Page 1

VOL. 35

No. 10

Dumaguete

City,

Philippines,

Sunday

AUGUST 17, 2008

P 10.00

FINAL STAND? Army clears Linantuyan, fifty CAFGUs installed B F B Y

LORENCE

AESA

he 11th Infantry Battalion of the Philippine Army declared Linantuyan, the farthest village of Guihulngan City and a favorite haven for rebels, free from the influence of the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army. At the height of the com- tionary tax and harassing the munist insurgency and even populace. weeks after the military arIt took the government rived in Negros Oriental, and the military a considerrebels maintained a shadow able time to gain the configovernment in Linantuyan. dence of the Linantuyan resiThey were free to do any- dents and thing like imposing revoluTurn to page 2

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DOJ appoints fiscal, who is judge’s brother BY DRT DEMECILLO fter almost two months of waiting, Guihulngan City now has a newly appointed prosecutor. The Department of Justice issued the appointment of Assistant Provincial Prosecutor Constantino Trinidad as officer-in-charge of the City Prosecutor’s Office. appointment which will take Provincial Prosecutor effect as soon as the latter Diosdado Hermosa furnished receives the official commuthe CHRONICLE Depart- nication. ment Order 524 dated AuHowever, some quarters gust 5 effecting Trinidad’s Turn to page 27

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BY DEMS REY T. DEMECILLO

ocal Governments Code author Senator Aquilino Pimental, Jr. barnstormed the province for two days and rallied for people’s support for the long-awaited switch from unitary system of government to federalism .

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As if his Senate Resolution 10 less, are supporting the transfer came on time, sixteen senators or of the center of power to 11 remore than three fourths of the upper gions of the country. An chamber and President Arroyo no Turn to page 27

Sen. AQUILINO PIMENTEL, JR.

PAL is back!

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hilippine Airlines, the Nation’s flag carrier of athletes to the current Beijing Olympics, is back to Dumaguete starting last Friday, August 15, using the sleek Airbus A319. (see photo)

PAL flies Manila to of its sister company Air Dumaguete and back twice Philippines after serving for daily. It took over the role almost ten years. Managing the PAL branch is still the Shaman Air headed by Marthon Uy and his former staff of Air Philippines. Both are sister company airlines of PAL.

SCHEDULE.

Dr. HENRY SOJOR

Rep.GEORGE ARNAIZ

Students criticize rising criminality in university town

MANILA TO DUMAGUETE is 7 am and 3pm while Dumaguete to Manila leaves 9 am and 5:05 pm. These are very convenient schedules, according to most businessmen. If you take the morning flight, you have enough time to work in Manila before lunch. If you take the afterPHILIPPINE AIRLINES AIRBUS A319 being serviced by airline crew at the noon flight, you have Manila tarmac. This is the same model which services the Manila-Dumaguete enough time to take an early run twice daily. This is a big boost to the tourism potentials of Dumaguete dinner and enjoy the night

ollege students from this university town of Dumaguete have criticized the rising street crimes committed in downtown Dumaguete strongly suspecting that the perpetrators are drug addicts who “rob people of cell phones and wallets in order to

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City and Negros Oriental.

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“GOD’S MYSTERY IS HIS .... HIS PROMISES, ARE YOURS.”


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August 17, 2008

Limkaichong status argued before SC M

ANILA, Philippines — The Supreme Court has granted Negros Oriental Representative Jocelyn S. Limkaichong’s request for an oral argument of the case she filed on the conflicting Commission on Elections (Comelec) decisions on her status as an elective official. This was reported by stitutionality. Tetch Torres at Inquirer.net “We respectfully pray last July 29. The Torres re- that the cases be set for oral port stated that : argument on the jurisdicThe high court en banc tional and constitutional set the oral argument for last questions that we have Tuesday, August 12 after raised,” Limkaichong said. Limkaichong, through her Limkaichong, who ran lawyer, Pete Quirino-Quadra, and won under the adminissaid it was necessary to tration Lakasclarify issues involving quesTurn to page tions on jurisdiction and con-

(email: elydejaresco@yahoo.com)

Most people support the reproductive bill

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JOSY LIMKAICHONG

OLIVE PARAS BY DEMS REY T. DEMECILLO

St. Francis College: Petit-Dodo collision No army ‘raid’ here seen in 2010 polls?

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HOW MEDIA SEES IT, AND NOT OTHERS

BY ELY P. DEJARESCO

he second hearing for the reproductive health measures pending in the Senate Committee on Health and Demography revealed that most government line agencies are supporting the bill on curbing the country’s population. People only know too well that if Filipinos depend on the weather and “zipper control”, population explosion will go unabated. It is important that most Filipinos be educated enough to know the repercussions of uncontrolled population.

TOP OF THE WEEK

hile admitting the presence of soldiers in their school, Brother Tim Gulay strongly debunked reports that St. Francis College in Guihulngan City was “raided.” The clergyman relates that a platoon of soldier belonging to the 11th Infantry Battalion sought permission from the school authorities last week if they can take their lunch inside the campus because of the availability of drinking water. Brother Gulay consented diers informed him that they for the soldiers to use the are leaving. Gulay says he is not school’s kiosk. However, Turn to page 19 minutes later one of the sol-

critical repor ting reporting

ot surprisingly, Vice Governor Jose “Petit” Baldado, a tireless advocate for environmental protection and preservation, bared his desire to be the next highest official of the province in 2010. But Governor Emilio Macias II may seek re-election or field his son Provincial Board Member Erwin for the plum Capitol post while he retires.

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Baldado, who is on his third and final term as Vicegovernor, has no other recourse but to move up and inevitably clash with Macias,

The Church-version of self control and rhythm methods which are otherwise known as “weather and zipper control” is not even widely accepted by most catholic women who use artificial means because they only know too well about dire economic consequences of the entire family if the birth of children is not controlled. But then again, the State policy under the reproductive bill now pending in Congress is to leave the decision to the couple. Meaning, legiti-

Elusive Reproductive Bill

slide down as provincial board member or return to his old post as mayor of Manjuyod. Turn to page 19

Rep. Arnaiz explains Perdices: Sue Customs rush of city road jobs to get our VAT share

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esponding to questions from motorists who complained of inconvenience due to the closure of a number of roads in the city of Dumaguete for concreting, Second District Representative George Anaiz explains that funds for these projects come from the Department of Budget and Finance and the local officials, like himself, have no other recourse but to implement them within the stipulated time frame set by the agency. The ongoing concreting tive routes which sometimes projects funded by the na- extend travel time when the tional government are those riding public are trying to in front of the Cathedral and reduce their consumption of of the north national highway gasoline. in Barangay Daro. Motorists As another form of rewere advised to take alterna- lief Turn to page 18

Army clears ...

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elieving it’s high time to insist on collecting what is long been withheld from them, Negros Oriental mayors led by Dumaguete City Mayor Agustin Perdices are poised to demand from the national government their share from the revenues derived from the Value Added Tax on services and products shipped in and out of the ports. The local government This was accomplished units’ Internal Revenue Al- through a memorandum of lotment is supposed to get an agreement between the two increase with VAT’s imple- tax collecting agencies which mentation, but the Bureau of are both under the DepartInternal Revenue tasked to ment of Finance. However, collect VAT at the ports instead of remitting asked the Bureau of Customs to do the job instead. Turn to page 18

Fifty new CAFGUs take oath

(From page 1) convince them that the soldiers and the local officials are sincere in their efforts to bring government closer to them. And to prevent the return of the rebels, some fifty members of the Citizen Armed Forces Geographical Unit or CAFGU took their oath before officials of the Guihulngan City Mayor Ernesto Reyes (left) exhorts the newly installed members of the Citizen Armed Forces Army and the local Geographical Unit or CAFGU to use their training and knowledge to maintain the peace and order of their government to up- barangay by keeping the rebels from gaining its foothold there again. partisans of the rebel move- training at the Headquarters tinue to pour in more hold peace and order of the ment but have returned to of the Bravo Company in projects especially livelihood opportunities to advillage. the government. They will Mckinley. Mayor Ernesto Some CAFGU mem- undergo de-breifing and Reyes assured the people of dress the root cause of insurgency. bers are said to be former Linantuyan that he will con-

Ultimately, the reproduction bill provides that it is the couple who will finally decide on what reproductive method they will use, not the law nor the church.

mately married couple. The unmarried couple should know only too well that besides committing adultery, both a sin against the State and God, this promiscuous culture can only end up in social poverty and distress of the entire society. The Committee on Health and Demography, chaired by Sen. Pia Cayetano, pointed out that all the government agencies invited to the hearing even expressed their support for the reproductive health bills, the second public hearing on various reproductive bills was attended by population experts, as well as representatives from “pro-life” and “prochoice” groups who gave contending views on the controversial measure. ”The interesting thing is that all the line agencies that were represented in this hearing—including the DOH, DSWD, DepEd, CHED, Commission on Population, National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women—all of them expressed support for the reproductive health bill.” A significant data presented at the hearing was the fact that the increasing popularity of modern contraceptives like the pill, injectable and condom among Filipino couples has led

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August 17, 2008

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For FEEDBACK: email elmarjay@pldtdsl.net

“M” to “F” in birth certificate

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client consulted me about her daughter’s birth certificate. The client said that instead of the letter “F” for “female” on the “sex” portion in the birth certificate, the letter “M” was erroneously typed.

Editorial

Economics of Federalism

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obody knows the Local Government structure better than Aquilino “Nene” Pimentel,Jr. , senator of the Republic and author of the Local Government Code.

That is why when this man from the opposition raises the call for serious Federalism, everybody listens, and even the administration of which he is a staunch critic, not only listens, but supports his idea. This idea is embodied in Senate Resolution 10. The question is, will the Senate and Congress adopt it? And if so, when will it be implemented? Offhand he has 16 Senate colleagues supporting, thus he has three fourths votes. To his big surprise, President Arroyo is supporting Federalism, thus we can surmise that the Lower House majority will follow suit. Therefore, we can say offhand that indeed, Federalism could happen even before the end of their terms in 2010. That is if our legislators will think of our nation first, and themselves second. Pimentel emphasizes that Federalism is a switch from the present unitary system wherein the concentration of power is in one place, that is Manila. Federalism will transfer the focus of power to eleven regions all over the country, four regions each in Luzon and Visayas and three in Mindanao including the new Bangsa Moro region which is actually the present ARMM or the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao.

I told the client in jest that perhaps the mistake was done by the nurse in the hospital who wrote the wrong “sex” of the new born. Perhaps the nurse mistakenly saw something protruding in your daughter’s private part when she was born. That might explain the mistake, I quipped. The mother vehemently denied this suggestion and said this might just have been a simple typographical error.

The regions or Federal States will be headed by a Federal Governor whose legislative body will be composed of selected provincial board members from member provinces. Economics-wise, from 60-40 sharing of internal revenue taxes only at present, the 11 regions will get 80-20 sharing with the national government, with money coming from all government-income not just taxes. Budget-wise, Negros Oriental’s IRA of P843M at present will increase to P1.585Billion under the Federal System. Moreover, Metro Manila will just be the seat of the administrative region like that of Washington DC, or Kuala Lumpur of Malaysia, while the Executive department will remain in Manila; Congress will now be transferred to the Visayas while the Supreme Court will be in Mindanao. But there has to remain onlys ONE Constitution, one Judiciary, one Supreme Court, one Armed Forces and one educational (DepEd) curriculum. The main purpose of the 11 Federal “states” is to speed up economic development and dissipate continued unrest in Muslim Mindanao, — not change our political structure. If adopted by both houses, then the legislature will convene itself into a Constituent Assembly, for the purpose of amending the Constitution under the concept of Resolution 10, and with both houses voting separately.

I told the client that an interchange of the letters “F” and “M” on the sex portion of the birth certificate is not considered a typographical error. It is a substantial error that requires one to bring the matter to court, in order that it may be changed. It is akin to a man who undergoes a sex change and wants to change the letter “M” to “F” in the birth certificate. That is a substantial change in the birth certificate because it changes the person’s gender. A substantial change requires a court proceeding. The mother was a little naughty because she asked a hypothetical question: What if the wrong letter typed in the birth certificate is, for instance, the letter “N”? Will that not be a typographical error, considering it is neither “M” (for male) not “F” (for female)? I said it is still a substantial (not mere typographical) mistake because “N” might mean “None of the above”.

Of lies and lack of “zipper control”

hen God decreed “Go thou therefore, multiply and cover the earth” he armed men (especially the male specie) with the faculty necessary to obey His decree. A just God, after all, issues not a law that man is not equipped to follow. We have heard of kings enough to blind the Thus the strong sexual urge was implanted. Some and emperors siring hundreds camera’s eye.” men were born (at birth) with of children at their heart’s conHe dropped off the presithe urge to touch the nurse tent. We also have no lack of dential race in January and before the bottle; others devel- modern-equivalents. helped Obama win by endorsoped the lack of “zipper conThe latest tragic charac- ing him over Hillary.John was trol” as they blossomed into ter is popular North Caro- a sure-fire candidate for a puberty. lina Senator John Edwards, prime Cabinet position under Now one adjunct that one of the then three lead- an Obama presidency. Now – makes this primal necessity ing Democratic presiden- no longer. compelling is “power”. One tial candidates behind Now after dodging the wit once said that “power is Barack Obama and Hillary issue for a year, Edwards fithe best aphrodisiac” the Clinton. The 55-year-old nally admitted (due to prebearer feels invulnerable former successful trial law- ponderance of evidence) and seductive, the female yer is good enough to be a that he had an affair with (usually) gets attracted to Hollywood actor described film-maker Rielle Hunter the sense of power and im- by the Associated Press as who made some of his bibes pride in it as if by os- “armed with the practiced documentaries. There are mosis by having a relation- charm of a court room war- talks that the 5-month Turn to page 18 rior and a smile bright ship.

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Dateline Manila by Bingo P. Dejaresco

34 YEARS OF COMMUNITY JOURNALISM

ELY P. DEJARESCO Editor-Publisher ATTY. JAY I. DEJARESCO Associate Editor

MARLEN I. DEJARESCO Business Manager

GEROME JUMALON News Photographer

DEMS REY T. DEMECILLO Editorial Assistant

RUBEN G. LABARES Graphics

JENNY B. DECIAR Legal Publications Officer

Pioneer BI-WEEKLY Newspaper in Dumaguete City and Negros Oriental. Address: E.J. Blanco Drive, Piapi, Dumaguete City. News and Advertising: (035) 225-4760 Fax: (035) 225-4760 E-mail: negroschronicle@yahoo.com Entered as Second Class Mail Matter in Dumaguete City on July 1, 1973.

http://www.negroschronicle.com

Member: Philippine Press Institute National Press Club Dumaguete Press Club


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Everyday Heroes

1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890 couple of months ago, some friends stopped by to get my opinion on an email they had received. Seems they had just won an International lottery (De Lotto Netherlands) and all they needed to do is give the Lottery Headquarters a bank account number so they could deposit the $3,000,000. This month I got an email from you are eligible for if you just a “Cedia” Estrada. She was ask- apply. ing for my help in smuggling, out • A person offers to of the country, millions of dollars buy something from you or her “ex-President” husband had your business paying with a stolen from the Philippines. Only cashiers check for more problem is “Erap’s” wife is named than the item’s price. The exLuisa not Cedia. tra cash is yours to keep. No Both of these are elaborate risk it is a “cashier’s check” computer scheme designed to good at any bank. separate you from your money. • People claim you Here are a few more (http:// failed to report for jury duty or www.snopes.com/): some other official appearance • An offer to hook you up and to avoid going to jail you with thousands of dollars worth of need to provide them proof of government grants (free money) your Turn to page 18

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Punishing email crooks

HER story

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friend of mine was sharing her email about the beauty of nature with a caption, “The Day God dropped the Paint Box.” I wanted to grab my paints and brushes and just recreate the awesomeness of the beauty which God gave.

12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 E have to be more aware and familiar with this phenomenon. We have to learn how to deal with it. Man, we can not avoid it anymore. Aware of it or not, it’s with us. This is actually raging in many condition, with the run of life, this developed, multicultural countries, spiritual and personal battle will like the US . And since the world is sooner or later show its effects exnow interconnected, synchro- ternally and socially until its elenized and shrunk into a global vil- ments can form part of our culture. This is where we can talk lage, we in the Philippines cannot escape from getting involved in it, about a certain culture war, an such that we somehow have our ongoing public debate involving not only arguments and own version of it. First, let us remember that doctrine but also attitudes and war or conflict, whether we like lifestyles, focusing on what’s it or not, is part of our life. Even right and wrong in some hotin Christian teaching, some button defining issues. The debate is usually in the warfare is, in fact, both to be expected and recommended, area of religion, faith, and morals though it’s waged more in the in all their different levels and asspiritual and personal side— pects. It involves values, and against temptations, sin and our weaknesses. Turn to page 10 Of course, given our human

Our culture war

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Coping with impossible dreams

Flowers after the Rain

falling leaves from the bougainvillea trellises and the mingling of colors from nature is a soothing balm for every weary soul. At night, when sleep is elusive, I just grab a brush and some paints. Let me share one of these small works with you today. Lilies in the pond.

It takes a Child

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It shows the explosions of colors blanketing the California hills and fields, the bright red reflection of autumn leaves upon the lake where two swans are in silent conversation, the soft rays of sunshine among the trees beside the brook, and many more. At 3 am today, the moon was shining inspite of the pouring rain, creating an incandescent glow among the avocado leaves in my garden. Today, the flowers are blooming profusely while they dance in rhythm with the wind. God is a passionate artist. His works of art deserves praise. His passion is seen in each petal of a rose, the velvety softness of a lily reaching out from the pond, the

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12345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890112345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 have a friend who hates the adage, the children are our 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 future. She absolutely abhors this phrase because she 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 says it robs children of their identity today. She explains 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 that society, because of this phrase, forces children to 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 be the solvers of the world’s problems. The danger here 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 is that children are used as an excuse for the adults to 12345678901234567890 12345678901234567890 continue to make mistakes. Because anyway, in the fuJAMES ture, the children will take care of it. “KOJAK” J ENNY I do not completely agree with child. What we forget is that HUGHS LIND her theory. In fact, we have de- oftentimes, it takes a child to E LMACO bated over it many times. However, point out a wrong. It takes a I do see her point. The problem child to see the cracks. It takes with society today is that we only a child to have the courage to see children for what they could speak out. It takes a child to E-MAIL be and often we forget the contri- remember to calm down. It jenny.elmaco@yahoo.com butions that they have already takes a child to put things in given. We are so caught up in our perspective. E-mail adult world that most of the time, Remember, the story of kojak3238@yahoo.com we forget that we are able to see Jesus and the children? Turn to page 27 things clearly in the eyes of the

A Journey Through Cancer

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M UFFET D OLAR V ILLEGAS

e-mail: blue_bell57@yahoo.com

Footsteps and Fingerprints

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Front Porch Musings

BY:

NANCY RUSSELL CATAN

e-mail: n r c a t a n @ i m a n i l a . c o m . p h


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email at: demcarl2003@yahoo.com

Promising mayor leads Amlan political dynasty

He knows becoming the mayor of Amlan is his destiny but he was surprised it happened so soon. This came after the death of his beloved brother Oscar, already groomed to succeed his father, but who perished during a fire that gutted their ancestral house on December 11, 2003. Faced with a strong possibility that the alliance forged after many years of dogged persistence by his father, the late Mayor Victoriano Dela Cruz will disintegrate without his commitment, Bentham decided days after his brother’s death and against his wife’s wishes to run unopposed as his father’s vice-mayor in May 2004. Hence, when his father succumbed to his illness in April 2005, Bentham, who is both a mechanical engineer and a lawyer, knows exactly what he wants to do. Young, well-schooled, active and efficient Mayor Dela Cruz managed to impress his constituents and fellow officials of his no nonsense approach and innovations in dealing with the affairs of the town. As this week’s guest, Dela Cruz shows why a political dynasty is not always a bane to total development. He also bares his whole-hearted support to the concept of federalizing the country as espoused by his town’s latest visitor, veteran politician Sen. Aquilino Pimentel Jr. Nanette Umbac-Flores of Banilad, Dumaguete City in the Silliman University College of Law who now industriously runs our store in the town center. I have three kids, namely, Celine who is a first year high school student in St. Paul, five-year old Billy Bentham II and Ethan Andrew who is four years old.

DEMS: Tell us about your family? Mayor Bentham: I have four siblings. The eldest is Gino, a mechanical engineer who is working with the Philippine Oil Corporation North Negros Geothermal Project based in Bago City; Oscar, was a lawyer and former Secretary to the City Council of Dumaguete; third, is the only sister, Dolly, a nurse by profession and married to an American doctor now based in Florida; then myself; Erwin, is our youngest, he completed a commerce degree at Saint Paul University Dumaguete and a former Poblacion barangay captain but now serves as municipal administrator. I first met my wife

DEMS: Are you in favor of Federalism? Mayor Bentham: I am very much in favor of federalism. We have been at the mercy of Imperial Manila for so long and since Central Visayas has the potentials, I am confident we will become well off. Imagine if we follow Senator Pimentel’s proposal, my town’s IRA will be nearly doubled from just P35M to P66M. That will allow us to accomplish many things for our 22,600 inhabitants in eight barangays.

DEMS: What are the lessons imparted by your late father which proved to be useful to you as town mayor? DEMS: Who else in the family are into politics? Mayor: Bentham: My father was my idol and the main reason why I opted to be a lawyer and soon a judge like him. He always emphasized the need to be prepared at all times whether in class or at workplace. As a public servant, he was a paragon of honesty and sincerity when dealing with people.

DEMS: What is your latest eco-tourism project? Mayor Bentham: We are working for the establishment of an eco-park on a 20-hectare property in Silab. We already planted some 700 seedlings of Narra and 80 seedlings of Dalakit. These trees attract fauna or birds and the site will serve as their sanctuary. To ensure sustainability, I have engaged a People’s Organization there to work in the area.

DEMS: Any plans for the development of the Tandayag port? Mayor Bentham: I have written to the Philippine Ports Authority and managed to secure their interest to develop our port. I have seen the blue print and it is a multi-million project that will turn Tandayag into a major alternative port of Dumaguete City. Although we may not get to manage the facility at least indirectly our people will gain from the economic activity when it opens.

Mayor Bentham: My father ran and was defeated three times in the years 1988, 1991 and 1995. He finally defeated the Trasmontes in 1998. He was re-elected overwhelmingly in 2001 and he was unopposed in 2004. My mother is the number one councilor of our town. My brother Eric, a former barangay captain is the municipal administrator while his son, my nephew, is the Sangguniang Kabataan Federation Chairman.

DEMS: How do you respond to criticisms that you’re building a political dynasty? Mayor Bentham: I know for a fact that my father dislikes political dynasties intensely. I was only made to run in 2004 when it was clear that since he is ill, there is a need for one of his sons to be elected vice-mayor. But, I think we are here to prove and make people realize that there is something good in a political dynasty. In fact, during policy deliberations, anyone in my family, especially my mother can argue honestly and confront you pointblank if they think that a certain measure is unwarranted or inadequate.

DEMS: Do you think the electorate of Amlan has matured politically? Mayor Bentham: Compared in the past when vote buying was rampant, I think there is an improvement now. But there are still those who ask money in exchange of their votes, even if you have served them honestly enough. This is one of my frustrations.

DEMS: Why did GWAVE choose your town to DEMS: Are you planning to stay long as mayor? be a pilot area of their advocacy?

MAYOR BENTHAM DE LA CRUZ

Mayor Bentham: I don’t exactly know, except that we invited GWAVE to become member of the Municipal Development Council. This NGO has conducted seminars for our men folk on women’s rights. We also teamed up to organize joint peer counseling for members of Bloods and Crips.

Front Porch ...

