCHE GIFT ITEMS

ation e Informrod Servic uction 16 Technik Int 20

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ENGINE REBUILDS - ALL MODELS GENERAL REPAIRS & SERVICING

GEARBOX REBUILDS ALL MODELS

RGA

AIR CONDITIONING

DISC RE-FACING

London’s Major Porsche Specialist Units 32-34 Miles St, Vauxhall SW8 1RY

www.rgaporschelondon.co.uk

TYRE SUPPLY & FITTING WHEEL ALIGNMENT

JIG REPAIRS

email bob@rgaporsche.co.uk All work to the highest standard and carried out in house Mon-Fri 7am-7pm, Sat 9am-6pm, Sun - call Tel: 0207 793 1447 - ask for Bob for booking advice

RESTORATION & RESPRAYS

DAMAGE REPAIR INCLUDING FOR ALL INSURANCE COMPANIES

WHEEL BALANCING, WHEEL STRAIGHTENING & RE-FURBISHMENT

TORQUE TUBE OVERHAUL 924,944,968,928

Rennline Fire Extinguisher Quick Release

Wheel Hardware - Studs, Nuts & Spacers

Adjustable Control Arms (802) 893-7366 www.Rennline.com


PREMIER PORSCHE To advertise in

Yorkshire‘s No.1 choice for classic to modern Porsche Please call us on 08434 996 911

Contact us on

www.yorkshireclassicporsche.co.uk Leeds Road, Collingham, nr Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS22 5AA

INDEPENDENT GARAGE SERVICES SPECIALISTS IN:VW AUDI GROUP PORSCHE

01202 586442 adinfo@imagine-publishing.co.uk

Independent Garage Services is an independent garage specialising in VW, Audi Group, Chrysler Jeep and Porsche. Based in Southampton, we undertake all aspects of maintenance.

In de pe n d en t Garage Ser v i ces

Porsche Servicing – With the acquisition of the latest Porsche diagnostic equipment, we can offer menu servicing to factory specifications. Whether you own the latest 911 Turbo, Boxster or Cayenne, we offer a real alternative to main dealers. With considerable experience gained from racing our 996 GT3 in endurance racing we are comprehensively equipped to cater for all. With little choice in the Southampton area and main dealers over an hour away, give Jim a ring today to discuss your requirements and find out how competitive we can be. For more details on the services we offer and our pricing range – please visit our website. www.independentgarageservices.co.uk Unit 5, Stanstead Road, Boyatt Wood Industrial Estate, Eastleigh, Southampton, SO50 4RZ Tel: 02380 629606 Fax: 02380 629329

// TUNING // MODIFICATION // UPGRADES

// EXPERIENCE // SERVICING // REPAIR

// CLASSICS // RESTORATION // SALES

// KNOWLEDGE // FACILITIES // VALUE

THE COMPLETE SERVICE With nearly 30 years experience, Parr is the UK’s leading Porsche specialist.

PARR Specialists In Porsche 5 The Faraday Centre, Faraday Road, Crawley, West Sussex RH10 9PX

+44 (0) 1293 537 911 // PARR-UK.COM

uk distributor for:

Porsche service work remains the core business for Parr and we offer the best possible service to our valued customers. Not only are we unrivalled in our Porsche knowledge and expertise but we offer excellent value – if in the unlikely event you are quoted a lower fixed price for your Porsche we will match the price on receipt of a written quote.

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WWW.HISTORIKA.COM instagram.com/historika911 facebook.com/historika911 twitter.com/historika911 YOUTUBE.COM/HISTORIKA911 Call 07836 384 999 or 07717 212 911

PHOTOGRAPHY: RéMI dargegen

Y e s t e r d ay ’ s P o r s c h e s .

P r e s e r v e d f o r T o m o r r o w.

E n j o y e d T o d ay.

FIN E C A RS // r es tor ation // r ace pre par ation // R ARE parts


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ONE OF ONLY 4 BEING BUILT IN 2016

AT RENNSPORT WE HAVE RECREATED THE 911S OF CLASSIC SIMPLICITY. BACK DATED TO REFLECT THE STYLE OF THE ICONIC 1970 STEVE MCQUEEN 911, THESE STUNNING CARS, FINISHED IN SLATE GREY, ARE BASED ORIGINALLY ON 1989 3.2L G50 CARRERAS. COMPLETE NUT AND BOLT REBUILD WITH BLUEPRINT ENGINE AND GEARBOX. PRICING STARTING FROM £100,000, CURRENTLY AWAITING FINAL SPECIFICATION. WITH 275BHP - A RESPONSIVE VEHICLE IDEAL FOR TOURING. VISIT OUR BESPOKE ENGINEERING FACILITY AND SHOWROOM IN THE HEART OF THE COTSWOLDS. BUILD YOUR OWN CLASSIC PORSCHE AND BECOME PART OF THE JOURNEY.

