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Death of a Salesman Kindle Fire You can download from the link below. http://theproductguide.net/books/Death-of-a-Salesman/

Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning play that forever changed the meaning of the American Dream and won multiple Tony Awards for the 2012 Broadway production directed by Mike Nichols and starring Philip Seymour Hoffman as the tragic hero Willy Loman and Andrew Garfield as his son Biff Willy Loman, the protagonist of Death of a Salesman, has spent his life following the American way, living out his belief in salesmanship as a way to reinvent himself. But somehow the riches and respect he covets have eluded him. At age sixty-three, he searches for the moment his life took a wrong turn, the moment of betrayal that undermined his marriage and destroyed his relationship with Biff, the son in whom he invested his faith. Willy lives in a fragile world of elaborate excuses and daydreams, conflating past and present in a desperate attempt to make sense of himself and of a world that once promised so much.   Arthur Miller's masterpiece has steadily seen productions all over the world since its 1949 debut. As the noted Miller scholar Christopher Bigsby states in his introduction, "If Willy's is an American dream, it is also a dream shared by all those who are aware of the gap between what they might have been and what they are."  


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About The Author Arthur Miller was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock. He has also written two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. More recent works include a memoir, Timebends (1987), and the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1993), which won the Olivier Award for Best Play of the London Season, and Mr. Peter's Connections (1998). His latest book is On Politics and the Art of Acting. Miller was granted with the 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Christopher Bigsby is professor of American Studies at the University of East Anglia. He edited the Penguin Classics editions of Miller's The Crucible, Death of a Salesman, and All My Sons.

Reviews New York Times Book Review

A contemporary classic....Listen to this album.

This novel dramatically reveals the struggles of capitalism compared to the communist society. The characters in the play convey strong emotions as Willy, the father of the family, starts losing his sanity because of the harshness of the capitalistic system. It seems that as hard as Willy tries he can never get to be a part of the Bourgeoisie society like he dreams. His loving wife supports him throughout the play always joining in on his dreams of wealth. He has two sons, Biff and Happy, which serve as foil characters to each other since Happy supports the system while Biff does not. This play was generally easy to read and serves as an excellent novel to teach in middle schools and high schools because it helps teach about capitalism v. Marxism. Willy's passionate attitude about finding wealth keeps you interested since it causes drama all throughout the play. It is recommended to read this book especially if economic-related novels are well-favored. Either way it is interesting to see the downfalls of the capitalistic society and what it causes people to do just so they can be happy.

Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller, is a superbly written play that typifies common misconceptions of the American Dream. Set in the 1940's in idealized suburbia, Miller ingeniously reveals that as an overriding theme as well as lessons on abandonment and betrayal. Readers witness the insecure Willy Loman slowly deteriorate mentally as his career as a traveling salesman progressively fails. His digression is seen through the interactions of his family in the house that he views as a major symbol of success, as well as in and around New York City and Boston. Linda Loman, his loyal wife, suffers through his constant disillusions and failed dreams. As Willy turns slips more and more from reality into a fantasy world created around his hopes and wishes, Linda continues to encourage his support from their sons Biff and Happy in the only way that she knows is right. Willy's retirement into the world in his mind is due mainly to his reliance on material wealth for fulfillment and the despair he feels when he can no longer provide it for his family. Therefore, Miller leads readers to reevaluate what things are most important to place value in. With the modern world increasingly leaning towards material wealth as a way to find happiness, this play is invaluable to keep readers from straying down the same path of decay as Willy Loman. Miller also offers a great deal of appeal to readers through Willy's relationships with his sons. The battle between desire to see his kin succeed and the necessity to be


understanding of different desires is an epic story held together by the love of family. All readers can relate to a tale so engrossing in nature. Arthur Miller created an outstanding literary work that's universal themes earn it a status among the timeless classics.

I HAD to read this book for school. It was sad and depressing with a horrible ending. I don't understand why anyone would think it is a "classic". Unless you HAVE to read it, choose another book.

Read An Excerpt INTRODUCTION Note to Teacher ABOUT ARTHUR MILLER Arthur Miller was born in New York City in 1915 and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge and A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock. He has also written two novels, Focus (1945), and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. More recent works include a memoir, Timebends (1987), and the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1993), which won the Olivier Award for Best Play of the London Season, and Mr. Peter's Connections (1998). His latest book is On Politics and the Art of Acting. Miller was granted with the 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He has twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.   DISCUSSION QUESTIONS Preparing to Read 1. How is the American Dream characteristic of American ideals and philosophy? What are the differences between the materialistic and the idealistic values associated with the American Dream? Understanding the Story Act One Writing Responses Exploring Further * included in the Viking Critical Library edition ** excerpted in the Viking Critical Library edition


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