(Nancy)

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From page 5 visiting my folks, I have the time to just sit and destress as I revel in the countryside views. Seated on the swinging loveseat gently swaying back and forth, I have time to breathe, to wander through my memories, to feel one with myself and my God, to just “be”. Would I be able to do this at home in the Philippines? Yes, I could if I would allow myself to divest from being forever busy with so many things. Yes, I could if I would set aside the time to find a quiet place to just sit, relax and be still. Yes, I could ... I don’t have a swinging seat on a

porch but I have a quiet spot in our little yard under the shade of our mango tree. Yes, I could ... I can’t see an uninterupted skyline from my window, but I am able to sing with the birds that gather in the branches of our mango tree. Yes, I could ... I don’t have a wide expanse of lawn around our home, but I can spend a day or two at our beach house in San Jose that fronts a wide expanse of sea with the Cebu mountains outlining the distant sky. Contentment is making grateful, faithful, fruitful and joyful use of what you have, whether it is little or much. Happiness comes from being content with what you have, wherever you are, in whatever

Mayor Bentham: Honestly, I only want to finish my term and return to law practice and teaching. That is why I am fast tracking the projects even if the snail paced bureaucracy sometimes dampens my enthusiasm. But, I will cross the bridge when I get there. circumstances you find yourself. When in the States I am content to revisit my roots, refresh my early memories, and restore my intimacy with the Green Mountains, wide fields, countryside farm fragrances, and rural life style. When at home in the Phil-

ippines, I am content to be with my husband, children and grandchildren, to fellowship with our BCBP community, to help stengthen and expand our family business, and to continue my passion for writing. I am content. I am happy. And to me, this is what life is all about!

For Free Deliveries & Inquiries:


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The lady behind the success of Maritime education in Negros Oriental BY: EDMUND B. SESTOSO or several decades, most of the aspiring youth hoped to obtain a kind of degree or an education which will land them in esteemed positions of work be it in the country or abroad that is related to sea adventure by becoming captains and mariners in their own right. But to obtain then, also considered a woman that the bulk of dollar remitparents who also want to with an iron clad determina- tances poured into the counsee their children holding tion. try by the Overseas Filipino a bright future has to scour She started from Workers, a sizable chunk of everything including the scratch the putting up of the the share, is from the seaselling of their own farm- now famous NEGROS men themselves. lands and domesticated MARITIME COLLEGE “I would always rememanimals just to send their FOUNDATION, INC way ber the beckoning of my kids to maritime schools in back in the early part of the childhood for that when this either Metro Manila or year 1994 and tapping well dream begun. A dream of still the nearby Cebu province meaning individuals in the unknown aspiration that which both entails huge community to help her run started to stir my expenses and draining fi- through the creation of the heartstrings, getting to fill my nancial resources in the school’s Board of Directors. vivid imagination with overfamily. The success of whelming delight” thus how Until one day, a deter- NEGROS MARITIME CAPT. EDITH A. VERA mined lady with iron clad COLLEGE FOUNDA- described in the start as she decisiveness had felt the TION which is the pioneer is now chairing as President need to answer the same maritime school in Negros of the prestigious institution. sentiments as aired by Oriental is synonymous with In the ensuing conversaparents giving a bright fu- the determination of CAPT. tion, she confided that while ture for their kids and in EDITH A. VERA. it is true that most parents the long run to help alleviThe two are considered has to shell out some finanate the economic plight of institutions and are insepa- cial resources in order for its their families and the rable that this unassuming children to attain a quality country as well. lady had drastically changed maritime education, but still It took an unassuming the education landscape in she insisted that much of the lady from Tayasan, the province by introducing proceeds goes to operational Negros Oriental who is a specialized maritime insti- and maintenance of the herself had felt the pangs tution. school including its people of poverty to take the lead For the past 14 years, working on it. in paddling that bright fu- NMC’s growth can now be But it would still come ture for the kids by estab- felt and seen with many of out to be cheaper than sendlishing what is now popu- its students topping exami- ing their children to either larly known as the Negros nations conducted by gov- Cebu or Metro Manila. Maritime College Founda- ernment agencies. She described the partion, Incorporated. Through the years, ents role in sending their stuThat lady is no other NEGROS MARITIME dents to NEGROS MARIthan CAPT. EDITH A. COLLEGE has built the TIME COLLEGE FOUNVERA. who is herself an niche in maritime education DATION, INCORPOestablished business per- by giving shipping agencies RATED an son who has reaped sev- top caliber boat captains and eral awards from the dif- seamen, thus contributing to ferent awarding bodies the country’s dire need of and is also considered hav- infusion of dollars to help ing a soft spot for the ma- propel its ailing economy. jority of poor families is Records would show Turn to page 10

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HISTORICAL NOTES

The Recollect Mission

BY: REV. FR. ROMAN C. SAGUN. JR.

T

“I assure you, unless you turn from your sins and become as little children, you will never get into the Kingdom of Heaven. Therefore, anyone who becomes as humble as this little child is the greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven.” Matthew 18:3-5 The disciples had become so preoccupied with the organization of Jesus’ earthly kingdom that they had lost sight of its divine purpose. Instead of seeking a place of service, they sought positions of advantage. It is easy

to lose our eternal perspective and compete for promotions or status in the church. It is difficult to identify with “children”—weak and dependent people with no status or influence.

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TODAY’S

Letter from Bishop Gabby

GOSPEL Matthew 15:21-28

t that time, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. And behold, a Canaanite woman of that district came and called out, “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon.” But he did not say a word in answer to her. His disciples came and asked him, “Send her away, for she keeps calling out after us.” He said in reply, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” But the woman came and did him homage, saying, “Lord, help me.” He said in reply, “It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs.” She said, “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.” Then Jesus said to her in reply, “O woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.” And her daughter was healed from that hour.

A

—————————————————This woman is clearly aware of the absolute power Jesus has at His command when she notes that even the scraps of it will suffice to heal her daughter! There are times when we need to pray for a greater con-

viction to the truths attached to living a life of faith. If we did this, I think we would be more inclined to know when to step out and ask for God’s intervention in the situations in which we find ourselves contending with.

THE CREATIVE RESPONSE TO HOSTILITY Hostility Mt. 5:21-26, 44-45 (Part III)

n the words of Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount lies one of the ingredients of a healthy personality — a reconciling spirit. He makes it specific: Dr. PROCESO UDARBE Therefore if you bring your gift to the altar, and you remember that your brother or your sister has something against you, leave the gift at the altar, first be reconciled to your brother and

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he guidebook Guia de Forasteros en las Islas Filipinas (1847) made an observation about only five secular priests serving the eastern coast of the Negros Island. Father Juan Facundo de Quimbo was in charge of Tanjay, Amlan, Bais, Ayungon, Tayasan, Jimalalud, and Jinobaan. Father Jose Gorriz was in charge of turning shortly thereafter, made represenDumaguete, Bacong and Valencia; Father Felix tations to the Bishop to send more propriRamos of Dauin, Siaton and the outlying settle- etary parish priests; in the Island of Negros ments up to the river at Sicopong; Father alone, (according to him), there is great Alejandro Jayme of Guihulngan and the adja- need of seven more priests that the poor cent mission areas until Calatrava; Father Bishop cannot give. And what is worse is Bernardo Ruiz of Sibulan and Ayuquitan (now that the seminary (in Cebu) for the most San Jose). part is occupied by troops, such that it is In mid-1847, the Intendant Superior of left without students and priests as it the Visayas went on a visit of inspection to shouldn’t.” Negros Island. Thereupon his return to Fresh from his visitations in other parts of Cebu, the Superior made an appointment the Diocese, the Bishop of Cebu on 15 April to see Bishop Romualdo Jimeno who was 1848 wrote to Governor General Narciso newly installed in the Cebu Diocese just a Claveria that in his capacity as vice-royal pafew months earlier on 27 February. He ex- tron of the Church in the Philippines, the Goverposed the necessity of increasing the num- nor may entrust the spiritual administration of ber of parishes in Negros, thereby taking Negros to any of the four religious orders then the island out of the paralysis with which it working in the Islands. A month after on 27 May, was left under the secular clergy. Governor Claveria accordingly sent a notice to Only a few weeks after the visit of the Inten- the four provincials. dant Superior, in his great resolve to look perThat communication of 27 May signed sonally into the religious situation, Bishop Jimeno by General Claveria in Malacañang sent to paid his first pastoral visit to Negros. It must have the provincial of the Augustinian Recolgreatly saddened the bishop to see, for example, lects read in part: “Having informed the the church of Dumaguete completely devas- vice-royal patron, the Bishop of Cebu tated as it had been gutted by fire on 25 Novem- serves notice of the scarcity of zealous ber 1846. priests in that bishopric … to take over vaOn 30 July 1847, Bishop Jimeno wrote cant parishes, or those that may become to the provincial of the Augustinian Recol- vacant in the Island of Negros, so as to lects. “The Intendant Superior went to visit bring about improvements to the towns.” the islands of Panay and Negros, and reTurn to page 9

sister, then you may come to the altar to offer your gift. The point therefore for us is we cannot compartmentalize our life with God. We cannot say “let me be religious, come to church, say my prayers, take communion;” but in the next breath we say, “Lord don’t meddle with my relationships with others. That is my private business.” (To be continued)

Here is another letter from Bishop Gabriel V. Reyes, D.D., Chairman of the Episcopal Commission on the Laity addressed to the Archbishops and Bishops of the Philippines to explain the split of Couples for Christ, to wit: April 3, 2008 Your Eminence/Your Excellency, The Love and Joy of the Risen Christ! ith regard to the conflict in the Couples for Christ, I would like to explain to your good self why I, as Bishop of Antipolo, gave to the Couples for Christ for Family and Life (the group of Mr. Frank Padilla) recognition as a diocesan association of the faithful.

W

When the three bishops, Archbishop Angel N. Lagdameo, Bishop Socrates Villegas and myself, made a strong recommendation to the Couples for Christ to postpone their elections in order to maintain their unity and avoid an irreparable division, the group of Mr. Frank Padilla followed the bishops while the group that is with Mr. Joe Tale did not. The group of Mr. Frank Padilla did not participate in the elections. The complaints of the group of Mr. Frank Padilla regarding the Gawad Kalinga (which is with the group of Mr. Joe Tale) was proven to be true, namely that Gawad Kalinga was veering away from the purpose and charism of the Couples for Christ and that Gawad Kalinga was receiving funds from pharmaceutical companies that produce contraceptives. After the elections of June 22, 2007, the Couples for Christ was divided and the two groups exchanged accusations, some of them were malicious and nasty. A month later, the group of Mr. Frank Padilla came to me telling me that they would like to separate from the group of Mr. Joe Tale and form the Couples for Christ for Family and Life. The reason they gave was to end the tensions and hostilities. They also said that if these tensions and hostilities continue, the Couples for Christ as a movement might just be destroyed. Besides, after the accusations, some of them malicious and nasty, hurled by the two groups against each other, it was very hard for them to work together again. Furthermore, they said,

FR. GAMMY TULABING JCD, VG

their group has a different thrust and emphasis from that of the group under Mr. Joe Tale. Had I not acceded to their request to be given recognition as a diocesan association of the faithful, they would have been disappointed and disillusioned with us bishops. They would have felt that they, who had been obedient to the bishops regarding the elections, were the ones who were abandoned by the bishops, were left out in the cold. Although hampered by the fact that we, Archbishop Angel Lagdameo, Bishop Socrates Villegas and myself did not have authority over the Couples for Christ in the national level, we did our best to maintain their unity and prevent irreparable division by asking them to postpone their elections. But the group of Mr. Joe Tale went on with the elections. Now, the Couples for Christ is divided. The division is irreparable, in the sense, that it is very hard for the two groups to work together again. To my mind, we have just to make the best of the situation. My decision is to give the Couples for Christ for Family and Life recognition as a diocesan association of the faithful was prompted mainly by pastoral reasons. With every best wish and prayer, I am Fraternally yours in our Lord, +GABRIEL V. REYES, DD Chairman CBCP Episcopal Commission on the Laity


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Coping with ...

(Art)

(From page 5)

of “why not!” He launched the rural electrification program – a centerpiece of his administration – that would provide 24hour electricity to his people from Batanes to Tawi-tawi. ——————— As a young lawyer then with modest experience in community development work, I was privileged to be part of the Team that pioneered the electrification of my province of Negros Oriental. I was appointed the first General Manager of the Negros Oriental Electric Cooperative, Inc. (NORECO I) in January 1, 1973 after surviving a tedious selection process involving applicants nationwide. ———————Fifteen days later, I issued my first appointment – a very important and crucial one as events later would prove – that of bookkeeper. I chose one Sunny Rose A. Madamba, a Certified Public Accountant. Sunny belongs to the prominent Abella clan of our province and the Madambas of Ilocos Norte. Before that year ended, Sunny passed the Bar examinations. Thus I was very lucky to have a CPA-Lawyer as my right-hand man and managerial understudy. The Abellas, like many landowners in our cooperative area of northern Negros Oriental, sacrificed a lot in donating their growing and productive coconut and other trees to enable our electric lines to pass through. ———————In record time we completed the construction of our backbone lines of the original six towns of the

coverage. The completed headquarter facilities at Tinaogan, Bindoy was so impressive, Gen. Pedro G. Dumol, then Administrator of the National Electrification Administration (NEA) rewarded us with a prize to take over the local utility in Bais City ahead of schedule and to accelerate the availability of 24-hour electric service in that city together with the original towns. ———————My transfer to NORECO II as General Manager in 1977 was demanded by the situation. NEA had put in place a vigorous time-bounded program to energize most of the provinces before the end of the decade. NORECO II was always in the mind of Gen. Dumol. “You transfer to Dumaguete and get things done.” He ordered me. Getting things done meant: to take-over the franchise of the Visayan Electric Company (VECO) which had been servicing the city even before the Second World War; continue to operate its power plants, energize the city’s some thirty barangays, construct the backbone lines and laterals from Pamplona to Basay, evolve a work program that would achieve all these without unnecessary delays. The rest is history. ———————How did we do it? Sunny Madamba and I are often asked this question – we, lawyers, of all people in the forefront of a revolutionary program never before implemented in other provinces much more in Negros Oriental! Let’s put it this way. We were just corporate managers who happened to be lawyers called upon to do a job. ——————— The rural electrification program is the late Pres. Marcos’ legacy to the Filipino people.

This is the truth. We owe it to ourselves to respect this truth – to give due recognition where recognition is due. ———————Rural electrification had all the challenging ramifications of an impossible dream. But impossible dreams cannot remain so in the face of gutsy, bold, decisive, focused program implementers inspired by tremendous public support, cooperation and sacrifices of local officials, members of district electrification committees, land owners, simple folks and ordinary citizens. ———————On our modest contribution – back to the question: How did we do it? It is very difficult to put this into words. Truth to tell, we just did what we had to do – plan, program, implement. We were so busy and so pre-occupied in getting things done we had no time to be scared, intimidated, or terrorized by the magnitude of lighting up the Negros Oriental countryside. Now looking in the hindsight it is quite scary. ———————I remember this quote from Admiral William “Bull” Halsey, one of America’s great naval commanders. He said: “There are no great men, only great challenges.” How true. But great challenges make ordinary men do great things. Do you agree?

The Recollect ...

(Sagun)

(From page 8)

In just two days, Fray Joaquin Soriano, the provincial of the Augustinian Recollects, replied by accepting the administration of the island and committing to send six priests within six months. On 20 June 1848, Governor General Narciso Claveria issued a decree entrusting the spiritual administration of Negros Island to the Augustinian Recollects. Of the seven missionaries sent to the Island in less than two years, four of them served in four towns of the eastern coast. Among them was ex-provincial Fray Joaquin Soriano who arrived in Bacong to assume duties as its first parish priest on 4 June 1849. Just a month later on 16 July that year, what came as a big surprise was Bishop Romualdo Jimeno of Cebu making a pastoral visitation to the parish of Fray Joaquin Soriano. The good Bishop came to the town of Bacong to personally thank the ex-provincial for accepting the invitation that Augustinian Recollects would work in Negros and stimulate the development of its immense natural resources.

RMJ SURPLUS Dealer of all kinds of Japanese surplus appliances and more . . . Dr. V. Locsin St., Beside DCDB Dumaguete City Tel. # 225-9748

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Supreme Court of the Philippines Judicial and Bar Council, Manila

A N N O U N C E M E N T

Conformably with Section 1, Rule 7 of the Rules of the Judicial and Bar Council (JBC-009), as amended the JBC will conduct a public interview at the Division Hearing Room, Ground Floor, New Supreme Court Building, of the following candidates for the positions of: B. ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE COURT OF APPEALS (vice Hon. Enrico A. Lanzanas, Lucenito N. Tagle, Agustin N. Dizon & Rodrigo V. Cosico) 12 AUGUST, 2008 TUESDAY 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon 1. ALARAS, SELMA P. 2. ANGELES, ADORACION G. 3. ARLES, HENRY D. 4. BACLIG, VIVENCIO S. 5. BALONZO, FREDDIE D.

2. 3. 4. 5.

15 AUGUST, 2008, FRIDAY 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon 1. MEREGILLANO, CHITO S. 2. PALMA, PELAGIO B. 3. PAREDES, MEINRADO P. 4. PAREDES, VICTORIA ISABEL A. 5. PERALTA, EDUARDO, JR.B. 6. PERALTA, WILLIAM, SIMON, P.

12 AUGUST, 2008 TUESDAY 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 1. BARRIOS, MANUEL M. 2. BORRETA, ABRAHAM B. 3. BUESER, DANTON Q. 4. CARPIO, AGNES R. 5. CORREA, LIBRADO S. 13 AUGUST, 2008, WEDNESDAY 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon 1. CRUZ, RAMON A. 2. DE ALBAN, ISAAC R. 3. DIMAGIBA, LEONCIA R. 4. DOMINGO, LORNA N. 5. DUMDUM, SIMEON, JR.P 13 AUGUST, 2008, WEDNESDAY 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 1. DUMLAO, LOLITA C. 2. ERUM, MARIA C. 3. FABROS, AMELIA A. 4. FRUELDA, CARMELITA G. 5. GUERRERO, JUANITA T.

MAGDOZA, PABLO R. MANAHAN, CARMELITA S. MAYO, MANUEL A. MAXINO, PAMELA ANN A.

15 AUGUST, 2008, FRIDAY 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 1. REGALA, LEAH D. 2. SARMIENTO, ULPIANO III P. 3. SORONGON, EDWIN D. 4. TANGUANCO, EDUARDO I. 5. UMALI, MARIVIC B. The other 17 candidates for the said position were already interviewed in October 2007 and March & June 2008.

14 AUGUST, 2008, THURSDAY 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon 1. GRULLA, CIELITO M. 2. HERRERA, OSCAR, JR.C. 3. INFANTE, AMELIA T. 4. INTING, SOCORRO B. 5. LACAP, MERCEDES, P. 14 AUGUST, 2008, THURSDAY 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 1. LAQUINDANUM, LILY LYDIA A.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

AQUINO, LYUHA A. ARELLANO, FLORENCIO S. ARMAMENTO, LEAH T. FE, FERDINAND A. FRANCISCO, RENATO C. GACUTAN, ANGELITA A. GAERLAN, SAMUEL H. GENILO, LITA T. MACAPAGAL, AIDA E. PAUIG, VILMA T. PATRIARCA, GEORGE S. SADANG, MELCHOR QUIRINO C. SALVADOR, PHILIP G. SOLUREN, CORAZON D. SORIASO, TERESA P. VILLANUEVA, RAUL B. ZALAMEDA, RODIL V.

(Sgd.) MA. LUISA D. VILLARAMA Clerk of Court & JBC, Ex-Officio Secretary


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Our culture war... (From page 5) (Roy)

things related more to the human soul than to our bodily and material welfare. In short, it involves things happening in our mind and heart from which our life is shaped. The problem starts when these fine distinctions are ignored, and people start weaving their own world-view rooted more on the material and temporal values, while neglecting the reality of the spiritual and supernatural values. Thus, we come out with categories of people like the more spiritually-inclined as contrasted to the more worldly and materially-attached type, the conservative, traditionalist person and the secular, liberal, progressive one, etc. From another angle, we can identify this culture war’s protagonists as believers and faith-based people, or non-believers, atheists, agnostics, skeptics, pragmatists, positivists, ideologues whether of the left, right or center, etc. Of course, in each category, we can have endless varieties. What is important is that we know how to identify them in their cultural orientation. This knowledge, which is at best tentative, can help us to effectively tackle the intricacies of the culture war. The burning issues that can trigger this culture war, at least in the US context, can be contraception, abortion, homosexuality, samesex unions, environmental extremists, radical feminism, public morality, discrimination against reli-

gious schools, etc. They divide the parties into either pro-life or anti-life, culture of life or culture of death, etc. Somehow they are distinguished by their attitude toward faith and religion, the role of reason and affectivity and their relationship with faith, etc. Also, they are identified by the tools and weapons used. The Christian-inspired use truth with charity as lived by Christ and now taught by the Church. They are expected to practice patience and to face trials, insults, sacrifices. Those less Christian if not anti-Christian and non-believers, can use anything and are prone to bullying their opponents. Remember what our Lord said: “The children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light.” (Lk 16,8) But I believe the last laugh belongs to the believers. In our country, this culture war can be dramatized in the current debate over the so-called Reproductive Health bills now being deliberated in Congress. I consider them as likely provoking a seismic shift in our culture, since they involve basic realignment of personal and social values. In spite of their proponents saying the bills are actually prolife, pro-family and even proGod, our Church leaders have considered them precisely the opposite because of their suspicious inspiration and their association of a certain world network whose ideology is incompatible with Christian faith and morals.

The lady ... From page 7 investment that will go a long way for the bright future of their kids. The success of this unassuming lady is now measured in the many students that graduated and now working in the shipping industry and other related agencies. CAPT. VERA admitted that it was not that easy putting up the maritime institution where the main purpose is helping others attain a bright future because as the years go by, it was also laced with problems and troubles including sleepless nights and even brickbats and doubts as to the sustainability of the institution going over the technicalities and other nifty gritty of the said institution. But, CAPT. VERA has came out victorious with surprisingly even academic authorities like the Technical Education Skills and Development Authority (TESDA) and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) giving the nod and approval of what she had done and even lauded her noble efforts and

I personally think these bills are meant to get a foothold in our society via our legal system, a wedge that will later open the floodgates of atheistic and agnostic opinions and ways into our country. Our culture war is on. We need to know how to deal with it!

even recognized for being both directly and indirectly contributing to the country’s education and economic well being. “As our home bordered the coastline of Negros Oriental, I would see the sun coming up one scalloped mountain of Cebu and from its aim, it would peep at me with the seeming warm hello in the eye. Likewise, it was saying, come step on the pedal, let’s ride the day together” CAPT. VERA recalls those early years. With CAPT. Vera’s iron clad determination, with her humble beginnings and the realization of such dream of putting up a specialized maritime school for the bright future of her kababayans, she reaped numerous awards in recognition of her silent but loudly committed and sincere efforts at helping others Among such special recognition are Maritime Educator Leader in the Philippines, Most Outstanding Head Educator and Public Servant, Mother and Business Executive Leader of the Year, among others. Due to her feat in her endeavor, she is now expanding her role and shared with the academic community her tireless efforts. She is also into networking and updating with fellow colleges and university administrators and organizations regarding academic and administrative affairs. This included other related issues, needs and problems. She is also into attending seminars and workshops both local and international about enhancing more the maritime school management and value orientation programs. “Now the dream of long ago has taken form at last, and I have it here in my hands. I must have worked very hard needing the strength of the time,

seeking the intelligence of the Lord to dwell in my mortal mind and His power to my mortal hands to construct and build monuments in His Name” Capt. Vera, a devout Roman Catholic reminisces those golden and untiring days. She has also integrated into the school formation, outreach projects taking the value of helping others is considered as a satisfying and fulfilling endeavor. Aside from holding the reins of the school’s operation, she is also right now the Squadron Commander of the 204th Squadron of the Philippine Coast Guard Auxiliary. She is also keeping herself busy being the national president of the Veterans Sons and Daughters Organization based in Metro Manila and also vice president of the Philippine Veterans Legion Auxiliary. Not everybody knows that she is also into construction business holding top positions of the different Manila-based companies. Among such as vice president of both Kraft Construction in Quezon City and Inter Phase Construction in Makati City and president of the E.A. Construction Realty and Trading. She also served as vice president for Finance of the J.G Cloma Construction Realty and president of Everlasting Garment. As if the same is not enough, this unassuming lady had still managed to have time in other business pursuits and

she was the former president and now chairperson of the Rural Bank of Basay and vice president of the Federation of Rural Bankers in Negros Oriental. Adding still extended educational jobs in her shoulder is that of being president of the Negros Oriental Association of TVET Institutions and one of the educators sitting in the Provincial Technical Education and Skills Development Committee. Aside from giving her time and effort to all other economic pursuits, it did not stop her to also take charge of her own business enterprise. CAPT. VERA owns the NMC Golden Beach/Sand Resort in Bayawan City, the Mariners Global Resort Village and she is now the Treasurer of the Korean Philippine tie up business, the DAEHAN Negros Farm, Incorporated. Huh!!! I’ll now stop here or else I may be unconsciously writing a book on this tough lady with a soft spot for those who are economically disadvantaged and clothed with an iron determination. A salute to CAPT. EDITH VERA, president of the NEGROS MARITIME COLLEGE with her so many feats that she has earned and worked hard without much fanfare.

