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Triangle Staff (Benjamin Forst Repoter, Editor,)

(Ian Pantale Print Managner)

(Weston Morgan online editor)

(RIcardo Lopez Design Editor Photographer)


Guide

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READERS RESPONSE to the monthly questions and online comunity.

ART SCENE (PG 6-8) Art from around the world taken out of their natural habitat and placed here for youre veiwing pleasure

THE PROCESS (PG 10-12) Anywhere from how to what the artist is doing, this section it is alll about the process of the art

15 23 Inside veiw local with artist Terra Keck pg14-23

Q & A with Chase Craig local artist pg24-27

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BRAIN Brain food FOOD soup SOUP a place (28-31) to work All of this meantaly issues puzzle workout and brain (28-31) teasers

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Art scene

The process

photos and articles all from juxtapoz.com

Photos pulled from brofosky.com Articles by Ben Forst article by Patricia Lowry

photos from special delvery by matt-werner

Feature stories

Photos by Ricardo Lopez Terra art from http://lovelyfacecomics.tumblr.com/

article from special delvery by James Pawlish Experiments in Photography by Lucas Simões “You Are Worth More Than Many Sparrows” by Ozmo

Readers response

Puzzles

photo by submision

word search mathgoodies.com

article by saratogojim

rebus puzzle http://blog.homerun.com/

contributers and resources page This is a Ball State Magazine and by no means will be made for distribution 2


Gumballhead, a refreshing, citrusy beer that Is one of the best wheat ales brewed in the U.S.

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REAders response This issues readers response is a colloage of all the online readers who responded to the question, what was your first show like? When I say show it can mean anything from punk show in the basement to big stadium show with lots of famous people. To be a part of the next issues readers response go to the website tforthrill.com and send a response in. The picture below is a staff favorite, and it was sent by Kelly from NY.

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C I S U M SHOW I believe my first real concert was The Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart at my all-time favorite venue for live music, The Aerodrome in Schenectady in the summer of 1969 (I think it was $4 or so) and the thing I remember most is a very skinny Rod Stewart leaning back against an amp head pointed at the ceiling with only the whites of his eyes showing while Jeff soloed. A few weeks later I went to the early Led Zeppelin concert at the same venue and saw an even skinnier Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, and remember saying that I hoped that all these poor English guys would become successful enough to afford a square meal at some point because they were really good. Thankfully they all seemed to have done okay for themselves, but I guess you could say it was mostly downhill for me concert-wise after that summer. -SaratogaJim

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response

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ART SCENE Art from around the world taken out of their natural habitat and placed here for your viewing pleasure

Both of these imagies (above and on the next page) are garffitti done by a group of anoymous artist in Berkeley, California as a part of the event called specail delivery bay Area 2012. 7

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Art Scene

Endless Canvas opens a Sistine Chapel of graffiti art (Community Voices) Thousands turned out Saturday night, September 8, 2012 for the Endless Canvas graffiti warehouse opening in Berkeley, California. This underground event called Special Delivery Bay Area 2012--despite being covered by very few local press outlets--grew to be the most popular art event in the East Bay Saturday night. It featured street art from over 80 local graffiti artists who covered nearly every inch of a 36,000-square-foot warehouse with graffiti and street art. The organizers were surprised with the masses of people who showed up, posting on their website the day after: “we didn’t think that many people would show up.” Perhaps the mystique of the event was heightened because the location of the warehouse was kept secret until the day before the event, leaving people to speculate about where the warehouse could be. There’s nothing like secrecy, controversy, and rumors of art depicting illicit things to bring out thousands to an East Bay art event. What attendees found in the former Flint Ink building at 1350 4th Street (a warehouse vacant since 1999), was a building transformed by graffiti artists into what Sean Hanlon, an Oakland resident, called “a Sistine Chapel of graffiti art.” Not only were the walls covered with spray paint, but also the floor, ceiling, stairwells, and even elevator shaft. It was not just tags and gang signs, but inside were works of art, like a Vincent Van Gogh portrait redrawn with a third eye, and Anne Frank in a headress with an apple floating above her-a reference to Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte. The artists took pains to integrate the warehouse’s granite-like concrete walls riddled with airshafts, windows, balconies, and staircases into their multi-story art pieces. Some artists also tackled political topics, like a mural featuring Fox News, depicting the White House under attack by UFOs, and another on the role of street artists and public dissent. In addition to artwork by over 80 local street artists, entertainment was provided by local hip hop and dance groups. As the sun went down, floodlights were turned on to illuminate the walls, and the crowds only grew as the hours went on. Between 6-7pm, there was no line to get into the event. But by 9:30pm, the line stretched 2 blocks. Informally polling people in line about how they heard about the event, most people said they found out about Special Delivery Bay Area through social media outlets like Facebook and Tumblr. Others said they read about it in the East Bay Express and SF Fun Cheap. A street art enthusiast in line said he attended Special Delivery, a

