Page 1


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The BLUE & ROYAL By Appointment to

Her Majesty the Queen

Established 1865

NEW & LINGWOOD

VOL. 1

NO. 2

1971

ColonelJn-Chiei: Her Majesty The Queen. Colonel and Gold Stick: Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, K,G., G.C.B.,

G.C.M.G., K.B.E., D.S.O., D,C.L.

ETON

Deputy Colonel: General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick, K.C.B., D.S.O., M.B.E.,

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MC. The Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding The Household Cavalry and Silver Stick: Colonel l. B. Baillie.

WET,

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Commanding Officer: LieutenantColonel J. A. C. G. Eyre. Officer Commanding Household Cavalry Regiment (Mounted):

Lieutenant-Colonel D. J. Daly.

1'?

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Tangier (1662-1680), Dettingen, Warburg, Beaumont, Willems, Fuentes d'Onor, Peninsular, Waterloo, Balaklava, Sevastopol, Egypt (1882), Tel el Kebir, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Relief of Ladysmith,

South Africa (1899—1902). Le Cateau, Marne (1914), Messines (1914), Ypres (1914), Gheluvelt, Ypres (1915), Frezenberg, Loos, Arras (1917), Ypres (1917), Somme (1918), Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Cambrai (1918), Sambre, Pursuit to Mons, France and Flanders (1914-1918). Souleuvre, Brussels, Nederrijn, Rhine, N. W. Europe (1944-1945), Iraq (1941), Palmyra, Syria (1941), Knightsbridge, El Alamein, Advance on

FOREWORD

Tripoli, North Africa (1941-43), Sicily (1943), Italy (1943-1944).

SPRING 1971

CONTENTS

A

ITHE ‘BURGHLEY’

Diary 1970

REGIMENTAL CAPIVIAKERS

‘ One of our dual purpose felt hats.

Mounted

T0

In rough finish

From Hay Nets to Jerry Cans

YOUR REGIMENT

lggésvgnigfcfreen.

Squadron

. I\)

The Weser Vale Bloodhounds

I\)

The Household Cavalry Museum 1970

Herbert johnson

I")

Soon Mechanical Management Mounted Sports 1970 (BOND STREET) LTD.

Exercise Pitfall 38 NEW BOND STREET, LONDON, W.1 Tel: 01 -629 7177. Civil and Mi/ltary Hatters. 40a London Road, Camberley. (Wednesday, afternoons only).

Book Review The Governor Generals Horse Guards

ETON:

118 HIGH STREET.

Tel: Windsor 66286

The Royal Canadian Dragoons The Band

LONDON: 53 JERMYN ST., S.W.1. Tel: 01-493 9621

The Blues and Royals Association Report 1970 Accounts

CAMBRIDGE:

11

KINGS PARADE

Tel. Cam 50191

Association Visit to the Regiment

,

The Standard of the 1 Garde- Dragoner Regment Please send me ‘The Complete Guide to Headwear’ Letters NAME,., ADDRESS.

Obituaries

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS TO

L:

The Rebuilding of Hyde Park Barracks Nominal Rolls

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postage

THE BLUES & ROYALS --—-—-_J

”The Blue and Royal" printed and published by Service Publications Ltd, Caxton House, Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex. The

Cover Depicts one of the regiment‘s Chieltain tanks training Larzac in South Western France during August 1970.

at

This second issue of The Blues and Royals records the last full year of the Regiment as a Chieftain regiment of the Rhine Army. At the time you will receive this magazine, “A” Squadron will have already converted to a Scout Car Establishment and will be on its way to Belfast. Later this year “C” Squadron will go to Cyprus for a two-year tour and the remainder of the Regiment will return to Windsor in the armoured recon~ naissance role. No account of the regiment's activities in 1970 can be complete without mentioning the departure of our first commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel R. M. Vickers, M.V.O., M.B.E. Every member of the Regiment and the Association owes him a great debt of gratitude for his understanding leadership during the crucial first two years of The Blues and Royals and the Association.


Bottom Lett: “B” Squadron on Exercise

L/Cp/s. Stacey, Trist-Col/ins, Tprs. West, Col/ett, Ratcliffe Top Right: Tpr. Ollin and

Mr. Goodall

explain the workings at

a

Chieltan tank to Lord Balniel, Under Secretary ol State tor Defence, during Exercise Foretront ll. Centre Right:

The Divisional Commander talking to members ol “A” Squadron prior to the Massed Bands Display From left to right: Tprs. Mead, Henchion, Cpls. Cain, Morris, Tpr. Shillabeer, Cpl. Cooksey, Tpr. Mazurwltz. Bottom Right: Tpr. Fisher preparing one of the R.H.0. tanks tor a battle run during Annual Firing at Hohne Next Page Top Left:

L/Cpl. Dunn (R.E.M.E.) and Tpr. Walsh at “C” Squadron fishing in a lake near Larzac, South-West France, where “A” and “C” Squadrons trained during August Next Page Top Middle:

L/Cpl. Robinson (“A" Squadron) instructing Colonel l. B. Baillie, in driving a Chieltain tank, during his visit to the Regiment in April Next The seat tary

Page Top Right: Rt. Hon. Reginald Eyre climbing out ol the driving at Mr. Goodall‘s tank, during the visit at a Parliamendelegation in April

Next Page Bottom Left:

Tprs. Scott and Brown at “B” Squadron Next Page Bottom Right: Tpr. Salisbury with the Bridge Layer at the Detmold at Home Day

The Major General talking to Farrier Corporal Warren, during his inspection ol the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment


Colonel Commanding The Household Cavalry. Dinner night for Colonel l. B. Baillie in Officers’ Mess. Study Day with R.A.F. Army Hockey Final. Association Dinner—Windsor. Cavalry Sunday. Troop Training at Soltau. Whitsun Break. “A” Squadron Arena Party for 4th Division Massed Bands Display. 20th Armoured Brigade Athletics Meeting. 4th Division Massed Bands Display.

12

JANUARY 9 Regimental Cross Country. 14 Captain A. H. Parker Bowles departs. Captain D. P. L. Hewson takes over as Adjutant. FEBRUARY 2~6 Border Patrol. 25 Major H. 0. Hugh Smith arrives to command ‘A” Squadron. Troop Leaders directing artillery fire of ”J” (Sidi Rezegh) Battery 3 R.H.A. Major H. F. Wright arrives to command “C” Squadron. Recce Troop exercise in Eifel mountains. Dinner night in Officers’ Mess for Brigadier J. W. Stanier, M.B.E., Commander 20th Armoured Brigade. Potential N.C.O.’s Cadre Course. 25 men on Winter Warfare Course at the Special Training Centre in the Harz moun-

tains under Cornet Birdwood. 4 Division Hockey Final. Visit of Major General G. T. A. Armitage, C.B.E., Director Royal Armoured Corps. Easter Break. Visit of Colonel and Deputy Colonel of the Regiment. Weser Vale Hunt Ball. Weser Vale Hunt meet to finish the season. Exercise BROKEN SEAL. Regimental Movement, Radio and Echelon exercise. Artillery Study Day with “J” (Sidi Rezegh) Battery 3 R.H.A. Infantry Study Day with 2nd Royal Green Jackets. Entertainment for all ranks of the Blues and Royals and 2nd Royal Green Jackets Battle Groups at Detmold. Tank crew training on Stapel training area. Visit of Colonel |. B. Baillie, Lieutenant-

Above:

.

Tpr. Thompson, “C" Squadron, who comes from Lelth, snorkelling in a lake near Larzac

Below: Staff Corporal Hunt receiving the British Empire Medal from His Excellency The British Ambassador in Bonn gm

Officers‘ Dinner, Hyde Park Hotel. Rhine Army Hunter Trials. Rhine Army Summer Horse Show. Subscription Dance in Officers’ Mess. Rhine Army Summer Horse Show. Queen’s Birthday Official Cocktail Party in Officers’ Mess. Visit of party from Regimental Association.

17-21 22 June3 July Combat Team Training at Soltau. JULY 4-17 Annual Firing at Hohne. 24 July25 Aug. “B” Squadron on block leave. AUGUST 5 Aug.1 Sept. ”A” and “C” Squadron training at Larzac (South Western France). SEPTEMBER 21 Sept.9 Oct. Exercise FOREFRONT l and II. Brigade and Divisional Autumn exercises.

OCTOBER 16 Oct.15 Nov. “A” Squadron on block leave. NOVEMBER 11 Guard of Honour at HQ. 1 (BR) Corps for the Deputy Colonel on his farewell visit as Commander in Chief B.A.O.R. 1-12 Regiment (less “A” Squadron) P.R.E., (annual inspection of all equipment). 16 Officers attend Union Brigade Dinner in Officers’ Mess of 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards. 26 Party from Imperial Defence College visit Regiment. Drinks in W.Os. and Cs.o.H. Mess. Dine in Officers’ Mess. 27 Demonstration by “B” Squadron for Imperial Defence College. DECEMBER 2-3 Visit of the Major General. 4 Handover of Commanding Officers. 10 Fitness for Role Inspection by Commander 20th Armoured Brigade. 10 Cocktail Party in Officers’ Mess for W.Os. and Cs.o.H. 18 All Ranks Dance. 19 W05. and Cs.o.H. Mess Draw. 19 Corporals’ Mess Draw. 23 Men’s Christmas Dinner. 23-28 Christmas Break.


Top Right: The Major-General talking to S.Q.M.C. Stephenson ol “A" Squadron. Major H. 0. Hugh Smith behind

Bottom Right: The log race at Larzac. 1st Troop “A" Squadron From left to right: Mr. Couper, CoH, Midwinter, Tprs. Goulding and Russell

Top Left: Command Squadron S.H.Q.

From left to right: Back Row—Tpr. Pritchett, Cpl. Hayes, Tprs. Cartwright, Farrell, Cpl. Black. Front Row—S.C.MC. Harty, S.C.M. Remfry, Major Crisp, S.C.M. Varga, Cpl. Stratlord Centre Left: Major‘General D. W. Fraser, G.O.C. 4th Division talking to S.C.M. Lane at Herlord Stadium during “A” Squadron’s preparatory work lor the Divisional Massed Bands Display

Bottom Left: Mr Messl’s tank on Exercise Forefront ll

,

Top

Left: The

Major-General

examining a

silver model

ol

a

Ferret scout car with R.C.M. Tucker in the Warrant Officers” and Corporals’ of Horse Mess

Centre Left: Her Majesty The Queen talking to Tpr. Brady during Her visit to the Guards Depot. With The Queen is Major N. S. Lawson, The Lile Guards

Bottom left: The Major-General talking to Tpr. Mellon. Blomquist in the background

14

Tpr.

Top Right: 1 Troop “B” Squadron Tprs. Young, Collett, Ratcllfle, Cpl. Scammell, Tprs. McAnut/y, Blomquist, Lee, Cpl. Back, Mr. Birdwood, CoH. Davis, Cpl. Calvert, Tpr. Wall, L/Cpl. Trist-Col/ins Centre Right: A Recce Troop scout car in a ditlicult situation Bottom Right: “B” Squadron carrying out maintenance at Soltau From left to right: Mr. Birdwood. Cpl. Scamme/l, Tpr. West,

L/Cpl, Black, Tpr. Ward


TIIE MOUNTED SQUADROM

FROM HAY NETS T0 JERRY CANS by BRIGADIER R. M. I". REDGRA VE, M.C.

The Thirtieth Anniversary of the year The Household Cavalry changed their cries from “Walk March” to “Driver

drivers had had less than 24

choppy

hours experience; radiators were repaired by pouring in egg yolks or plugging holes with dates. Once a single battery

sight of a German tank column

must not pass unnoticed. Since 1941 We have served in more

mechanisation was in everyone‘s thoughts. To stand idly by in a remote country while London was being bombed, France and the Low Countries overrun and General Wavell’s first offensive in the Western Desert

places and been asked to do

begun,

and

was used to keep the engines

more for our country than in

disheartening to all ranks.

In

all our previous histories put

September,

together. Admittedly much time has been spent in North have had periods of excitement such as the Berlin Airlift when The Blues and The Royals served together. Years later in

Sticks, Lord Athlone and Field Marshal Lord B'irdwood, had requested the C.I.G.S. that the Household Cavalry should be allowed to give up their horses, but were refused. Lieutenant Colonel R. F. Heyworth, com-

of six trucks running continuously for two days. Machine gun attacks on tyres by aircraft

the Canal Zone, Cyprus, Aden,

manding the Royal Dragoons

Malaya, to mention a few, there were always moments when we were very glad to be inside armoured fighting vehicles and not sitting on a horse.

and later to die of wounds,

reverse,

co-ax

Germany,

The Queen’s Birthday Parade 1970. Queen approaching Horse Guards

the

Queen

Edinburgh

are and

His Royal Admiral

Mountbatten ol Burma.

Her Majesty The Parade. Behind

Highness The Duke ol ol

the

Fleet

The

Earl

On the lelt behind the Duke

ol Edinburgh is the Field Officer of the Escort, Major the Hon. A. H. G. Broughton and the Escort Commander, Captain J. F Mackie The Field Officer’s Trumpeter is Corporal Brown

but

traverse

right“,

even there we

It is possible to trace how the self confidence, courage and military skill of young vehicle commanders today stems from those first dramatic years during which the mental as well as physical change from horses to armour took place. This change began in February, 1940, when thousands of horses

of

the

were

lst

led

Cavalry

across

the.

Division slippery

cobbles of le BaSSin de la Pinede in Marseilles and embarked for Palestine. The 1st Cavalry Division consisted of the Household Cavalry, a composite Regiment of The Life Guards and the Royal

was

frustrating 1939,

both

Gold

also wrote in September, 1940,

requesting permission for his regiment to be mechanised. Prime

Minister,

Mr.

Winston

Churchill, wrote in January, 1941, “The mechanisation of the Cavalry Division in Palestine is a distressing story", and

in February “I deeply regret the whole story of this fine body of men . . .” With such eminent support it was not surprising that a few weeks

1941,

into

Persia,

60

lst

Household

Syria cent

of

and

whole impression was of a fleet

the

of destroyers surging through

armoured

cars and prepared to move into the Western Desert. From then onwards the history and equipments of both regiments was very similar.

Horse Guards, and eight Yeo-

with rocks and the R.M.O. once had to fill all four pneumatic

tyres

with

camou-

flage netting. Friction caused the nets to catch fire which he then extinguished every few miles until over 50 punctures could be repaired by long suffering fitters.

It was during this Odyssey that

The

Royals

coming

up

from Palestine fought alongside lst Household Cavalry Regiment in Syria near Homs, in Marmon-Harringtons Mk II,

that rugged machine which was to become both regiment’s first

car.

Its

Ford

V8

but as a fighting vehicle it had many limitations, its armour was thin and its turret too small, it lacked proper traverse and only mounted a Bren L.M.G. and a Boys anti—tank rifle. Regiments soon removed

the turrets to make room for German or Italian 20mm. cannons or even fitted Italian 49mm

Breda

proved

highly

guns

which

ments

The

still

Royal

left

in

Scots

the Army,

Greys

and

The Royal Dragoons who had,

incidentally, both been specifically omitted from the Royal Her Majesty The Queen looking at a newly-arrived Household Cavalry Remount, during her visit to the New Hyde Park Barracks. In the background Corporal

Fry and S.C.M. Doxey

Armoured Corps when it was formed in April, 1939.