& , 304 ., Philippines 6200, Tel. No. 225-9625


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11

Sta. Rosa, Dumaguete City Tel. No. 422-7384

DUMAGUETE to

DAPITAN 2 hrs. & 45 mins. lang ! P200.00 ra !

Departs 5:00 PM Daily neighborhood.

Dapitan Office: 0922-8802514, 0921-9556656 Dumaguete Office: 0922-8802517, 0922-8802518, 0927-9971299 Cebu Office – Tel. (032) 2310639, 2323150, 3455581, 2335733

across

0918 929 6047


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Republic of the Philippines Province of Oriental Negros Municipality of Amlan OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN OF AMLAN Telephone No. (035) 417-0112 EXCERPT FROM THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR SESSION OF THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN OF AMLAN, PROVINCE OF NEGROS ORIENTAL HELD AT THE MUNICIPAL SESSION HALL ON JANUARY 17, 2007. Present: Hon. Carmen G. Tan - Mun. Vice-Mayor (Presiding Officer) Hon. Winfredo S. Teves - SB Member Hon. Melvyn Y. Reynado - SB Member Hon. Jonathan R. Kitane - SB Member Hon. Jose G. Bocanegra - SB Member Hon. Amador S. Sienes - SB Member Hon. Marichu B. Hinaut - SB Member Hon. Consuelo P. dela Cruz - SB Member Hon. Maverick Vincent Y. Sienes - SB Member (SK Federation President) Hon. Emelyn B. Rosales (Liga ng mga Barangay) Absent: Hon. Edmund R. Tubac

-

SB

Member

- SB Member

ORDINANCE NO. 03 A Comprehensive Municipal Ordinance for the Sustainable Development, Management, Conservation and Protection of the Municipal Waters and its Coastal and Fishery Resources, Harmonizing and Integrating All Ordinances Pertinent thereto and for other purposes. Be enacted by the Sangguniang Bayan of the Municipality of Amlan, Oriental Negros in its regular session assembled, that: Section 1. This Ordinance shall be known as “AMLAN COMPREHENSIVE COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (CRM) ORDINANCE.“ ARTICLE I. Declaration of Policy Section 2. Declaration of Policy It is hereby declared the policy of the Municipality to : 1. Promote conservation and ensure sustainable and equitable utilization of its coastal areas and resources in conformity with RA 8550, the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998. 2. Ensure the benefits and enjoyment of the people of Amlan, Oriental Negros the judicious and wise utilization, protection, conservation and management on a sustainable basis of its coastal and fishery resources with the necessity of maintaining a sound ecological balance and protecting and enhancing the quality of the environment. 3. Protect the rights of the small and marginal fisherfolks in the preferential use of the communal coastal and fishery resources. 4. Ensure people’s full support and active participation in the conservation and management of the coastal and fishery resources and shall promote awareness of sustainable fisheries through appropriate education and training. 5. Provide full support for sustainable fisheries in the municipal waters through appropriate technology and research, adequate financial support production and marketing assistance, and other services. 6. Encourage the residents and private sector to utilize fishery resources under the basic concept that grantee, licensee or permitee thereof shall not only be a privilege beneficiary of the municipality but also an active participant and partner of the municipal government in the management, development, conservation and protection of the coastal and fishery resources of the municipality. 7. Promote and adhere to the precautionary principle of conservation, management and exploitation of living coastal and fishery resources in order to assure the sustainable development of the coastal environment. The absence of adequate scientific and technical information should not be used as a reason for postponing or failing to take conservation and management measures. Section 3. Application for its Provision The provisions of this ordinance shall be enforced in : 1. All the municipal waters, as defined in this ordinance; 2. All fishery resources in the municipal waters; 3. All fishery activities or business relating to the use, development, conservation and management of the municipal waters and its coastal and fishery resources; and 4. All people, entities or corporations that use and/or intend to use the coastal and fishery resources in the municipality. Section 4. Definition of Terms As used in this ordinance, the following terms and phrase shall mean as follows: 1. Aquaculture - fishery operations involving all forms of raising and culturing fish and fishery species in fresh water, brackish and marine water areas. 2. Aquatic / Coastal Pollution - the introduction of substances by human or machine, directly or indirectly to the coastal environment which result or likely to result in such deleterious effects as to harm living and non-living fishery and coastal resources; pose potential and/or real hazard to human health; hindrance to coastal activities such as fishing and navigation, including dumping/disposal of waste and other marine litter; discharge of petroleum or residual products of petroleum, and other radioactive, noxious or harmful liquid, gaseous or solid substances from any water, land or other human-made structures. Deforestation, unsound agricultural practices such as the use of banned chemicals and excessive use of chemicals, intensive use of artificial fish feeds, and wetland conversion, which cause similar hazards and deleterious effects shall also constitute aquatic or coastal pollution. 3. Aquatic Resources - includes fish, all other flora and fauna and other resources of the aquatic environment, including but not limited to salt and corals. 4. Auxiliary Invoice - a special permit issued by the municipal government. 5. Closed Season - the period during which the taking of specific fishery species by a specific fishing gear is prohibited in a specific area or areas in the municipal waters. 6. Coastal Area / Zone - is a band of dry land and adjacent ocean space ( water and submerged land in which terrestrial process and uses directly after oceanic processes and uses, and vice-versa; its geographic extent may include areas within a landmark limit of one (1) kilometer from the shoreline at high tide to include mangrove swamps, brackish water ponds, nipa swamps, estuarine rivers, sandy beaches

and other areas within seaward limit of two hundred (200) meters isobath to include coral reefs, algal flats, seagrass beds and other soft bottom areas. 7. Coastline Structure - any structure within the environmental protection area. 8. Commercial Fishing - the taking of fishery species by passive or active gear for trade, business or profit beyond subsistence or sports fishing, to be further classified as : a. Small-scale commercial fishing - fishing with passive or active gear for trade or business; fishing vessels of 3.1 gross tons(GT) to 20 gross tons (GT). b. Medium-scale commercial fishing - fishing with passive or active gear utilizing fishing vessels of 20.1 gross tons (GT) to 150 gross tons (GT). c. Large-scale commercial fishing - fishing with passive or active gear utilizing fishing vessels of more than 150 gross tons (GT). 9. Coral - marine animals, anthozoan and cnidian coelenterates, consisting of polyps and rigid skeletal structure they produce. The living animal with its skeleton and the skeleton alone are both referred to as, coral. Included are members of the genus Corallium, characterized by a rigid axis of compact calcareous or horny spicules and represented by red, pink, and white corals which are considered precious corals; the Antipatharians, characterized by a thorny, horny axis and represented by the black coral which are considered semiprecious corals, and ordinary corals which are neither precious nor semi-precious and usually characterized by calcareous skeleton. 10. Coral Reef - geological features built by natural calcification and other deposits from corals and calcareous algae. 11. Delineation - the determination of the outer limits of the jurisdictional waters of the municipality. 12. Department - shall mean Department of Agriculture 13. Drift Net - net with more than 3 cm. mesh size without anchor for deep-sea fishing and goes with the current *Example (local names) a.”Kurantay”- a drift net with at least 1,000 meters in length. b. “Habal-habal” - a drift net with larger mesh size with thread c. “Palaran” - a drift net with shorter length 14. Electro-fishing - the use of electricity generated by batteries, electric generators and other source of electric power to kill, stupefy, disable or render unconscious fishery species, whether or not the same are subsequently recovered. 15. Endemic Fishes - are fishes common and existing only in a particular area. 16. Fine-meshed Nets - all net webbing whether made of natural fibers, synthetic or any other materials used in fishing with a mesh size of less than 3 centimeters. 17. Fish Pen - an artificial enclosure constructed within a body of water for culturing fish and fishery / aquatic resources made up of poles closely arranged in an enclosure with wooden materials, screen or nylon netting to prevent escape of fish. 18. Fish Cage - any method of culturing fin fishes in an enclosure which is either stationary or floating made up of nettings or screen sewn or fastened together and installed in the water with opening at the surface and held in place by wooden posts or various anchors or floats. 19. Fish Corral/Trap - a stationary contraption devised to intercept and capture fish consisting of rows of bamboo stakes, plastic nets and other materials fenced with split bamboo matting or wire matting with one or more enclosures, usually with easy entrance but difficult exit, and with or without leaders to direct the fish to the catching chambers, purse or bags. 20. Fisheries - refers to all activities relating to the act or business of fishing, culturing, preserving, processing, marketing, developing, conserving and managing fishery resources. 21. Fishers - people directly, or personally and physically engaged in taking and/or culturing and processing fishery/ coastal/marine resources. 22. Fishery License - a document that qualifies a person / cooperative / partnership / corporation to engage in any fishery activities in the municipal waters. 23. Fishers Organization an accredited organized group, association, federation, alliance or institution of fishery which has at least 15 members, a set of officers, a constitution and by-laws, and having an organizational structure and programs of action. 24. Fishery / Marine Resources - include not only fin fishes but also mollusks, crustaceans, echinoderms, marine mammals, and all other products derived from aquatic resources in any form. 25. Fish Fry a stage at which a fish has just been hatched, usually with sizes ranging from 1 to 2.5 centimeters. 26. Fishing - the taking of fishery species from the wild state or habitat, with or without the use of fishing vessels. 27. Fishing Gear - any instrument or device and its accessories utilized in taking fish and other fishery species. It can be either of the following : a. Active Fishing Gear - fishing gear characterized by active movement and/or pursuit of target species by towing, lifting and pushing the gears surrounding, covering, dredging, pumping and scaring the target species to impoundment or encirclements, such as but not limited to, trawl, purse seines, Danish seines, bag nets, push nets, cast nets, harvesting machines, beach seines, “pa-aling”, drift gill nets and tuna long line. b. Passive Fishing Gear - is characterized by the absence of gear movement and/or the pursuit of the target species such as, but not limited to, hook and line, fish pots, traps, and gill nets across the path of the fish. 28. Fishing Vessel - any vessel, boat, ship, or watercraft equipped to be used for taking of fishery species or aiding or assisting one or more vessels at sea in the performance of any activity relating to fishing, including but not limited to the preservation, supply, storage, refrigeration, transportation and processing. 29. Fishing with Noxious / Poisonous Substances the use of any substance, plant extracts or juice thereof, sodium cyanide and/or cyanide compounds or other chemicals either in a raw or processed form, harmful or harmless to human beings, which will kill, stupefy, disable, or render unconscious any fishery species and coastal resources and capable of damaging and altering the natural habitat. 30. Gill Net - type of drift net used nearshore ( eg. local names – “pamantig”, “pamahala”,“padumog”, etc.) 31. Gratuitous Permit - a permit issued to marginal and subsistence municipal fishers free of any charges. 32. Landing Area - permanent docking place of marginal fishermen 33. Lightboats - fishing boats equipped with lights used to attract fish. It can be either of the following: a. Super lightboat - using halogen

lights b. “Demano” lightboat - using light bulbs at varied strengths 34. Mangroves - a community of intertidal plants including all species of trees, shrubs, vines and herbs on coasts, swamps, or border of swamps. 35. Migratory Species any fishery species which in course of their life could travel from fresh water to marine water or vice-versa, or any marine species which travel great distances in marine water. Anadromous species are marine fishes, which migrate to fresh water to spawn. Catadromous species are fresh water fishes, which migrate to marine areas to spawn. 36. Monitoring - for monitoring fisheries, this may include long-term observation of: 1) fishing effort, which can be expressed by the number of days or hours of fishing, number of fishing gears and number of fishers; 2) characteristics of fishery resources; and 3) resource yilds or catch. 37. Municipal Fishers persons who are engaged in municipal fishing and/or fishing within the municipal waters. 38. Municipal Fisherfolks - persons who are directly or indirectly engaged in municipal fishing and other related fishing activities. 39. Municipal Fishing - refers to fishing using fishing vessels of 3 gross tons or less, or fishing not requiring the use of fishing vessel within the 15-kilometer distance from the shoreline. 40. Municipal Government - refers to the municipal government of Amlan. 41. M FARMC - Municipal Fishery and Aquatic Resource Management Council 42. Municipal Waters include not only streams, lakes, inland bodies of water and tidal waters within the municipality which are not the subject of private ownership and not included within the national parks, brackish water fishponds leased by the government, and national fishery reserves, refuge and sanctuaries but also marine waters included between two lines drawn perpendicular to the general coastline from points where the boundary lines of the municipality touch the sea at low tide and a third line parallel with the general coastline including offshore islands and 15 kilometers from such coastline. Where two municipalities are so situated on opposite shores such that there is less than 30 kilometers of marine waters between them, the third line shall be a line equidistant from the opposite shores of the respective municipalities. 43. Non-Government Organization (NGO) - refers to an agency, institution, a foundation or a group of person whose purpose is to assist peoples’ organizations/ associations in various ways including, but not limited to organizing, education, training, research and/or resource accessing. 44. Overfished Area an area within the municipal waters, which cannot sustain the fisheries. It can be due to any of the following types of overfishing: (i) too much harvesting in such a way that the mean size of fish capture is sub-optimal for providing effective yields from a fishery; (ii) intense fishing pressure by which the process of fishery restocking through reproduction and resettlement is impaired; (iii) shift in community structure from a fishery dominated by valuable species to one dominated by species of less economic value or utility; and (iv) when resource users faced with declining catches and lacking any other alternative, initiate wholesale resource destruction in their effort to maintain their incomes. 45. “Payao” - a fish aggregating device consisting of a floating raft anchored by a weighted line with suspended materials such as palm fronds to attract pelagic and schooling species common in deep waters. 46. Pelagic Fishes - migratory fishes. 47. People’s Organization a bonafide and duly accredited association of citizens with demonstrated capacity to promote the public interest and with identifiable leadership, membership and structure. Its members belong to a sector in the community who voluntarily band themselves together to work for their own upliftment, development and greater good. 48. Permit - a document issued to license holders before engaging in fishing using particular gear and/or boat or engage in any fishery activities within the municipality. 49. Persons - natural or judicial entities such as individuals, associations, partnership, cooperatives or corporations. 50. RA 8550 - otherwise known as the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998. It is the national law that governs the management and conservation of the fishery resources in the of the country. 51. Sanctuary / Marine Reserve - a designated area within the municipal waters where fishing and other human activities are prohibited. 52. SCUBA - Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus Section 5. Boundaries of the Jurisdictional Waters Pursuant to the Local Government Code of 1991, the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998 and upon the recommendation by the National Mapping and Resources Information Authority (NAMRIA), it is hereby delineated the jurisdictional waters boundaries of Amlan, Oriental Negros, shall be within the following geographic coordinates: Beginning at Pt. 1 09º 28’ 54” latitude, 123º 11’ 02” longitude Pt. 2 09º 21’ 06” latitude, 123º 11’ 32” longitude Pt. 3 09º 29’ 16” latitude, 123º 11’ 48” longitude Pt. 4 09º 31’ 03” latitude, 123º 13’ 40” longitude Pt. 5 09º 31’ 45” latitude, 123º 14’ 19” longitude Pt. 6 09º 31’ 29” latitude, 123º 14’ 26” longitude Pt. 7 09º 30’ 45” latitude, 123º 14’ 54” longitude Pt. 8 09º 29’ 48” latitude, 123º 15’ 21” longitude Pt. 9 09º 28’ 41” latitude, 123º 15’ 39” longitude Pt. 10 09º 28’ 11” latitude, 123º 15’ 49” longitude Pt. 11 09º 27’ 14” latitude, 123º 14’ 07” longitude Section 6. Jurisdiction of the Municipal Government The municipal government shall have jurisdiction over the municipal waters. The municipal government shall be responsible for the management, conservation, development, protection, utilization and disposition of all coastal and fishery resources within the municipal waters. The municipal government in consultation with MFARMC, shall enact corresponding ordinances and issue executive orders thereon; Provided, that all ordinances enacted and executive orders issued by (next page) the municipal government shall conform with the existing national and local laws and policies and shall not endanger the sustainability of the coastal and fishery resources or destroy the ecological balance; Provided, however, that the municipal government, in coordination with the MFARMC and other con-


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Trade and Navigation Zone The coverage of this zone is the following area: · From a point on the shoreline with reference number 221 ( 51P 525841/UTM 1043786 ) to another shoreline point with reference number 222 ( 51P 525963/UTM 1044144 ) the bearing and distance of which is19º north-northeast and 380 meters respectively. The offshore boundaries are marked as thus : from reference number 221 to an offshore point with reference number 269 ( 51P 525968/UTM 1043724 ) the bearing and distance of which is 117º east-southeast and 140 meters respectively. Then from reference number 222 to an offshore point with reference number 270 (51P 526063/UTM 1044119) the bearing and distance of which is 104º east-southeast and 100 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 410 meters. This zone covers a total area of 4.77 hectares. 2. Multiple-use Zone The coverage of this zone are the following areas: · From a shoreline point with reference number 222 ( 51P 525963/UTM 1044144 ) to another shoreline point with reference number 223 ( 51P 525880/UTM 1044676 )the bearing and distance of which is 352º north-northwest and 540 meters respectively, The offshore points are marked as thus : From reference number 222 to an offshore point with reference number 270 ( 51P 526063/UTM 1044119 ) the bearing and distance of which is104º east-southeast and 100 meters respectively. Then from reference number 223 to an offshore point with reference number 271 (51P 526105/UTM 1044794) the bearing and distance of which is 63º east-northeast and 250 meters. This zone covers a total area of 10.15 hectares. · From a shoreline point with reference number 224 (51P 525749/UTM 1045041) to another shoreline point with reference number 225 (51P 525598/UTM 1045202) the bearing and distance of which is 317º north-northwest and 220 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus: From reference number 222 to an offshore point with reference number 272 (51P 525935/UTM 1045162) the bearing and distance of which is 57º east-northeast and 220 meters respectively. Then from reference number 225 to an offshore point with reference number 273 (51P 525726/UTM 1045336) the bearing and distance of which is 44º north-northeast and 190 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 130 meters. This zone covers a total area of 3.52 hectares. 3. Protected Zone The coverage of this zone are the following areas: · The Marine Protected Area (MPA) of barangay Tandayag: From a shoreline point with reference number 223 (51P 525880/UTM 1044676) to another shoreline point with reference number 224 (51P 525746/UTM 1045041) the bearing and distance of which is 341º north-northwest and 390 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus: From reference number 223 to an offshore point with reference number 271 (51P 526105/UTM 10447940) the bearing and distance of which is 63º east-northeast and 250 meters respectively. Then from reference number 272 (51P 525935/UTM 1045162) the bearing and distance of which is 57º east-northeast and 220 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points are is 410 meters This zone covers a total area of 9.22 meters. · The Marine Protected Area (MPA) that extends from barangay Tandayag to barangay Poblacion: From a shoreline point with reference number 226 (51P 525065/UTM 1046118) to another shoreline point with reference number 227 (51P 524525/UTM 1046457) the bearing and distance of which is 297º west-northwest and 600 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus: From reference number 226 to an offshore point with reference number 274 (51P 525276/UTM 1046258) the bearing and distance of which is 72º east-northeast and 220 meters respectively. Then from reference number 227 to an offshore point with reference number 275 (51P 524602/UTM 1046648) the bearing and distance of which is 23º north-northeast and 210 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 780 meters. This zone covers a total area of 9.39 hectares. · The Marine Protected Area (MPA) in barangay Bio-os : It is an offshore reef, the middle point of which corresponds to the coordinates (51P 521394/UTM 1048769) the boundaries are described in detail in Municipal Ordinance No. 21,series of 1999. · The mangrove areas in barangays Jugno and Bio-os are also classified as Protected Areas under this zoning plan. Although the boundaries of which are subject to verification with the Bureau of Lands of the DENR pending the determination of the land classification status of these areas. The species composition of these areas was assessed and reported by the Mangrove Research Assistant of the Coastal Resource Management Project (CRMP). 4. Eco-tourism Zone The coverage of this zone are the following areas: · The Eco-tourism zone in barangay Tandayag: From a shoreline point with reference number 225 (51P 525598/UTM 1045202) to another shoreline point with reference number 226 (51P 525065/UTM 1046118) the bearing and distance of which is 332º west-southwest and 1,130 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus: from reference number 225 to an offshore point with reference number 273 (51P 525726/UTM 1045336) the bearing and distance of which is 44º north-northeast and 190 meters respectively. Then from reference number 274 (51P 525276/UTM 1045336) the bearing and distance of which is 72º east-northeast and 220 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 1,030 meters. This zone covers a total area of 22.22 hectares. · The Eco-tourism Zone that includes the shoreline of barangays Poblacion, Jugno and Bio-os : From a shoreline point with reference number 227 (51P 524525/UTM 1046457) to another shoreline point with reference number 230 (51P 520019/UTM 1048189) the bearing and distance of which is 292º west-northwest and 4,830 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus: From reference number 227 to an offshore point with reference number 275 (51P 5246602/ UTM 1046648) the bearing and distance of which is 23º northnortheast and 210 meters respectively. Then from reference number 230 to an offshore point with reference number 280 (51P 520443/UTM 10 48383) the bearing and distance of which is 66º east-northeast and 470 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 4,510 meters. This zone covers a total area of 160.86 hectares. 5. Rehabilitation Zone The coverage of this zone are the following areas: · The Rehabilitation Zone in barangay Mag-abo: It is an offshore Artificial Reef (AR),the core zone of which corresponds to reference number 276 (51P 523989/UTM 1046818). The boundaries of this zone extend 100 meters to all sides. · The Rehabilitation Zone in barangay Jugno: It is an offshore Artificial Reef (AR), the core zone of which corresponds to reference number 227 (51P 523353/UTM 1047026). The boundaries of this zone extend 100 meters to all sides.