similar street art exhibit in Portland, Oregon in July, 2011, and heard about this event through Endless Canvas. The Berkeley warehouse looks similar to Kunsthaus Tacheles in Berlin, Germany, except this one has even more graffiti covering every inch of the interior. Read more about how Alan Varela came to host the Special Delivery Bay Area 2012 art show in the East Bay Express. Endless Canvas opens a Sistine Chapel of graffiti art (Community Voices) Thousands turned out Saturday night, September 8, 2012 for the Endless Canvas graffiti warehouse opening in Berkeley, California. This underground event called Special Delivery Bay Area 2012--despite being covered by very few local press outlets--grew to be the most popular art event in the East Bay Saturday night. It featured street art from over 80 local graffiti artists who covered nearly every inch of a 36,000-square-foot warehouse with graffiti and street art. The organizers were surprised with the masses of people who showed up, posting on their website the day after: “we didn’t think that many people would show up.” Perhaps the mystique of the event was heightened because the location of the warehouse was kept secret until the day before the event, leaving people to speculate about where the warehouse could be. There’s nothing like secrecy, controversy, and rumors of art depicting illicit things to bring out thousands to an East Bay art event. What attendees found in the former Flint Ink building at 1350 4th Street (a warehouse vacant since 1999), was a building transformed by graffiti artists into what Sean Hanlon, an Oakland resi-

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Experiments in Photography by Lucas Simões

Lucas Simões is an artist living and working in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Through a combination of both geometric and organic shapes overlaid, he’s been able to use cut out photographs of close friends to explore identity and cultural individualism. Participating in the Urban Arena 2 event in Roma, Italy, Ozmo, recently completed this striking new mural. The piece entitled “You Are Worth More Than Many Sparrows” displays different levels of economic classes separated by levels, all underneath the Monopoly board game character, Rich Uncle Pennybags and bags of money. The words

“You Are Worth More Than Many Sparrows” by Ozmo

Participating in the Urban Arena 2 event in Roma, Italy, Ozmo, recently completed this striking new mural. The piece entitled “You Are Worth More Than Many Sparrows” displays different levels of economic classes separated by levels, all underneath the Monopoly board game character, Rich Uncle Pennybags and bags of money. The words “In art we trust” hovers above as well, possibly commenting on arts relation or the importance of separation to money.

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The Process Anywhere from how to what the artist is doing, this section it is alll about the process of the art

(TOP) Jonathan Borofsky prepares a sculpture to be a part of the staute “walking to the sky” which is ABOVE.

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the process

By Patricia Lowry /  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette As a boy, Jonathan Borofsky used

to sit on his father’s knee and listen to stories about a friendly giant who lived in the sky. The giant did good things for people, and in the stories, Borofsky and his father would go up to the sky and visit with him. The child grew up to be an artist, one whose inspiration comes from both the human figure and the human condition. Because his work speaks to us on both an intellectual and emotional level, you don’t need an advanced art degree to get it. As the best public art should be, Borofsky’s work is provocative. One of his sculptures, inspired by his father’s stories about the giant and called “Walking to the Sky,” has been stirring the pot at Borofsky’s alma mater, Carnegie Mellon University, for several months, and it hasn’t even arrived. Where and even if it should be installed has been widely debated on campus, ever since the university announced its intention to plant it at the intersection of the Hornbostel Mall and the Cut, the campus’s two rectangular green spaces, by building a concrete pad there.

In the business world, the intersection of the Mall and the Cut would be called the “100-percent corner,” the location that gets the most traffic and the place where retailers want to be. Often the 100-percent corner joins two historic streets, and often historic buildings come down to accommodate the new store, usually a chain pharmacy.

where making art is something of a sacred act.

Which is not to compare the aesthetics of “Walking to the Sky” with those of a chain drugstore, and certainly no buildings would fall to make way for it. Nevertheless, it would be an intrusion on the historic Hornbostel Mall, as out of place there as a bland, one-story commercial building is amid the facades of Main Street.

In an editorial, The Tartan, the campus newspaper, called the sculpture “ugly and cumbersome” and “a huge phallus.” Some students complained about being left out of the decisionmaking process.