There is little doubt that during the first fifteen months of the Second World War

successful

but

ficient spares and repair backing

necessary to keep vehicles going, must have been quite a shock to cavalrymen, who had previously thought only about the welfare of. their horses and often believed machines required no maintenance at all. Yet their ingenuity and adap-

tability was quite remarkable. When lst Household Cavalry Regiment was launched on its 6,500 mile journey in May,

was

also

the

pretty

awe inspiring, they took lots of stopping once under way and clearly objected to armoured cars which shadowed them. During one of the many Household Cavalry Regiment had to send a squadron to man a dummy tank unit in the

Mechanisation without suf— manry regiments. In Palestine they joined the only two regular horsed cavalry regi-

East

course,

there were no spares. Solid tyres had their holes plugged

engine was thoroughly reliable

Marmon-Harrington

moving

Of

establishment changes in 1942,

Cavalry

Regiment received some ancient Guy lScwt. trucks with orders to move into Iraq while The Royals received South African

seas.

caused hours of work because

armoured later

Iraq, per

could only be fired through the rear doors.

Western Desert.

Division

them

could stretch ten miles when on the move and was a remarkable sight.

With coloured pennants

flying, bedrolls and canvas on the mudguards. petrol cans. pots. packs, sand trays and chargol bags tied to the sides, each car would throw up a great billowing dust cloud. The

Headquarters

on

towards

sent

Rotunda

Segrali, an Italian strongpoint. By the time they had received

orders to withdraw, which they proceeded to do at five miles an hour with boiling radiators, two columns of Italian trucks had retreated and Italian tanks which had come out to cover their withdrawal were bombed by German Stukas in mistake. By October,

1942,

at the

Battle of Alamein lst House— hold Cavalry Regiment was equipped with two MarmonHarringtons and one Daimler per troop, while The Royals

had two Humbers and one Daimler. At last there was a wireless in every car. They watched that long battle unfold

and An armoured car regiment

These proved

to be very antiquated Morris 30cwt. trucks covered to represent Crusader tanks. Their finest hour came in April, 1942, when a wrong map reference from lst Armoured Division saw them arrive at an astonished outpost of The Royals, a request for verification from

then

through

drove

those

carefully

immense

mine-

fields to unleash themselves on to the enemy's rear where they caught supply columns and installations asleep or at breakfast. A few bursts of machine gun

fire

was:

all

that rwas

needed to spread a trail of flaming destruction as they pressed on cutting telephone 17


wires and spreading alarm. Although their vehicles had

Sicily.

improved they were

Regiment

still very

vulnerable from the many

tyres

were

air and

punctured.

“C" Squadron of The Royals would have been brought to a halt had not a fitter discovered how to fit 3 ton lorry wheels to Daimlers. In three days lst House— hold Cavalry Regiment fought many spirited actions and captured literally thousands of prisoners while The Royals destroyed 185 vehicles including three tanks and fortyeone guns, but were more selective about whom they put in the bag! The Royals continued this pursuit for six months across the Western Desert and right up to Tunis. They formed the vanguard of 4th Light Armoured Brigade,

constantly

trying

to

outflank or penetrate the enemy. The desert provided unlimited

room for manoeuvre and great opportunities for imaginative armoured car commanders. lst Household Cavalry Regiment by then in excellent spirit and with supreme confidence in themselves Were alas withdrawn from the pursuit. Their Marmon—Harringtons Were certainly inferior to the Humbers of other regiments and the 8th Army logistic supply could never have supported all those regiments who fought at Ala— mein. Instead they motored back to Syria and joined 10th Armoured Division. They spent a lonely Christmas, 1942 in the most

miserable

pox—ridden

village of Raqqa on the River Euphrates near the Turkish frontier and indeed the next fourteen months in the Near East.

armoured

campaign ended in Africa, when

The Royals took part in the invasion of Sicily and Southern Italy in May, 1943, whilst lst Household Cavalry Regiment. who followed remained. until Autumn. 1944. For both regi— ments the tactics and terrain were naturally quite unfamiliar. There were slow cautious advances, mines to lift. rivers and mountains to cross. The Royals learnt waterproofing techniques and for a time were the only

regiment

often

mand of the covered wide

in

under

A Guy 15cwt. truck and dismounted cavalry section in Persia 1941. Water chargol bags hang from the door

com-

troop ran into strongly entren— ched Polish infantry in Northampton, who with infinite zest smashed up all their radios, left their cars. minus wheels, in the

Polish Corps. frontages and

eventually reached Pesaro on

to

County

Household

Durham Cavalry

and

"The

as We gingerly approached it and although nothing stirred I had a feeling we were being

Regiment

to Aldershot. Meanwhile back in England a Second Household Cavalry Regiment had been formed; initially they guarded Staines Reservoir and patrolled Windsor Park. They sent their horses away in September. 1940. to Melton Mowbray. where certain newspapers belie-

mid

1944

all

three

Service Dress Windsor 1940

and

gas

masks

for

both

horse

and

rider

at

while

Each

squadron

it was the Daimler which We shall remember as one of the fittest armoured cars in the world and which we were to use for sixteen years. It could idle in gear and go backwards as fast as forwards thanks to a fluid flywheel and two steering wheels. To work the the com-

had

the commander would be swept

become the reconnaisance regi-

away from the wheel and had to resort to pressing the “dead man's” button which cut out the engine but seldom stopped the car. In spite of

Lieutenant - Colonel Henry Abel Smith commanding 2nd

Household

Cavalry

all

this

tackled the problem of training

2pdr

an armoured car regiment with an enthusiasm which never waned for a moment until he

could

up

command

five

lives

were

saved

by

these devices. while the QR

Regiment

gun

and

wreak

Besa

7.92mm.

havoc.

Silent

approach and surprise were the key to their success and

uniquely British. for our allies

years

seemed

later. Every crewman learnt every job. the whole regiment would drive backwards for miles. or for days work only by night. Officers had to master every trade. leading to a memorable occasion when two senior captains crewed a Daimler scout car. neither knew how to switch the engine off or the wireless set on! Exer— cises in England were on a lavish scale deploying on Ex

recced yards

the bridge. away. Very

to

rely

more

on

shooting up every bush before advancing.

The last step in the change to armour took place after the

Household Cavalry Regiment was the best trained to fight in Europe

and

they

certainly

exploited every opportunity to the full. To get the best

had his pistol and could not reverse, fortunately the tank was too close to depress its gun fully. Seeing their predicament Corporal Boon in his scout car advanced at full speed firing his Bren at the tank cupola. crawled up to the

three

never

mentioned

in

even

got

despatches!)

at them with chaotic results. As I was finishing I heard over the wireless ‘Retire at once. Enemy tanks advancing on you. Have laid smoke' we retired like scalded cats".

had always been to “Seize and

treated

with

circumspection, there were some lucky escapes and magnificent examples of cool courage. One armoured car was hit three times, one shot passing between the driver's legs, one removing the front suspension and one clean through the whole length

of the car including the engine! Yet the crew baled out and escaped with injuries. In another close shave “Suddenly

Hold” a bridge which meant a

troop leader could by-pass all aim, but it required tremendous self confidence. Quite early on in Normandy Lieutenant Powle 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment with only one armoured

car and a scout car discovered a

virtually

unguarded

bridge

over the River Souleuvre which in the words of the llth Armoured Division history

ing the approach to the bridge. Fortunately the Germans were not on their toes. and the driver switched off the engine of his scout car which was then quietly pushed to safety round the corner.

before

the

started firing wildly dawn".

enemy

into the

There was a remarkable rescue of one scout car crew another

after

meeting

a

with

rain,

the

roads

could They

were

blocked by every form of traffic, including German tanks, and they had run out of maps.

Yet all the bridges were captured, ready to blow, and then held for four hours until relieved by Grenadier Guards tanks. Although

much

written

about

pursuit

in

war,

the

has

been

thrills

many

of

would

have been sickened by the corpses and destruction along the roadside, i: they had not been so frightened. Yet the

undeniable

fact

remains

that

when squadrons were pushing on. to build up a nervous exhilaration hard to define, yet almost impossible to supress.

bogged. Powle remembers

"rushing

madly

through

the

Foet l‘Eveque after a German

grenade I threw accounted for him . . . we came upon a couple of 88mm guns but

was

Charity,

the rear half of his troop had

underneath the gun muzzle of

which

and

got

four

tank

Hope

“was unquestionably a turning point in the campaign". After

Corporal Bland continues “I spotted a German lookout

German

the River Somme, nicknamed Faith,

the chatter of machine guns, the sudden head on encounters, the cheering crowds, orders and counter orders, all tended,

dead . . . Lieutenant Metcalfe went forward on foot . . . he discovered the car actually

preparing to move off. There were several more tanks guard—

orders at 1 am. 3lst August to capture three bridges over

opposition with this paramount

the scout car in front stopped

a

Household

moved at 2 a.m., the men were already tired, it was pouring

(He

The great prize on exercises

were

2nd

driver and his troop leader to

magazines

Tanks

Bren

1944,

before the Germans organise their defence.

—what a target at eighty yards fired

August,

Cavalry Regiment and The Royals were side by side in the pursuit to the River Seine and beyond. 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment received

crippled vehicle under continuous fire and extricated both

be the first British troops into Belgium.

wheeled

armoured

car"

guard, he ran but luckily a

although they tried hard they missed us . . . I looked at the map and realised we were getting near the the bridge . . .

it was decided I should have a crack at crossing the bridge covered by the armoured car . . I and Trooper Read dismounted, we slipped up behind a sentry and quietly

finished him off". They hid the body and their cars in bushes and got the message back.

all

important

It was not all plain sailing

and there were some tight moments when crews had to rely on each other‘s skill to stay alive. Lieutenant Bradstock,

Royals. found himself entirely surrounded in a small town square North of Amiens. His troop fought a desperate battle and killed twenty S.S. men

before forcing a passage out. A few miles away Lieutenant Tabor. 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment. with three men in two scout cars. met five half tracks mounting short 75mm guns and in what must have been a remarkable action, they destroyed all the guns and captured 40 prisoners.

88mm Panther at eight yards The tank fired and the

armour piercing shot tore away the complete side of the scout car. The blast knocked out Lieutenant Clarke leaving him uninjured but helpless. The

Spartan no less than five Army

Corps. These exercises were taken very seriously. one 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment

its

to see fifty or more of the

range.

2nd

firing

The driver only

Clarke and Boon were later to

of

regiments.

began

showing . . . we were amazed

by

three

and

safety.

Invasion of France in 1944. It is probably fair to say that the

tracks

machine gun.

carefully we turned the corner and halted with just our nose

I

cars.

turret floor, open a little visor

ment to the newly-formed Guards Armoured Division.

i 200

scout

beginning

they

now

enemy standing on the bridge

tracked Bren Carriers and Guy armoured cars, and by the

1942

wisely remained covering . . .

scout cars. and a seventh, assault troop, also in White

usually to find his vision blocked by loose kit, there was also a hand throttle and hand brake but neither really worked so orders were shouted to the driver. If the gunner got too excited and traversed the turret,

of

lifeless

four squadrons had five reconnaissance troops of two Daimler armoured cars and two Daimler scout cars, a sixth heavy troop with 75mm. guns in A.E.C. armoured cars or on White

mander had to kneel on the

out butts) they eagerly awaited

appeared

watched . . . our Troop Leader

rear steering wheel,

ved the rest of the regiment spent the war too. Left with bicycles. Austin sevens and Hotchkiss machine guns (with-

village

regiments were equipped with new armoured cars. Each of

headquarters had Chevrolet Staghound armoured cars. but

lst

of Normandy a Corporal wrote

the crews into prison.

By

many years away, The Royals

Cavalry Regiment History makes excellent reading as these extracts reveal. in the narrow lanes and dense undergrowth

middle of the town. and cast

the Adriatic. Their foot patrols

at over 6,000ft. found them— selves up against German ski troops in snow. Lieutenant A. L. Rook stalked a German medium artillery O.P. captured him at pistol point with all his maps and codes and brought him back through a minefield. The emphasis of the war had, however. shifted and both regiments were very glad to return to England, after so

gave

The next step in the change from horses to armoured cars came after the

car

lst Household Cavalry

impression of what those days

tank then moved closer hoping

were like the 2nd Household

to

crush

the

car

under

its

Between 16th July and 16th August. 1944. 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment lost over forty vehicles. twenty-five of

them scout cars.

It was there-

fore n relief to get out of the close country and res.rictions of the bridgehead. On 24th

On

3rd

September.

1944.

2nd Household Cavalry Regi— ment advanced over 90 miles to be the first of the Allies to reach Brussels. It was probably the "longest day“ in their

history and is a story in itself. Lieutenant Hanbury pushed on

Daimler Armoured Cars triumphal entry into Brussels 1944, etc.

19 18


to capture the main bridge in Louvain which was strongly held by infantry. A furious battle ensued which got down to the crews using pistols and to some incredible gallantry by the local Belgian Resistance before the bridge was secure.

night;

a

period

during

which

Top: Daimler scout car crew with an improvised mounting for crashing into a ditch. He and his operator jumped on to his

cars and half tracks were later

Household Cavalry Regiments finished side by side between

course in armoured fighting vehicles and since then the rest has seemed relatively easy— two hundred and eighty years

the assault troops and heavy troops came into their own.

Besa MG and rear vision not obscured by massive bedrolls

Middle: Humber Armoured Cars near Foggia in Italy 1943

As both regiments advanced towards the Dutch frontier, the Germans fought harder on the

Early in 1945, lst Household Cavalry Regiment, after four months in England, took over a sector of the Maas from 11th Hussars and so it was that all three regiments were ready to take part in the final advance into Germany. There

line of successive canals, The

were

Albert, Ghent and Escaut. Lieutenant Buchanan-J ardine 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment in a daring reconnaissance became the first Allied soldier to enter Holland. In two scout ears, he ran the gauntlet of numerous parties of Germans to reach Valkerswaard. which could not in fact be liberated until a week later. Their return through six miles of successive ambush parties was

crowds or helpful just a dour stiffening and the only thrill the first to liberate

breathtaking “nose to tail, with

Holland, and found himself in the middle of a large halted enemy convoy of guns, half tracks and lorries. He had no

ARMOU RED FIGHTING VEHICLES

idea how many, it was, in fact, over a mile long, and he

CREWED BY THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY—l94l-l97l

their fluid flywheels screaming defiance they raced Southwards at over sixty miles per hour," . “everything on the outside of the cars was punctured by small arms fire" before they reached the safety of an Irish Guards bridgehead over the Escaut Canal. The Anglo/American Air— borne operations which followed really extended both regiments to the limit. The Royals had to protect the flanks of the corridor against most determined German attacks while 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment linked up with the Airborne forces. They

no

longer

any

resistance opposition was being our own

prisoners of war.

decided to overtake it with his armoured car leading followed by his troop and a white scout car of assault troopers. It was impossible to miss, lorries burst into flames and exploded as ammunition and petrol were scattered. They had gone about 500 yards before the enemy thought of returning the fire from ditches or of driving off. The

faster

the

enemy

went,

have

they shot it up, it caught fire and had to be barged out of

They were, in fact,

the

two

rear

vehicles,

the only troops to get within sight of lst British Airborne

the way by the rear scout car.

Division

The Germans had by now lined ditches with bazooka men and 37mm anti tank guns, luckily they kept missing the armoured cars and sometimes

at

Arnhem,

directed

medium artillery fire and provided the only radio link between the beleaguered parachutists and HQ. 30 Corps.

hit

After the failure at Arnhem,

2nd

Household

Cavalry

Regiment and The Royals spent many eerie nights on the River Maas, manning Observation Posts by day, and carrying out hair-raising foot patrols by

An armoured car regiment had twenty-eight sabre troop leaders

to

led or wounded in ten months.

the

Cavalry

Rhineland.

in the saddle and thirty years in vehicle crews—may have resulted in the Household Cavalry showing a particular tolerance towards each other, a lot more professional skill

Regiment

where

by

August. 1945. they had once again become The Life Guards and Royal Horse Guards. respectively.

and self confidence throughout. and the ability to still get a lot

position in a small wood where it had to beat off an attack before slipping away with less than a belt of ammunition left between them. Sixty-eight including

armoured

When the war ended The reached

For none of those regiments who had actually ridden

of fun out of soldiering. On reflection, the peculiar discip-

Lubeck were ordered to Den— mark and they received a tremendous welcome as they drove to Copenhagen. The

horses in the Second World War was it ever to be the same again. They had all had an incredible four years crash

line. arrogance and panache of the cavalry has, thank heavens. survived the traumatic change

Royals

who

had

from

hay

nets

to

jerry cans.

into a main road near Ruurle,

tween

Friends”.