· The Rehabilitation Zone in barangay Bio-os : It is an offshore Artificial Reef (AR),The core zone of which corresponds to reference number 278 (51P 521348/UTM 1047909). The boundaries of this zone extend 100 meters to all sides. 6. Sustainable Aquaculture Zone Located in the Busuang river in barangay Bio-os This zone is divided into the following segments: · Segment 1 : From reference number 346 (51P 520093/ UTM 1047544) to reference number 347 (51P 52011/UTM 1047594) the bearing and distance of which is 27º north-northeast and 60 meters respectively, then from reference number 348 (51P 520126/UTM 1047603) to reference number 349 (51P 520154/UTM 1047603) the bearing and distance of which is 92º east-southeast and 30 meters respectively, then from reference number 349 to reference number 350 (51P 520291/UTM 1047497) the bearing and distance of which is 128º east-southeast and 170 meters respectively. · Segment 2: From reference number 351 (51P 520291/ UTM 1047496) to reference number 352 (51P 520262/UTM 1047594) the bearing and distance of which is 334º north-northwest and 100 meters respectively. · Segment 3: From reference number 353 (51P 520291/ UTM 1047625) to reference number 354 (51P 520244/UTM 1047625) the bearing and distance of which is 360º north and 50 meters respectively, then from reference number 354 to reference number 355 951P 520208/UTM 1047823) the bearing and distance of which is 347º north-northwest and 150 meters respectively, then from reference number 355 to reference number 356 (51P 520136/UTM 1047885) the bearing and distance of which is 311º west-northwest and 90 meters respectively. The following are the Policies and Regulatory Mechanisms of the different Coastal Zones of the Municipal Waters of Amlan: 1. TRADE AND NAVIGATION ZONE a) Strict implementation of waste disposal b) Collection of anchoring fee, docking fee, polluter’s fee and other necessary fees. c) Control speed of fast crafts and other motorized vessels. d) No construction of structures or obstruction within / along the trade and navigation zone. 2. MULTIPLE-USE ZONE a) Prioritize resident fishers. b) Bangus fry catchers are encouraged to be members of registered fishers associations / organizations. c) Catching of mother bangus (“Sabalo”) is prohibited. d) Other species of fry caught must be returned to the sea. e) Fishing during spawning season is prohibited. f) Registry / licensing of all legal fishing gears. g) Renewal of permits and licenses annually. 3. PROTECTED ZONE (Mangrove Areas, Artificial Reefs and Marine Reserves) a) No conversion (cutting of trees), backfilling of mangrove areas for other uses – public or private. b) All types of fishing is not allowed within the Artificial Reef’s core zone. c) Only hook and line fishing is allowed inside the Artificial Reef’s buffer zone of at least 100 meters. d) Only registered members of municipal fishers associations are allowed to fish in the Artificial Reef’s bufferzone. e) Fishing and other activities are not allowed inside the Marine Reserves. However, diving and snorkeling for scientific and educational research purposes may be allowed subject to rules and regulations. Provided, all results and findings of the study or research must be submitted to the local government of Amlan. f) Motorized vessels are prohibited to pass and anchor in the Marine Reserve. 4. ECO-TOURISM ZONE a) Strict implementation of waste disposal. b) Operators are required to secure permits and licenses. c) Operators must provide safe facilities. d) Sand and gravel quarrying is prohibited. e) Construction of any structures along the beach without the necessary permits / clearances is prohibited. 5. REHABILITATION ZONE (includes Artificial Reefs and mangrove areas) a) Entrance to rehabilitated areas of unauthorized persons is prohibited. b) No dumping of waste. 5. SUSTAINABLE AQUACULTURE ZONE a) Operators are required to secure permits / licenses. b) Prioritize local residents. c) Permits / licenses are non-transferable, use of dummies is disallowed. d) No aquaculture operation is allowed outside the designated areas. e) Aquaculture operations must not adversely affect the livelihood of the people and their access to fishing grounds. f) Strict implementation of waste disposal – proper discharge of effluents. Section 8. Use of the Municipal Waters The municipal waters shall be reserved for municipal fishers. Provided, That other activities such as but not limited to, research and monitoring may be allowed under appropriate regulations, for purely research, scientific, technological and educational purposes. Section 9. Users of the Municipal Waters All fisheries and coastal related activities in the municipal waters, subject to existing laws and regulations shall be utilized by the registered municipal fishers and their organizations and cooperatives duly accredited by the Sangguniang Bayan Provided, That NO COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSEL IS ALLOWED TO OPERATE within the municipal waters. Section 10. Municipal fishers from adjacent municipalities / cities Municipal fishers from adjacent municipalities / cities may be allowed to use the municipal waters. Provided, that only hook and line fishing gears are used. Provided however, that they are registered fishers from their respective municipalities / cities and shall secure the necessary fishery license from the municipal government of Amlan. Provided further, that they shall pay the amount of the prescribed fees for the use of the municipal waters and its coastal resources. Provided furthermore, that the license issued to municipal fishers from adjacent municipalities / cities shall be legal and binding for only one (1) year and may be renewed subject to existing rules and regulations. Provided finally, that municipal fishers from adjacent municipalities / cities shall abide all ordinances and executive orders pertaining to the use and management of municipal waters and its coastal resources. Section 11. Registry of Municipal Fishers, Fishing Vessels, Fishing Gears The Municipal Government, shall maintain a registry of municipal fishers for the purpose of determining priorities among them, of regulating and limiting entry into the municipal waters, and of monitoring fishing activities and/or other related activities: Provided, That such list of registry shall be updated annually or as often as may be necessary, and shall be posted in

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barangay halls or other strategic locations where it shall be open to the public, for the purpose of validating the correctness and completeness of the list: Provided, however, that the Municipal Government in consultation with the MFARMC shall formulate the necessary mechanisms for inclusion or exclusion procedures that shall be most beneficial to the resident municipal fishers. The MFARMC may likewise recommend such mechanisms: Provided, Further, That the municipal government shall also maintain a registry of municipal fishing vessels, type of gears and other boat and fishing particulars. ARTICLE II Utilization and Exploitation of Fishery Resources Section 12. Preferential Treatment to Municipal Fishers and Their Organization in the Grant of Exclusive Fishery Privileges The duly registered and accredited organizations, cooperatives of municipal fishers; peoples’ organizations which have municipal fishers comprising the majority of members shall have preference in the grant of exclusive fishery privilege by the Sangguniang Bayan, pursuant to Section 149 of the Local Government Code of 1991: Provided, That the Sangguniang Bayan shall be guided by the following procedures: a. The Sangguniang Bayan shall post in the municipal hall and in at least two (2) other strategic places a notice to fishers organizations or cooperative to apply for the exclusive fishery privileges. The notice shall also be posted in at least two (2) conspicuous places in every fishing barangay and announced once a week for four (4) consecutive weeks. The same notice shall indicate the amount of the exclusive fishery privilege. b. Interested parties shall have a period of 30 days from the posting of the notice to signify their intention to the Sangguniang Bayan to avail of the exclusive fishery privilege. c. Should two (2) or more groups signify their intent to avail the exclusive the fishery privilege, the Sangguniang Bayan shall accommodate them, if possible. If this should not be possible, the Sangguniang Bayan, in consultation with the MFARMC, shall draw up guidelines to resolve the matter. d. Only when no organization have signified their intent to avail the privilege or the failure of the grant of the exclusive fishery privilege to the organization shall other parties be invited to participate in a public bidding. Provided, however, that interested bidders should have fishery license issued by the municipal government. e. The Sangguniang Bayan through a resolution shall award the exclusive fishery privilege. f. The fishers organizations or cooperatives or the winner in the public bidding for exclusive fishery privilege shall submit/secure the necessary requirements for their operations and management. Section 13. Limitation on the Grant of Exclusive Fishery Privilege The following limitations shall be strictly followed: 1. The exclusive fishery privilege shall be binding and legal for three (3) years . 2. The exclusive fishery privilege shall not be sub-contracted or sub-leased, in whole or in part. 3. The members of fishers organizations or cooperatives, whose households are already in possession of any Exclusive Fishery Privilege, other than for fish capture, cannot enjoy the Exclusive Fishery Privilege granted to the organization or cooperative. Section 14. Grounds for the Cancellation The following are the grounds for the cancellation of the exclusive fishery privilege: 1. Construction and operation of fish corral and/or gathering of bangus fry outside of the designated area in the municipal waters. 2. Violation of any fisheries and environment-related ordinances. 3. Use of dummies; 4. Failure to comply with national laws, rules and regulations; and 5. When the public welfare so requires as deemed by the municipal government, in consultation with the MFARMC Provided, That a voluntary written request to forego the exclusive fishery privilege by the holder is a sufficient ground for the cancellation of the privilege. ARTICLE III Management , Development And Conservation of Coastal and Fishery Resources Section 15. Designation of Closed Season The municipal government may designate closed season in the catching, gathering, capture of possess breeders or spawners of other species based on available data or information, EXCLUDING mother bangus “Sabalo”, which is totally banned. Provided, that catching of other breeders/spawners for local breeding purposes or scientific or research purposes may be allowed only if written permission was obtained from the municipal government Section 16. Limited Entry Into Over fished Areas Whenever in a particular area in the municipal waters is being over fished or in danger of being over fished, based on available data or information, the Sanggunian Bayan, in consultation with the MFARMC, shall enact an ordinance prohibiting or limiting fisheries activities in the said waters. Section 17. Management of Marine Reserves The Municipal Government, in coordination with the Barangays concerned, MFARMC and concerned organizations shall manage the marine reserves with the following geographic coordinates. Tandayag Marine Reserve The Marine Protected Area (MPA) of barangay Tandayag: From a shoreline point with reference number 223 (51P 525880/ UTM 1044676) to another shoreline point with reference number 224 (51P 525746/UTM 1045041) the bearing and distance of which is 341º north-northwest and 390 meters respectively. The offshore points are marked as thus. From reference number 223 to an offshore point with reference number 271 (51P 526105/UTM 1044794) the bearing and distance of which is 63º east-northeast and 250 meters respectively. Then from reference number 272 (51P 525935/UTM 1045162) the bearing and distance of which is 57º east-northeast and 220 meters respectively. The distance between the two offshore points is 410 meters. This zone covers a total area of 9.22 hectares. Bio-os Marine Reserve The Marine Protected Area in barangay Bio-os is an offshore reef, the middle portion of which corresponds to the coordinates 51P 521394/UTM 1048769 the boundaries are described in detail in Municipal ordinance No. 21 series of 1999. Provided, That fishing and other human activities destructive to the marine reserves are prohibited in the marine reserves: Provided, however, That scientific and educational activities shall be allowed inside the marine reserves for monitoring and other related purposes, only if written permission was obtained from the municipal government: Provided, further, That the municipal government, in consultation with the MFARMC and other concerned organizations, (next shall page) formulate management plans in the operation of the marine reserves.


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Section 18. Mangrove Protection and Conservation The municipal government, in coordination with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, the MFARMC and other concerned organizations, shall initiate proper management of mangrove area: Provided, That the municipal government, in coordination with the Office of the MENRO shall develop programs that promote and ensure community participation in the rehabilitation and management of existing mangrove areas. Provided, however, that no conversion of the mangrove areas for other purposes and backfilling is strictly prohibited. Section 19. Artificial Reef The municipal government in coordination with the Municipal Agriculture Office, BFAR, MFARMC shall initiate proper management of Artificial Reefs. The municipal government, in coordination with MAO and MENRO shall develop programs that promote and ensure community participation in the rehabilitation and management of existing Artificial Reefs. Section 20. Regulation on Construction and Operation of Fish Corrals The municipal government, in consultation with the MFARMC, shall regulate the construction and operation of fish corrals in the municipal waters: Provided, That no fish corral shall be established and operated outside of the designated areas for the establishment and operation of fish corral: Provided, however, That no fish corral shall be constructed within two hundred (200) meters of another fish corral: Provided, Further, That the tail of the fish corral shall not be more than 100 meters: Provided, Furthermore, That the mesh size of the net of the fish corral shall not be less than 3 centimeters and shall be entirely lifted during the designated closed season to enable a considerable number of spawner/breeder to reach their spawning grounds: Provided, Finally, That ownership of fish corral is limited to only one per permittee. Section 21. Protection of Other Marine Habitats The municipal government, in coordination with the MFARMC and other concerned organizations, shall ensure the protection, conservation and rehabilitation of other marine habitats but not limited to Artificial Reefs and mangroves in the municipal waters. Provided, That the municipal government, in consultation with the MFARMC, shall regulate the use of fishing gears and other human activities that may adversely affect the marine habitat. Section 22. Coastal and Aquatic Pollution All activities in the grounds or waters, directly or indirectly, which result or likely to result in such deleterious effect which harm living and non-living aquatic resources, hazards to human health, hindrance to coastal or fishery activities such as fishing and navigation, including dumping/disposal of waste and other marine litter shall be prohibited: Provided, That it shall be the responsibility of the polluter to contain, remove and clean-up pollutants at his/her own expense: Provided, however, That in case of failure to do so, the municipal government in coordination with other concerned agencies and institutions, shall undertake containment, removal and cleanup operations and the expenses incurred in said operation shall be charged against the person and/or entities responsible for such pollution. Section 23. Maintenance of Water Quality and Cleanliness The municipal government shall monitor the quality of the municipal water at the optimal level relative to natural productivity and the cleanliness of the areas devoted for aquaculture development. The operators and owners of aquaculture facilities shall develop a mechanism of proper waste disposal. Violation of his section may be a ground for the cancellation of the permit to operate aquaculture activities. Section 24. Use of “Payao” The municipal government shall regulate the use of existing “payao” and other fish aggregating devices in the municipal waters: Provided, That no more payao or any other fish aggregating devices shall be deployed in the municipal waters: Provided, however, That only registered municipal fishers shall utilize the existing payao in the municipal waters. Section 25. Navigational Route The municipal government, in consultation the MFARMC, shall designate the navigational routes of ferries and other fishing crafts and shall disallow any activity that shall obstruct the designated navigational route: Provided, That, nothing in the foregoing section shall be construed as permitting the lease, licensee or permittee to undertake any construction which may obstruct free navigation and impede water circulation such as the flow of tide to and from the sea. ARTICLE IV Aquaculture Development Section 26. Promotion of Aquaculture The municipality shall consider coastal aquaculture as a means to promote diversification of income and preservation of coastal and fisheries resources: Provided, That the municipality shall ensure that resources are used responsibly and adverse impacts on the environment and on local communities are minimized: Provided, however, That coastal aquaculture development shall consider the genetic diversity and ecosystem integrity of the municipal waters: Provided, further, That the municipal government shall ensure that the livelihood of the people and their access to fishing grounds are not adversely affected: Provided, furthermore, That the municipal government shall establish effective procedures to undertake appropriate environment assessment and monitoring with the aim of minimizing adverse ecological changes and related economic and social consequences resulting from water extraction, discharge of effluents, use of chemicals and other aquaculture activities. Section 27. Size and Distance Between Fish Cages The municipal government shall designate an area for the establishment and operation of fish cages in the municipal waters. Provided, however, That no fish cage shall be constructed and operated outside of the designated area, except for scientific and education purposes. The minimum size of fish cages shall be thirty-six (36) square meters per module. Fish cages can be clustered, but the distance between clusters should not be more that twenty (20) meters: Provided, That each cluster should not be more that eight (8) modules. Section 28. Distance from the Shoreline No fish cage shall be constructed within fifty (50) meters from the lowest tidemark: Provided, however, that no fish cage shall also be constructed in front of any wharf. Section 29. Limitation of the Granting of License to Construct and Operate Fish cage The following limitations shall be strictly followed: 1. Ownership is limited to at most two (2) clusters of fish cages per licensee. 2. License to construct and operate a fish cage shall be binding and legal for three (3) years and may be renewed for another three (3) years at the discretion of the municipal government. 3. The fish cage shall not be subleased, in whole or in part. Joint venture operation partnership and/or management

contract on a profit-sharing basis may be allowed only with prior consent from the municipal government. 4. The use of dummies shall be sufficient cause for the disqualification of an applicant from obtaining such permit. Section 30. Grounds for the Rejection of Applications for License to Construct and Operate Fish Cage and/or Cancellation of Existing License. The following are the grounds for rejection and/or cancellation of an application for a permit to construct and operate fish cage: 1. Fraudulent, false and misleading statements in the application; 2. Failure to comply with the provisions of existing national laws and local ordinances; 3. Construction and operation of fish cage outside of the designated area; 4. Abandonment and non-operation of the area for 6 months and/or lack interest of the permittee to continue; 2. Failure to pay the necessary fees and other surcharges relative thereto; 3. Non-construction of fish cage within 6 month from the date of issuance of the permit to construct and operate; and 4. When public welfare so requires as deemed by the municipal government. A voluntary written request to forego of the license is sufficient ground for the cancellation of a permit. Section 31. Registration of Fish Hatcheries and Private Fishponds All fish hatcheries, fish breeding facilities and private fish ponds must be registered with the municipal government which shall prescribe minimum standards for such facilities in consultation with the MFARMC/Municipal Agriculture Office and MENRO. ARTICLE V Fishery License and Permits Section 32. Fishery License All individual fishers, cooperatives, partnerships, firms or corporations who are listed in the Registry of Municipal Fishers shall be issued Fishery License, upon payment of the prescribed fee: Provided, however, That the Fishery License is non-transferable: Provided, further, That the holders agree unconditionally to comply with all the laws, orders, policies and rules and regulations governing fishing. The licensee shall also assume responsibility for any and all of his acts with his fishing operation. Section 33. Renewal of Fishery License and Permit The Fishery License shall be renewed annually. The holder shall have sixty (60) days prior to the expiration of the license to renew. Section 34. Licensing and Permitting Procedures Applicants for Fishery License shall submit the following documents to the Municipal Agriculturist’s Office and Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office: 1. Duly Accomplished Application Form 2. Community Residence Certificate (for individual) or Certificate of Registration or Certificate of Accreditation (for organizations, cooperatives, partnership, firms of corporations) 3. Barangay Clearance 4. Official receipt of payment of License Fee Applicants for fishery permit shall submit the following to the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer: 1. Fishery License 2. Duly accomplished application form 3. Registration papers (for motor boats) 4. Official receipt of payment of permit fee 5. Other documents depending on the permit fee The Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer, in consultation with the MFARMC shall recommend the issuance of the permit to the Municipal Mayor. Section 35. Schedule of License and Permit Fees License to occupy, produce, culture, capture, or gather fish and other fisheries products in the municipal waters maybe granted upon payment of corresponding license fee at not exceeding those fixed hereunder: I. CAPTURED FISHERIES Annual Registration/License/Permit Fee A. Fishermen/Fish workers’ Registration (including I.D.) 25.00 B. Fishing Boats 1. Motorized · 1 gross ton and below 60.00 · over 1 gross ton to less than 3 gross tons 130.00 · 2. Non-motorized 25.00 · C. Fishing GEARS (local names) with a maximum length of 1,000 meters · Padumog/Pamant 50.00 · Palaran 50.00 · Patulay 50.00 · Pamo/Abal-abal 50.00 · Sagiwsiw/Kayakag 50.00 · Palutaw/Kurantay 50.00 · Patara/Pamahala 50.00 · Hook and Line 25.00 · Other kinds of fish nets not prohibited by RA 8550 50.00 * Use of Fine Mesh Nets (RA 8550, Section 89) – It shall be unlawful to engage in fishing using nets with mesh smaller that that which may be fixed by the Department: Provided, That the prohibition on the use of fine mesh net shall not apply to the gathering of fry, glass eels, elvers, tabios, and alamang and such species which by their nature are small but already mature to be identified in the implementing rules and regulations by the Department. B. Fish trap · Deep water Fish coral · a. Binaterol 500.00 · b. Nilayte 800.00 · Shallow water fish coral (Pahubas) 200.00 · Big fish pots (bobo – minata) 50.00 · Small fish pots (bobo – tinagik) 25.00 · II. AQUACULTURE · Oyster Culture 0.10 /sq.m. · Mussel Culture 0.10 /sq.m. · Clam, cookie, other bivalves 0.10 /sq.m. · Seaweed Culture 0.10 /sq.m · Fish Pen 0.10 /sq.m · Fish Cage 1.00 / sq.m. Section 36. Coding of Fishing Boats The municipal government shall designate colors for all fishing boats that will be operated in the municipality: Provided, That the following shall be designated as color code for each of the barangay to identify fishers from other municipalities. Red Tandayag

Green Poblacion Yellow Mag-abo Orange Jugno Blue Bio-os Section 37. Permit to Dock and / or Anchor All sea crafts of more that three (3) registered gross tons shall be allowed to dock and/or anchor in the designated area of the municipal waters and shall pay the following docking and anchoring fees to the Municipal government: 1. For sea craft of 3 GT to 10 GT a. Anchoring P 50.00/ day b. Docking 100.00/ day 2. For sea craft of more than 10 GT a. Anchoring P 75.00/ day b. Docking 150.00/day 3. Unloading their fish caught 10.00 / box / bañera Section 38. Gratuitous Permit The Municipal Government may issue gratuitous permits to municipal fishers to exploit, occupy, produce, culture, or gather fish of any species and other fisheries products in the municipal waters in accordance with Section 149 of the Local Government Code of 1991: Provided, that government agency or institution of learning may also be given gratuitous permit to engage in any fishery activities in the municipal waters for scientific or educational purposes, subject to the terms and conditions as may be imposed. Only registered municipal fishers and their associations/organizations shall be issued a gratuitous permit on the catching of bangus fry upon written request to the Municipal Mayor. Section 39. Report of Transfer of Ownership of Boats and Fishing Gears The owner/operator of registered boats and fishing gears shall notify the Municipal Agriculture Office of the transfer of ownership of the boats and fishing gears within fifteen 15 days after its transfer and submit such transfer to the MENRO. Section 40. Duties of Licensee and Permittee, and Exclusive Fishery Privileges Holders All licensees, permitees, and exclusive fishery privilege holders shall be governed by existing laws, orders, rules and regulations governing coastal and fishery resources and shall: 1. Take precaution as may be necessary to prevent destruction to the coastal and fishery resources and habitat and the municipal waters, and to ensure environmental protection at all times. 2. Assume responsibility for the use of fishing boat and any or all acts of his/her agents. Employees or laborers, including those of contractors connected with his/her agents. Employees or laborers, including those of contractors connected with his/her fishing operations, or in the establishment, management, or operation of the contract or during the fishing expedition, such as transport and or possession of dynamic, cyanide and other poisonous or noxious substances, as well as any fish caught through unlawful means. 3. Keep and submit all records and reports of transaction in connection with the license permit or lease in such format as required by the terms and conditions of the license and as may be required by law. 4. Allow or render assistance to any enforcer for purpose of inspection, searching and examining any person, document, records and places of operations including storage areas, auxiliary boats or goods aboard the boat; 2. Vacate the area covered by the fishery privilege, upon expiration or as directed by authorized municipal officials, unless renewed or cancelled; 3. Clear, remove, destroy or demolish any debris, material, structure or gear, or the vacated area placed or constructed on the site of the fishery privilege upon expiration or cancellation of the privilege. 4. Abide all other related rules and regulations that will be legislated after the enactment of this ordinance. Section 41. Funds for Coastal Resource Management The municipal government shall allocate 50% from all revenues derived from the utilization and exploitation of the municipal waters to coastal resource management activities such as, but not limited, to law enforcement, livelihood program for fishers, research, training and education. Section 42. Share of Barangays on Revenue of the Municipal Government The municipal government shall appropriate ten (10) percent of all fees derived from the utilization and exploitation of the municipal waters to the barangays: Provided, however, That the Municipal Government, within 60 days from the enactment of this code, shall formulate implementing rules and regulations of this section: Provided, however, That such share shall be remitted to the barangays before the end of each quarter. ARTICLE VI Post-harvest Facilities, Activities and Trades Section 43. Establishment of Post-Harvest Facilities The municipal government shall coordinate with the private sector and other concerned agencies and MFARMC in the establishment of post-harvest facilities such as, but not limited to, municipal fish landing sites, fish ports, ice plants and cold storage and other fish- processing establishment to serve primarily the needs of the municipal fishers. Section 44. Municipal Fish Port Construction and Development and Designation of Landing Areas in the Five (5) Coastal Barangays Municipal fish port development should be sited and designated in a manner that will minimize changes to existing water and sediment quality parameters such as salinity and temperature, dissolved oxygen, nitrogen and sediment concentration, organic constituents, and transparency of waters. Provided, that municipal fish ports and harbors should be placed in areas with the highest available flushing rate, and access channels should be designed to minimize adverse water circulation changes and creation of stagnant water column: Provided, however, That municipal fish ports and harbors should incorporate facilities which allow for effective waste disposal and erosion control. Section 45. Exportation and Importation of Fish and Fishery and Fishery Products Export of fish and fishery products shall be regulated whenever such exportation affects the food security and production. Provided, That exportation of live fish shall be prohibited except those which are hatched or propagated in accredited hatcheries and ponds. Provided, however, that to protect and maintain the local biodiversity or ensure the sufficiency of supply, spawners, breeders, eggs and fry of bangus, prawn and other endemic species, as maybe determined by the Department, shall not be exported or caused to be exported by any person. Provided, further; that no person shall import fish and fish products of whatever size, stage or form, for any purpose without securing the necessary permit. Section 46. Auxiliary Invoice (next page) All fish and fishery products, except those caught in violation of the provisions of this ordinance or are declared as health hazards by concerned institutions, must have an auxiliary