In an essay last fall in Focus, the university’s faculty and staff magazine, CMU architecture librarian Martin Aurand campaigned for preservation of the Mall, created in the first two decades of the 20th century as the defining feature of architect Henry Hornbostel’s original campus. “Hornbostel’s Beaux Arts design principals, as derived from French Baroque planning, addressed space as a positive element, rather than just a void,” Aurand wrote. Unfortunately, the university hasn’t always seen it that way, installing the occasional event tent as well as permanent intrusions like Wean Hall, whose protruding, brutalist concrete lecture hall, since 1971, has been as welcome as an ocean liner at a lawn party. Still, above it all, Hamerschlag Hall has endured as the terminus to Hornbostel’s vista, “which is a work of art in its own right,” Aurand wrote. That so few people see it that way is a measure of how little historic landscapes are recognized, understood and valued, even on a campus

“The 100-foot-tall ‘Walking to the Sky’ will challenge the century-old primacy of the Hamerschlag Hall tower, the scale of the entire campus ... the clarity of Hornbostel’s vista, and the integrity of his ‘grand design.’ “

And then along came Hilary Robinson, who, a century later, holds the same position Hornbostel did -- dean of the College of Fine Arts. She’s new to the job, having arrived in September from Ireland, where she was head of the School of Art and Design at the University of Ulster. She must have packed among her luggage a great big bag of diplomacy, because it didn’t take her long to find a solution agreeable to groups that were even divided among themselves. About 15 years ago, Robinson saw the first version of the sculpture, a single figure on a slanted pole called “Man Walking to the Sky,” which appeared at Documenta IX in Kassel, Germany. “I thought it was such an optimistic piece of work, about being ambitious, aiming high, the sky’s the limit. I think all of those messages are absolutely right for this university and what we do here,” she said. The newer piece, with seven figures walking up a 100-foot-tall pole and three figures at the base, was installed temporarily at Rockefeller Center in the fall of 2004, where many saw it as helping to heal the wounds of 9/11. That work was purchased by the Nasher Sculpture

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Center in Dallas, where it is permanently installed. The one for CMU, a gift of alumna and trustee Jill Gansman Kraus, is being fabricated now in Los Angeles.

create a public art committee that includes students and community members, and propose a series of campus forums to guide the selection and placement of public art.

To Borofsky, who lives in Maine, the sculpture represents “all of

At the first one last week, closed to the news media, the approximately 175 people attending shared both support and opposition to the committee’s selection of a new site for “Walking to the Sky,” on the Cut in front of Warner Hall and near Forbes Avenue, from which the sculpture also will be visible to passers-by. When it’s installed in May, CMU will gain an important work by one of its most successful sons and the Hornbostel Mall will suffer only its usual intrusions. Relocating the 100-foot-tall sculpture from the 100-percent corner was the right move.

"A friendly giant who lived in the sky" humanity rising upwards from the earth to the heavens above -- striving into the future with strength and determination,” he said in an e-mail. “It seems to me that we are all learning to be free, and ultimately this sculpture is a symbol of our collective search for wisdom and the awakened consciousness that comes with this freedom.” Those who know what to look for still can find the giant story: The three figures at the base include a father holding the hand of his young son. Robinson’s solution, welcomed by the President’s Council, was to develop a public art policy,

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Ad by the Triangle meadia orginazation tforthrill.com


TERRA KECK Triangle Magazine sat down with local artist Terra Keck to talk about her inspirations, her aims, and her unique interpretations of the visual medium

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TM: When did you find out you wanted to be a visual artist, what happened in your life? TK: There was never really a point where I didnt know that’s what I wanted to do. From day one I understood that this was my path, this is my gift. I loved comic books when I was little, cartoons, and I was entering shows at a very young age for like elementary school and kindergarderners so there was never a point in time when I was unsure of what I wanted to do, I didnt know exactly where in visual arts I wanted to go. My parents where very supportive they were like “ya go off and paint with your fingers” there was never a point where I didnt know. TM: What were your favorite TV shows? TK: Growing up, Craig McCracken was my hero. So I loved Dexter’s Lab, he worked on that, I loved Powerpuff Girls and I was a huge Dragon Ball Z fan, I was a huge Sailor Moon fan. Tenchi Muyo was my favorite show as a kid.