Household

Regiment twenty-one were kilThe now badly battered troop took tip a defensive

went into the Harz and 2nd

weeks before the war ended.

and in 2nd Household Cavalry

vehicles

West of Arnhem, “Stable Boys

Feathered

accelerated out of such 21 hot

spot.

Bremen and Cuxhaven. lst Household Cavalry Regiment

One final story from that last advance which illustrates the professional skill attained by the regiments. Lieutenant Harvey Williams, 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment, turned

then 82 US. Airborne South of Nijmegen and finally 1 Polish Parachute Brigade South contacted

Below: Maintenance on a Marmon Harrington armoured car in

the Western Desert 1942

knocked out. Sadly Williams and his were both killed in near Buxethude two

cheering

the faster sped the pursuing armoured cars. Both armoured car turrets were kept traversed half right with guns blazing. The assault troopers lobbed grenades into all the open lorries they could overtake. A staff car got sandwiched be-

got through to 101 US. Airborne North of Eindhoven,

CoH‘s armoured car as it passed, followed by his driver who lay flat on the front tool bin of the rear scout car as it

counted Harvey operator Appensen

their

own

vehicles,

but

things were clearly getting more difficult. A Corporal in the white scout car was hit in the lung, so troopers straddled his body and kept on firing. Harvey Williams’ armoured car was then hit and sent

ARMOURED CARS

ENGINE—bhp

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Bren

Humber Mk 3 and 4

Rootes 90hp

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3 x Browning x Browning .50

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21 20


The Household Cavalry Museum 1 9 7 0 VISITORS From tst January to 20th October, 1970, 1,600 people The first season

signed the visitor's book. The total number of visitors would be nearer 3,000 as organised parties seldom sign the book. Among those who signed the “V.l.P’s. Book' were Major-General G. T. A. Armitage, Director Royal Armoured Corps, Prince

of the Hickman for all the hard work

Weser Vale Hunt was a great they put success

in

spite

of

organising

it,

Lieutenant-Colonel

in,

in

R.

bad and

to

Michael of Kent, General Sir Michael Carver, Mr. Gavin Astor. Lady Hermione Howard-Vyse, General Sir Edward Howard—Vyse.

weather which curtailed activiM. H. Vickers, M.V.O., O.B.E., ties.

The

Hunt

managed

to for giving

permission

for the

meet no fewer than 35 times.

Ball to be held in the Officers' Mess at Detmold. This

present

season

No fewer

ap-

than two hundred and ninety

the

Part of the Field With the Weser Vale hounds, after a meet near Wahrendorf, during Exercise Forefront II. From left to right: Major J. H. Pitman, Lt. Gen. Sir John Sharp, Commander 7 (Brit/sh) Corps and Major H. 0. Hugh Smith (Field Master).

D.R.A.C.

of

the

Swedish

Army,

Lieutenant

General

Sir

Mervyn Butler and Prince George of Denmark. The number of visitors was almost treble the total for last yeah

pears to be going even better. people

attended

and

the

So far we have had eleven money

greatly

assisted

in

ACQUISITIONS

official meets, and during the keeping Regimental

Shoot

at

hounds

during

the A remarkable trumpet banner of the Royal Horse Guards, of the reign of George l was willed to us by Colonel G. C. Fawns, RA.

Hohne Summer months when hunting

four early morning cub-hunting was almost at a standstill. meets, where the Field on two occasions numbered sixty.

in July, Sir John Grotrian, Bt., most generously gave us his collection of the uniforms and equipment of the giant Blue,

The Hunter Trials held at Merlsheim

The hounds have hunted well on lines that were from

Captain

The Weser Vale Bloodhounds. Captain W. A. Stringer on Ulysses and Corporal of Horse Burton Johnson on Regent

were

R.

Corporal

excellent.

Colonel F. G. Burnaby.

C. Wilkinson with of

Horse

Burton

twenty minutes to an hour and

Johnson worked very hard at

a

building

The sword in this unique personal

collection is the largest ever made by Wilkinson and is five inches longer in the blade than the normal pattern of state sword. Major R. G. Gunther, 2nd Life Guards gave us two

George IV Standards (Royal and Squadron), with their original half

cold,

through

varying

the

course

and

the Standard belts and trumpet banners.

scenting only

conditions

and

on

Hunt

occasion

failed

to

during next year.

one

own the line or acknowledge

on

their

BL000H0UNDS

quarry

both

civilian

(Corporal Pitt, the Regimental

sher

Barber)

Dijsseldorf,

the

Rheinisch-Westfalli-

Schleppjagdverin where

the

about to be overtaken went

day

meet was given

to ground

their

draghounds

e.v. Satur—

over to

their

hounds

own

vs.

helpful

in

allowing

us

weekend

breaks

cases have built fences and

came

into

even suggested the best lines

the

two

to take, and sometimes after

during

by

hunting

hunting

the

Field

have

5.»

a thorn

bush,

Tuesday

and

the

over the battle area. Placating

was

the

as they did so, all the angry

having first run several circles

following

in

turn of the Bloodhounds.

effort

to

throw

the

On

and

both occasions the Field were

only

disgruntled

farmers

day

before

Johnson

continues

our

to

do

were sterling work in looking after

soon flushed him out to the

over one hundred. Hauptmann

threatening

astonishment

Busso Freise of the German

reprisals because of damage

Army

done by tanks.

all

manner

of

hounds and Corporal of Horse and

delight

of

i

.

great deal to repair the ill feelings caused by the damage that we did with our tanks

been

who

kennelman the

purchased

a

rare

edition

of

Fortescue’s

Hunt at the Rhine Army Summer

virtually as they left the printers some thirty-five years ago.

SEARCHES AND UNDERTAKINGS Assistance was given to a number of publications among

which were the biography of Wellington by the Countess of Longford, histories of The Life Guards and of The Blues (both by Lieutenant Colonel R. J. T. Hills), “True Animal Stories"

asked in for tea.

Trooper

an

hounds off. Undaunted, hounds

The scene outside Regimental Headquarters during Exercise Forefront II. At weekends, when the exercises were halted, two meets ol the Weser Vale Bloodhounds were held. They proved to be enormously popular with the German farmers, and did a

Parade of the Weser Vale

in

committee

”History of the British Army", all twenty volumes of which are

On the Armoured Brigade Exercise,

The

and

across their land, and in many

with

was

Some fifty items have been added to the Royal Dragoons' collection, either by gift or purchase, which now await their

military have been most kind and

A memorable hunt was on Boxing Day when the quarry he

another

permanent home in the new extension. farmers,

whilst he was still on the run.

realising

hold

All of the landowners and

they "killed above ground" by up

to

THE WESEB VALE

their quarry. On five occasions

catching

hopes

Horse Show

by

Left to right: CoH. Burton-Johnson, Captain Stringer, M.H. and Captain Hickman, M.H.

edition by Mrs. Esther Terry-Wright, ”First Day on the Somme”

E.

R.

Delderfield,

“London

Past

and

Present"

revised

by M. Middlebrook and a History of the Shire Horse Society.

We also did military research for part of a new BBC T.V. series called ”Rule Britannia" which will not be screened until 1972 and produced an exhibtion, sponsored by Austin Reed Ltd. for British Week in Helsinki which was visited by His Royal

Burton Johnson keeps hounds the Field.

gave

us

a

day

at

It ended with

Highness The Duke of Edinburgh. in

Lopshorn were the Field total-

order

as

afternoons Other notable hunts were

led

seventy—five

and

hounds

at

the

end

of

August

hunted very successfully three

Saturday

are

still

looked

next forward

the Hovel Senne Meet and the

Whip.

the Germans inviting us back to

when

everybody

whether on horse or foot can consequent

run

of

eleven

very

well

fenced

The first Hunt Ball proved

miles, the last official meet of

was

the 1969/70 season at Hain-

hounds must have run a good

a

and

hausen

fifteen miles

thanks go to Captain and Mrs.

good

22

the

joint

meet

Plans for

this

have

been

finally

approved

and

work

is

German soldiers The country get out and enjoy some very

and

ANNEXE

year.

great

success

and

sport.

our W.A.S.

expected to start within a few months.

The building will be

the home of the Royals collection plus an exhibition of presentday state dress and a section devoted to current activities of the Household Cavalry.


SACCONE & SPEED ARE ABOUT IOOYEARS BEHIND THE TIMES.

SPORT

Since we started serving the military in 1839, our attitudes haven’t changed a bit. Nor have our wines. When you come to order from us you’ll

find that we still keep an excellent cellar. Stocked to the brim with superb burgundies, clarets and hocks. Not to mention a wide range of spirits, liqueurs and cigars.

Football Notes This article is always written in the middle of the season, so that it deals with the end of one season and the start of another. Last year‘s article finished by saying that we had set our sights again on the Cavalry Cup. We were due to play the first round against the 15th/19th Hussars before 215t February.

But understandably, there’s at least one

thing that we’ve changed since 1839. Our service. Thanks to the horseless carriage, we can now deliver your orders in about

48 hours, which just happens to be the quickest service in the business.

SACCONE &SPEED LTD.

Our big opponent here was the snow, which arrived early in December and did not disappear completely until March. Throughout this period we were unable to play any games at all, although every-

17 CUMBERLAND AVENUE, LONDON NW1 0.

one carried on training under

C.S.M.I. Knight A.P.T.C., in the gymnasium. After endless postponements on the grounds of either snow or water logged pitches, it was decided that

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In the second half it started to rain very heavily, the Regiment played with more determination and pulled the score back to 2-2. Unfortunately, with five minutes to go and neither team on top, Cpl. McMcKenna was injured and had to be carried off with an injury that kept him in hospital for three weeks. Then a weak pass by

one of our team allowed the opposition through, and we were out of the Cavalry Cup. This proved to be the last game of the season; the weather had put every one so far behind with their matches, that the local League was abandoned. Looking back, it was a very frustrating season.

Finally, we must remember the activities of Staff Corporal Hunt, B.E.M., who is a Class l referee, and who was chosen to referee the B.A.O.R. Final, at the end of the season.

Hockey

Sgt. Jasper, L/Cpl. Tyson, L/Cpl. Love, Lt. Col. R. M. H. Vickers,

L/Cpl.

Butler,

S.Q.M.C.

Wood,

CoH.

Melbourne,

A.Q,M.S, Hitchcock

Hockey Notes

dered a team spirit that was never broken.

The present season started slowly because of training at Larzac and leave during August followed by the Autumn exercises; however We did manage to fit in an inter squadron tournament, which was won by an attached team of ten members of the R.E.M.E. and one A.C.C. The regimental team were unprepared for the first round of

It will probably be many years before the Blues and Royals will be able to match the impressive achievements of

a

the Army/B.A.O.Ft. champion-

In the very early part of the season, the team did not show up particularly well. However, the Commanding Officer then decreed early mor< ning training for every one in the team, this was to last five months. We now had time to evolve a 4-2—4 system, which allowed us the luxury of attacking and defending in depth. Even more we engen-

on Saturday 14th March, snow

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or no snow. A squadron of men succeeded in clearing most of the snow beforehand. The team were rearing to go, and from the start they succeeded in mastering the difficult conditions better than our opponents. As the game went on, it became apparent that we were the fitter team, and we finished the game winning 4-1. The second round was played against the 4th/7th the following Tuesday, St. Patrick's

Day.

SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET

Their pitch

had

ship and we were heavily defeated by 28th Amphibious Engineer

Regiment.

been

clear for some time; for us, this was the first game on grass for over three months.

The 4th/7th took control of the game from the start and by half time they were 2-0 up.

We are now looking for replacements for Cpls, McKen-

na, Sibley, Burt, L/Cpl. Butler and Cfn. Hazeldene and Babb. all of whom have left since last season. Once again our eyes are on the Cavalry Cup.

this year's Hockey Team.

The

Regiment won the B.A.O.R.. the R.A.C and the Divisional competitions, they were the League Champions and Army Finalists. They also won the Jubilee Cup.

Anyone who has enjoyed

long

B.A.O.Fl.

cup

run,

knows that, not only must one fight for rhythm and fitness, but also compete against weather and nerves. These were to be our problems in the match against our near neighbours, 3rd R.H.A. So far from being the clear cut victory, that we expected, there were grounds for suspicion over the only goal scored. However, we soon gained our confidence, and followed a dream path to the finals, with a 15-1 goal average. that speaks for itself.

Sgt. Jasper and L/Cpl. Tyson need special mention, for the normally infallible defence system relied upon these two obliterating any wing

25


threat from the opposition; this was only achieved by disciplined and aggressive play. Poor Cfn. Love, our goal keeper, was rarely allowed to show his skills, but he could always be relied upon in emergency The backs, S.Q.M.C. Wood and the Colonel, apart from their obvious skill, were a useful indication as to how we were progressing, depending on how they leapt, when we scored a goal.

The link men, Cpl. Bi-rt and A.Q.M.S. Hitchcock always maintained mid<field possession, while the forwards, Lamb,

Musgrove,

Melbourne

and Butler were never mastered. Their vast repertoire of tricks enabled them to capitalize any error by the opposing defence.

No team is complete without its official, and S.C.M. Heath always umpired to the very highest standards. This is our heritage, what

of the future? Perhaps we will have a clearer picture, when early risers hear the clash of hockey sticks in the gymnasium.

of six fencers would rest upon

individual performances at the Divisional Championships from the following fencers:—Major Lane~Fox, CoH. Barnes, CoH. Lawson,

CoH.

Martin,

MECHANICAL MANAGEMENT

MOUNTED SPORTS 1970

Cpl.

Bright, L/Cpl. Collett, L/Cpl. Norton, A.C.C. and Cfn. Lamb, R.E.M.E.

by .Mayor A. B. T. BABE 1. RHG/l)

The Divisional Championships took place on 23rd-25th March,

1970,

and

the

Regi-

mental fencers literally swept the board—winning the team event and individual honours as follows: Foil—1st Cfn. Lamb, 2nd CoH. Barnes, 4th L/Cpl. Norton. Epe’e—1st Cfn. Lamb, 2nd Cpl. Bright, 3rd L/Cpl. Collett. Sabre—2nd Major Lane-Fox. After this success the team competed in the B.A.O.R. finals on the 7th-8th April to try to qualify for the Army Finals.

The first fight in the

team event was against the team that had come runnersup in the Division. Over confidence proved the downfall and the team were very surprisingly beaten. Suddenly finding themselves in a pre-

carious fought

apply to the horse for a way to maintain tanks may

technological revolutioneas one ex—Prime Minister has described

it. The reference may even touch the wounds of recent military history. But on the other hand the way in which horses were kept fit involved a mental attitude and a style which is not found in the way tanks are now kept on the road, and there is reason to think that standards might improve if it were. Stable management had a difi‘erent character from servicing, and that character might be usefully applied to the care of armoured fighting vehicles under the name mechanical management,

Horses were cared for according to the conditions in which

they were found to operate well. The business was only indirectly related to the horses’ insides and vets were established to look after ana:omical problems. But now, a crude digest of the anatomy

of the tank is the first conditions under which an thought. The mechanical substitute for the soldier‘s

preoccupation of training, and the A.F.V. operates well are given less vet is constantly being used as a native wit. Engine cycles, gearbox

ratios and servicing schedules are almost too well known. practical aspects are forgotten.