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Support to Municipal Fishers The municipal government, in coordination with other agencies and institutions concerned, shall provide support to municipal fishers and their organizations through appropriate technology and research, credit, production and marketing assistance and other services such as, nut not limited to, training for additional or supplementary livelihood. ARTICLE VII Fishery and Aquatic Resource Management Council (FARMC) Section 48. Creation of Municipal FARMC Pursuant to Section 69 of the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998, Municipal FARMC shall be established in this municipality. The municipal government shall provide assistance to the Municipal FARMC and allocate funds for its operations/activities. Section 49. Composition of Municipal FARMC The regular members of the MFARMC shall be composed of the following: a. Municipal Planning and Development Officer b. Chairperson of the Sangguniang Bayan Committee on Agriculture/Fisheries c. Representative of the Municipal Development Council d. Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer e. Representative from accredited non-governmental organizations f. Representative from the private sector g. Representative from the Department of Agriculture; and h. At least eleven (11) fishers representative [seven (7) municipal fishers, one (1) fishworker and three (3) commercial fishers] in each municipality which include representative from youth and women sector. The MFARMC shall adopt rules and regulations necessary to govern its proceedings and election. Section 50. Powers and Functions of the Municipal FARMC The Municipal FARMC shall have the following powers and functions: 1. To assist the municipal government in the implementation of programs and projects on coastal and fishery resources management. 2. To assist the municipal government in the monitoring and evaluation of coastal and fishery resources management programs; 3. To advise the municipal government in the arbitration of disputes over fishery rights and sharing contracts. 4. To assist the municipal government in the conduct of public hearings and community consultations, in aid of the formulation of plans, policies and proposed ordinances and regulations; 5. To coordinate with law enforcement agencies in the enforcement of fishery and environmental laws, ordinances, rules and regulations; 6. To assist the municipal government in the promotion of comprehensive rehabilitation and conservation of municipal fishing grounds and coastal and fishery resources; 7. To assist the municipal government in the promotion of anciliary economic activities, including cooperative marketing and socio-economic services; 8. To maintain an updated registry of municipal fishers, and 9. To perform such other functions the Municipal Mayor, the Municipal Development Council and the Sangguniang Bayan may delegate, as provided by ordinance or resolution. ARTICLE VIII Prohibitions and Penalties Section 51. Compliance with National Laws All relevant national laws, orders, rules and regulations shall be implemented in this municipality. All violations, penalties and prosecutions pertaining thereto shall be based upon the penal provisions of R.A. 8550, otherwise known as the Philippines Fishery Code of 1998. Section 52. Other Prohibitions The following fishery activities are prohibited under this ordinance. The prosecution of these violations of R.A. 8550 otherwise known as the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998, except when: 1. Engaging in authorized fish capture or aquaculture activities: No person shall exploit, occupy, produce, breed, culture, capture or gather fish, fry or fingerlings of any fishery species or fishery products, or engage in any fishery activity in the municipal waters of Amlan without a license, lease or permit. 2. Fishing through explosives, noxious or poisonous substances, electricity, using a spear or any other fishing gear with the aid of an air compressor or using a spear or any other fishing gear with the aid of a SCUBA diving gear. It shall be unlawful for any person to catch, take or gather or cause to be caught, taken or gathered fish or any fishery species in the municipal waters with the sue of explosives, electricity, noxious or poisonous substances such as sodium cyanide, using a spear or any other fishing gear with the aid of an air compressor or using a spear or any other fishing gear, which will kill, stupefy, disable or render unconscious fish or other fishery species. Using a spear or any other fishing gear with the aid of a compressor or a SCUBA diving gear to engage in fishing for PROFIT in the municipal waters is punishable by a fine of two thousand (P2,000.00) pesos or imprisonment ranging from six (6) months to one (1) year or both upon the discretion of the court. Leisure and/or sports fishermen shall be allowed to engage in spearfishing with the use of SCUBA in the designated area of the municipal waters after issuance of a Mayor’s Permit. Provided, that only a maximum of five (5) divers per day with a maximum of 5 kilos of fish caught per diver. The issuance of the Mayor’s Permit shall be per dive and only two (2) dives per month whether it is a repetition or new divers except for research purposes. ARTICLE IX Creation of Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office (MENRO)

Republic of the Philippines Province of Oriental Negros Municipality of Amlan OFFICE OF THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN Telephone No. (035)4170112 EXCERPT FROM THE MINUTES OF THE REGULAR SESSION OF THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN OF AMLAN, PROVINCE OF NEGROS ORIENTAL, HELD AT THE MUNICIPAL SESSION HALL ON JULY 9, 2008. Present: Hon. Carmen G. Tan ficer) Hon. Consuelo P. dela Cruz Hon. Jonathan R. Kitane Member Hon. Jose G. Bocanegra Member Hon. Ana Linda E. Esparcia Hon. Marichu B. Hinaut Hon. Melvyn Y. Reynado

- Municipal ViceMayor (Presiding Of- SB Member - SB Member - SB Member -

SB SB

SB

and provisions adequate facilities relative to environment and natural resources, particularly on coastal resources management and fishery services. 2. Develop plans and strategies upon the approval thereof by the municipal mayor and the Sangguniang Bayan, as the case maybe, implement the same, particularly those which have to do with coastal resources management and fisheries programs and projects which the municipal mayor is empowered to implement and which the Sangguniang Bayan is empowered to provide. 3. Ensure the maximum assistance and access to resources in the sustainable management and use of the environment and natural resources, particularly on coastal and fishery resources. 4. Enforce rules and regulations relating to environment and natural resources, particularly on coastal resources and fishery management. 5. Coordinate with government agencies and non-governmental organizations, which promote sustainable management of the environment and natural resources, particularly on coastal and fisheries resources. 6. Be in the frontline of the delivery of basic services, particularly those needed for the survival of the inhabitants during and in the aftermath of man-made and natural disasters and calamities. Section 55. Deputization of Barangay Treasurers The Barangay Treasurers of the five (5) coastal barangays maybe deputized to collect fees related to the exploitation and use of the municipality waters: Provided, however: That the Barangay Treasurers are properly bonded and the auditing and accounting procedures and regulations are strictly followed. ARTICLE X General Provisions Section. 56. Person and Deputies Authorized to Enforce this Ordinance The Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer, Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator, Municipal Agriculturist, Municipal Treasurer, Philippine National Police, Municipal CRMO, Municipal FARMC, Bantay Dagat and Barangay Officials shall take lead in the implementation if this ordinance: Provided, That the municipal government, in coordination with the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, shall deputize other law enforcement groups to enforce this Code. Section 57. Mandatory Review The Sangguniang Bayan shall undertake then mandatory review of this ordinance at least once every 3 years and as often as it may deemed necessary, to ensure that coastal and fisheries policies and guidelines remain responsive to the changing circumstances. ARTICLE XI Transitory Provisions Section 58. Ad Interim appointment of Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer Pending for the permanent appointment of the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer by the municipal government, as provided for in this Ordinance, the Municipal Mayor, subject to Civil Service rules and regulations, shall designate an Ad Interim Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer to assist the Municipality in the implementation of this Ordinance. Section 59. Conduct of Registration of Resources Users Within 60 days from the effectivity of this ordinance, the Municipal government shall conduct a registration of all resource users, as provided for in this ordinance. ARTICLE XII Final Provisions Section 60. Appropriation The sum necessary to effectively carry out the provisions of this ordinance during the first year of its implementation shall be allocated from the budget of the Municipal Coastal Resource Management Program under the MENRO. The budget for the subsequent years which shall not be less than the amount of the prior year’s appropriation shall be submitted by the MENRO to be included in the Annual Municipal Budget Ordinance. Section 61. Repealing Clause All previous ordinance, executive orders, rules and regulations or parts thereof which are inconsistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed and modified accordingly. Section 62. Separability Clause This ordinance shall take effect ten (10) days after a copy thereof is posted in a bulletin board at the entrance of the Municipal Hall and in at least two (2) other conspicuous places of the municipal building and the ordinance has been published once in a local newspaper of general circulation in the municipality. Approved. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Section 53. Creation of Municipal Environment and Natural I hereby certify to the correctness of the foregoing /OrdiResources Office (MENRO) nance No. 03, series of 2007 of the Sangguniang Bayan of Amlan, There is hereby created a Municipal Environment and Natu- this province. ral Resources Office (MENRO), solely for the purpose of attending to the needs of the environment and natural resources, (Sgd.) ADELYN Y. RACAL particularly the coastal and fishery resources of the municipalSecretary to the Sanggunian ity. The MENRO shall be headed by the Municipal Environment Attested: and Natural Resources Officer. (Sgd.) CARMEN G. TAN Section 54. Functions, Duties and Powers of the MENRO Presiding Officer The MENRO shall have the following functions, duties and APPROVED: responsibilities: (Sgd.) BENTHAM P. DELA CRUZ 1. Formulate measures for the approval of the municipal Municipal Mayor mayor and the Sangguniang Bayan, as the case may be, in car- Negros Chronicle rying out measures to ensure the delivery of basic services August 17, 2008

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Member Hon. Jose R. Rendal - SB Member. Hon. Emelyn B. Rosales SB Member – Liga ng mga Barangay Absent: Hon. Edmund R. Tubac - SB Member Hon. Paul Louis T. dela Cruz - SB Member - SK Federation President ORDINANCE NO. 07 AN ORDINANCE ENACTING THE REVISED INTEGRATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM OF 2008 OF THE MUNICIPALITY OF AMLAN PROVINCE OF NEGROS ORIENTAL. Be it ordained by the Sangguniang Bayan of Amlan, Province of Negros Oriental, in session duly assembled that: ARTICLE 1 Section 1. – The Revised Integrated Solid Waste Management Program of the Municipality of Amlan is hereby enacted. Section 2. – Title. This Ordinance shall be known as the Revised Integrated Solid Waste Management Ordinance of the Municipality of Amlan and hereinafter referred to as “Ordinance” ARTICLE 2 Coverage Section 3. – This ordinance shall apply to all individuals, households, commercial/recreational establishments (sarisari stores, bakeries, eateries, groceries, stall, public markets, hardware stores, cinema/video houses, shops, resorts/ hotels, department stores, appliance centers, billiard halls, etc.); institution (schools, clinics, banks, hospitals, churches, chapels, funeral parlors, public/private offices); industrial establishments (factories, piggeries, rice/corn mills, warehouses, slaughterhouses, poultry, etc.); transportation facilities (wharf, terminals, buses, jeepneys, cargo, trucks, tricycles/trisikads, taxis, rent-a-cars, ships, boats); parks; open spaces; thoroughfares; and agricultural areas. Section 4. PURPOSE. This ordinance is enacted for the following purposes: General: a. To guide, control and regulate the generation and storage at source, collection, transport, processing and disposal of solid waste within the jurisdiction of the Municipality of Amlan and promote a systematic and sustainable management of solid wastes; b. To update and upgrade the solid waste management program of the municipality to include other components in the 10-year ISWM Plan. c. To enhance the protection and rehabilitation of the ecosystem through the necessary control and mitigation of negative environmental impacts caused by indiscriminate disposal of solid wastes. Specific: a. To minimize the generation of solid wastes and maximize resource recovery/recycling and utilization of the same; · encouraging reduction of consumption and waste generation and maximization in the use of resources; · encouraging resource recovery and recycling of solid wastes at source through composting of biodegradable wastes and other technologies. · encouraging waste segregation at source and recovery of the factory returnable; · providing the assistance and support in redemption and recycling of solid waste a. To implement a systematic management of solid wastes Section 5. GOAL – The primary goal of this ordinance is to have a garbage-free environment in the Municipality through an integrated people-oriented and sustainable waste management program. Section 6. OBJECTIVES – The objective of this ordinance are the following: a. To attain a complete garbage-free society through a proper and systematic management of solid waste; b. To instill in the populace social responsibility and people’s participation in local governance in the aspect of waste management; c. To emphasize the principle of responsibility for the generator of the solid wastes; d. To totally prohibit open garbage dumping which results in the proliferation of disease-causing organisms; foul odors; emission of greenhouse gases which causes global warming and ozone layer depletion; pollution of soil, air and water bodies, and an unhealthy, unpleasant environment; e. To eradicate unsightly, uncovered, overflowing trash receptacles in public places, streets, thoroughfares, and open spaces; f. To eradicate dumping of solid wastes in rivers, shorelines, canals, vacant lots, open spaces, and other bodies of water; g. To eradicate indiscriminate burning of solid wastes that causes the emission of harmful gases and pollution; h. To maximize sanitary resource recovery and turn trash into cash. ARTICLE 4 Definition of Terms Section 7. – The terms used in this Ordinance shall be defined as the following: 1. Biodegradable – organic material that can be reduced to simpler compounds. These are the food wastes, garden/ agricultural wastes, human wastes and animal wastes. 2. Compost – decayed organic material for use as soil conditioner or fertilizer. 3. Composting – biological process in which organic matter is broken down into simpler compounds by the action of micro-organisms (i.e. trichoderma) 4. Factory returnable – non-biodegradable wastes like bottles, tin cans, paper, hard plastics, which can be sold or given away to collectors or craft makers. 5. Factories/Plants – establishments for manufacturing or production. 6. Hazardous/Toxic waste – special types of waste containing biological chemical, or radiological elements which are harmful to human health like: X-ray films, fluorescent lamps, batteries, pesticides, hospital wastes, sanitary napkins, adult/ infant diapers, used syringes/needles, pads, which need a special form of disposal. 7. Non-biodegradable waste – materials that cannot be reduced simpler compounds like plastics, tin cans, soft plastics, cardboard, dry processed fibers, tires, styrofoam, etc. 8. Recycling – use of recovered materials in a form of similar to its original use i.e. recycled paper 9. Resorts/Recreational centers – frequently visited places, which provide recreation and entertainment. 10. Residual Wastes – shall refer to wastes that can no longer be used or recycled and must, thus, be disposed properly. 11. Resource recovery – recovery of materials and energy from the waste stream. 12. Segregation at source – separation of solid wastes into biodegradable, non-biodegradable, and toxic/hazardous (next page) wastes at the point of generation or at the place where the solid waste is produced.


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13. Sanitary receptacles – covered and leak-proof containers (sack, plastic bags, cans) where wastes are stored prior to collection. 14. Solid waste management – systematic control of the generation, storage, collection, transport, processing, and disposal of solid waste in accordance with the best principles of public health, economics, engineering, conservation, aesthetic, and other environmental conditions. 15. Special Wastes – shall refer to household hazardous wastes such as paints, thinners, household batteries, leadacid, spray canisters and the like, including bulky wastes and consumer electronics from residential and commercial sources. 16. Transfer station – place where waste from small collection vehicles are transferred to a larger truck for transport to segregation/dump site. ARTICLE 5 Engineering Component SECTION 8. WASTE GENERATION, SEGREGATION AND STORAGE. 8.1.1 The Municipal Environment and Natural Resource Office (MENRO), the Municipal Solid Waste Management Board and the Barangays Solid Waste Management Committees must coordinate closely in promoting active people participation in proper solid waste management. 8.1.2 Generators or producers of solid wastes shall be encouraged to minimize/reduce consumption and thereby minimize/reduce generation of solid waste; 8.2 Solid waste generated is primarily the responsibility of the generator/producer, therefore it is imperative that the waste segregation at source is the responsibility of the generator, wastes shall be segregated as follows: a. Biodegradable Wastes b. Recyclable Wastes c. Residual Wastes d. Special Wastes 8.3 Residents shall provide four-container receptacle for segregated waste and must be coded with corresponding colored tags namely green for biodegradable, blue for recyclable, red for residual using empty cement bags and black plastic garbage marked with cross bone/skull sticker for special waste. 8.4 Color coded receptacles or the four-container receptacle system prescribed by MENRO shall be provided by the municipality in public areas such as parks, playground, public market, government offices and other designated areas. 8.5 Commercial and food establishments shall provide their own storage receptacles based on the prescribed fourcontainer receptacle system of the MENRO. 8.6 Segregated wastes (biodegradable, recyclable, residual and special waste) shall be stored in sanitary receptacles prior to collection inside the premises of the households, commercial/recreational establishments, institution, industrial establishments, transportation facilities. 8.7 Segregated wastes shall only be taken out for collection upon arrival of garbage truck in the vicinity. 8.8 Garbage Collector shall inspect if the waste is properly segregated during scheduled collection. 8.9 Unsegregated and improperly labeled/coded wastes shall not be collected. 8.10 Toxic/hazardous wastes from industrial establishments and funeral parlors which are highly hazardous to human health and the environment shall be the responsibility of the generator/producer. Such toxic/hazardous wastes must be stored in leakproof storage tanks and a dumping pit for final disposal of such wastes, lined with concrete and properly sealed must be constructed within the property of the industrial establishment/ funeral parlor. Permit from the Municipal Engineer and PENRO must first be secured before the installation of the dumping pit for toxic/hazardous wastes; 8.11 Households, commercial/recreational establishments, institutions, industrial establishments shall be responsible in keeping public areas/thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks and front or in the vicinity of their buildings, clean and free from solid waste at all times; 8.12 Trees, shrubs and weeds within the vicinity of the households, commercial/recreational establishments, industrial establishments, and institution shall be regularly maintained and cared for to minimize generated waste and unpleasant sight; 8.13 Transportation facilities (jeepneys, tricycles, trisikad, taxis, boats) operating within the Municipality shall provide two (2) color coded receptacles (one for biodegradable and another for non-biodegradable) in their vehicles and should be responsible for its storage prior to collection. 8.14 Littering or scattering/dumping of solid waste in streets, sidewalks, highways, canals, bodies of water, and other public places shall be strictly prohibited; 8.15 Burning of garden/agricultural waste must be minimized (only for occasional fumigation of pest/insects) however, burning of non-biodegradable waste especially tires/ rubber shall be strictly prohibited. SECTION 9. COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT 9.1 The following waste collection policies shall be adopted in the Municipality: a. Only segregated waste shall be collected during the established schedules for each type of waste. b. During collection, each type of waste shall be placed in the prescribed containers and properly coded and labeled. Unsegregated and improperly labeled wastes shall not be collected. A due notice shall be issued to the generator for the above violation. c. Only the correct type of garbage should be taken out of the premises of the generator and collected by the collector at a specific schedule of collection. d. A regular schedule of separate collection shall be determined and established by MENRO. It shall be announced and posted in conspicuous places. It shall be strictly observed and followed. Following is the minimum schedule to be established. Biodegradable - two days in a week Recyclable - one day in a week Residual - one day in a week (Morning) Special - one day in a week (Afternoon) a. Residual and special wastes maybe collected at the same time depending on the volume, quantity of the waste, provided a division or barrier separating the two types of waste is properly installed on the garbage truck. b. Barangays shall establish its own schedule of collection. This schedule shall be likewise announced and posted in conspicuous places in the barangay. 9.2 The following shall be the duties and responsibilities of the MENRO in the collection and transport: a. Establish a regular schedule for separate collection of each type of segregated solid waste. b. Responsible in collecting biodegradable and recyclable wastes from open spaces and public places. c. Responsible in collecting residual and special waste from households and commercial establishments. d. Responsible in collecting residual waste from barangay MRFs and composting facilities after sorting and

processing. e. Transport of biodegradable waste to the designated Municipal Composting Facility. Where space becomes limited and unavailable for processing of additional biodegradables at the Municipal Composting Facility, the MENRO shall transport collected biodegradables to the barangay composting facility. f. Transport of recyclables to the designated Municipal or Barangay Material Recovery Facility. g. Transport of residual and special waste to the designated Municipal Transfer Station and THW Vault. Utilize bells, chimes or public address system for the garbage truck to signal its arrivalin a specific area. 9.3 The MENRO may collect bulk biodegradable waste from the generator and transport the same to the municipal composting facility for a fee. The generator shall inform the MENRO of the volume of waste and the location. He shall pay the corresponding fee at the Treasurer’s Office before MENRO shall schedule the pickup of this waste. 9.4 The following shall be the duties and responsibilities of the Barangays in the collection and transport of wastes: a. Barangays shall collect biodegradable and recyclable waste from households and commercial establishments in their area of responsibility and transport the same to the barangay designated and established processing areas. The barangay shall designate Purok Coordinators who shall take charge in the collection and redemption of recyclables. a. The barangay shall provide its own waste transport facility. Section 10. WASTE PROCESSING AND RESOURCE RECOVERY. Waste processing and resource recovery must be undertaken in the following manner: 10.1 The Municipal Agriculture Office shall be mainly responsible for the Municipal composting program. It shall operate and maintain the central composting facility to be established by the municipality in a designated site. 10.2 It shall provide trainings, establish pilot and model composting facilities, and control the quality of compost that will be produced. It shall supervise all composting facilities established by the barangays. 10.3 Barangays shall designate and establish an area for composing within the barangay. A barangay that is spatially located may cluster with other barangays where areas are limited and unavailable. 10.4 Barangays may undertake composting of biodegradables from households, commercial and food establishments when these generators cannot compost their own biodegradable waste due to lack of space in their respective area. 10.5 Household, institutions and commercial/recreational establishments, institutions and other entities shall undertake composting on site. Composting technology and supervision shall be provided by the MAO through its extension workers. 10.6 Farmer associations or any interested organizations may undertake composting of collected biodegradable solid wastes under the supervision of the Municipal Agriculture Office and to be undertaken in duly approved composting sites; 10.7 A material recovery center/redemption center shall be set up in each Purok at the designated area and to be managed by Purok/Barangay officials and members. 10.8 Waste processing technologies will be introduce to facilitate optimum resource recovery and processing; 10.9 Waste processing technology research and application will be promoted through contests and other incentives; 10.10 Trading and selling of recyclables recovered at the purok and barangay levels shall be undertaken by the Barangay. Trading and marketing of recyclables recovered at the municipal MRF shall be undertaken by MENRO. Trading and marketing of compost and other compost products processed at the municipal composting facility shall be undertaken by the MAO. Section 11. DISPOSAL OF WASTE Disposal of waste should be governed by the following: 11.1 Transfer stations or Residual Containment Area (RCA) shall be established by the municipality for storage of residual wastes. This shall be engineered to assure safety and sanitation until final disposal of these wastes to a designated final disposal site. 11.2 Residual wastes collected from households, commercial/recreational establishments, open spaces and public areas shall be deposited at the Transfer Station, properly contained and secured. 11.3 Where space is available and appropriate, biodegradable waste shall be composted at household/purok/barangay level to minimize collection cost and initiate counterparting between the LGU and private sector. 11.4 Animal waste from piggeries shall be segregated (solid/ liquid) and shall be disposed of in septic tanks or covered pits. No waste, whether solid or liquid shall be disposed of in septic tanks or covered pits. No waste, whether solid or liquid shall be disposed into any body of water. 11.5 Chicken dung, cow and carabao manure shall be dried and stored in covered receptacles before being brought outside the premises for collection. 11.6 Garbage Truck must be cleaned after performing their duties of the day before returning to parking area. Section 12. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT FEES. Solid waste management fees shall be collected from the following generators. 12.1 The following are the schedule of fees; Food Establishments Php 10.00 per day General Stores Php 5.00 per day Public Market Stalls Php 5.00 per day Recreation Center Php 5.00 per day Residential Php 0.86 per day Bulk Biodegradable Waste Generator Php 50.00 per trip 12.2 Residential or household generators shall pay on a monthly basis their SWM Fees to the Barangay Treasurer. A 20% of the collected fees shall be retained by the Barangay for its SWM program and operations. 12.3 General Stores, Public Market Stalls and Commercial shall pay annually their SWM Fees during renewal or application of business and Mayor’s permit. 12.4 Special fee of Php50.00/trip shall be imposed on residential sources for collection of biodegradable bulk waste. ARTICLE 6 Education Component Section 13. INFORMATION, EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION (IEC) 13.1 Massive IEC on the Ecological Solid Waste Management Program (ESWM) and all National Laws, Municipal Ordinances/Resolutions related to ESWM will be undertaken in the whole municipality. 13.2 Creation of Information, Education, Communication (IEC) team that shall conduct the IEC activities. This shall include the members of the Technical Working Group (TWG), especially the Municipal Health Officer, Multi-sectoral group and the Barangay IEC counterpart. IEC activities shall include the following: 13.2.1 Comprehensive and intensive IEC campaign which shall be undertaken for a period of at least six (6) months during the first year of the implementation.