(woodcut by Terra)

Keck, who in 2012 was awarded with the Ball State University Award for Excellence Keck, who in 2012 the at in Drawing, haswas hadawarded her workwith featured Ballnumerous State University Award for Excellence events including the Blue Bottle in Drawing, hasand hadnumerous her work online featured at Art Gallery comic numerous eventsFrom including the Blue publications. her tumblr siteBottle Lovely ArtFace Gallery and numerous online comicyouthful Comics, Terra in her genuine, publications. From her humor describes hertumblr hopes site andLovely dreams as Face Comics, Terra in pictures her genuine, youth“Get paid to draw of myself making ful humor describes and ugly faces”. Then her shehopes goes on todreams describe as “Get paid draw pictures of myself herself asto “Energetic, Requires daily walks, making ugly faces”. Then sheprone goesto onfits to of selfSheds, easily distracted, describe herself as “Energetic, Requires loathing followed by cartoon binges”. She is daily walks, Sheds, distracted, prone a versatile artist easily working in multiple medito fits ofTerra self-loathing followed by cartoon ums; was covered in wood shavings binges”. is a versatile artist whenShe we came to talk to her.working in multiple mediums; Terra was covered in wood when to talk to to be TM:shavings When did youwe findcame out you wanted her.

TM: What do you find taboo about American culture that you draw inspiration from? TK: Nudity for sure. A lot of erotic art, and it’s very strange that we find it very taboo. And it’s only Americans and Middle Easterners that are very afraid of the naked body, you go to France, there is like this orange drink where in the commercial there are naked animals, you see panda tits, you see a lot of nudity in French culture and European culture. It’s just weird that we made it strange. TM: Do you have a studio? or where do you feel most comfortable creating things? TK: I dont have my own studio, yet. During the senior project, you get your own studio. There is something so relieving about not having to take down your work everytime

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you take it down for the day. So im stuck meandering between the studios that we have. I dont like to work at home on art, it’s really uncomfortable especially in my room, it’s constricting, each room has a purpose. TM: Here is a kind of hypothetical question, do you think artistic expression is based upon how things are or how things should be? TK: I think it depends on the artist and what they are trying to say. There are a lot of artists that are very straightforward, and it’s the kind of person you are. There are no borders, no guidelines.

have a Fresco I’ve been using to sort of inspire me, and kinda channel that person, that inspiration that they had. I drink a lot of coffee. TM: Do you like acting purposefully bizzare in social situations or public just to pull people’s legs? TK: I actually have really bad social anxieties so I don’t like to talk to people I’m not comfortable with. So I’m usually not very talkative. I usually stick to my own and let other people talk, Im not as outspoken. TM: In what ways have your professors opened up your eyes and help you grow creatively?

TM: What animal do you find visually appealing? TK: I love the jelly fish, the jelly fish is my favorite animal, and I think they are gorgeous. They are really strange, they dont have brains, they dont even look real, they don’t even look like animals TM: What materials do you enjoy working with the most? TK: I love print making, I love relief wood block art, Ink and a briar. I feel most at home with graphite just because I’ve done it my whole life. TM: What goes into a wood block? [TM: Terra then holds up a plank of wood, on it is the intricate and numerous carvings of a sheep. These indents and carvings are covered over with oil and placed on a piece of paper making an intricate ‘stamp”’] TM: Do you feel relaxed or jittery after making something you found beautiful? TK: I go crazy, I have to talk about it to everyone I meet, Like look at what I did! It’s like a little kid. It’s kinda like you have to pee, and you have to pee really really bad, I get really excited. TM: Do you have any rituals you do to make you feel more ‘in the zone’ prior to starting? TK: I look at artists before I work every time, I’m always at the library checking out artist books, I

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TK: By telling me my stuff sucks and then I have to figure out why it sucks. My professors have been pretty hard on me and I am thankful for that. And just getting really excited about my work. It’s really hard to be excited about your own work when no one else is excited about it. When they are not asking questions. So when professors ask questions and just talk to you really brings value I suppose, because it’s hard to see value in your own work cause it’s like ‘I made this, i’m not special’.


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‘Women of the Fungal Variety' A project Terra is working on for her drawing 5 class

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sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo. Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi

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Triangle Magazine had the opportunity of sitting down with local Muncie Artist Chase Craig, to once again, dive into the mind of the creative person. Craig, who had been featured in art galleries around the Muncie area, recently gave a public demonstration on the process of making wood cuts to a full crowd at local bar Be Here Now. TM: When did you first find out you wanted to be a visual artist? CC: I don’t know how much finding out there was, since I was a little kid, I’ve always liked to draw. Since even before kindergarten, I’ve loved to draw stuff, it’s something I’ve kinda always done. Late high school came around, and it’s like ‘so what are you going to do with your life’ and Im like ‘I don’t know, go to art school, I like art’. TM: What were your early influences in the formative years? CC: I’ve always liked the crass 90‘s kids’ cartoons like Ren and Stimpy and Rocko’s Modern Life, all that great stuff. At least as a kid I drew macabre stuff a lot. I grew up watching horror films. I was always doing monsters and obscure animals killing people. Kinda dark, macabre, silly stuff, I guess I still kinda do that, and it’s sorta started there with me. I dont know how much thought little kids put into what they make, it’s just kinda a fantasy idea. Later on I think video games kinda influenced my interest a little.