The

position the team back determinedly,

defeating the eventual winners and

To

seem out of place in the romping stomping white heat of the

taking

second

Mechanical management would take into account, for example. the age of the more important components. A glance

place,

at the speedometer should give the crew commander a shrewd

Fencing Notes

January,

1970,

saw

Major

Lane-Fox and CoH. Lawson with the support of C.S.M.|. Knight trying hard to consoli-

date a team to take part in the

forthcoming

Divisional

thereby qualifying for the Army Finals. Success came also to individualsz—Foil—2nd Cfn. Lamb, 3rd CoH. Barnes, 4th L/Cpl. Norton. Epe’e— 2nd Cfn. Lamb. Sabre—3rd Major Lane-Fox The finals of the Army Inter Unit Team Championships took place at Aldershot on the 19th May.

team eventually took place to the Royal

At the end of February, however, the team was streng-

College of Science, thereby just failing to have the honour of representing the Army at

emerging from our midst in the

form of Cfn. Lamb, R.E.M.E.

day of very hard fencing the

All in all, a very successlooking

Overnight

the

picture

changed completely —— every

fencer now had to prove his ability and fight for a place in the team. It was decided that the final selection for the team 26

second Military

the Royal Tournament in the Inter Services Unit Team Championships.

ful season.

the

store.

Engines,

to

take

another example,

operate, charge

and cool badly at low speed. and the effective manager would do almost anything to avoid that debilitating condition. The

with

great hopes, but sadly without two of its stalwart members —Major Lane—Fox and CoH. Lawson—our regards go with them and hope that they will continue to keep fencing alive.

CoH. Burton-Johnson riding Regent, in the Weser Vale Hunt Hunter Trials in September.

The Regiment has had an extremely enjoyable and adequately successful year at Mounted Sports durlng 1970. The main sporting activities have been The Weser Vale Hounds. Hunter Trialing and Show Jumping, of which The Hounds are to be dealt with elsewhere in this magazine.

In the Hunter Trial Events the Regiment also enjoyed a certain degree of success. CoH. Burton Johnston, riding Regent. won once and was placed three more times, and finished the season the winner of the B.A.O.R. Novice Hunter Trial Competitions for 1970. Further successes went to Captain G. H. Twecdie on Sefton, Cpl. Sherwin on Nymphet, and Captain T. M. Hickman on

not least into ammunition bins which contain we-know—what sort of ammunition, and some trouble must be taken to achieve drying. protection and drainage.

Tightening nuts is not just a matter of the straight yank or the periodic lean on the spanner by those who forget that the

rack went out with the middle ages.

Close mating of threads

and surfaces is necessary. But more important than the steps taken to tighten a bolt is the train of thought its diScovery sets off.

A loose nut, like dry rot, may lead to another loose nut and then rapidly spread. One loose bolt must bring into question the mechanical cohesion of the whole vehicle.

Immediate steps

are necessary to find out if it is just one instance. if it runs throughout the whole vehicle. or the whole troop or the design of the vehicle throughout the army.

The team is now

forward to 1971

Tpr. Butcher on Outlaw, competing in the Rhine Army Summer Horse Show

same sort of thinking would prompt crews to recognise that rain gets into bins and into ammunition bins in particular, and

After a long

Championships. At this point it appeared that a team of six could just about be scraped together.

thened by the arrival of CoH. Barnes from Records and a few weeks later even more so by hidden talent suddenly

idea of the sort of distance he could expect to go without trouble

and also the sort of ironwork he would hope to trip over in

Designers work to meet certain conditions, but do not meet

the full range of conditions equally well. Far better understand, observe and note the critical conditions, and

to to

deduce from them the particular difficulties of the contrivance. rather than to get bogged down in the details of the mechanism. Pragmatic flair and not technical knowledge is the key to mechanical management.

Show Jumping centered mainly on the Rhine Army Horse Show. Success here was frequent. Nymphct won three Class L jumping competitions. variously ridden by Captain T. M. Hickman and Captain J. C. M. L. Crawford. Captain G. H. Tweedie rode Sefton to Victory in a Class A

his wife‘s horse, Bootsie.

The season finished with our

competition, and Major H. 0. Hugh Smith and L/Cpl.

own Weser Vale Hunter Trials. Among the prize winners here were Captain R. C. Wilkinson on Sefton. Mr. M. R. Sorby on Morocco, Major B. H. P. Wright on Ulysses, Captain G. H. Tweedie on Outlaw and Mr. P. R. L. Walker-Okeover on Caesar.

Partridge were placed more than once on Outlaw and Captain Hickman’s Montolas, Unfortunately. in the Regimental Team jumping, success eluded the Regiment. Also during the Horse Show Tpr. Butcher was placed on Outlaw, in the soldier's class jumping and Prix Caprilli. The Regiment won the Q.O.H. Cup for the best all round unit at the Horse Show.

For 1971 we have great hopes. Certain dead wood has been weeded from the Stables. and promising replacements have arrived from London. With similar good conditions, the Regiment could well improve on the 1970 record of success.


PITFA LL

THE GOVERNOR GENERAUS HORSE GUARDS

by Cornet T. L. de G. Messe/

This year The Blues and Royals Climbing Club culminated its year‘s training with an expedition to Andorra, the small principality in the Southern Pyrenees between France and Spain. The party was led by Mr. Messel and Cpl. Pitt.

The team consisted of

Cpl. Moore. Cpl. Heathcote, Cpl. March. Tpr. Scarrott, Tpr. Fuller, Cfn. Salmon and Tpr Nixon

performed

a

Each member. apart from being an enthusiastic mountaineer,

valuable

administrative

job.

ranging

from

Quartermaster

to

Last year's article alluded to the fact that we were waiting for our government's policy decision on the Canadian Armed Forces.

interpreter. The expedition left Larzac, where “A" and "C” Squadrons were exercising, on 23rd August and entered Andorra the following day.

As a result of their decision to cut-back on total numbers, etc., the Governor General‘s Horse Guards were cut back in establishment to 157 all ranks; and a Regimental Band, and from three fighting squadrons and a Headquarters Squadron to

The next day we made a camp in the North of Andorra. and the afternoon was spent in learning the various methods of crossing fast-running rivers. During the lunch break, we discovered a wandering American, by name John Pearson, who remained with us until the end of the expedition.

two squadrons of four five-vehicle troops each and a slightly enlarged Regimental Headquarter’s group.

The next day the whole team made an attempt to conquer Mont de l‘Abela (2,800 metres) which, due to the unacceptably dangerous nature of its rocks, conquered us. However, after spending the following day in practising our skills on rocks in the neighbourhood of the camp, we did manage to reach

staff, and our Paymaster, and his staff. However, we managed to cover off these positions with people coincidentally, look just like our old OM. and P.M.R.

We lost the establishment for our Quartermaster, and his have who,

the peak of the highest mountain in our area, Mont del Serrat (2,950 metres). Whilst doing so we sustained a casualty, who suffered from exposure, brought on by the icy cold winds at that altitude. The night we endured a thunderstorm, which soaked all our clothing and made a planned expedition impossible. The following day we planned to reach a small cave high in the mountains, but the route was considerably more difficult than anticipated, so we were satisfied by reaching the Col d'Ordino (2,500 metres). The next day the party broke camp and started the four-day journey by 3-ton lorry back to Detmold, one day of which was spent on a French Mediterranean beach.

Adventure Training—Mountaineering

Exercise “Pittfall” was a successful mountaining experience, as well as being most enjoyable. The Club hope to embark in the near future on

“Pittfall Phase Two" in the Atlas Mountains in Morocco.

Our Cavalry Squadron under Captain E. Constantinides has been very busy again this year. Not only have they performed the normal number of escorts at the opening of the Provincial Legislature, the Royal Agricultural and Winter Fair, Queen's Plate, etc., but they have also been busy at the opening of the Canadian National Exhibition (Canada's largest, and oldest annual exhibition) where they escorted Her Highness Princess Margerite of the Netherlands to the official opening and, the

number of inquiries from people wanting to join the regiment and, in fact, an increase in the number of new recruits who actually sign up. The Canadian Government, around ist June, decided that they were going to provide some relief for our unemployed student population during their summer holidays. The plan the

Horse

Guards

was the Summer

Student

We were authorized to enrol 50 secondary school students and to train them as trained troopers. and, if time allowed to the trade level. We were also impowered to employ unit personnel as part of the fifty, and selected unit personnel as instructors. it is with a certain amount of pride that we report that all

Orders: Should be placed with R.E.M.E. Corps Secretariat, Moat House, Arborfield, Reading, R62 9LN, Berks. (Cheques payable to R.E.M.E. Corps Account No. 2).

This book tells the history of the Corps from its roots in the old Army Ordnance Corps and Army Ordnance Department to the present day, R.E.M.E. was formed in 1942 during the darkest days of the Second World War and at once became and has since remained, a vital component of the British Army. Although historically correct as to the facts it relates, this book presents. a readable and varied story rather than a purely Regimental history. Set against a backcloth which discloses the great strides in technology which the Army has had to match—in weapon systems, telecommunications, automotive science and aviation—it tells a tale of people, places and units. For a reader in search of statistics, tables and graphs the book may fall short of expectations—though there are enough Vital statisticst for normal tastes. But for a reader who likes a story full of human interest, which displays t e exten it of the soldier-craftsman’s ingenuity and resources and his officers’ profes5ional leadership and skill, measure. ample in pleasure and affords interest

On 14th April, we also had a change of R.S.M. Our Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel G, A. Burton officiated at the hand-over to C.W.O. (R.S.M.) H. G. Busch. C.D., from C.W.O. (R.S.M.) J, Davis CD.

Although the present unpleasantness in the Province of Quebec has shaken up all our preconceived ideas of tranquility we have found that a side effect has been an increase in the

Publishers: Leo Cooper Ltd., 196 Shaftesbury Avenue, London, WCZH 8JL. Price: ‘23 (22-10 for members of the Corps of R.E.M.E.).

His Excellency the Governor General was well—received in all messes and met as many people as time allowed.

We wish both the commanding Officer and the R.S.M. the best of luck and success during their tenure of office, and further, wish the past 0.0. and R.S.M. the best of luck in their renewed civilian life.

BOOK REVIEW

The story of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

was heaped upon us by all spectators.

As you are probably aware, due to the fact that the Horse Guards are a militia (your territorial) unit we are subject to rather large variations in strength, depending on the quirks and receptivity of our local populace to the military,

that concerned Training Plan.

“CRAFTSMEN OF THE ARMY”

At this chance of Command Lieutenant Colonel M. B. W. Davis, C.D., A.D.C.. handed over to Lieutenant Colonel H K. Forbes, C.D., A.D.C. Colonel Forbes has been with the Regiment since the middle 50's and won his commission from the ranks. All ranks performed splendidly and a great amount of praise

fifty were qualified trained troopers, and thirty-five (those who decided to remain in the Regiment) were qualified in their trade. This was all accomplished in six weeks, which included a week at Base Petewawa undergoing field craft and field firing training. Other than the above special course, our training remained the same, except that as a culmination of last year's training our summer concentration was spent at C.F.B. Petawawa where all members of "Mobile Command Squadron", under Major J.

S. G. McCrimmon qualified and exercised on the Lynx Recce vehicle. A good time was had by all ranks, and naturally we hope for further training of this ilk this year. We, on

ist September, had a change of Command, Our

Honorary Colonel,

His

Excellency the Governor General

and

Our Honorary Lieutenant Colonel officiated and inspected the dismounted

regiment,

and

the Cavalry Squadron.

following day. to the saluting base of the Warrior's Day Parade,

The number of other escorts and duties provided by the Cavalry Squadron and the regiment prove not only our popularity, but also increase our faith in the premise that part~time soldiers, paying their own way, as do the cavalry enthusiasts in the Regiment. still have a function to perform within the framework of the Canadian Armed Forces. The regiment initiated a competition for Militia units in connection with the annual "Miles For Millions" Walk (to aid needy charities like OXFAM) which is held in Toronto each May. A trophy. the Horse Guard's shoe, a mounted, plated horseshoe, was donated for presentation to the five-man team completing the 32.7 mile walk with the lowest elapsed time. it was only fitting that the first year of the competition the trophy should be won by a Horse Guard team. Coporal J. M. Gilchrist and his team of four others handily won, beating out the nearest competitors by almost thirty minutes.

Other personnel were involved in the roving check-points. providing radio communications with the finish line. and in other ancillary duties. With all these activities, military and otherwise. we have attempted to maintain our position as Canada's oldest and most senior militia cavalry regiment. Our motto “Nulli Secundus" guides us all.


THE ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS The Royal Canadian Dragoons origina— ted on December let, 1883, when the “Cavalry School Corps" was formed in Quebec. During the North~West Canada campaign of 1885 the Cavalry School Corps patrolled

the

lines

of

communication

of

Armoured Car Regiment (Royal Canadian Dragoons)"

embarked

for

the

United

Kingdom as part of the 5th Canadian Armoured Division. The Regiment landed in Sicily on October 22nd. 1943. With the British Eighth Army they fought a tough

redesignated The Royal Canadfun Dragoons. When the Royal Canadian Dragoons said goodbye to Sennelager for the last time ten years ago they little suspe:ted the fashion in which they would suddenly re-appear.

Although the move is effectively compIete the hectic pace has not cased. At the time of writing the Regiment is in the

establishing new contacts and forming good working relations with CENTAG. Gone are the 01d familiar areas of Hohne,

being able to conduct % troop battle runs. Despite these further restrictions the Regiment will undoubtedly maintain the

midst of making Iinztl preparations to celebrate ‘ .. , the ‘ 70th anniversary of the battle ol Liliclontcm. ()n the 7th of November

Sennelager, Soltau and Haltern.

high standard of gunnery attained with the

relatively short period of time names like Grafcnwoehr, Hohcnfels, Wildflecken, and

the Regiment will troop its guidon followed

Kleinhoctz Will

campaign across the Sicilian mountains to

invade Italy itself early in January, 1944. After a month of rest and refitting the Regiment became the Reconnaiszance Regi-

The

reviewing

During

the

South

African

Regiment

raised

War the

of resumed

its

role

as

the

armoured

car

regiment of the lst Canadian Corps where

involved

some

1,700

1900, “Royal

miles

of

it fought until May 7th, 1945. The Regiment returned to Canada in January. 1946.

repeated

engagements, the most notable being the engagement at Liliefontein on November

Following the war the Regiment was based at Petawawa and Camp Gagetown

7th, 1900.

and served as part of Canada's Nato Force

fought a

Outnumbered five to one. they

running

battle from

dawn

to

dark, covering the withdrawal of the main

British column from Liliefontein and con« tinuously thwarting the enemy intentions to cut off the withdrawal. It was on this day that three Dragoons won the Victoria

Cross in the same action.

At the outset of the First World War, the Regiment was mobilized. It arrived in England in October,

families and effects in 2% months. one short week personnel were

embarked

for

remained for

Now

the

rear par.y

located

in

Lahr,

in

May,

armoured regiment.

in Germany from 1955 to 1959. Single Squadrons also saw service in Germany. Korea. the Middle East and Cyprus.

North Marguerite and Central Marguerites of the Lahr air base. With the move

On June 15th. 1970. the Dragoons returned to Germany. In a short ceremony at Sennelager Training Area the Lord

on the ground the job of unpacking and settling in begins in earnest. Unfortunately unlike Fort Beausejour. space is at a

Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) and

premium in the Marguerites and non-essentials will remain packed.