13.2.2 Succeeding campaigns shall be in shorter periods for at least two (2) months per year. 13.2.3 Conduct of IEC team orientation/training. 13.3 Standard presentation materials on various aspects of SWM shall be produced to be use during IEC lectures. 13.4 IEC team shall be exposed to best practices on SWM as part of its strengthening. 13.5 IEC team shall coalesce with other sectors of the society such as the civic organizations (e.g., Little Health Brigade, Barangay Health Workers Federation, Vendors Association, Senior Citizens, Bantay Dagat), religious groups (e.g., Couples and Single for Christ, Catholic Women’s League, Social Action Center of the Diocese) and the media (e.g., newspaper, TV, radio). 13.6 IEC team shall organize regular seminars, dialogues, meetings with key sectors and make use of public gatherings to make important announcements. 13.7 School-based activities shall be organized such as the following: 13.7.1 School-wide promotion of recycling involving all schools in Amlan. 13.7.2 Contest targeting students for the development of posters, slogans and jingles. 13.8 Community-based clean-up and beautification activities shall be implemented. Civic organizations may sponsor areas to be cleaned and beautified. 13.9 Information and dissemination of National Laws, Municipal Ordinances/Resolutions related to Solid Waste Management shall be regularly undertaken. 13.10 Posters and signboards shall be placed in all conspicuous public places transportation facilities, commercial/ recreational establishments, and institutions. 13.11 Flyers, brochures, updates on Solid Waste Management shall be regularly distributed to households and other waste generators/producers. 13.12 Information campaign shall be conducted before fines and penalty are imposed. It shall be conducted for a duration of one (1) month. 13.13 Seminars and Trainings shall be conducted for various stakeholders: 13.13.1 In-service trainings for teacher trainors on Solid Waste Management shall be undertaken in cooperation with DepEd, TESDA, DOST, and other government agencies. 13.13.2 On the job training and workshops shall be conducted for community advocates/trainors to enhance their knowledge and skills on ESWM, popular Education, community organizing and related topics. 13.13.3 On the job training and seminars for ESWM personnel and community implementers. 13.14 Trainings and seminars on resource recovery, recycling technologies, waste management technologies and other related technologies shall be conducted in coordination with TESDA, DOST, DENR, other government agencies and NGOs. Section 14. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM ON ECOOGICAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT (ESWM) 14.1b A Management Information System shall be set up for the Ecological Solid Waste Management. This system shall cover the following activities: a. Documentation of all activities and information related to ESWM. b. Establish Benchmark data of Solid Waste in the municipality. c. Establish an ESWM Action/Research Desk under the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office. Personnel will be the organic personnel of the municipality. ARTICLE 7 Organizational Structure Section 15. THE BARANGAY SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 15.1 The Barangay Solid Waste Management Committee (BSWMC) will be the barangay’s counterpart and will mirror organizationally and assist in the different SWM initiatives of the municipality. The following are the different committees of the Barangay SWM with corresponding duties and responsibilities: 15.1.1 Executive Committee – review and recommend the over-all policy direction of the SWM program establish effective and efficient program monitoring system. 15.1.2 Engineering Committee – review and recommend all technical aspects and facilities of the Integrated Solid Waste Management Program. 15.1.3 Education Committee – review and recommend education, information and communication aspect of the program. 15.1.4 Enforcement Committee – ensure strict enforcement of all provisions of this ordinance and all related ordinances, national laws and issuance. 15.1.5 Equity Investment Committee – ensure sharing of every LGU level and private sector in the various aspects of Solid Waste Management activities. Oversee the MESWM Trust Fund. 15.2 The Barangay Solid Waste Management Committee (BSWMC) shall be the overseer on the implementation of the SWM Plan at the barangay level. It shall formulate policies and guidelines and recommend the same to the barangay officials for appropriate action in order to make the SWM Plan more sustainable, effective and efficient. 15.3 The Barangay Solid Waste Management Committee (BSWMC) shall also submit periodic report to the MSWMB regarding the implementation of the SWM Plan at their respective jurisdiction. Section 16. THE MUNICIPAL ECOLOGICAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT BOARD (MSWMB) 16.1 The Municipal Solid Waste Management Board shall be created pursuant to the provisions of Republic Act 9003. The composition of the Municipal Solid Waste Management Board (MSWMB) shall be in accordance with that prescribed by Section 12 of Republic Act 9003. The MSWMB shall be composed of: a. Municipal Mayor – as head of MSWMB b. SB Representative – Chairman of the Committee on Environment c. President – Association of Barangay Councils in the municipality d. Chairman – Sangguniang Kabataan Federation. e. NGO Representative – whose principal purpose is to promote recycling and the protection of air and water quality; f. A representative from the recycling industry. g. A representative from the manufacturing or packaging industry; and h. A representative of each concerned government agency processing relevant technical and marketing expertise as may be determined by the Board. 16.2 The MSWMB shall have the following powers, duties and functions: a. Serve a advisory body to the Sangguniang Bayan in aid of legislation on all matters related to Integrated Solid Waste Management; b. Undertake continuing advocacy on Ecological Solid Waste Management and environmental rehabilitation and

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Ensure a systematic, sustainable and people oriented planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the Integrated Solid Waste Management Program. c. As deputized individuals, they shall have police powers in relation to the full enforcement of this ordinance and all ordinances, national laws and issuance related to Solid Waste Management; d. Raise funds in pursuit of the objectives of the ISWM program and to administer and disburse of the same in accordance with government rules and regulations. ISWM funds shall be placed in a trust fund; e. Ensure transparency and full accountability in all financial transactions and activities of the ISWM program; f. Exercise such other powers and performs such other functions as may be necessary and proper to carry out the objectives of the Board. Section 17. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SECTION 17.1 There is hereby created a Solid Waste Management Section under the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office, solely for the purpose of attending the needs of the environment and natural resources particularly on Solid Waste Management. 17.2 The Municipal Solid Waste Management Section shall be headed by the Municipal Solid Waste Management Coordinator under the direct supervision of the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Officer.. 17.3 The Municipal Solid Waste Management Coordinator shall have the following functions, duties and responsibilities: a. Assist the municipal government in the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programs and projects under the municipality’s Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan. b. Coordinate with the Municipal Solid Waste Management Board (MSWMB) in the conduct of public hearing and community consultations in aid of formulation of Solid Waste Management – related plans, policies, ordinances and regulations. c. Coordinate with the MSWMB in the conduct of Information Education Campaigns (IEC), Seminar workshops, leadership trainings and other Solid Waste Management related activities. d. Coordinate with law enforcement agencies in the enforcement of environmental laws, ordinances, rules and regulations. e. Coordinate with NGOs, NGAs and peoples organizations that promote sustainable management of the environment and natural resources, particularly on Solid Waste Management. ARTICLE 8 Enforcement System Section 18. THE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEM The enforcement of SWM, ordinances shall be undertaken by government law enforcement personnel, i.e., Philippine National Police (PNP)-PEDO and deputized SWM enforcers. The Enforcement Team shall ensure strict and massive implementation of the municipality’s SWM Program and all related ordinances/resolutions. The deputized SWM Enforcers shall be composed of three groups, namely: a. regular enforcers b. auxiliary enforcers c. volunteer enforcers 18.1 The regular enforcers shall be composed of the members of the Municipal Ecological Solid Waste Management Board and the SWM enforcement personnel of the MENRO. 18.2 Among the functions to be performed by the regular enforcers shall be the following: a. Coordinate the actions and activities of the auxiliary enforcers and deputized volunteers. b. Apprehend violators of SWM Ordinances and issue citation tickets. c. Prepare and submit monthly reports to the Enforcement Committee of the MESWMB. d. Perform other related functions as may be required by the Enforcement Committee from time to time. 18.3 The auxiliary enforcers shall be composed of Barangay Officials and Barangay Tanod/Bantay Dagat. They will be tasked to enforce specific SWM regulations in their areas of jurisdiction. The functions to be performed by the auxiliary enforcers are the following: a. Apprehend violators of SWM ordinances within their areas of jurisdiction and issue citation tickets. The Head of the MENR Office shall prescribe the specific SWM Ordinances and/ or regulations of the municipality that may be enforced by the auxiliary enforcers. b. Immediately return the copies of issued citation tickets to the nearest regular enforcer. c. Prepare and submit monthly reports to the Enforcement Committee of the MESWMB 18.4 The volunteer enforcers shall be formed to supplement the regular and auxiliary enforcers. Volunteers may be members of civil society organizations (NGOs, youth groups, etc.), purok officials, and other concerned citizens. This could very well be the Bantay Kinaiyahan or Bantay Dagat. The “Bantay Kinaiyahan” will be composed of but not limited to tanods, BHWs, BNS, street sweepers, utility personnel, purok officers, and community volunteers. 18.5 The Head of the MENR Office shall prescribe the requirements of qualifications needed for volunteers and the criteria for selection. This will then be approved by the MSWMB Enforcement Committee. 18.6 The Enforcers shall have the following minimum qualifications: · Must be able to write and speak in English · Of good moral character with available character references · College level (at least 72 units in college) · Must be 18 years old and above 18.7 The functions of deputized volunteers are as follows: a. Apprehend violators of SWM ordinances and issue citation tickets. The Head of the MENR Office shall prescribe the specific SWM Ordinances and/or regulations of the municipality that may be enforced by the deputized volunteers. b. Immediately return the copies of issued citation tickets to the nearest Regular Enforcer. c. Prepare and submit weekly reports to the Enforcement Section Head of the SWM Office. 18.8 To initiate the process of recruitment, the Head of the MENR Office will hold an LGU – wide information dissemination and orientation regarding the need for volunteers, their roles and responsibilities, and the criteria for selection. The Head of the MENR Office will then evaluate and screen the applicants. The results of the screening will be published or

posted in strategic places. Section 19. TRAINING AND DEPUTATION 19.1 The process of deputation will start with the training of regular enforcers, auxiliary enforcers and the selected volunteers. The Head of the MENR Office shall organize the training/s to be conducted and may seek the assistance or engage the services of qualified persons or organizations in developing the training module/s, training materials and evaluation criteria as well as in conducting the actual training/s. The training/s shall, at the minimum, cover the following topics: a. Key Components of the 10-Year ISWM Plan b. ISWM Ordinances c. Roles and functions of enforcers d. Procedure for apprehension and issuance of citation tickets e. Reporting requirements 19.2 For the volunteers, they will be evaluated after the training and those who pass shall go through a probationary period of one (1) month as temporary enforcers. After the probationary period, they shall again be evaluated and those who pass shall be deputized by the Municipal Mayor. The deputation shall be effective for a period of one (1) year, after which, the deputized volunteers shall again be evaluated to determine their fitness to serve as such. 19.3 The above enforcers shall be strict in the massive implementation of this ordinance and all related ordinances/ resolutions for the proper implementation of the SWM Program. 19.4 A citation ticket shall be issued to the violators of the provisions of this ordinance and that of the RA 9003. It shall state the type of violation and the corresponding penalty or fines. 19.5 Payment of fines shall only be made to the Municipal Treasurer’s Office. 19.6 A training-workshop on the salient features of RA 9003, this ordinance and other pertinent laws and ordinances shall be conducted. No enforcers shall be deputized unless he undergoes training for enforcers and able to pass both the written and practical examinations. Section 20. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ENFORCERS 20.1 The deputized enforces shall see to it that all the provisions of this ordinance and the RA 9003 and all other orders and directives are properly obeyed, observed and complied with. 20.2 Coordinate the actions and activities of the auxiliary enforcers and 20.3 Apprehend violators of SWM Ordinance and issue citation tickets. 20.4 Prepare and submit monthly reports to the Enforcement Committee. 20.5 Perform other related functions as may be required by the Enforcement Committee from time to time. Section 21. APPREHENSION AND REPORTING SYSTEM 21.1 Deputized enforcers shall report daily to the MENRO and submit the list of apprehended offenders whether individuals, households, establishments or institution. 21.2 The report of the deputized enforcers shall include the names and the corresponding violations committed, date, hour and the location where the violation is committed. 21.3 Reporting shall be done during the last hour of the same working day the violation is committed. 21.4 If the violation is committed on a holiday or a nonworking day the apprehending deputized enforcer shall report the same on the very first working day following the non-working day it was committed. 21.5 The names or list of violators who fail and/or refuse to pay fines/penalties or render community service shall be submitted to the LGU department where transactions are frequently done for appropriate and proper actions. ARTICLE 9 Prohibited Acts, Fines and Penalties Section 22. VIOLATORS OF THE ACTS Any act done in violation of the provisions in this ordinance shall subject the offenders to penalty. 22.1 Drivers, passengers, conductors shall be fined separately; 22.2 If violator is a corporation, firm or other corporate entities, the maximum penalty shall be imposed upon the president, manager or any person responsible for its operation. Section 23. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION TO THE PROVISIONS IN THIS ORDINANCE SHALL SUBJECT OFFENDER TO THE FOLLOWING: OFFENSE PENALTY Littering P20.00/piece litter or street cleaning for four (4) hours Dumping of garbage or poultry waste or other Php200.00 for individuals or street waste or other livestock waste in public places, cleaning for eight (8) hours P500.00 streets, sidewalks, canals and vacant lots or bodies for institutions, commercial/recreational of water. establishments, etc. Unsegregated garbage for collection No collection. However, for habitual offense (3) times, a fine of P200.00 for households/individuals or street cleaning for eight (8) hours; and P500.00 for institutions, commercial/recreational establishments, etc. Unmaintained vacant lots P200.00 for households or street cleaning for eight (8) hours P500.00 forinstitutions, commercial/recreational establishments, etc. Burning of tires and other toxic hazardous waste P200.00 for households/individuals or and other non-biodegradable waste; indiscriminate street cleaning for eight (8) hours burning of garden wastes P500.00 for institutions, commercial/recreational establishments, etc. Failure of personnel to collect garbage at scheduled Suspension for concerned personnel period without due cause Unsegregated waste from street sweepers/utility Suspension for concerned personnel workers Habitual violation (3 times) by commercial/ No renewal of Mayor’s/business permit recreational establishments, institutions without attending two-day seminar on ecological Solid Waste Management at their own expense ARTTCLE 10 Incentives and Rewards Section 24. Incentive and Rewards System The municipality will adopt some incentives systems to help promote its Solid Waste Management Program. The following shall be adopted: 24.1 A discount of 30% for payment of garbage fees for all generators that pay their annual fees in advance within the first month of the year. 24.2 Conduct of an annual search for Most Outstanding barangay in Solid Waste Management implementation. The Local Government Unit (LGU), through its MSWMB shall develop the guidelines for the contest, with the criteria on the four elements of the SWM which are: reduction/segregation at source, collection and transport, MRF and disposal

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24.3 Guidelines shall follow the strategy as set by the LGU to the barangays. 24.4 Provide annual incentives on households, individuals consistently practicing waste segregation and reduction at source. The MSWMB shall organize team (e.g. CMFM Monitoring Team) to monitor and observe several practices at source and during collection. 24.5 Annual Public announcements and recognitions during purok and barangay assemblies on households, sitios, barangays and households. 24.6 Conduct annual poster, slogan, and news writing contest and shall be aired in both radio and TV networks, which shall encourage participants from all ages. 24.7 Provide commendations and cash incentives to enforcers based in the apprehensions that they make. ARTICLE 11 Institutional Arrangements Section 25. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT Arrangements shall be adopted with the following offices for the respective concern and activities that the Municipality deems necessary to undertake for the effective implementation of the programs on Solid Waste Management: 25.1 Philippine National Police (PNP) / PEDO and other government law enforcement personnel on the enforcement of the provisions of this ordinance and provide support to LGU SWM enforcers when police matters arise. 25.2 The LGU-HRD, SB, Legal Office, Philippine National Police (PNP) /PEDO, for the training of enforcers that will be deputized. 25.3 Schools, organizations and other institutions on IEC, composting and recycling with which the Municipal Mayor will enter into Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for such undertaking. 25.4 The Barangay Council which may enter into Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with external organizations that may undertake composting at the purok or barangay level. ARTICLE 12 The Ecological Solid Waste Management Trust Fund Section 26. STABLISHMENT OF FUND There is hereby created, as a special account of the Municipal Environment and Natural Resource Office, an Ecological Solid Waste Management Trust Fund to be ministered by the Municipal Solid Waste Management Board (MSWMB). Sources of funds shall include but not limited to the following: 26.1 Proceeds from paid citation tickets (50%), grants, donations, fund raising activities. These funds shall be placed in the ESWM Trust Fund. 26.2 Equity investment, wherein all LGU levels and the private sector share in the cost of ESWM, shall be encouraged. Equity funds shall be placed in the ESWM Trust Fund. 26.3 Proceeds from the sale of factory returnable and organic fertilizers recovered from Central Material Recovery Facility (CMRF) and composting facilities. Section 27. USE OF FUND The ESWM Trust Fund shall only be used to finance the following: a. Products, facilities, technologies and processes that would enhance LGU programs on proper Solid Waste Management; b. Awards and incentives; c. Research programs that would enhance technologies on material and resource recovery from solid waste; d. Information, education, communication and monitoring activities e. Technical assistance and counterparting; f. Capability building activities ARTICLE 13 Budgetary Allocation Section 28. An initial Municipal Budget of Php 1,060,000.00 shall be appreciated for the first year of implementation. Section 29. A budget for CY 2008 in the amount of Php 1,060,000.00 shall be allocated for Solid Waste Management. It shall be appropriated from the Internal Revenue Allotment of the Municipality. Section 30. Thereafter, an annual budget appropriation for the MENRO and other SWM programs shall be included in the Annual Municipal Budget Ordinance. ARTICLE 14 Implementation Schedule Section 31. IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE Following shall be the target implementation schedule for the activities as provided in the Ordinance: ACTIVITY TARGET DATE 1. Ordinance January 2008 2. IEC Two (2) months upon approval of amended ordinance 3. Segregation at source On-going 4. No Segregation No Collection On-going 5. Imposition of fines and penalties

March 2008

6.

Composting/Recycling at source and/or centralized On-going 7. Collection of Updated Fees March 2008 8. Institutional Arrangements Upon approval of the new Ordinance 9. Hiring, Training and Deputation of enforcers Upon approval of the new Ordinance ARTICLE 15 Final Provisions Section 32. All provisions of the Municipal ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby amended/modified/repealed accordingly. Section 33. Separability provision. If any provision of this ordinance or the application of such provision to any person or circumstances is declared unconstitutional, the remaining provisions to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected by such declaration. Section 34. Effectivity. This ordinance shall take effect sixty (60) days after publication in all conspicuous public places and massive information dissemination in the whole Municipality of Amlan. ____________________ I hereby certify to the correctness of the foregoing /Ordinance No.07, series of 2008 of the Sangguniang Bayan of Amlan, Province of Negros Oriental. (Sgd.) ADELYN Y. RACAL Secretary to the Sanggunian Attested: (Sgd.) CARMEN G. TAN Presiding Officer Negros Chronicle August 17, 2008

APPROVED: (Sgd.) BENTHAM P. DELA

CRUZ Municipal Mayor


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Of lies and lack ... (Bingo)

From page 4 old Hunter’s daughter is Edwards’ son. The senator’s wife is reportedly fighting off a debilitating disease – increasing the melodrama. Senator Edwards abruptly lost the support of his followers and the Cabinet position (as a consequence) because as they said:” You can’t lie in politics and still have the people’s confidence.” Leaders having sexual affairs in America in commonplace but lying is never accepted as a public norm. It is very instructive. Recall that President Richard Nixon was impeached not necessarily because he illegally tapped the headquarters of the Democrats (said “Deep Throat”) but because he used the power of his office to hide the truth. It is the dishonesty part that rankles the psyche of Americans. Notice further that playboy-president Bill Clinton owned up to his “Oral” Office affair with Monica Lewinsky and apologized to wife Hillary for his private transgression. The American public had forgiven him. Even John “Camelot” Kennedy who had alleged sexual exploits with many including the Great Temptress – actress Marilyn Monro is still one of the most famous American presidents ever. If the Americans pretend to have amnesia when considering the sexual offenses of their leaders – more so the Filipinos. The early Commonwealth President Manuel L. Quezon, the Mestizo, was an inveterate womanizer, his good looks and oratory – a lethal combination. President Ferdinand Marcos had his tape-recorded dalliances with a CIA Hollywood B-actress called Dovie Beams. Plus, among the stars and starlets, a reported romance with a leggy creamy-skinned singer (a’la Imelda) and an international beauty queen.

Rep. Arnaiz ... From page 2

to the motorists, City Councilor Rotelio Lumjod has asked the Traffic Management Office to study the possibility of decreasing the number of roads designated for “NO ENTRY” allowing the drivers to convey their passengers using less circuitous routes. But the TMO said it will still conduct dry runs before they would decide on the request. Rep. Arnaiz and City Administrator Dominador Dumalag appeal for understanding among the motoring public saying these road projects will not last for long.

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But in 1986, the Filipinos did not oust him because of his sexual excesses but because he lied on his mandate by stealing the elections from the widow Cory Aquino and plundered the nation. Fidel V. Ramos (FVR) won the presidency despite his publicized romance with a fair Makati socialite who allegedly bore him a son who studied Economics in London. Top on the list, of course, is Joseph Estrada who had a bevy of girl-relations (with kids) who were flaunted like part of his biodata, yet he won the presidency with the biggest majority vote in Philippine recorded election history. He was ousted by money issues of alleged plunder and corruption. Even the late Fernando Poe Jr., who almost made it to the presidency, if not for some Mindanao “magic” had his share of women stars and starlets with at least one alleged child out of wedlock. People accept this “lack of zipper control” among their leaders for it has almost become a part of the counter-culture of the country dating back from the Spanish times. Then – the rich and powerful had mistresses among the Indios, the married soldiers cavorting with local lasses and my goodness, even friars and bishops had their indiscretions that echoed through the communities like the pealing of church bells. The same happened when the Japanese invaders occupied the land – to the victors belong the booty, including the women. In today’s governance, however, a somewhat ticklish issue revolves around the public official who holds a mistress or two or three, as the case may be. Paid a pittance officially and disallowed to go into private business as a public official, the government functionary who is known to hold a harem through girls housed in

personal information Punishing email ... your or access to your accounts. (Kojak) From page 5

identity. They steal your identity and open up credit card accounts. • There are several “work at home” scheme. One is you cash a check, then after extracting your forwarding fee, send the balance of the money to a third party. No risk, they will deposit the money in your account. • They promise you $200 worth of gasoline coupons or a $500 dollar shopping spree at a big name shopping mall. All they want from you is a $3.49 filing fee. • PayPal or Ebay will contact you and require you go to a linked site and update your information. Looks very official. • A bank will contact you and request you tell them what to do with the $200,000 they have deposited under your name. The account has been inactive for over 5 years and they closed it. • Hired as a secret shopper, you are asked to provide bank account information so they can deposit the money you need to make the required purchases. • A job offer from a company in England. They want you to be their agent here in the Philippines. Everyday crooks think of a new way to “phish”

a condo apartment in every relevant port in the country or goes wild on a spending orgy in social clubs, bars and discos – are always suspect. Suspect as in having used the people’s money – through direct assault on the treasury (false expense claims) or through kickbacks generated. Per the World Bank that “tongpats” is at least P88 billion a year, Senator Edgardo Angara had a kinder estimate of P24 billion, many years back. Now that is not just sexual mania, that is partial kleptocracy. That is no longer just lack of “zipper control” but dipping one’s dirty fingers into the cookie jar. From page 2 For Comments: email to the VAT revenues to the bingo_dejaresco@yahoo.com.ph BIR, the Customs remitted it dior bohol-rd@mozcom.com

Perdices: Sue ...

rectly to the national government. Now, the mayors want to ask the courts to intervene so that the VAT revenues collected by Customs will be included in their IRA share.

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The FBI (http://www.fbi.gov/ ) recommends: • Do not reply to email or pop-up messages requesting financial information. • Do not open any links on these messages or “cut and paste” addresses from these message. • When asked to call your bank, do not call phone numbers provided in the computer message; use the one on your monthly statement. • Keep your anti-virus / firewall up to date. Run a scan frequently. • Do not email financial or personal information. • Be very cautious about downloading or opening any email attachments even when you “know” the sender. · Contact the bank or other financial institute and report anyone using their name to get information from you. There are worm viruses that record and send everything you type to a third party. Be very careful to keep your computer virus free and avoid sending banking information or other personal data whenever possible. General Rule: If it sounds too good to be true…..it probably isn’t true. They say you can not cheat an honest man. These schemes use the promise of easy money for little or no work. That is the hook they use to land you their “phish”. Do not be a victim. Be an everyday hero and do not let your friends be a victim either.

critical repor ting reporting HOW MEDIA SEES IT, AND NOT OTHERS (email: elydejaresco@yahoo.com)

Most people support ... (From page 2) to lower population growth in the Philippines in the last seven years, ….but not through the promotion of natural family planning.

But abortion is not allowed by this bill anywhere in the Philippines. Never. “These bills are not paving the way for abortion to be allowed in the country. To address the concerns of Pro-Life groups, chair of the Committee on Health Sen. Pia Cayetano assured the Pro-life group that abortion will not be allowed in the country. It’s one of the major issues that the senators have resolved.” Moreover, the same public hearing also emphasized that couples still have the last say on the family planning method they are going to follow, which depends on the needs of a family. Finally, It was also emphasized in the hearing that the choice of family planning method is a personal choice. These bills do not dictate couples to use artificial contraception, the bills only aim to provide couples with choices which are based on age, on needs and on their own personal circumstances.”

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Legaspi St., Dumaguete City

Tel. 225-7994

St. Francis ...

OCEAN FAST FERRIES INC.