biggest contemporary influences is Suko. I do a lot of kinda dark, “smart-ass-y” animal treatment, rights related stuff. TM: What do you find taboo in American culture that you draw inspiration from? CC: I don’t know if taboo is per say something I try to dance around with. Human behavior in general, the kind of things people choose to align themselves with and consume, that I don’t think people think about a lot. Kinda like a mindless sense of consumerism. Like taking these things in or aligning yourself with a certain group of people or mind set without actually thinking; People who jump on bandwagons. TM: What animal do you find most visually appealing? CC: That’s a tough one, I don’t know. I’ve been really fascinated with insects lately, they are so different and weird and so un relatable, they have all these parts and anatomic structures that we don’t have. I think people empathize with dogs and cats and other mammals, other things that they can relate to in certain ways but insects don’t really have that for the most part. I like that they are small and insignificant almost like less than life forms, people will sympathize with chickens being killed to a certain degree or cows, but no one really questions the killing of a spider, they are disposable less than life forms. It’s totally justifiable in all cases, I always think that’s funny. TM: Currently what materials are you really enjoying?

TM: Currently, what artists are inspiring you? CC: One of my favorite biggest influences has been Fransico Goya. I feel like my art, not in themes, but intent draws a lot of parallels with some of his later works, especially his Capriches and prints. One of my

CC: I’ve been working heavily in lithography this year. Lithography and wood cuts for the most part, but neither is anything too new for me. I’ve been doing encaustic paintings. It’s very different from anything else i’ve worked with. Really difficult to work with.

CHASE CRAIG 24


Black Stag

A Quick Little Prick

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All art work done by Chase Craig

Jock Fight 26


Brain Food Soup A PLACE TO WORK YOU BRAIN OUT

How many triangles are in this magazine?

A: In the section art scene what was on top of Anne Franks head?

A: Where is you are worth many sparrows from?

A: What is Terra favorrite animal?

A:

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puzzles

A rebus is a representation of a name / word / phrase using pictures. Look at the following images and try to work out what they mean.

A:

A:

A: 28


Art and Architecture word search 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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architecture art fractal geometry math patterns polyhedra

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

proportion reflections sculptures similarity symmetry tesselations tranformations


puzzles

The Emperor You are the ruler of a medieval empire and you are about to have a celebration tomorrow. The celebration is the most important party you have ever hosted. You’ve got 1000 bottles of wine you were planning to open for the celebration, but you find out that one of them is poisoned. The poison exhibits no symptoms until death. Death occurs within ten to twenty hours after consuming even the minutest amount of poison. You have over a thousand slaves at your disposal and just under 24 hours to determine which single bottle is poisoned. You have a handful of prisoners about to be executed, and it would mar your celebration to have anyone else killed. What is the smallest number of prisoners you must have to drink from the bottles to be absolutely sure to find the poisoned bottle within 24 hours?

Boolos’s Puzzle Three gods A , B , and C are called, in some order, True, False, and Random. True always speaks truly, False always speaks falsely, but whether Random speaks truly or falsely is a completely random matter. Your task is to determine the identities of A , B , and C by asking three yes-no questions; each question must be put to exactly one god. The gods understand English, but will answer in their own language, in which the words for yes and no are “da” and “ja”, in some order. You do not know which word means which.

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editor's letter

We often forget that the truth is still just that: the truth. The unexpected kindness, or the simple act of following through: these are things that brighten a day and lift a spirit. An action that says Hey, I care. It can be something as simple as holding open a door for someone else. Buying someone a cup of coffee. Writing a nice note. Making time for someone else. When life gets rough, or the day seems long, that is when the small gestures matter most. It doesn’t have to cost a lot of money. It doesn’t have to cost anything at all. The simple act of showing that you care? It’s priceless. (A dear friend reminded me of this, yesterday.) For me, especially recently, I know how easy it is to get bogged down by the crap life throws at a person. The weather’s turning cold. It’s easy to be cranky. But then, the phone rings – and I feel better. Or I get something in the mail. Or someone sends me a wonderful email. It reminds me that there’s always something to look forward to, there’s always something on the horizon, even if we can’t quite see it yet. This issue of Triangle Magazine is dedicated to all the small things from the tinest little dot on the page to the unsung heros who helpeld me out with this magazine. Thanks -Ricardo M. Lopez

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CHEATS.WALKTHROUGHS.EASTEREGGS.

pQE: vist ign.com for all your video game help


The Truth about cigarettes is not hidden go to thetruth.com to find out more

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