The

complete

“C"

Squadron

amalgamated

and

were

unit

and

is presently situated

all

vehicles

them had ever imagined, even the veterans

of the South African storm. The Regiment first saw action in the trenches at Festubert as part of lst British Division. Baptism In the first four days

they achieved only minor successes but sufiered appalling losses from enemy artillery and machine guns. Shortly after— wards the Regiment moved to the area of Givenchy. again to the trenches for the

remainder of the year. With the formation of the third Canadian Division the Royal Canadian Dragoons resumed their role as

cavalry and subsequently served during 1916-1918 in the Canadian Cavalry Brigade of the (British) Cavalry Corps. It was during

this

time

that

the

Dragoons

par-

ticipated in the last great Cavalry charge. the action at Moreuil Wood on March 30th. 1918. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the newly designated “lst

will

be

G.

deS.

and

on the

equipment

so

the

Squadron Commanders receive pennants on rebadging to R.C.D. at Sennelager on 15th...June, 1970 Left to right: Major B. R. Dixon, Major W. A. Methuen, Major H. B. E.

Lake, Major W. L. C/aggelf, Lt. Col. P. A, C. Carew.

of

R.A.C’.

Gunnery

Wing

and

the

familiar.

Despite the disruption of the move, the

Brigadier

help

Hohne facilities.

Despite all the disruptions a full training gear is still planned for 1971, with

Wotherspoon.

completion of the Liliefontein festivities will

the

Colonel Commandant of the Royal Cana-

see all thoughts turn to the gunnery and

dian Armoured COTPS-

the

RECCE depending on the availability of tank manoeuvering area at hand. The

(Ref)

D.

impending

Grafenwoehr. Perhaps

the

largest

task

will

be

January

gun

camp

at

Unlike Hohne we will likely

be faced with the further restriction of only

possibility

of

a

large

portion

being

variety of challenges facing us, should, to say the least prove interesting.

THE BAND The year has been an extremely busy one for The Band, beginning with a Kneller Hall Inspection in March, which is a thorough “dig out” in all aspects of a Band’s activities. Unfortunately snow and ice covered Wellington Barracks Square, and our Mounted Display had to be cancelled. However, overall, our Inspection went well and we were given a very good report. We then prepared for and played at The Major General’s Mounted Inspection, and The Queen’s Birthday Parade. This year the Musical Ride was produced and we accompanied them at most of their engagements, finding ourselves way out in the country; at the Royal Cornwall Show, Wadebridge; the Suffolk Show, Ipswich; the United Services Show at Carmarthen, and the Bakewell Derby Show. The Trumpeters have been in great demand, and amongst many appearances have played at the Opening of The Commonwealth Games, and The > X

1915.

During this time the Regiment went under canvas and in the following months endured the worst weather and conditions any of

of fire was not easy.

to complete.

Schwarzwald.

the Dragoons serve with 4th Canadian Mechanized Battle Group as Canada‘s only

1914, and trained at

France

Within looking

back with fond memories to the rain-soaked training area of Sennelager. Miraculously enough by the 8th of October when the main party left Ft. Beausejour very little

Pond Farm Camp on Salisbury Plain until it

the

AIM: Move a major unit complete with

Battalion Canadian Mounted Rifles, which was redesignated in August,

complete

in July, 1944. Fighting continued on up through the Gothic Line to the Senio River

First

Canadian Dragoons". The Royal Canadian Dragoons’ line of march in South Africa

Sennelager

F. and E. Lists and piles of cardboard boxes. The real battle was about to begin

North West Europe in March, 1945. and the

last

officer

Regiment returned to Beausejour to stocks

ment of the lst Canadian Infantry Division,

until after twenty months of tough cam— paigning the regiment was withdrawn to 1899-1902

Our

too

by a mounted roll past of all tracked vehicles and a fly past by Helicopter Troop. General

General Middleton's Column in his search for the Metis through Saskatchewan. A Detachment of the Regiment served with the Yukon Field Force which was sent to help the North-West Mounted Police maintain law and order within the territory during the Klondike Gold Rush in 1898.

all

Within a

E

.- 9;,

a

Edinburgh Tattoo, also appearing on Television programmes “Blue Peter“, etc., etc. Our civilian appearances were kept up with shows at the Royal Parks, Victoria Embankment Gardens, Bournemouth, several B.B.C. broadcasts, and two appearances at the Royal Albert Hall competing with the RP. Orchestra and London Philharmonic Orchestra to outdo each other for noise in the “1812” Overture. Several more old stagers have retired to civilian life—00H. Simms, CoH. Hammill, L/Cpl. Sedgwick, L/Cpl. Palmer, L/Cpl. Sellors, Tptr. Hill, we wish them well. Nine young lads have just returned from Kneller Hall, where all made good progress. They are now “enjoying” equestrian training, and we look forward to their joining us in the New Year. Finally, our latest L.P. record “ON PARADE" has been selling very well world wise, it can still be obtained either in Detrnold BFPO 41, or Knightsbridge Barracks.


THE BLUES and ROYALS ASSOCIATION

S“ tiltl).\‘.\l »\\‘.\'lllP & STEEL . . . 8

THE STATE SWORD OF THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALHY Tins 1s Tin-1 “lLKINSON sworn) supplied to Otlicers of the Is! Life Guards from 1834 to the present da). and to (“liters of the 2nd Lite (luards from [8741 until they were disbanded in 19222. The Sword was also adopted h) the Horse (iuards in 1874 and is still carried at the present time. The blade is 392$ inches. making this weapon the longest British Service Sword. and is embossed with the Regimental Cypher and Battle Honours. The grip is of blackened sharkskin [found with silver wire and the guard is of sheet steel with (pinned on) a raised Crown and Regimental Cypher in brass. In an age when swords are no longer a matter of life and death. \\ ilkinson Sword still keep scrupulously to traditional specifications. Ewr)‘ Made. for example, must withstand a double-handed lilo“ against a solid oak lllUl‘k. and must bend 5” out of true and return to the straight. \\ ilkinson Sword today make razor blades and garden tools as well as swords, and still put quality first. as they have done since 1772. \

-

.

. Bu appoiliimmila ILILII. Duke of Edinburgh

‘Wl'lkl'ruon Sword Lid. London

Wilkiiuon NIH-rd Ltd. London

3...... a...”

ma (‘uum

Membership

1970

The Membership of the Association is now:— Officers

by Saturday, 17th April, 1971, Coaches will be organised on repayment from Knightsbridge—Winsdor and return. Depart Knightsbridge Barracks 1600 and 1700 hours.

417

Life Members Life Members

970 (Serving)

657

Annual Members

Cavalry Memorial Service

Subscriptions (Annual Members only) The annual subscription of 37 p complete the enclosed proforma. (Life this subscription).

is now due. Please Members do not pay

The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades' Service will be held in Hyde Park on Sunday, 2nd May, 1971. Dress: Lounge Suits (Overcoats), Medals will be worn. Assemble at 10.50 am. on Regimental Marker in Broad Walk East The Association Banner will head the contingent Members are requested to ensure a large turnout. After the parade, Members will be welcome with the Household Cavalry Regiment at Hyde Park Barracks.

Addresses

W I LKJ 1:15 O N \\.\

REPORT

Suit. No decorations, Bars will be open at 5 pm. Applications for tickets on the enclosed prolorma to the Hon. Secretary

7/ 9/

\i\>

By appnin enira ll. J1. Queen A Lubelh II

ANNUAL

-

._ g

\

{.7 5,

\ , swo R 1) s

)

All

Members are

reminded

that

it

is

their

responsibility

Annual Reunion

to keep the Hon. Secretary informed of any change of address.

It

is

improbable

that

an

Annual

Reunion

can

be

held.

However, if it is at all feasible. Members will be notified under separate cover.

Annual General Meeting This will be held in the W0. and N.C.O.‘s Mess, Combermere Barracks, Windsor, at 5 pm. on Saturday. 1st May, 1971. All members are Agenda will be:— 1.

entitled

and

encouraged

to

attend,

The

Minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on 2nd May.

1st ROYAL DRAGOONS 1970. Water colour by O. Norie c. 1860

Queen’s Birthday Parade An extremely limited number of free tickets for this Parade on Saturday. 12th June, 1971, and for the Final Rehearsal on Saturday, 5th June, 1971. are normally available to the Association. The majority of tickets are for the Inner Line of Sentries (standing), Applications are not acknowledged.

Points arising from those minutes. Confirmation

of

the

Accounts

for

year

ending

31st

Field of Remembrance December, 1970. Committee. (8) Under Rule 13 the following members of the Committee are due to resign:— 1, Mr. J. Edwards 2. Mr. Z, A. Goodacre. (b) In accordance with Rule 13 the undermentioned members of the Association are recommended by the Committee to be appointed members of the Committee:

THE PARKER

1.

Mr. J. S. Clark

2.

Mr. H. J, Beasley.

The Field of Remembrance will be opened at 12 noon on Thursday, 4th November. 1971. Assemble in St. Margaret's Churchyard at 11.30 am. The Badge Cross will be planted by the Colonel at 11.45 am. Dress: Lounge Suits. Medals will be worn.

Christmas Cards Members requiring The Blues and Royals Card should order on the enclosed proforma. Details and price in Autumn Newsletter.

Amendment to Rule 12. The Committee recommend that the following amendment

Notices should be made to Rule 12:—

GALLERY

1.

That Para (b) of Rule 12 be deleted and the following

substituted:— (b)

Specialists in Military Prints

2 ALB EMARLE STREET PICCADILLY

Water Colours, Paintings, etc..

LONDON, W1X 3HF

Also in Sporting, Marine and Topographical Pictures and

Telephone: 01-499 5906/7

“The R.C.M. of the Regiment and all Warrant Officers of the Regiment serving at home with the Regiment and with the Household Cavalry Regiment shall be ex-oificio members of the Committee“.

Any other business.

1.

1 H.C.R. Dining Club. The Twenty-Fifth Annual Dinner will be held in Hyde Park Barracks on Saturday, 30th October. All enquiries to: Mr. A. Quiney (Assistant Hon. Secretary) 54 Francis Avenue. llford, Essex, (Tel: lLFORD 3452). Association Badge Lapel badges for the Association are available from the Join Hon. Secretaries price 13p.

Cleaning and Restoration 01 All Types

FOUNDED 1750

Annual Dinner The Annual Dinner will be held at Combermere Barracks.

Windsor, at 6.30 pm. on Saturday. 1st May, 1971. Dress: Lounge

Association Visit to Zanvoorde (2nd to 10th August).

Anyone interested contact Mr. A. C, Millin. 92 Southcoast Road, Peacehaven. Sussex. Telephone: 07-914 4140.


SUBSCRIPTIONS AND DONATIONS DIVIDEND ON INVESTMENT BADGES

5

BEING EXCESS OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR, CARRIED TO ACCUMULATED FUND BALANCE.

4 0

PRINTING, STATIONERY AND POSTAGE MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES, WREATHS, Etc. ANNUAL REPORT AND MAGAZINE 1,046 3 Less sales 63 14

AUDITORS‘ REMUNERATION

3 0 499 19 287 0

Cost of Dinner Less sale of tickets

ANNUAL DINNER

Soldiers and Airmen

St. George‘s Church—Ypres Combined Cavalry—Old Comrades Royal Hospital—Chelsea Royal Hospital

£2,875

2

3 6

£28,969 18

342 British Legion National Association of Regular Sailors,

ACCUMULATED FUND

I I-

GRANTS AND ASSISTANCE TO MEMBERS SUBSCRIPTIONS AND DONATIONS

LI.I

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT for [he year ended 3131 D 9‘C 5MB .9vIf 1970

on

CURRENT LIABILITIES

—I

Auditors‘ remuneration

D

1

I-I.I

3

(I)

Balance as at 1st January, 1970 28,105 12 Add excess of income over expenditure for the year to 31st December, 1970 814 4

05

BALANCE S”E!9171

o:

28.91916

O

Chartered Accountants

We have audited the annexed balance sheet at 31st December, 1970, and income and expenditure account for the year ended on that date with the books and vouchers of the Association and certify them to be in accordance therewith. The investment and cash at bank have been verified. 3 London Buildings. EC2 TOUCHE ROSS AND CO.

4 4

< >—

4

—I

at cost

2 9

U)

Cash at bank Cash in hand

<

Stock-in-hand—members’ badges

(I)

1, 84 6 4

22896916

£26,849 12 11

U)

CURRENT ASSETS

O

INVESTMENT

L)

22,886 shares in United Services Trustees Combined Charitable Fund at cost (Valuation: £26,891-—-1 969, £25,093)

2 l.— S

DECEMBER 3131 I970

Z

ASSOCIATION VISIT TO THE REGIMENT Early in the year the Commanding Officer \ery kindly invited members of the Committee of the Association to visit

There is little doubt that those of the older generation were

the Regiment during the “Waterloo" celebrations in June.

Mess

A total of 14 accepted this invitation and the following attended: Major 0. W. J.

Lewis, M.B.E., Major E, L. Payne, Mr. J.

Edwards, Mr. H. Grace, F.Q.M.C. E. J. Woodman, Mr. G. Hayward, M.M., Mr. H. M. Healey, Mr. G. A. Johnson, Mr. H. Norris, Farr/Staff/Cpl. P. Smith, Mr. F. Provis, Mr. W. Thomas, Mr. B. Turp, R.V.M. (Chelsea Pensioner), and Mr. N. Harvey (Chelsea Pensioner).

dumfounded at the type and variety of meals served in the compared to when they were serving.

We had arranged to travel back to England on Sunday. 21st June, and the departure day arrived far too quickly. On the Sunday morning we all attending the Church Service in the Garrison Church and the collection was taken by the two

Chelsea Pensioners in their full dress. After lunch and with final farewells the party boarded the coach to take them to Bunde to catch the express to the

Hook of Holland. Arriving

After careful consideration of the various ways to travel was agreed that those travelling as a party would travel

at the station we found that there had been

a

mix up in the seat reservations on the train and by the time

on

this had been put right the train was moving and we found that the strength of our party had increased by two. These were CoH. Barrett and Tpr. Maskell. They had very kindly

All went very smoothly to the Hook

travelled with us from Detmold to look after our needs, and

of Holland except that we almost lost one of our Chelsea Pensioners who became attached to a very senior member of

our baggage in particular, and they were so intent on ensuring that this was done correctly that the train was well on its way before they realised that they were unable to leave the train.

it

on the Harwich-Hook of Holland route, and would depart from Liverpool

Street

Station

Wednesday, 17th June.

on

the

mid-morning

boat

train

the Women's Royal Air Force from H.Q. British Army of the Rhine. However, this obstacle was overcome and the complete party entrained on the Nord Express at the Hook of Holland. To prevent changing trains the Regiment had very kindly

However, they were fortunate to be able to de-train at the next station and from reports received arrived back with the Regiment safe and well.

agreed to meet us with transport at Lohne station which is on

the main line.

This train journey normally takes about six

hours and it was found that due to some labour dispute no

buffet car was attached to the train so that by the time the party arrived at Lohne it was a very thirsty and hungry party. Imagine our surprise and pleasure when we arrived at Lohne to see awaiting our arrival on the platform was the Commanding

Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel R. M. H. Vickers, M.V.O., O.B.E., the Adjutant, Captain D. P. L. Hewson and ROM. T. Tucker.

Travelling on the same train was a party of the Queen's Dragoon Guards Association who had been out to visit their Regiment in Detmold for the same reason that we had travelled. Needless to say we were soon intermingling and the tales being told would have far outdone any angler with his fishing tales. We eventually arrived at the Hook of Holland about 11.30 pm. and immediately embarked on to the boat for Harwich.