E: PAUL@911RENNSPORT.CO.UK T: 0788 1973 911 COTSWOLD BUSINESS VILLAGE, MORETON-IN-MARSH, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, GL56 0JQ 911RENNSPORT.CO.UK

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RENNSPORT MCQUEEN EVOLUTION G50


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The Porsche Bike RX. The Porsche Bike RX and the Porsche 911 RSR. There is no mistaking the relationship: the famous design line of the 911 silhouette is echoed in the dynamic appearance of the Porsche Bike RX.

Take it for a test ride at Porsche Centre Bournemouth now.

Porsche Centre Bournemouth 282-284 New Road Ferndown Dorset BH22 8ER Tel: 01202 897 688 info@porschebournemouth.co.uk www.porschebournemouth.co.uk

LIFESTYLE

A design line is what connects everything.


PREMIER PORSCHE

INSURANCE & FINANCE


NEXT ISSUE Issue 139 in shops and available for download from 20th April

964 Turbo flatnose! Test drive in the ex-Sultan of Brunei’s Turbo with an alternative silhouette

997.2 GT3 BUYER’S GUIDE

PORSCHE HISTORY OF THE DESIGN PROFILED 911 SUSPENSION

Everything you need to know about the last GT3 powered by a Mezger engine

How does Ferry’s fashion company fit in with making cars at Zuffenhausen?

Know your LSA from your PASM with our look at suspension evolution Contents may be subject to change


114 Great roads #82 brought to you by Great Driving Roads

Buttertubs Pass, Yorkshire Dales Written & Photographed by Alisdair Cusick

WHA YOU T’S R RO AD?

Uplo via t ad your o o Grea tal911.c wn grea t roa t Dr om for y iving Ro or get th d o e a fromur iPhon ds app iTun e es

Essential info This lofty pass dissecting the Yorkshire Dales offers a breathtaking driving experience – but be warned, there’s little room for driver error!

©2016 Google

LOCATION: Hawes, Yorkshire COORDINATES: 54.3033 -2.2061

TOTAL LENGTH OF DRIVE:

7 miles

POINTS OF INTEREST:

Hawes market (Tuesdays); Wensleydale Cheese Creamery; Aysgarth Falls; Ribbleshead Viaduct; Leeds-Settle-Carlisle railway FOOD AND ACCOMMODATION:

The Garsdale luxury B&B, www.thegarsdale.com; Simonstone Hall, www.simonstonehall.com; The Moorcock Inn, Garsdale Head, www.moorcockinn.com

W

e look at many types of roads in this series, each with seemingly different characters. While there are some that can carry a little speed thanks to open sight lines and a suitably smooth surface, from time to time we also look at the opposite; hills, twists, turns and summits. This entry is just one of those. We’re looking at the Buttertubs Pass in the Yorkshire Dales. Weaving north away from the market town of Hawes and heading to the rural village of Thwaite, the road hacks its way through empty moorland over some serious hills. So serious, in fact, that the Buttertubs Pass attracts many cyclists, who relish the challenging climb. It has even featured in organised races like the Tour de Yorkshire, where

it is called the Cote de Buttertubs. Be warned if you try to go in July, as there will be throngs of people lining the route. We’re attracted to those same hills because, as we’ve often noted, the rising road offers a useful feature to work the car against. Unlike the cyclist, though, we have the famous flat six! If you get out of third gear, you're missing the point of the route. This isn’t one to push onwards in haste, instead it is one to enjoy the landscape. Leaving Hawes behind, the road rises, but it isn’t until the houses thin out that the climb properly starts, peaking to around 18 per cent in places. Cyclists will probably allow 18 minutes and plenty of wheezing to the summit, but we can simply enjoy the rise, looking left to Great Shunner Fell, and a seemingly endless horizon in our rear view mirror. The name Hawes aptly

means ‘pass between mountains’. On the summit, we thread down the side of a valley, around a hairpin and steadily down towards Thwaite, with only sheep, characteristic dry stone walls and the odd picturesque barn for company. So often, driving is about reaching somewhere, by a set time. Here, for once, the point is merely to enjoy your 911 being somewhere different, so take your time. Stop off and walk to the limestone potholes where travelling farmers would take a pause and cool their butter and cheese in the depths of the buttertubs. Just out of Hawes there is a small parking spot where you can stop for a picnic, with nothing to see but your 911 and layered, distant hills. Your other half may not enjoy the smell of hot oil wafting across your lunch, but hey, with the rear wing up at least you have your own picnic table.

Unlock the best roads on Earth with the Great Driving Roads app available on iTunes


Total 911 issue 138 2016 uk  
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