From page 2 bothered at all of the soldiers’ presence since they asked for permission and left immediately in accordance to his advice. 1st Lt. Mark Posadas, Commanding officer of Bravo Company of the 11th Infantry Battalion, expressed surprise over the reported army raid of the local private Catholic school when the last time they paid St. Francis College a visit was in 2005. At that time, the army conducted an Internal Security Awareness Symposium but there was never any follow up activity after the school administration refused them permission. The young officer said that while other schools, public and private alike, have welcomed their symposia, but St. Francis College has consistently refused to open its doors for the military.

Pier 1 Warehouse Bldg., Cebu City, Philippines, 6000 E-mail: marketing@oceanjet.net Tel. Nos. (032) 255-7560 Fax no. (032) 255-0115

SCHEDULE OF TRIPS AND RATES EFFECTIVE JULY 14, 2008 ORIGIN

CEBU

From page 2

ETD

DAPITAN DUMAGUETE SIQUIJOR

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 3:35 PM 3:35 PM 6:00 AM 9:30 AM

TAGBILARAN

DAPITAN

DUMAGUETE

Petit-Dodo ...

Adding spice to the 2010 elections is the bold intention of last termer Dumaguete City Mayor Agustin Perdices to contest the governorship as well. And Second District Rep. George Arnaiz also intimated that he reserves the right to reclaim his gubernatorial post. But the political heavyweights of this province who contested in several elections years before have managed to keep their friendship and camaraderie alive which spared Negros Oriental from nasty feuds that retard the province’s development and gains.

DESTINATION

SIQUIJOR

CEBU DUMAGUETE TAGBILARAN CEBU DAPITAN SIQUIJOR TAGBILARAN CEBU DUMAGUETE TAGBILARAN CEBU

TAGBILARAN

DAPITAN DUMAGUETE SIQUIJOR

TOURCLASS ETA ACCOMMODA- IST TION 11:40 AM TOURIST/BC 1,250.00 9:40 AM TOURIST/BC 800.00 7:25 PM TOURIST/BC 800.00 8:25 PM TOURIST/BC 950.00 7:40 AM TOURIST/BC 800.00 11:20 AM TOURIST/BC 800.00

BUSINESS CLASS 1,650.00 1,100.00 1,100.00 1,350.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

TEMPORARY CANCELLED

3:35 PM 6:00 PM 12:20 PM 12:20 PM 12:20 PM 7:00 AM 2:20 PM 10:00AM 7:40 PM\ 7:30 AM 2:20 PM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:05 AM 9:00 AM

5:30 PM 7:40 PM 6:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 10:50 AM 6:00 PM 11:40 AM 8:25 PM 8:40 AM 4:00 PM 10:50 AM 6:45 AM 8:40 AM 8:45 AM 10:50 AM

TOURIST/BC 800.00 TOURIST/BC 800.00 TOURIST/BC 1,250.00 TOURIST/BC 650.00 TOURIST/BC 900.00 TOURIST/BC 800.00 TOURIST/BC 800.00 TOURIST/BC 650.00 TOURIST/BC 200.00 TOURIST/BC 520.00 TOURIST/BC 520.00 TOURIST/BC 950.00 TOURIST/BC 200.00 TOURIST/BC 700.00 TOURIST/BC 800.00 TOURIST/BC 800.00

1,000.00 1,000.00 1,650.00 850.00 1,200.00 1,100.00 1,100.00 850.00 350.00 720.00 720.00 1,350.00 360.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

4:10 PM 5:30 PM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 5:45 PM 5:45 PM

5:50 PM 7:20 PM 11:40 AM 9:40 AM 7:25 PM 8:25 PM

TOURIST/BC TOURIST/BC TOURIST/BC TOURIST/BC TOURIST/BC TOURIST/BC

800.00 800.00 900.00 520.00 520.00 700.00

1,000.00 1,000.00 1,200.00 720.00 720.00 1,000.00

TEMPORARY CANCELLED

note: LIBRE BALIK PROMO WOULD STILL BE IN EFFECT AGAIN FOR CEBU AND TAGBILARAN LINK ONLY CEB-TAG & V.V ONE WAY TRIP IS P500.00 ONLY COMPUTATION OF DISCOUNTS SENIOR : LESS 20% ROUND TRIP OR ONE WAY STUDENTS : 800.00 LESS 15% = 680.00 SO WE HAVE TO OFFER THEM THE LOWER RATE THAT IS P500.00 MINOR : 750.00 LESS 50% = 375.00


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123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 August 17, 2008 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Republic of the Philippines REGIONAL TRIAL COURT OF NEGROS ORIENTAL 7TH Judicial Region Hall of Justice, Dumaguete City OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF COURT & EX-OFFICIO SHERIFF FOR: EXTRAJUDICIAL FORECLOSURE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE (Under Act No. 3135 as Amended) HOME DEVELOPMENT MUTUAL FUND, Mortgagee, – vs. – ANDREY NOEL TUMULAK married to VIDA VIOLETA TUMULAK Mortgagor. x———————————————————————/

NOTICE OF EXTRAJUDICIAL SALE

Upon extra-judicial petition for sale under Act No. 3135, as amended, filed by HOME DEVELOPMENT MUTUAL FUND, (mortgagee), against ANDREY NOEL A. TUMULAK married to VIDA VIOLETA TUMULAK (Mortgagor), residing at lot 2, Blk. 3, San Jose Village, Banilad, Dumaguete City, to satisfy the mortgage indebtedness which, as of June 16, 2008, now amounted to FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED TEN & 98/100 (PHP 420,510.98), inclusive of interest, penalties and other charges, attorney’s fees and the cost of this foreclosure including sheriff’s fee, the undersigned will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash and in Philippine Currency on September 1, 2008, from 9:00 o’clock in the morning until 4:00 o’clock in the afternoon at the Office of the Clerk of Court & Ex-Officio Sheriff, located at the Hall of Justice, E.J. Blanco Drive, Piapi, Dumaguete City, Philippines, the hereunder described properties of the mortgagors, together with the improvements now existing thereon, to wit:

TRANSFER CERTIFICATE OF TITLE NO. T-24351

A parcel of land, Lot 2, Block 3, of the subdivision plan, Psd-0746100289, being a portion of Lots 4329-B-1, Psd-07-019157, situated in the Barrio of Banilad, City of Dumaguete, Island of Negros. Bounded on the NW., along line 3-4 by Lot 4328, Dumaguete Cadastre; on the NE., along line 4-1 by Lot 1, Block 3,; on the SE., along line 1-2, by road Lot 2; on the SW., along line 2-3 by Lot 3, Block 2, all of the subdivision plan. xxx containing an area of EIGHTY (80) SQUARE METERS, more or less. Xxx All sealed bids must be submitted to the undersigned on the said date and time. Dated this 25th day of July, 2008 in the City of Dumaguete, Philippines. (Sgd.) MA. ANTONIA L. BULADO Clerk of Court & Ex-Officio Sheriff By: The Negros Chronicle Aug. 3, 10 & 17, 2008

(Sgd.) ROGELIO P. FORNIZA Sheriff IV

MO VING? MOVING? Call: Lipat-Bahay Francis TRUCKING SERVICES 225-2365 0920-779-7378 Colon Ext. Taclobo, Dumaguete City

AGENCIA CIUDAD PAWN SHOP Main Branch JAT Building San Juan St., Dgte. City Branch 1, San Jose St., Dgte. City, Beside UCPB Tel. # 225-8543 / 225-7651

NO TIME ? I knelt to pray but not for long, I had too much to do, Must hurry off and get to work, For bills would soon be due. And so I rattled a hurried prayer, Jumped up from off my knees. My Christian duty now was done, My soul could be at ease.

TOPS DETERGENT BAR Available at Traders Lucky Mart Pinili St., Dumaguete City

Tel. No. 226-1527

OVAL REVIEW CENTER E.J. Blanco Drive, Daro, Dumaguete City

Tel. # 225-9922 Cel. # 0918-7076-144

W ANTED: SSecretar ecretar ecretaryy

3

Female Good English Pleasing personality Over 23 yrs. old

Send your biodata to: Jay Rm. 306 Check-Inn Pension House Locsin St., Dumaguete City

LIPAT BAHAY &

OTHER TRANSPORT SERVICES L.G. MARIÑO TRUCKING Colon Extension, Dumaguete City

All through the day I had no time, To speak a word of cheer. NO TIME to speak of Christ to friends, They’d laugh at me I feared. NO TIME, NO TIME, so much to do, That was my constant cry. NO TIME to give to those in need;

This Breakfast could yet change your Life.

At last, t’was time for me to die…. And when before the Lord I came, I stood with downcast eyes, With his hands He held a book, T’was the BOOK OF LIFE. Brotherhood of He looked into the book and said, Christian Businessmen and Professionals “Your name I cannot find, I once was going to write it down But never found the TIME.”

FREE BREAKFAST for First Timers Tel. No. (035) 422-7990 Cell No. 0918-5563535

Just cut out and present this invitation to: Bethel Guest House: 1st Saturday 7:30 a.m.


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21

HEALTH IS WEALTH BY DEMS DEMECILLO BONG TORINO

Suspect in the murder of cellshop owner surfaces PNP Investigators took custody of the Innova car driven by Kent Lariosa moments before he was ambushed and killed by four unidentified persons armed with .45 caliber and 9mm pistols along San Jose Street Tuesday. Police recovered seven spent shells from the crime scene.

esults of the paraffin test conducted on Thursday by the PNP Crime Laboratory indicate that the main suspect in the shooting of a businessman was negative of gunpowder burns. Dumaguete City PNP Chief of Police Supt. Leopoldo

R

Cabanag Jr. identified the suspect as Jessie Misamis of Canday-ong, Calindagan Dumaguete City. He is said to be a notorious robber here and is actually on the police watch list, adds Cabanag. The victim who was declared dead on arrival at the Holy Child Hospital, Tuesday evening was Kent

Turn to page 24

Norwegian robbed of three laptop computers

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or the second time, he was robbed by the same suspects but unlike in the past now he opted to seek police assistance. A Norwegian national, Svein Helge Grooem, 46 years old and a resident of Springville Homes in Banilad, Dumaguete City lost two laptop computers to burglars who es-

caped but whose identities the victim claim to know. Items stolen were one unit Acer Laptop worth P 65,000 and one unit HP Pavilion Laptop worth P 90,000. The victim identified the suspects as Jefferson Flores of 108 Hibbard Avenue Piapi and Jeffrey Duran of Batinguel, Dumaguete City. The burglary incident was supposedly discovered last Wednesday at 4:30 in the

Turn to page 24

Lawyer loses valuables inside Hall of Justice

awyer Hazel Villegas of the Public Attorney’s Office and a resident of Batinguel, Dumaguete City was robbed of her bag containing cash and other valuables inside her office at the Hall of Justice, Piapi Dumaguete City during lunch break, Thursday. A woman who appeared to be pregnant and who was with a girl of 7 to 8 years old was tagged as suspect according to the victim’s colleagues. The woman suspect was also reportedly accompanied by two men who acted as look out. Witnesses Earl Dinglasa, the build- was told to leave. When the victim discoving’s head security and Reynaldo Gara, ered that her brown bag was stolen, the an administrative aide of PAO said that woman suspect was seen hurriedly getting the woman was already seen inside the into a waiting tricycle and fled. Atty. Villegas victim’s cubicle before the incident and Turn to page 24

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PAIN: Human Equalizer “Adversity reveals genius, prosperity conceals.” Horace rom birth to the last breathe, in one way or another, man experiences pain and suffering in various ways. No human being is ever spared from the reality of the existence of pain. In this philosophical sense, pain is said to be a great human equalizer and proving the very fact that all men are truly created equal. As a doctor, I may be able to describe or define pain in its physiological context. Medically speaking, pain is said to be an unpleasant or uncomfortable sensation that ranges from mild irriatation to excruciating agony. Pain is the most common reported symptom felt by anyone as a result of a disease or disorder. Man by nature desires to major sources of psychic live in a state of good health (emotional) pain in life which at any cost and avoids suf- include the extreme deprivafering of pain of any kind. tions of biological, psychoThis wish is unrealistic and a logical, social and spiritual sort of a denial (defense needs of man. Let me cite mechanism) for life without some examples: pain is not life. God never • Biological causes promises to take away pain include: intractable insomnia; but He allows it to happen. exhaustion or overfatigue Theologians say that pain pu- (i.e. Burnt-Out Syndrome); rifies, tempers, humiliates and extreme hunger and starvamakes man more compas- tion; addiction; brain damage sionate towards his neighbors due to drugs and alcohol; and it could make him a bet- lack of exercise; obesity; inter person. Pain is part of our validism; effects of severe deliverance. God promised infections; cancer, etc. His Eternal Kingdom to those • Psychological who could face and endure causes include: sudden loss the pains and sufferings of of loved ones through death this life. This is a great les- or separation; impoverishson of “No cross, no crown’ ment; utter lack of love and philosophy. affection (cruelties); meanLet us be reminded of the inglessness; powerlessness;

F

DR. ANGEL V. SOMERA

bankruptcy; burned alive; trapped; crippling accidents; disfigurement; war; famine; epidemics; traumatic catastrophies or tragedies, etc. • Social causes: impaired interpersonal relationships, abandonment; constant quarrels; living in a terror-stricken area; bad and hostile neighbors; ostracism; absence of friends; divorce; infidelity, etc. • Spiritual causes: atheism; agnosticism; hedonism; materialism; severe immorality or state of sinfulness, a godless life; demonpossessed; superstitious living; witchcraft (vodoo), etc.

1st A and G Sy Memorial Open Chess Championship (3rd Round Standings)

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our combatants remain unbeaten with a perfect score of 3 points in as many rounds in the on going “1st Antonio and George Sy Memorial Open Chess Championship” sponsored by the Sy Family through their youngest Beboy Sy. Also co-sponsoring the event are Father and Son Hon. Board Member Erames and City Councilor Rommel Erames.

The tied tournament leaders are Gemon Tolentino, Jason Mongcopa, Pastor Almer Banaria, and Ramon Sonjaco. And with four rounds left to play, in solo temporary second with 2.5 points is Al Dumalag. Eleven (11) campaigners are crowding in the third spot

with two points each headed by Visayas-Wide Olympic gold medalist Junaico Segismar, Ryan Trajera, Robert Ball (from Oregon USA), Hilbert Arinaza, Ding Salon, Griffin Eumague, Jhun Tampi, Rex Siglos, Anthony Buenavista, Narciso Eumaguete and Arnulfo

Nodado. The 4th round will resume this coming Saturday at 1 o’clock p.m. Vice-Governor Jose “Petit” Baldado is like awarding trophies to the top finishers in this 7 rounds 36 man-field competition.

Medical Herb salesman or Drug user?

Members of Task Force 24 who conducted surveillance operation in Zone 4 Looc, Dumaguete City chanced upon Leo E. Janio (left) in possession of one transparent plastic sachet believed to contain shabu. Police Officer 3 Rowino B. Bayuna (right) of the Criminal Investigation Detection Group said that the suspect who strongly protested saying he is a Junob resident. Janio was later released after the PNP crime laboratory declared that the content of the seized sachet is not shabu.

District Governor of the Rotary International District 3960, DG JOSEPH MICHAEL “YUMI” ESPINA and spouse Lady Sandra Lim-Espina were special guests of the Rotary Club of Dumaguete South (RCDS) when DG Yumi came for the induction of new officers for the coming Rotary year. The Espina couple is shown here with RCDS PP Greg Uymatiao and PP Trops Ochavillo during the induction affair..


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Around RP Federalism before Negr osmayors BY DEMS REY DEMECILLO

Senator Aquilino Pimentel (center) speaks before mayors of Negros Oriental last Friday at the Escosas Bar and Restaurant in Amlan town regarding his proposal to adopt a federal form of government. He was joined by (from left to right) Second District Rep. George Arnaiz, League of Municipalities President Jimalalud Mayor Reynaldo Tuanda, Governor Emilio Macias II and Mr. Terry Dumogho, who is the senator’s chief political affairs officer and a native of La Libertad, Negros Oriental.

Traffic violators Couple gives 1.9 ha Blood or fines? lot to the homeless

ith the end view of establishing a local blood bank with a steady supply of blood plasma, Councilor Alan Gel Cordova is pushing for the passage of an ordinance which will provide traffic violators an option to donate blood instead of paying fines. This voluntary blood donation not exceeding 250cc shall be available only to those whose prescribed fines is P 300.00 or less provided further that the apprehended violator is determined by a physician at the City Health Office to be “medically qualified and physically Turn to page 24

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his is faith in action indeed. A couple donated a 1.9 hectare lot in Barangay Talay to the Couple’s for Christ Gawad Kalinga project aimed at providing decent homes for the city’s poor. The owners of the property, Babes and Chico Pastor led the blessing of the first duplex house built with the help of Japanese student volunteers led by the adopted son of Dumaguete Professor Nobu T. Imaizumi of Kwansei Gakuin University. Appropriately named Pastor GK Village, some sixty-five duplex house units will soon rise along with the community’s chapel, basketball court, children’s playground, gardens piggery, and inland fishpond. The Japanese students who left last Tuesday are regular volunteers of the Turn to page 24

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Bais water is clean,

tests show-Acas

B

ais City Water District Manager Iris Ivan Acas disputed allegations that the agency’s water is dirty therefore not safe for drinking and consumption of its consumers. Acas pointed out that the monthly tests conducted by the Negros Oriental Provincial Hospital Center Diagnostic Clinical Laboratory showed the water distributed by his agency negative of any harmful bacteria. In contrast, the results of the sampling taken from the exhibited ozonized water distributed by the local government unit of Bais City proved to contain the dreaded e coli bacteria, Acas added. However, Bais City Mayor Hector “Tata” Villanueva questioned the manner by which the said samples were

I

Bigger perks for rebel returnees

n another effort to lure members of the Communist Party of the PhilippinesNew People’s Army to yield to the government, the Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process or OPPAP under its Social Integration Program is offering now bigger cash incentives, livelihood opportunities and a safe abode where his return to normal life can be assured. These fresh offers of benefits for rebel returnees were bared by OPPAP Visayas action officers Alvin Ebreo and Milo Maestrocampo, a former rebel soldier involved in the Oakwood mutiny, who visited the headquarters of the 79th Infantry Battalion under Lt. Col. Erwin Bernard Neri and the 302nd Brigade Headquarters in Palanas, Tanjay City, Thursday. Rebels who surrender without any firearms are given P 20,000, P 50,000 for those with long as initial capital Turn to page 24 firearms, additional P 50,000 Turn to page 24

Lady police excels over men

DUMAGUETE’S PRIDE. It was the turn of the city government to acknowledge the tireless efforts of SPO2 Josefa Lacandula to prosecute women and child abusers. Last Thursday, the city council led by Vice-mayor Woodrow Maquiling unanimously approved the resolution sponsored by Councilor Alan Gel Cordova, Chairman of the Peace and Order Committee commending Lacandula for being selected as one of 2008 Country’s Outstanding Policemen in Service in the Police Non-Commissioned Officer Category for her “exemplary professional competence and devotion to duty.” Shown in photo (left-right) are Councilors Antonio “Tonyrems” Remollo, Amy Dicen, Athena Duran, Raul Infante, Maquiling, Lacandula, Nilo Sayson, Franklin Esmena, Esperidion Catan, Noel De Jesus, and Cordova.

MUMBAKI

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Ancestral domain & self determination

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he subject of ANCESTRAL DOMAIN (AD) is now the hottest, most controversial, political issue in the light of the BANSA MORO CLAIM FOR TERRITORIAL IDENTITY, for more autonomy and self determination in Southern Philippines. The subject matter even becomes more muddled if taken under the backdrop of the GMA Administration’s dubious motivation to cease the moment and initiate a constitutional change to establish the Federal Republic of the Philippines. Atty. Joel Cadiogan Obar Being a PROUD IGOROT vives the former. The philosophical MYSELF the subject of Ancestral understanding, which is the HARD joel_obar@yahoo.com Domain is one that is nearest to my TRUTH, is that LAND owns MAN heart. As I grew up to earn an edu- and not the other way around. “From dust and unto dust we shall cation and have a formal career of my own the blood than runs through return” so goes the verse of the Holy ity arising from an unpopular presimy veins continue to carry the tribal Writing which is the penultimate ex- dency offers the fertile environment to revisit and reassert their century chromosomes that makes me con- planation. Incidentally, the Moors old desire for SELF-DETERMINAscious of the dignity and pride of my (MOROS) cannot trace their oriTION THRU A CLAIM OF THEIR forebears regarding the justice, equity, and efficacy of their tribal gov- gin in Mindanao (Gran Molucas) ANCESTRAL DOMAIN. Meantime, constitutional ernment, informal and unofficial as it thru antiquity, thus are not truly indigenous. They are a member democracy has rooted itself and may seem to appear. founded undeniable vested of a nomadic people of Arab and Ancestral Domain has its This is the present situaroots in antiquity and any con- Berber descent whose civiliza- rights. tion of the country which crestitutional or statutory provi- tion and religion (Islam) flour- ates the most difficult, thorny, sion on the subject is not, by ished in North Africa between intricate and complex assemany means, a grant of a right the 8th and 15th centuries. They blage of varied rights and dobut rather a recognition or ac- also settled in Spain during this mains demanding therefore a knowledgment of a long exist- period. In the Philippines, the tough and challenging demoning reality which modern mind Islam Religion began to spread stration of a credible and trustfailed or even refused to accept in the 13th century with the es- worthy leadership in order to and appreciate. It should be on tablishment of the Sultanates of navigate and steamer this nathis preposition that the sub- Sulu and Maguindanao. In this tion to greater and loftier ject on Ancestral Domain should context, I would rather refer to heights. All the ingredients of a be understood and examined our Muslim brothers as a timely paradigm shift from a corby both government and CLERICO-LINGUISTIC GROUP- rupt and ineffective political ING which is now assuming an system are all obtaining except people. Applied to the Philippine set- indigenous connotation. There for a credible leader whose ting, Ancestral Domain, which is not are many tribes which are truly statesmanship is beyond any of doubt and upon whom equivalent to ancestral land, is a indigenous in Mindanao, the iota the sovereign pays unquesSTYLE OF GOVERNANCE that Lumads. To the LUMADS (and tioned homage and allegiance. predates the Spanish Conquest. It the IGOROTS, IFUGAOS, True enough the balance in this may even precede the “MORO KALINGAS, TINGGUIANS of the present dichotomy is FEDERALISM. (moors) WAVE” that landed into the Cordilleras) belong their respec- It is unfortunate that the political leadshores of those “unknown” Islands tive ANCESTRAL DOMAIN. ership (the elite), both opposition and Nonetheless, conflict started administration, have their own dubiand Islets which now compromise the Philippine Islands. ADs have upon the onset of Constitutional De- ous, self-centered intentions that their own executive system, legis- mocracy which adhered to the muddle the genuine issue of PEACE, lative processes and judicial formu- REGALIAN DOCTRINE. The State JUSTICE, EQUALITY and HUMAN lae; the relationship between two or or the King (REGALIAN) is the DIGNITY. For more details, I will more domains was restricted to trade owner of all lands of the public do- have this matter be the subject of my and commerce. The customs and main and the natural resources be- next article. Until we find or establish a traditions evolved its own civil regu- neath or embedded in it. The doclations governing persons, family trine diametrically runs counter to, GENUINE LEADERSHIP with THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF and property relations. Criminal or and in fact completely obliterated, the the Filipino will punitive processes are also ad- concept of Ancestral Domain. Peace STATEMANSHIP, contend himself in keeping the equately provided. In simple terms, and justice have thenceforth been flame of modern revolution ANCESTRAL DOMAIN is a sys- threatened, if not compromised, until burning. tem of government, having its own this very day. This dichotomy exHave a nice day my dear territory and a people that maintain plains the assertion of self-determi- compatriots. MABUHAY ANG allegiance to it. Land ownership is nation of indigenous communities PILIPINAS! strictly communal and generational (IC) and indigenous peoples (IP) limited only within the concept of which in recent time is becoming the USUFRUCT AND STEWARD- “battle-cry” of modern revolutions in SHIP. The reason is that man can- this country. To many of the IP and not own the land as the latter sur- IC, the mistrust and political instabil-

Even if others are not. Even if others will not. Even if others can not. “He who walks honestly walks securely.” Proverbs 10:9 A message from:

Brotherhood of Christian Businessman & Professionals


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Horta salutes Ninoy, Cardinal Sin

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“Selyo at Kasaysayan”

Manila Auxilliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo (left) welcomes Timor Leste President Ramos Horta (second from right) and his Foreign Minister Zacarias Albino Da Costa (right) at the Manila Cathedral, Wednesday. Also present were NCCA Executive Director Cecile-Guidote Alvarez and former senator and Secretary Heherson Alvarez.