This was indeed a most kind gesture about the hour of midnight

Despite the hectic past four days almost all members adjourned

and we quickly forgot our parched throats and empty stomachs. The journey by road from Lohne to Detmold takes nearly one

to the ship's lounge where they were regaled with a continued stream of humour by Staff/Corporal Smith. It was several hours before the party eventually dispersed to their cabins and

hour but on the W.O.'s exchanging Needless to most of the

arrival a most excellent meal was awaiting us in and CsoH. Mess and very soon everyone was greetings and drinking excellent cool drinks. say dawn was breaking on “Waterloo” Day when party, and their hosts retired to bed.

there to find that the air conditioning plant had broken down. Despite this it was vew noticeable that on arrival at Harwich the following morning everyone looked fit and well and I am sure that if it had been possible to return to Detmold they would have done so.

To give full details of all the places visited and the functions attended would indeed take up a great deal of space but everywhere we went and everyone we met gave us a grand feeling of being more than welcome. Three events must, however, receive special mention, these were the cocktail party

in the Officers' Mess, the W.O’s. and CsoH Mess Ball, and the dance organised by the members of the Corporals‘ Mess. The organisation of all these functions was really first class and the Committee were sorry when each one closed. They were a credit to everyone concerned. Another event which

The Committee were most grateful for the kind invitation

and would like to thank Colonel Vickers and all ranks of the Regiment for the trouble they had taken to ensure that we wanted for nothing and it could not have been bettered. It will be talked about for many years to come. We also thank the ROM, Mr. W. Tucker and his members very much indeed for their hospitality and care they gave to us all. and we offer our apologies for the long hours, but it was certainly worth it. In

we must mention is the lunch meal in the other Ranks’ Mess where members were able to have this meal talking to the junior ranks of the Regiment and this was most amusing.

were

conclusion please note that both Chelsea Pensioners returned to The Royal Hospital intact and unmarried.

This in itself was an achievement.


In the year 1893 Her Majesty Queen Victoria was appointed Colonel» in-Chiet ot the lst Guard Dragoon Regiment of the Royal Prussian Army by His Majesty Wilhelm ll, German Emperor and King of Prussia. In the following year Emperor Wilhelm became Colonel-in —Chief of the 1st Royal Dragoons, and the Regiment was nominated “Sister" regiment to the lst Guard Dragoons. A short account of the origin and services of that regiment appeared in the Eagle, 1963. On her appointment as Colonel-in-Chiet, specially designed Banderole (Paradeband)

the Queen presented a for attachment to the

Standard. A description of the Standard and distinctions attached to it is the purpose of the present article. in the Prussian Army all the colours of cavalry regiments were called standards although those of Dragoon, Hussar. and Uhlan regiments were in guidon form, the cuirassiers alone carrying standards similar to

those of Household Cavalry and Dragoon Guards in the British Army. It was a peculiarity, special to the Prussian Army, for a regiment to bear on its Standard, on ceremonial parades and in review order,

THE STANDARD of the l GARDEDRAGONERREGIMENT

My father, Ex-Band Corporal of Horse H. T. Arnold, served on the Blues Comrades Committee for many years until his death in 1958. He was a great character, and many old Blues will remember him. His nickname was “Dabby Arnold".

LETTERS

I enclose a photograph of my grandfather, and of my father on the Drumhorse “Caesar“. 51 Smiths Lane

Windsor Berkshire Dear Sir,

28th August, 1970

I had the honour of serving in the Blues during the last war from 1942 to 1946, during which time I served with the

The photograph accompanying this

article shows

E. G. ARNOLD

The Standard

of

the

1st

3lst August

My father, Benjamin T. Fisher, a Blues trooper of World

War I vintage (regimental numberhappropriately enough—1915) died on Thursday, 20th August, at the age of 80. He went out to France a servant to Captain Sir Sidney Herbert, who was then, I believe, adjutant of the regiment.

KONIGIN VIKTORIA VON GROSSBRITANNIEN UND IRLAND

Even during his last illness and barely conscious he spoke of the Regiment and often mentioned the names of his fellow by Lieutenant Colonel R. North

Dragoons

is

of

white

brocade,

troopers (most freqeuntly a colourful character called “Basher” Moon) and wondered what they’d have thought about him in his present state.

twenty

inc-hes on the lance and twenty-five inches in width with a border fringe of gold thread two inches in depth.

133 Victoria Road Fulwood Preston Dear Sir,

in some detail,

the Banderole of Queen Victoria,

Your Truly,

Household Cavalry Regiment, and was wounded in Italy. I should mention that I could not join before 1942, as I was a regular Police Officer.

distinctions in the form of Banderoles presented by Members of the Royal House appointed to positions of honour in a regiment: Ribands as rewards for some particular display of heroism in war, or for long service; and ribbons with clasps similar to those awarded to officers and other ranks for campaign service.

I am, of course, rather prejudiced about these personalities, but I am very proud of them and feel they should not be forgotten, although it will be a long time before my father is.

In the centre, on a red field, is

Because I'd been so well briefed on the history of the

the Black Eagle of Prussia armed with sword and thunderbolts. Above

Regiment and its exclusive virtues it was natural, perhaps, that I, too, should follow in his footsteps.

it on a white scroll the Motto “Pro Gloria et Patria”: the whole framed in a gold embroidered wreath of laurel ensigned with the Royal Prussian

This

crown.

I

did,

reporting

to

Windsor

in

1942

before

being

posted to Pocklington in 1943.

In each of the tour corner compartments, on a red ground, the Monogram

WR in gold framed by gold embroidered laurel and palm with the Crown above each.

branches

Whilst in France as a scout car driver with “A" Squadron 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment, under Major Bowes Daly.

of

Trumpet Major G. E. Arnold, served in Blues lrom believed the R.C.M.—Mr. Jobson—approached me and enquired: “You 1880—1904. Instrument Trombone

The lance, nine feet six inches long including the spearhead ot gilt metal. is white with a ring of gilt metal below the flag engraved wtih the Title of the Regiment. The lance head shows a replica of the

wouldn't be related to 3 Ben Fisher I served with in the last war would you?" For the first and last time—as a humble trooper—I met a

Iron Cross, enclosed in a laurel wreath awarded for service in the Regimental Corporal Major on grounds of unmilitary informality

war of liberation, 1814-15.

as we expressed mutual pleasure at this remarkable coincidence. Best wishes to the Regiment.

The Banderoles attached to the lance below the spear head are the

Royal Blue Ribands of Queen Victoria's gift.

The Decoration consists Yours sincerely,

of two ribands, exquisitely embroidered in gold and red terminating in heavy fringes of gold-thread. At the base of each riband, all in their proper colours, are, respectively, the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom with the Imperial Crown above and the Royal Black Eagle

BENJAMIN FISHER

HOUSEHOLD DIVISION CLUB (LUTON) of Prussia.

The

photograph

shows the

detail

of the

inscriptions

on The Household Division Club (Luton) is a flourishing concern open to past and present members of all seven members of the Household Division living in the areas of Luton and

each riband. Beneath this Royal Banderole are the black and silver ribbons oi the award for the Franco-Prussian War, 1879-71, and the orange, black

B'edford.

and white edged ribbon for the campaign in Bohemia, 1866.

The club has frequent social meetings and outings. Past and serving memebrs of The Blues and Royals or of either parent regiment will be welcomed as members.

The 1870-71 ribbon bears a small gold plaque commemorating the Regiment's distinguished part in the battle of Mars-la-Tour. campaign ribbons are gilt metal clasps bearing actions at which the Regiment was present.

the

On these

names

of

the They should contact the PRC. Mr. J. Neale (R.H.G. 1940—46),

The Standard was carried on ceremonial parades by a senior Wachtmeister (an appointment equivalent to that of Squadron Corporal

9 North Drift Way, Luton.

Major or S.S.M. in British Cavalry).

Or if living in the Bedford area Mr. C. Churchman (also ex-R.H.G.),

This Standard, with all the banderoles and ribands, is now (1970) in the possession of the Foundation, “Stiftung preussischer Kulturbesitz"

8 The Glen. Kempston, Bedford.

in Berlin. Authorities: Band Corporal 01 Horse, H. T. Arnold on Caesar

Dear Sir,

14th September, 1970

M. Lezius "Fahnen und Standarten de Nalten preussischen Armee'.

Stuttgart, 1935. Dr. K. G. Klietmann. 1-Berlin, Liebnizstrasse. C. T. Atkinson—“History of the Royal Dragoons", Maclehose, 1934.

Banderole 01 Queen Victoria

However. my Grandfather and his two sons, my tamer and my uncle, all served their full time in the Blues Band and all finished as senior Band N.C.Os.

Members will remember that under the Will of the late Miss A. D. T. A. Stubbs, in February, 1968, the Association was left

the sum of £11,473.

This was left in memory of Miss Stubbs’ 37


father and grandfather who joined The Blues in 1875 and 1846 respectively. It may be of interest to read a short summary of Miss Stubhs' father‘s service as obtained from records. UnforLtmately no records are available for her grandfather. 829.

of

the

Household

Division

the

urgent financial

needs

of The Foooo o o .9 ooooooooo o oooo o o o o oo 00¢" 'QOWN’N Nooowooo 0000 0990 «o ¢oooooNNNW 1,

Parish and Garrison Church of Holy Trinity. Windsor. Almost

all

of

your

readers

must

at

some

time

or

other

in the course of their service have worshipped in this Church.

and will

be well aware that

it enshrines memorials to The

THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSOCIATION

Household Cavalry and the Foot Guards for the Crimean War. Egyptian Campaign of 1882. The Boer War, The Great

William STUBBS.

Joined: Windsor 10 Dec. 1875 aged 18.

OBITUARIES

War and the last War. together with Standards and Colours and Born: Ebberston. Snainton. York. 10.12.1857. School: Malton Grammar School. Trade: Scltoolmaster. Unmarried.

a large number of individual military memorials.

Since the war it has been necessary to raise and spend some {30.000 on the repair and maintenance of the Church. half of

Height: 6ft. 1% ins.

which sum was absorbed by the virtual re-roofing of the Church.

0.R. Service: 19 years 351 days.

owing to the depredations of dry~rot and woodworm.

Orderly Room Corporal Major.

efforts the Parish was most generously helped by the co-operation of the Windsor Garrison in fund-raising events. but. in the

Married: Agnes Mary Young 16 Sept. 1882 (3 children). Promoted: Q.M. R.H.G. 27.11.1895.

nature of the case. had to be responsible for the major portion of the large expenditure. Most unfortunately the exterior of the Church is now found

Mentioned Dispatches 29.11.1900. S. Africa.

Rendered Special and Meritorious Service S.A. (18994900). S.A. War Medals + 6 Clasps. Retired 13.12.1905 (Hon. Capt.(Q.M.) ).

Yours faithfully.

In these

to be

in

urgent need

of attention

to crumbling stonework.

together with repair of wooden beams under the Sanctuary and

in the Belfry.

The total estimated cost is at least £15000.

We are seeking help in three ways~from interest-free loans to help us to pay our immediate bills; from covenanted gifts. which

increase the value of the

gift

at

no extra

cost to

the

MAJOR A. J. DICKINSON

Col. M. H. CRICHTON, 0.B.E., 16.4.70. C. M. STOCKDALE, Esq., 12.5.70. Hon. G. LAMBERT, 26.8.70. Lt. Col. R. C. H. KIDD, 0.B.E.. 8.4.70. Maj. THE LORD BASING, T.D.D.I.., 2.10.69. 22382009 CoH. J. E. KINGSTON of 11 Loring Road. Windsor. Born: Forest Gate. London. 3.2.1932. Served: 1950-1954. 1956—1968. Died: —.4.70. 23865889 Tpr. P. LAWTON of 10 Consett Road, Blurton, Stoke—on—Trent.

1223

Tpr. E. J. PROVIS of 19 Church End, Haddenham, Aylesbury, Bucks. B'orn: Bampton, Oxford. 20.1.1886.

Served: 1906-1914. 1914-1936. Died: 4.7.70. 4551

Sgt. H. G. RIDLEY of 22 Cairnfield Avenue. Cricklewood. N.W.2. Died: 7.7.70.

Mr. W. R. MOXHAM (Hon. Member) of 39 Camp Street, Derby.

Died: 9.6.70.

giver: and from outright gifts. Born: Blurton. Stoke—on»Trent 25.2.1944. If any of your readers feel that they could help us in any

Dear Sir.

Holy Trinity Rectory 73 Alma Road Windsor Berks. 4th September. 1970

of these ways we should be deeply grateful.

most ready to furnish any fuller information which may be desired. Yours sincerely. ERIC D. DAWSON~WALKER.

I shall be grateful if you will allow me the hospitality of your columns in order to bring to the attention of members

Served: 1962‘1968. Died: 25.7.70.

I am. of course.

Rector.

6339146 Tpt. S. E. KNIGHT of 50 Essex Avenue. Slough. Born: East Grinstead. Sussex. 1.3.1907. Served: 1927-1948. Died: 19.6.70.

5912/3233 Tpr. F. J. WALKER of Austonley. Harbour Road. Hayling Island, Hants. Born: Wantage. Berks, 6.6.1901. Served: 1919—1927.

Died: 31.1.70. 5434554

S.C.M. J. L. B. BURNHAM

of Wellington Barracks, S.W.l.

Born: Hull. 15.1.1910. 2549/354 CoH. T. CLARKE of 15 Worcesters Avenue, Enfield. Middlesex.

Served: 1931-1950.

Died: 188.70. Born: 212.1882.

Served: 1915—1918. Died: 2.6.70. 1915

Born: Preston 1890. Served: 1914-1919.

20,000

Died: 20.8.70.

Served: 1902-1928.

Died: 9.3.70.

A word of encouragement and a token of helpkneedcd, now, by British Ex-Service men who have sacrificed a full life. Many of them are completely unable to help themselves. Money is urgently

needed to help these men conquer their handicap—money to

Douait’om and information: Major the Earl of Ancaster. T.D.. Chairman of Appeal (5.6) Midland Bank Ltd., 60, West Smithfield. London, E.C.l.

S.S.M. H. A. HATHERILL of 13 Cholmondeley Close. Harlesdon. N.W.10. Died: 20.9.70 (aged 91).

14468436 Cpl. R. H. SHANNON of Vale Cottage. Church Hill. Horsell. Woking. Surrey. Born: N. Kensington. London.

Served: 1945—1953. 324024 R.C.M. J. WINTERBURN. M.S.M. of 1 Greenfield Cottage. W. Alvington. S. Devon. Born: Leicester 1879.

Limbless Ex-Service Men await a word from you equip and maintain homes in which they can be given convalescence, or care and comfort in their old age. BLESMA is not aided by the State. Will you help ?

Tpr. B. T. FISHER of 43 Rose Lane. Holmslack, Preston. Lanes.

4797

Another way you can help. Do you know any British ExService man or woman who has lost a limb and would benefit from specialist help and advice?

Let BLESMA know.

BRITISH LIMBLESS EX-SERVICE MEN’S ASSOCIATION (Registered in accordance will: the Naiiorial Ambiance Act 1948 and, as a chart/y, imdyr (lie Charities Act 1960.)

Died: 18.9.70.

Major J. ENGLISH of 127 Winchester Avenue. Leicester. Died: 10.10.70.


THE REBUILDING OF HYDE PARK BARRACKS

ONE HUNDRED and

FIFTY TONS OF METAL WORK Metal work has been synonymous with the Household Cavalry Regiments for several centuries. Their gleaming ceremonial paraphernalia is an internationally known feature of the London scene as is the new Hyde Park Barracks for which we manufactured the Gates and Railings that constituted a portion of some 150 tons of metal work supplied in all.

We were naturally proud to be involved in the construction of the barracks which now house The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals, the senior Regiments in the British Army, for we were confident that our craftsmanship and expertise would be in keeping with the tone and the standards maintained by these elite regiments of The Household Cavalry.

ESTABLISHED 1840

H. x. c. DAVIS ’2. co. LTD.

Knightsbridge, or as it was vaguely identified on the maps of the late 18th Century, the road “To Bath, etc.,” has now witnessed the erection of three cavalry barracks the first in 1795 which was demolished in 1876; the second completed in 1880 and the last which was begun in 1967 and occupied in October of last year. All of these have, of course, been on the same awkwardly shaped site— approximately 7} mile long, in plan resembling a wedge of cheese and falling sharply from North to South and gradually from East to West. The architects of the eighteenth and nineteenth century barracks, given relatively simple and similar briefs solved their planning problems in much the same way. The focal point of both developments was obviously the stable yard, surrounded on four sides by blocks, housing stabling below and barrack rooms above; a detached officer’s house, riding school and officer‘s stabling together with a polyglot mixture of improvised out-buildings completed both ensembles—all in all the archetypal cavalry barracks plan adapted to the peculiar requirements of a difficult urban site. The first barracks, to judge from the contem— porary engravings and photographs that survive, was externally much in accord with the character of the houses that faced it on the other side of the high road—some of these can still be seen. To Our eyes it would appear to have presented a pleasant and modest enough face to the world and doubtless would nowadays be the subject of a preservation order. By 1876, however, the idiom of architectural expression and the canons of taste had changed to the extent that in the Journal of the Household Brigade for that year it was referred to as “the ugly brick structure for so many years prior to its condemnation, an eyesore to the habitués of the Row and the inhabitants of Knightsbridge.” 80 Thomas Henry Wyatt’s barracks of 1880 although similar in plan to its predecessor, was in character much more in keeping with the spirit of the times—grandiose, formal and yet peculiarly inefficient. Curiously enough as the writer recalls, it also appears to have been remarkably anonymous ——before the new barracks was completed, how many Londoners could have told you where the old one stood?

ENGINEERS & METAL WORKERS

59 OLD TOWN ° LONDON ' S.W.4 TEL. 01-622 4501

And again in another age, another form of condemnation, this time from Miss Jennie Lee; “I was angry, l was embarrassed, I was ashamed when i saw the conditions in which married families were living right in the heart of London. I went into rooms where the walls were running with water and where the children had all to be cooped up together in one small place.” (memories of the scenes in Barracks in Tony Richardson’s film, ”The Charge of the Light Brigade".)

Therefore, in 1959, the Ministry of Public Building and Works commissioned Sir Basil Spence to submit proposals for the design of a new barracks to replace Wyatt’s buildings which were by then attaining an advance state of dilapidation. On the site were to be living quarters, messing and recreational facilities for some 500 officers, warrant officers, N.C.O.’s and men, housing for 120 families (a reduced requirement this, the original being for some 200 married quarters) a riding school, stabling for some 270 horses, a miniature range, stores, offices, and the innumerable detailed facilities that are an integral part of a modern barracks and the special ones that are peculiar to a home for a Cavalry Regiment: all in all what would appear to be a quart into a pint pot type of commission! After the consideration of innumerable alternatives the final and present plan of the development of the site crystallised in 1961. Briefly this was to be with the working heart of the Barracks centered as always around the stable yard: the Barrack block with offices under, on its South side: the J.R.C., O.R.’s mess, stores, workshops, etc., to the East; the W.O.’s and N.C.O.’s mess, gymnasium, miniature range to the West. Essential privacy would be preserved by an impenetrable brick wall to the North and an evocation of past glories by the incorporation of the pediment to Wyatt‘s riding school over the Ceremonial Entrance from the Park. At the far East end of the site was to be the block that would represent the greatest break with traditional cavalry barracks planning and would thus provide the Architect with some of the biggest headaches of the entire project.

To contain

the

two squadrons of the Mounted Regiment the stables were planned to be on tw0 floors, artificially lit, mechanically ventilated, heated and incorporating many of the lessons learned during the design, construction and occupation of the temporary stabling at Wellington Barracks—problems associated with corrosion, lighting, dung removal and the need to provide resistance to the ravages of the occupants, both horses and men, had all to be coped with. To reach this “Horse Hilton” as it was at one time dubbed, ramps (electrically heated to prevent freezing up in winter) were to link the stable yard to both levels; Blues and Royals above, Life Guards below. Beyond the was and N.C.O.’s mess was to be the riding school—pneumatically operated doors were to be an innovation here, incorporating the type of equipment that is normally used to open the hatches of merchant ships—and beyond this again was to be the tower. Of all of the parts of the site about which there can be little more left to say, it must be this—succinct headlines in the daily press such as “A monster from the ashes”, “Join the Army and

41


see London” and best of all ”Honestly” left one in doubt as to the nature of its popularity in certain quarters. Now that it has been completed, the wailing and lamentation have been somewhat stilled —perhaps in time it may even come to be regarded with affection and when it finally disappears, lamented.

3‘31! ll'IrtI/wmfl

To close the West end of the site were to be two more blocks; one incorporating eight maisonettes for Officers and their families and finally the Officer's Mess itself. 'lhe architecture of all the various low rise blocks, each of differing scale and function had to be as one—the use of the strong concrete frames, the red brick, the arches are all calculated to unify and give military character to these buildings. And after much debate, planning and replanning, hesitation and uncertainty, the political masters gave the green light. In 1965, the temporary stabling at Wellington Barracks was erected and occupied; in 1966, Wyatt’s Barracks were demolished and at the beginning of 1967, Sir Robert McAlpine and Sons Ltd,, arrived on site. It seemed unbelievable at the time that after so many years, the thing was actually going to be built!

Block D W.O.‘s and N.C.O.‘s Mess, in Corner 01 Ante Room

Within the nine years that the writer has been associated with the project and in particular in the last four, there have been innumerable events and associations, a description of any one of which would emphasise the unique and exciting nature of the entire experience; to try and abstract and relate a few of these is infinitely harder. One does recall, however, one’s abysmal ignorance during the earlier days, of the actual working, perhaps one should refer to them as mysteries,

of

the

Mounted

Regimentwno

hint

of

these is given in the “Barrack Synopsis 1948” that fountainhead of all wisdom as far as scales of accommodation are concerned and which is at one and the same time a very masterpiece of generalisation. Fortunately, however, contact with the Regiment was well enough established to avoid catastrophe at Wellington—had it not been, the Unit might well have found itself without feed boilers, tack rooms and the other necessities of cavalry life, the absence of any one of which might well have resulted in a smart and embarrassing return to base on 2nd September, 1965.

Block A Stables. Typical Troopline. Above the beams can be seen the ventilation

ductwork.

An all too real embarrassment did, in fact, follow on the evening of that famous day when the roof drainage of the stable blocks failed to cope with a monsoon like deluge which went everywhere but where it should—the electrical system filled with water, sparks and small explosions, horses under mini Niagaras, fury and ”I told you so”, all round. It must have rained as hard in the following years but inexplicably there was never a repeat performance. One also remembers being very much younger, more arrogant about one’s professronalism and one

day at lunch at Hyde Park having bored all within earshot solid with a detailed account of our investigations into the removal of dung, being put well and truly into one’s place by a young Officer’s disinterested (and prescient) comment—“Architecture must be an interesting trade." Another occasion of vivid memory—ambling across the stable yard at the old Hyde Park one damp and foggy afternoon looking, one supposes every inch the shaggy architect (too much hair at the back, donkey jacket and hands in pocket) and being pulled up with a start by the Cavalry Foot Drill Instructor's all too audible comment to a captive audience, drawing vivid comparisons between their own totally unsatisfactory posture and that of . . that bloody idle civilian over there . . As there was no one else around who else could it have been but me? During

the demolition,

there

was,

of course,

always the hope that one might alight upon buried military treasure; if it was there, it was a long way

further down than the ground we scratched. Rusting carbine barrels and a few hitherto unknown brick wells weren’t of much archealogical interest—the forgotten terra cotta coat of arms esconced in the pediment on the South side of the Officer’s mess was, however, a very worthwhile discovery. Hanoverian in origin, as was revealed in a delightful letter from Bluemantle Pursuivant of Arms, it may well have come from “The ugly brick structurel”—if so, and, of course, one likes to believe that it did, it represents the sole link with the fabric of that building—it now surmounts the fire place in the Officer’s mess. The most vivid memories of the rebuilding are, of course, of those incidents that were comical or catastrophic. In the former category the varied expressions, mainly horror, on the faces of those intrepid Household Cavalrymen and wives who venture up the outside of the tower during its construction; of being stranded at the top with the Silver Stick one lunch hour, the lift driver as usual having been smitten with deafness or hunger just when one wanted him most; one isn’t allowed to forget the ensuing scramble down external ladders or the seemingly endless walk down innumerable flights of stairs. Of the abortive testing of the prototype container for the dung tunnel at Wellington Barracks —this was, in fact, a moment of unexpected high comedy—the writer recalls suggesting in exasperation to the Colonel that one sure way of overcoming the problems associated with this exercise would be to mount the Regiment on “those"—pointing to the goat mascot of The Royal Welsh Regiment who was an interested spectator of these farcical proceedings. Of the production of the prototype locker for the 4-man Barrack rooms, which were in themselves a startling change for the Regiment one recalls the fact that Barrack Synopsis 1948 makes no mention whatsoever of what to the civilian is the quite unbelievable quantity of kit held by each and every man—discovery of its existence led to the decision 43


\«4 .

"i/‘anu‘m’mv‘v‘tu;

'

to design special lockers for all sleeping and wardrobe areas—a prototype of these would be built at Wellington Barracks. An assistant meticulously catalogued and measured each item of equipment; after usual delays, the locker was built and installed, the kit carefully put in piece by piece—to everyone‘s astonishment a pair of boots too many for which there was quite plainly no home. “Oh these were issued in lieu of putties about three months ago— didn’t we tell you?" So back to the drawing board more detailing, another prototype built and installed and considerable relief when it was found that the kit issued hadn‘t changed again in the interim. As for catastrophies—memories of the floods in the barrack and stable blocks—the last on the evening before the Ceremonial march-in, the collapsing hoardings, the few accidents are perhaps predominant. Of the rest; the building process now assumes the form of a composite and telescoped memory

of one problem succeeding another, of seemingly interminable meetings to discuss technical problems —hour upon hour, day and night over the drawing board, mud, dust, heat, cold and noise—the last so much an essential part of the scene that when at the weekend, comparative quiet reigned, one longed for Monday and the return of the uproar which, of course, represented progress But, of course, above all there is the one dominant recollection—of the years of close association with the Household Cavalry Regiment without which, it goes without saying, the job would never have been done, which has been an abiding source of personal pleasure and interest and for which one is eternally grateful. One is frequently asked “what next?”—one hesitates to reply because when one does know that the next job is to hand the links with Hyde Park and those in it will have been severed and life will never be quite the same again.

Barracks . Block B Forge

Block C, typical locker, tour-man Barrack Room

Hyde Park Barracks, The Olficers’ Mess. c. 1900

Hyde Park Barracks. Regimental Drill Autumn 1970


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REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS Commanding Officer: Lieutenant Colonel J. A. C. G. Eyre Second in Command: Major T. C. Morris Adjutant: Captain D. P. L. Hewson Assistant Adjutant: Lieutenant J. W. Matthews

Regimental Signals Officer: Lieutenant I. R. Knock, R Signals Regimental Corporal Major: W.O.I. T. W. Tucker Intelligence \Varrant Officer: W.O.II. G. Varga Chief Clerk: Staff/Cpl. D. J. Wenncll

DOUBLE DIAMOND “A” SQUADRON

and

Squadron Leader: Major H. 0. Hugh Smith Second in Command: Captain J. S. Olivier Second Captain: Captain I. M. D. L. “leston Squadron Corporal Major \V.0.II. B. Lane

4th Troop CoH. Adams Cpl. Davies Tpr. Allen

. Hibbert . Morley

1st Troop

SKOL International In bottle and on draught

S.H.Q. Troop Lieut. D. M. Reed Felstead CoH. Midwinter Cpl. McEvoy, J. L/Cpl. Harris L/Cpl. Cousins L/Cpl. Nelson Tpr. Allen

Goulding . Henchion . Mazurkiewitz . Russell Shields

2nd Troop

CoH. I’omroy Cpl. Lloyd Cpl. Villers Cpl. Cooksey L/Cpl. Chessher L/Cpl. Smith

. . . . .

Ayscough Greer Haley Hutchinson McGreary

Admin. Troop

Cornet L. T. de C. Messell CoH. Hill Cpl. Cain Cpl. Horan Cpl. Triggs L/Cpl. Allsop L/Cpl. Shillabeer

Gillingham . Shaw . Smith . Webb Wyatt

S.Q.M.C. Stephenson CoH. Wilkinson CoH. Pearce Cpl. Worthy L/Cpl. Robinson L/Cpl. Tompkins

3rd Troop

L.A.D. Section

Cornet A. M. W. Armitage CoH. Patterson Cpl. Lisney L/Cpl. Chapple L/Cpl. Caple Tpr. Chillingworth Tpr. Douglas

S/Sgt. Chasczcweski Sgt. Ward Sgt. Jasper Cpl. Murray L/Cpl. Nuesink L/Cpl. Sadkowski L/Cpl. Short

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Gardiner Grimes Mead MacLeod Williamson

. Callaghan Cooper . Ford . Maskell Rose

. . . . . .

Booth Grant Hope Saul Farley Wormstrup

. . . . . .

Brown Cooke Gambrell Gardiner Nixon \Velsh

“B” SQUADRON Squadron Leader: Major T. N. P. W. Burbury Second in Command: Captain 0. M. Barn Second Captain: Captain G. H. Tweedy Squadron Corporal Major: W.O.II. J. A. Clarke

THE BIRMINGHAM CITY POLICE

4th Troop Ct. A. J. T. Carter CoH. Cook Cpl. Gregory L/Cpl. Robinson L/Cpl. Longhurst L/Cpl. Williams Tpr. Batchelor

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S.H.Q. Troop

Ct. G. T. R. Birdwood Ct. A. S. Lukas CoH. Davis Cpl. Scammell Cpl. Calvert L/Cpl. Trist-COIIins L/Cpl. Stacey Tpr. Blomquist

Garrett . Lee McAnulty . Mellor . Ratclific Ward

CONSTABLES—E1,023 per annum, rising by annual increments to £1,458 per

CoH. Smart Cpl. O’Halloran Fox . Back

. Mitchell

L/Cpl. Bennett

SERGEANTS—21J16 per annum rising to £1,914 per annum. Applicants must be not less than 5ft. Bins. in height and under 30 years of age (under 40 in certain circumstances).

3rd Troop Lt. P. R. L. Walker Okcovcr

Clews Kennard

Roberts Thomson Thornburrow

. Hennessy

Admin. Troop S.Q.M.C. Cox

annum after six years sevice and to £1,683 per annum after 17 years service.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr .

L/Cpl. W'ood Tpr. French

L.A.D. Troop

CoH. Livingstone Cpl. Gibbs L/Cpl. Donnelly I./Cpl. Maskell L/Cpl. Standen Tpr. Chamberlain

Copsey . Harkncss McGowan . Smith . West Young

S/Sgt. Cooper . . Kesby Cpl. “'att L/Cpl. Mills L/Cpl. Butler

L/Cpl. Mitchell L/Cpl. Itiassey L/Cpl. Tyson Cfn. Nlansbridge Cfn. Tong

Chiel Inspector S. Longcrolt,

“C” SQUADRON Birmingham City Police Recruiting and Training Centre,

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Pershore Road, Birmingham, BS 7RN.

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‘ Squadron Leader: Major B. H. F. \Vrizht Second in Command: Captain T. M. Hickman (L.(y.) Squadron Corporal Major: W.O.II. Heath

2nd Troop

without obligation. Address

Lt. M. R. Snrby CoH. Chapman Cpl. Bright Cpl. Jones L/Cpl. Seddon L/Cpl. Kemp Tpr. Bramble

_

. . . . . .

_ Davies Goodman Mc_Intyrc Qiunn Savage Vaughan

3rd Troop Ct. C. R. Goodall CoH. Fortt Cpl. Benn

Cpl. Reid L/Cpl. Mills L/Cpl. Taylor Tpr. Bunting Tpr. Ford Tpr. Jones

. . . . . . .

Measor Ollin Piper Skinner Thomson Williams Stretton


4th Troop gnfiM. A. Corry Reid ta Cpl. Melia

Admin. Troop Tpr. Meredith

L/Cpl. Mufi

Tpr. Steel

Tpr. Buckle Tpr. Evans. Tpr. Manning

Tpr. Stickies Tpr. Walsh Tpr. Wischhusen

S.Q.M.C. “'ood Cpl. Bellas

L/Cpl. Phillips

Tpr. Curtis Tpr. Guy Tpr. Ricketts

L/Cpl. Claridge L/Cpl. Stevenson Tpr. Perry Tpr. Sowerhy Tpr. Symc Tpr. Barden Tpr. Coffey

CoH. Clayton Cpl. Bennett

L.A.D. R.E.M.E. Sr’Sgt. Thomas Sgt. “'alker Cpl. Carr Cpl. Elliot Cpl. Smith

L/Cpl. Love I./Cpl. Meadows Cfn. Avards Cfn. Styles Cfn. Wright

R.H.Q. Troop Tpr. Hutton Tpr. McHale Tpr. Sanderson

Stalwart Troop CoH. Smith Cpl. Hughes Cpl. Stevenson ./Cpl. Heathcote L/Cpl. Moloney L/Cpl. Young Tpr. Buekman Tpr. Carolan

L/Cpl. Jones L/"Cpl. Norris L/Cpl. \Vhyte Tpr. Charleton Tpr. Greaney Tpr. Howson

S.Q.M.C. Harty Cpl. Black Cpl. Hayes Cpl. Strattord L/Cpl. Stephenson

'l'pr. Watson

Cpl. Roberts L/Cpl. McGregor Tpr. Johnson

Tpr. Maddams Tpr. Thompson

Officers’ Mess L/CoH. Bradley Cpl. Stratiord

Tpr. Twinn

Regimental Barber Cpl. Fisher

L/Cpl. Salisbury Tpr. Fisher Tpr. Murray Tpr. Patrick Tpr. Proost

L/Cpl. Pritchett L/Cpl. Cartwright Tpr. Farell Tpr. Sedgwick

Duty Troop

Major The Hon. _A. H. G. Broughton Capt. J. F. Maclue W.O.II Doxey Tpr. S.Q.M.C. Jamieson 'I'pr. Cpl. Marchington Tpr. Cpl. Jones Tpr. Cpl. Austin Tpr. L/Cpl. Arnold . L/Cpl. Lawson . L/Cpl. Smith . L/Cpl. Lecs Farr. Cooper Tpr. Griffiths Tpr. Hague .

Henesy Jeffries Manners RiacGregor McBryan Purcell Pyne Spurs Strevens W'hite Waldron William:

Remount Troop Orderly Room CoH. Barnes Cpl. Docherty Cpl. Freeman Cpl. Greene Cpl. Sturroek

Heavy Troop

L/Cpl. hiee

Equitation Staff

S.H.Q. . Dearden . Godding . Grogan Holt . Kendon . Marshall . Slater Tpr. \Vilkinson

S.H.Q. Troop Recce Troop

CoH. Garvey Cpl. Embree Cpl. O’Connor L/Cpl. Carroll

Cpl. \Varren

THE BLUES AND ROYALS MOUNTED SQUADRO N, HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT

Squadron Leader: Maior J. S. Crisp Second in Command: Captain “7. R. Marsh Squadron Corporal Major: W.O.II. Remfry

Ct. C. H. Boone CoH. Holt Cpl. Fisk Cpl. Harman L/Cpl. Caple L/Cpl. Davis L/Cpl. Forester L/Cpl. Haine

Tpr. Summers

Pharmacy

Guardroom

“COMMAND” SQUADRON

Stafi/Cpl. Bell L/Cpl. Edwards L/Cpl. Frampton Tpr. Boreham

N.C.O.’s Mess L/Cpl. Sammons

F.Q.M.C. \Voodman li/S/Cpl. Smith

S.H.Q. Troop CoH. Burroughs Cpl. Morris L/Cpl. Chaloner L/Cpl. Collett L/Cpl. Shaw L/Cpl. \Villiams Cpl. Thurston

Medical Centre L/Cpl. MacKenzie

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Mus.

Baldwin Lees Lyons Williams

Lt. J. W. B. Robertson CoH. Stubley Cpl. Parr Tpr. Cross Tpr. Drogomirccki

Lt. R. C. P. Whetherly CoH. Donnelly CoH. Hawley CoH. Kelsall Cpl. Neatsey Cpl. Mapley Cpl. Brown Cpl. Lane L/Cpl. Fry L/Cpl. Howell L/Cpl. Thornton

L/Cpl. White Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Aindow Amey Beecham Brunton Campbell Chambers Church

Currah Fletcher Gasson Hyett Innes Kilpatrick Malinowski Masters McFarlane Ogilvie O’Gorman . Reynolds . Roberts Rougvie Salisbury . Stewart Urquhart Winstone

. . . . . . . . .

Trainee Troop

Provost Troop CoH. Sweeney L/Cpl. Doubtfire

Lt. T. K. L. Brennan CoH. Idle L/Cpl. McGinley L/Cpl. Timmis

L/Cpl. Dalziel

. . . .

L/Cpl. Farrow Tpr. Ashmore Tpr. Barber Tpr. Cross

Davidson Douglas Girnblett Slevin \Vilson Wood

R.A.V.C., The Centre, Melton Mowbray Lt. R. N. Couper CoH. Sellars L/Cpl. Ayres

Tpr. Hows Tpr. Perrin

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON Squadron Leader: Major J. C. M. L. Crawford Squadron Corporal Major: W'.0.II. Hearn

' Gymnas'um

Cpl. Birt

Cpl. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

Pitt Priestley Rochford Hewitt

Ouartermaster’s Troop Captain W. A. Stringer

R.Q.M.C. Martin Staff/Cpl. Preece CoH. Howick Tpr. Watson

Cpl. Craig Cpl. Clay L/Cpl. Provost Tpr. Laycock

Cpl. O’Sullivan Cpl. O‘Dwyer Cpl. Jordan Cpl. Jones 502 L/Cpl. Hatherall L/Cpl. Kay L/Cpl. Smaldon

Staff/Cpl. Hunt

CoH. Greenwood Cpl. Cpl. Cpl. Cpl.

Howell Cooper Elmslie hioore

L/Cpl. L/Cpl. L/Cpl. L/Cpl.

Captain T. J. Williams R.Q.M.C. Handley Stafl/Cpl. Hunt CoH. MacDougall Cpl. Brandon Tpr. Brady L/Cpl. Kennedy Tpr. Coram

Tpr. Hall Cpl. Anslow L/Cpl. Haighton Tpr. Hardgrave Cpl. Crowley L/Cp]. White Tpr. Gibson Tpr. Stainsby

Medical Centre Surg. Major J. P. A. Page

Cpl. Feldwick

Blake Bird Grant Graves Harding Mountfort Northover Scannell Robinson Byatt

Malia . Shell . Davidson Lake Lloyd

W.O. and CoH. Mess CoH. “'illiams L/Cpl. Freeman

Birch

Lt. Col. D. J. Daly Capt. R. C. “'ilkinson R.C.M. Designate D. J. Clark Staff/Cpl. Cross

Hannant Hayward . Johnson Nisbot

S.H.0. W.O.II Cooper Cpl. Rankin

L/Cpl. Butler Tpr. Finnie

Cpl. Murtagh Cpl. “‘estwood . . Mansfield

L/CoH. Howells Tpr. Hughes Tpr. Hulett L/COH. Hunter L/CoH. Martin S/Cpl. Matthew

R.H.Q. Household Cavalry S/Cpl. Desborough CoH. Lee Cpl. Oakcs

J.S.S.C. Latimer Cpl. Barrett

H.Q. Bahrein Garrison Tpr. Bates Cpl. Parkes

Cpl. \Vall

A.A.C. Arborfield CoH. Baylay CoH. Edwards

CoH. Brown L/Cpl. Preece

Tpr. Shears

Armoured Delivery Squadron

L/CoH. Banham Tpr. Bell L/Cpl. Johnstone

Tpr. Callaghan L/Cpl. Cox S/Cpl. Denny 'l‘pr. Mitchell L/Cpl. Law I./Cpl. Lazcnby 'l'pr. Waterman

Tpr. Gratton Tpr. McWilliams

Tpr. O'Donohoc Tpr. Reid

CoH. Buckingham

H.Q. Norlhumberland District

No. 1 (Guards) lndep. Coy Para Tpr. Jones CoH. Maskcll

Cpl. Calcraft

Cpl. Mannering

Rheindahlen Garrison Cpl. Chamberlain Tpr. Harvey

S/Cpl. Hunter L/Cpl. Waters

Army Recruiters

Tpr. O‘Connell CoH. Strudwick CoH. \Vilmott \V.O.II “'oods

CoH. Coleman CoH. Liquorish CoH. Sampson

CoH. Desborough

W'.O.I Cowdrey

5/Cpl. Tribe CoH. \Vhitworth

H.Q. 1 (B.R.) Corps

Royal Yeomanry Regiment CoH. Acton

. Staveley ./ pl. Chillingworth Tpr. Boardman

L/Cpl. Kearns Cpl. Munro

Mons 0.0.5. Cpl. Sproats CoH. Vaudin

R.A.C. Para Squadron

Army Air Corps CoH. Ball

Quartermaster L/Cpl. Reed L/Cpl. France

L/CoH. Fairs

CoH. Forrester Tpr. Fuller W.O.II Kersting

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON, HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT R.H.Q.

S/Cpl. Ellis

M.V. and E.E. (Kircudbright) L/CoH. McKenna L/CoH. McLean Tpr. O‘Toole L/Cpl. Palmer L/CoH. Perry Tpr. Pritchard Tpr. Proudfuot CoH. Sayer L/CoH. Shalwell Cpl. Smith L/CoH. Tucker Tpr. Williams L/COH. Wills Smith S/Cpl. Wright

Ikins

Stables CoH. Burton Johnson CoH. King Cpl. Sherwin Cpl. Catlin L/Cpl. Partridge

Tpr. Cartlidge L/Cpl. Colcs Tpr. Collett Tpr. Cooper Tpr. Douglas Tpr. Eastwood

L/Cpl. Liddell

Officers’ Mess

L/Cpl. Hill Quartermaster (Tech) Troop

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr.

L/Cpl.

Staff/Cpl. Peck CoH. Barrett L/Cpl. Dunn

BLUES AND ROYALS AT E.R.E. Guards Depot

M.T. Troop

S.H.Q. Troop S.Q.M.C. Hague Cpl. Jones 323 Cpl. Dickman L/Cpl. Dean

L/Cpl. Lloyd

M.V. and E.E. (Aldershot)

Berlin lniantry Brigade

L/Cpl. Aldridge

CoH. Deacon

Cpl. Woolard


R.A.C. Centre Kuwait Liaison Team CoH. Grinyer CoH. Scriven

Col-l. Thomas

\\'.0.II Hayes

CODOLETTE

R.M.A. Sandhurst

PROGRAMME

FOR

BLOODSTOCK

P. and E. Establishment S/Cpl. Rainger 'l‘pr. Pearce

Hong Kong Regiment W.O.II Simpson

R.M. School of Music 1 Div. H.Q. and Sig. Regiment

CoH. Shearn

CODOLETTE

S/Cpl. Whittington

Household Cavalry Hospital

7E Cadet Training Team

S/Cpl. Fielding

CoH. Weeks

Junior Leaders” Regiment (R.A.C.) S/Cpl. Hales

CoH. Pinks

CoH. La Roche

CRUMBS

(14lb. drums)

T0 BALANCE VITAMIN INTAKE The easiest method of feeding Cod Liver Oil and Mall Extract

H.Q. R.A.C. 3 Div. Cpl. “'eston

S/Cpl. Storey

W.0.II Mackay

S/Cp]. Yates

R.A.C. Training Regiment

Long Service List

Cpl. Sibley

CoH. W'right

00H. Straw

CoH. Wilkins

\V.O.I Kidman \V.O.II Kimble S/Cpl. \Veller

POLIENTA TONIC FEED ADDITIVE S/Cpl. AicLaugthn-Kitchen CoH. Collier

(56Ib.bags)

TO BOOST PERFORMANCE For extra health, vigour, growth and vitality.

BAND OF THE BLUES AND ROYALS Maior E. JV. Jeanes S/Cpl. Batune Musn. Bames L/Cpl. Blogg Musn. Brammer Cpl. Briggs Musn. Bull Musn. Chesters Cpl. Commins L/Cpl. Daniels Musn. Frew

(Director

of Music) Musn. Graver L/L/Cpl. Hayne Musn. Healey Musn. Hempsced Nlusn. Jaskulski Musn. Kine Musn. Leslie Musn. Mansfield CoH. Middleton L/L/Cpl. O‘Donnell

POLIENTA

Musn. Orritt Musn. Tanner Musn. Parker Cpl. Todd Musn. Parsons NIusn. Turner Musn. Phin L/Cpl. \Vatts Musn. Platt .V‘lusn. \Vatts Cpl. Rddell Musn. \Vatson Musn. Rowden IViusn. \Vhennell L/L/Cpl. Sowter Trumpet Major “'ilson Musn. Stephens L/Cpl. \Visc Musn. Marsh (Royal Military School of Music, Kncller Hail)

OFFICERS SERVING AWAY FROM THE REGIMENT

SALTS

(11lb. buckets)

T0 MAINTAIN AT PEAK CONDITION A palatable Physic, Conditioning and Blood Salt for all-the-year-round condition.

Write or telephone for details to:

H.Q. British Troops, Malta Guards Depot

THE

Lt. Col. C. A. Banham, M.C.

Ministry of Defence Col. R. M. H. Vickers, M.V.0., 0.13.13. H.0. Southern Command

Major J. D. Smith Bingham Captain D. V. Smiley

POLIENTA

COMPANY,

2,

Woodland

Avenue,

Northampton, NN3 ZBY.

Telephone: Northampton 32645

Captain 1’. Ni. R. Brook Lt. P. B. Rogers

(STD Code 0604)

H.0. Household Division Captain A. H. Parker Bowlcs

Lt. Col. T. A. K. \Vatson

Trucial Oman Scouts H.Q. D.R.A.C.

Captain N. M. B. Roberts

Lt. Col. J. B. Evans

Gunnery School

Castlemartin Ranges

Captain C. J. Simpson Gee

Established 1878 Captain L. N. Brooksbank

Major J. A. Dimond, M.C.

Royal Military College of Science

H.Q. London District

COLES LTD.

Captain J. W. L. Bucknall

Major B. J. Hodgson

D. and M. School

British Military Delegation, Paris Captain C. E. T. liddison Major

S.

E.

M.

Bradlsh

Ellames

SHIRT

ADC to D/SACEUR

AND

PKIAMA

MAKERS

The Lile Guards Captain A. N. D. 8015

Major D. S. A. Boyd

Lt. The Earl of Normanton

Sultan of Muscat‘s Armed Forces

Brixmis

Lt. J. W. “‘yburd

Major D. Miller

Junior Leaders‘ Regiment R.A.C.

H.O. R.A.C. Centre Major D. J. S. Wilkinson

Lt. H. T. Hayward

Ct. H. P. D. luassey No. 1

Armour School

(Guards) Indep. Coy, Para

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS TO THE BLUES & ROYALS

Lt. R, D. G. Corbett

Major B. J. Lockhart

H.Q. Northumbrian District

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