2 Sillimanians win top stamp exhibits set 2008 Palanca prizes for fiction, & poetry C

ebu Stamp Club Incorporated (CSCI) once again is gearing up for a major philatelic event in the beautiful City of Dumaguete and will be held in Silliman University Library Main Exhibition Hall on August 23-26, 2008.

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The exhibit titled “Selyo will be launched in SM City Lapulapu and will culminate UMAGUETE CITY —The most sought-after top prizes in the annual Don Cebu in association with the Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature went to two at Kasaysayan: A Retro- Cebu City Cultural and His- in one of Cebu’s malls to spective of Filipino Heroes Silliman alumni this year. torical Affairs Commission celebrate the November

Dumaguete-based fictionist Ian Rosales Casocot won First Prize for the Short Story in English for “Things You Don’t Know,” and Baguio-based poet Francis Macansantos also won First Prize for Poetry in English for his suite of poems titled “Morphic Variations.” This is the fourth Palanca win for Casocot, and the third for

Macansantos. The judges for short fiction were J. Neil C. Garcia, Vicente Groyon III, and Charlson Ong, while the judges for poetry were Cesar Ruiz Aquino, Marjorie Evasco, and Jaime An Lim.. Casocot a native of Bohol, is currently a member of the faculty of the Silliman University Department of English and Litera-

Valencia holds medical mission

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he local government of Valencia will hold a medical mission in cooperation with EnergyDevelopment Corporation on Friday, August 15 from 8:00 in the morning to 12:00 noon at the Valencia Plaza.

Simultaneous to the medical mission is the conduct of the annual blood letting activity in Valencia which is done in cooperation with the Philippine National Red Cross (PNRC), Negros Oriental Chapter. Valencia Information Officer Des Tilos said the LGU is targeting a turnout of 100 blood donors on Friday

to keep up with their record. The blood letting activity in Valencia, which was started by Valencia Mayor Rodolfo Gonzalez, Jr. eight years ago, has already been institutionalized as the LGU consistently holds the record of having the highest number of blood donors in the province based on records from the PNRC here.

ture, while Macansantos used to be a teacher in the same department but has now retired from teaching from the University of the Philippines in Baguio . “This story is something quite personal to me,” says Casocot. “It is a meditation on faith, about believing and not believing, about pretending and coping, about the nuances of daily living that affects the humanity in all of us.”

Through Stamps” (originally titled “Philippines, The Land of Heroes: A Retrospect Through Stamps”) coincides with the country’s celebration of the Philippine Heroes month and highlights stamps and philatelic materials that feature our heroes, presidents and our country’s history with some stamps dating as far back as 1898 and 1906. After the Dumaguete event, the Cebu exhibit tour

(CHAC) and the Philippine Postal Corporation (PHILPOST) on August 28 and will end on August 31, 2008. We will be in selected schools and universities in the Cities of Cebu, Mandaue, and Talisay and

Non-working holidays set on Aug. 18 and 25

A

ugust 18 has been declared a special non-working holiday in the country.

In Proc. No. 1463 issued by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on Feb. 25 this year, August 18 has been set as a special nonworking holiday as it is the Monday nearest August 21, which is Ninoy Aquino Day. On the other hand, August 25, being the last Monday of August, is a regular

holiday in observance of National Heroes’ Day. Pres. Arroyo has earlier issued Proc. No. 1463 setting the specific dates of movable holidays for year 2008 as mandated by RA 9492 which rationalized the celebration of the country’s holidays.

RADIO CLINIC Internal Medicine Consultant August is Lung Month celebrated under the auspices of the Philippine College of Physicians. According to Dr. Cesar Ligo, Internist and Consultant on Pulmonary Diseases at Holy Child Hospital, Lung Month is commemorated in August because former President Manuel Quezon whose birthday falls in August also died in August of tuberculosis. Dr. Cesar Ligo discussed the causes of bronchial asthma during the program Radio Clinic

EL CAMINO BLANCO ENTERTAINMENT CORPORATION HAPPY HOURS ALL DAYS OF THE WEEK FROM 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM 3+1 Red Horse, San Mig Pale Pilsen, Cali Shandy, & Cali Ice 5+1 San Mig Light & San Mig Strong Ice Great for parties & events .... Good food .... Fantastic music .... Beautiful atmosphere .... Amazing drinks .... Cor. EJ Blanco Dr. & Flores Ave., Piapi, Dumaguete City

Call us up at (035) 225-9428/ 422-5373

Philatelic Month. Contact: Aidalyn C. Arabe, Exhibit Chairperson, Member-CSCI Board, Contact No.09163302252 or 422-3561.

pix

DR. CESAR LIGO CONSULTANT IN INTERNAL MEDICINE, HCH over DYEM Energy FM’s Dumaguete Tonight.


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theCIVICcircle

(Civic clubs and organizations are welcome to submit their articles and pictures about their services and activities. It is free of charge. Deadline for submission is Wednesday. You may send by email to: elydejaresco@yahoo.com – EDITOR)

PAL makes a comeback

T

he month of August is said to be auspicious, welcoming many big events nationwide and worldwide; the World Olympics is underway and many new businesses in the City opened this month.

After ten years’ absence, Philippine Airlines made their first flight to Dumaguete Friday morning August 15, using the mod-

was a reunion of sorts, with the travel agents greeting Ricky, who they know from way back when he was assigned here.

in. Shaman bosses Momeng and Sylvia Uy, with sons Marthon and Farley, were busy greeting their guests and the PAL crew and

PAL Senior Sales Officer Ricky de la Cruz holds the briefing with the travel agents with Shaman Air Manager Mark Anthony Uy and Nina, Shaman Air supervisor. ern Airbus 319. PAL takes pride in their flight service complete with inflight amenities, with two flights daily to and from Dumaguete, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Last Saturday, Aug. 9, Shaman Air, Philippine Airlines’ Domestic Sales Agent in Dumaguete City , invited all their sub agents from the travel agencies to a briefing

The new Airbus 319 boasts of business class wide seats and economy seats with accompanying inflight amenities. The arrival of the first PAL flight after 10 years was greeted by the presence of the important

checking that everything ran smoothly. August 15 morning started off cloudy but the sun came out to greet the huge Airbus 319 as it landed. PAL and Shaman Air had a big buffet setting for their guests,

to introduce the various promo sales and available routes of PAL. Also introduced was the PAL Express that runs flights to other cities aside from the regular destinations. On hand to explain PAL’s rules and regulations was Senior Shaman Air bosses Father and son Momeng and Marthon Uy in Account Officer a light mood during the PAL briefing with their sub agents at the Shaman air office. Ricky de la Cruz, who was assigned here pre- officials like Congressman a heavy brunch of fruits and viously with the Dumaguete George Arnaiz, Gov. Emilio main courses with the tradiPAL office. Macias III, Board Member tional Filipino lechon. It was The invited travel agen- Mariant Escano and many cies and sales outlets sent others. Provincial tourism great to see the PAL sunrise their representatives to at- officials Dindo Generoso and logo bearing plane flying the tend the briefing at the Sha- Myla Abellana. PAL offi- Dumaguete skies again ! man Air Sales Office. It cials were also on hand to welcome the first PAL flight

Suspect in ...

Couples give ...

Norwegian ...

From page 21 Lariosa owner of Kent Cell Shop. Lariosa was gunned down by four armed men on board two motorcycles while he was driving his Innova car along with wife Chinky Mae, who survived the attack. He sustained two gun shot wounds in the chest. Cabanag said Lariosa accused Misamis of stealing a cellular phone in his store days before and was reportedly beaten up. Lariosa also filed theft charges against Misamis. For the police, this provides the suspect a strong motive to harm the victim.

From page 22 Habitat for Humanity International but because there is still no ongoing construction in Habitat sites, they were instead asked to work in the Pastor GK village site where they also donated P 150,000 for the construction of the first unit duplex house.

From page 21 morning. The suspects gained entrance by removing six window glasses in the kitchen before taking the items. Grooem added that the same suspects were the ones who stole his other lap top in March 2008 but he merely let it pass.

Lady lawyer ... From page 21 lost her Nokia cellphone, P8,000 cash, credit cards, airplane tickets and other valuables.

Traffic violators ...

With the PAL Airbus 319 in the background, travel agents Bing (King A Travel), Nenette (Tabloza Tavel), Janette (Maganda Travel), Jun and Sally (Gateway Travel) Lele (Whynot Travel), Janet (Grandeur Travel) and Pearl (Tabloza travel) pose with PAL Officer Ricky de la Cruz and Shaman Air matriarch Mrs. Sylvia Uy.

From page 22 fit.” However, if found unfit, the apprehended violator has the option to look for medically fit individuals to donate blood in his stead within seven days from the issuance of the Traffic Violations Citation Ticket or else he will be compelled to pay the fine. After the blood donation,

Bigger perks ... From page 22 for livelihood and a safe place where he can reside upon his re-entry to the mainstream society. Maestrocampo, who was convicted by a court martial but pardoned by President Gloria MacapagalArroyo, described the program as comprehensive unlike the previous Balik Baril program of the Armed Forces of the Philippines. This time, however, the local government units will be designated as the overseer of the former rebels. the TMO will then indicate in the Traffic Violation Citation Ticket issued to the offender that the “voluntary blood donation has counterbalanced the fine. The donated blood is then deposited to the Blood

Bais water ... From page 22 taken adding that the local government was not informed that the Negros Oriental Provincial Hospital Diagnostic Center Clinical Laboratory took the samples and ran the tests. The local government unit of Bais and its city water district are feuding over the refusal of the former to secure a permit to distribute drinking water to the residents. The water agency has asked the Office of the President to penalize Mayor Villanueva. Bank to be managed by the Dumaguete City Blood Bank Commission headed by the City Mayor as Chairman which will promulgate rules for the effective implementation of the proposed measure.


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CAR SALE

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BY REA LYNN D. REAL

THIRTY YEARS AGO

(From the CHRONICLE Files)

FL endorsement defended by JV

No. 1 dealer of Surplus Cars and SUVs Best Buy! Best Condition! Prices Negotiable

ugust 20, 1978— Negros Oriental Assemblyman Atty. Je Villegas, one of the opposition stalwarts at IBP, has defended his support for the First Lady Imelda Marcos’ bid to the deputy prime ministership by saying that it is in keeping with tradition that “when the Prime Minister comes from the North, his deputy prime minister should come from the South and that the First Lady comes from the Visayan region of Leyte.” “Unquestionably, no political leader from Minister until the IBP elects a succesthe south who can approximate the image and sor. “Why deprive the Visayans, nay the the sphere of influence that the First Lady has in the government; her competence as admin- nation, of her influence when this could istrator had been tested and proved with very well bring out faster development crowning achievements,” Villegas told the of the region, especially Central Visayas Chronicle. He lamented that simply because where we belong? She is a Visayan and she is First Lady, this would disqualify her to I know that her mind and heart are for the DPM. He explained that in case of inca- the Visayans and the Filipinos,” Villegas pacity, the DPM merely acts as interim Prime added.

A

P150T

P210T

P145T

TWENTY YEARS AGO P275T

Contact:

P275T

P260T

JULIUS, owner

Tel. 225-8912 Rizal Boulevard Tinago Area

REVO

P450T

Probe Okoy fund mess

A

ugust 14, 1988— Gov. Emilio Macias II has exposed what could be a multi-million peso fund anomaly in the Department of Public Works and Highways. The suspected massive fund anomaly concerns the construction of a P5-million new Okoy Bridge which links Sibulan and San Jose towns in the north. is an existing emergency such that it will In exposing the alleged anomaly, Gov. directly endanger the lives and limbs of Macias said that without knowledge of the motorists and pedestrians; second, that province, the construction of the P4.9M there is failure of bidding, meaning all the Okoy Bridge has been awarded to a bidbidders have all bidded a price higher than der from Ozamis City on a negotiated conwhat the government can afford; and third, tract. According to the rules in the Dept. there is contiguity of the project, meaning of Public Works and Highways, negotiated a similar project is going on and that the contracts can only be resorted to under present contractor may continue such three existing conditions, namely: that there project.

TEN YEARS AGO

Court junks Lotto petition

A

ugust 17, 1998— The Court junked the case questioning the city and provincial government’s regulation of lotto here filed by former president and chairman of NORECO 2 Board Enrique Medina, Jr. The court granted former mayor Agustin Perdices, Governor George Arnaiz and the Provincial Board’s move to dismiss on technicality Medina’s petition seeking a temporary restraining order on the closure of his lotto on-line terminal for lack of cause of action. Branch 40 Judge Godofredo Sison dismissed Medina’s call for a declaration of nullity of PB resolution 411 regulating lotto operations here.

In his three-page resolution, Sison stated that Medina’s petition failed to present cause of action. Moreover, Sison explained that Medina is not the proper person to pursue a suit against any action questioning lotto op-

erations since the business belongs to the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office and Medina, in his petition, failed to establish that he was representing PCSO.

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REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE Call 0918-929-6047

Code D1

Kind House & Lot

-

negotiable D2

P17M negotiable

D3

-

CommercialBldg. and Lot plus

Location / Area Price Pulantubig 2689 sq.m. along highway, near SPUD concrete fenced, 6BR w/ basement + 2 maids quarter, spacious lawn P12M Locsin St., near PNP along, negotiable

next Lot

634 sq.m.

House & Lot

Near Batinguel Elem. School, 454 sq.m. 3 BR, 1 maids quarter spacious, fully furnished P3M

LOTS FOR SALE

negotiable

Contact: 0918-929-6047

REAL PROPERTIES FOR SALE: LOT-A

1.

Lot NO. 5721, Situated at Apolong Valencia, Negros Oriental, containing an area of 2,953 square meters. - price: PhP1.8M Neighboring residences are owned by foreigners - Clean title with only two registered owners. ———————————————

LOT-B

2. One property, with two separate titles, being separated by a barangay road passing through them: LOT NO. 4529, Situated at Valencia, Negros Oriental, containing an area of 1,189 square meters and LOT NO. 4528, Situated at Valencia, Negros Oriental, containing an area of 633 square meters - price for the whole property: PhP1.6 M. With more than a hundred standing matured lanzones trees. - Clean title with only one signatory to the deed of sale. ———————--——————-

LOT-C

3. BEACH LOT Situated at Dauin, Negros Oriental, containing an area of 7,081 square meters. - Negotiable Price: PhP 15.5M. - Only one signatory to the deed of sale LOT-D

4. LOT NO. 6805, Situated at Opao, Seit Siaton, Negros Oriental, containing an area of 22,432 square meters - Price: PhP60.00 per square meter. Elevated property with scenic view of Tambobo Bay where the Yachts can be seen being docked. Just a road away from the river - Clean title. With proper documents. ——————————------—— Contact: 0918-929-6047.

FOR SALE Sprawling 4.1 Has. of land Ideal for Downtown Subd., Sulodpan, Bacong Contact: 0918-929-6047

Real Estate

Call: 0918-929-6047 1. Commercial Lot K-10 Location: Looc Area 194 sq.m. Clean title P6 M negotiable 2. House & Lot K-11 Location: Bantayan Area 1,852sq.m. 6 bedrooms, garage, lawn huge sala, kitchen fence P10M negotiable Clean title

EXTRAJUDICIAL SETTLEMENT AND PARTITION WITH SIMULTANEOUS SALE OF A PORTION

NOTICE is hereby given that Marcela Sumanoy, Ambrosio Sumanoy and the heirs of Dionesio Sumanoy, namely:Francisco Sumanoy, Sr., Florencia Nuay, Pablita Sumanoy, Nicasio Sumanoy and Amancia Oberique have filed and executed an Extrajudicial Settlement And Partition With Simultaneous Sale Of A Portion of Lot 5893-C, TCT No. 1851, situated in Balugo, Dumaguete City in favor of Dioscora S. Patajo as notarized by Atty. Joel Obar under Doc. No. 465, Page No. 94, Book No. 49, Series of 2008. The Negros Chronicle Aug. 3, 10 & 17, 2008

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Contact 0918-929-6047

HOUSE AND LOT (K 1)

Area: 160 sqmtrs. Location: Casa Alicia Subd., Candau-ay, Dgte. City Price: P2.5M Description: 3 bedrooms, garage, lawn, with good neighbors.

HOUSE AND LOT (K 2) Area: 320 sqmtrs. Location: Casa Alicia Subd., Candau-ay, Dgte. City Price: P4M/ negotiable Description: 3 bedrooms, garage, lawn, with good neighbors.

HOUSE AND LOT (K 3)

Area: 250 sqmtrs. Location: Casa Alicia Subd., Dgte. City Price: P4M Description: 3 bedrooms, garage, lawn, with good neighbors.

AGRI LOT

HOUSE AND LOT (K 4)

Area: 900 sqmtrs. Price: P1.5M Location: Combado, Negros Oriental (Bacong) Description: Accepts 2 payments, 3 bedrooms, with underground, Garage, lawn, 3 rooms of piggery and respectful neighbors.

HOUSE AND LOT (K 5)

Area: 1,200 sqmtrs. Price: P 2M Location: Upper, Cantil-e Description: 3 bedrooms, garage, lawn, right of way and good Neighbors.

PEBEYY GOLD BUYER

We buy gold jewelries, (scrap / broken or good). Swiss watches and old coins (from 1903-1945). All transactions are confidential. Call Beth at 09176272665 or 09228183600 or 415-8574. EXTRAJUDICIAL SETTLEMENT AND PARTITION OF A RESIDENTIAL BUILDING WITH WAIVER OF RIGHTS NOTICE is hereby given that the heirs of the late PETROS BAILADO have filed and executed an Extrajudicial Settlement and Partition of a Residential Building With Waiver of Rights on a residential building situated at Poblacion, Bindoy, Negros Oriental, covered by TD No. 99-06-00100317 in favor of Nida M. Bailado, per Doc. No. 855, Page No. 79, Book No. VII, Series of 2008 of Notary Public Atty. Jose V. Carriaga. The Negros Chronicle Aug. 17, 24 & 31, 2008

AGRI LOT

The Negros Chronicle Aug. 17, 24 & 31, 2008

WANTED Bookkeeper Part-time Call: 0918-929-6047 Submit biodata, resume to: NEGROS CHRONICLE

(K 2)

Area: 2,280 sqmtrs. Price: P500 Thousand Location: Lutao, Bacong, Negros Oriental Description: 4 coconut trees and sources of wood trees.

HOUSE AND LOT (K 7) RUSH SALE

Location: Northern Junob, Four Bedrooms, Open style living area 2 CR’s (inc. ensuite to main bedroom) Sari-Sari Store - possible fifth bedroom Under Cover Parking, approx 8 minutes to downtown (4 mins. to Lee Super Plaza)

LOT FOR SALE (K 8)

Northern Junob, Area: 4,908 sq.m. Products: 100 coconut, Hundreds of corn plantation Price: P4.9M. Accept 2 payments, with Clean Title

BEACH LOT FOR SALE (K 9) Location: Sibulan; Area: 400 sq.m.; Price: P2M (negotiable) Clean Title

AGRI LOT

(K 3)

Area: 700 sqmtrs. Location: (Talay) East Balabag, Valencia City Price: P 350 Thousand Description: 3 bamboo trees, 2 jackfruits, with right of way, accepts two payments and Clean Title.

EXTRAJUDICIAL SETTLEMENT OF STATE NOTICE is hereby given that the heirs of the late Spouses SEMIONA V. MORIA and VICTOR MORIA have filed and executed an Extrajudicial Settlement of State on Lot No. 1871, Pls-146, covered by OCT HV-249, situated in Cambagahan, Bais City, Province of Negros Oriental, containing an area of 91,528 sq.m. per Doc. No. 388, Page No. 39, Book No. 30, Series of 2008 of Notary Public Atty. Joseph Ray S. Valencia.

(K 1)

Area: 14,700 sqmtrs. Location: 120 coconuts at Combado, Bacong, Negros Oriental, with Price: P4.5M negotiable Right of way and good neighbors.

Call: 09189296047

Beach LOTS for Sale Call: 0918-929-6047 Code Area B1 B2 B3 B4

3,400 sq. mtrs 1,200 sq. mtrs 1,085 sq. mtrs 1.4 hectare

Location

South Poblacion, Bacong Buntis, Bacong South Poblacion San Miguel Bacong (Near Ducomi) B5 20,000 sq. mtrs Bulak, Bacong B6 40,000 sq. mtrs Boundary Near Beach: of Bacong & Dauin B7 2,100 sq. mtrs South Poblacion, Bacong B8 2,900 sq. mtrs South Poblacion, Bacong

Price 10 M w/ clean title 1.5 M w/ clean title 2.5 M w/ clean title 15 M w/ clean title 15 M w/ clean title 40 M w/ clean title 2.3 M w/ clean title 3 M w/ clean title


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11 Federal regions ... (From page 1) Arroyo support means the support of majority of the congressmen in the lower house who are pro-administration. Proof of this is the all-out support of Negros Oriental’s congressmen Josy Limkaichong, George Arnaiz and Pryde Henry Teves of the three congressional districts. Thursday, Pimentel spoke before a jampacked NORSU gymnasium upon the invitation of NORSU President Dr. Henry Sojor; in the evening, Senator NENE was guest of DUMAGUETE TONIGHT over DYEM ENERGY FM, where he spent a full hour answering texts and questions from listeners. Next day, he spoke before all mayors of Negros Oriental courtesy of the three solons and Gov. Emilio Macias II. What is crucial is that the whole Congress will adopt the Pimentel \Resolution 10 , convene itself into a Constituent Assembly for the purpose of amending the Constitution , and voting separately. Dubbing his modified version of federalism as “the final solution within reason” of the country’s ills, veteran lawmaker Senator Aquilino Pimentel Jr. and main author of Senate Resolution No. 10 calling for a constituent assembly for the purpose of revising the constitution to establish a federal system of government visited the province Thursday to rally the people and local officials to

DOJ appoints ... (From page 1) commented on Trinidad’s appointment since the city’s trial court presiding judge is Mario Trinidad, a brother of the new fiscal. Hermosa himself admitted that the law prohibits a prosecutor and the trial judge to be related by blood. Primarily because of the absence of a city fiscal since May, the local Philippine National Police force headed by Chief Inspector Petronilo Dinglasa Gracia Jr informed Provincial Director Sr. Supt. Augusto Marquez Jr. that the following are the cases still pending and not acted upon: For murder and frustrated murder four cases with respondents being Rufil Belen aka Tongtong, Irol Vergara, Roger Lumapay, Randy Saguran, Felix Susas, Gerly Lanutan, Bentot Deniega and Romlex Etaw; five cases of grave threats with respondents namely Dionesio Baloy and Felipe Gelle; robbery raps against suspects Marlo Gallos, Alvin Bane, Rayle Hewmpesao, Danilo Maro, Bimbo Lanojan and Oscar Baybayanon and qualified theft with John Paul Martin as respondent. Chief Inspector Gracia said that the absence of a city fiscal only put to waste the efforts of the local policemen in running after the suspects who were released after the 36 hours reglamentary period had elapsed.

his cause. Pimentel, who was also guest of ENERGY FM’s radio public affairs program DUMAGUETE TONIGHT, argues that the shift to federalism will “speed up the economic development of the country and dissipate the causes of unrest in Mindanao.” Unlike in the present unitary set up, his proposal will allow the establishment of 11 federal states that will become “centers for power, finance and development.” To illustrate his point, Pimentel said that the sharing of revenues between the national government and local government units will be altered from 60-40 percent sharing to 20-80 percent in favor of the latter including taxes from the Bureau of Customs, Land Transportation Office, airports and seaports. Thus, if the city of Dumaguete gets only P 199 M IRA share this year it will be getting P 376 million once we shift to federalism. And the total share of taxes to be divided among Negros Oriental’s five cities namely Canlaon, Bais, Tanjay, Guihulngan, Dumaguete, and Bayawan will balloon from just P 1.5 Billion to P 2.9 Billion. Under Pimentel’s proposed measure the eleven federal states shall be the following: The State of Northern Luzon, The State of Central Luzon, The State of Southern Tagalog, The State of Minparom, The State of Bicol, The State of Eastern Visayas, The State of Central Visayas, The State of Western Visayas,

PAL is back ... (From page 1) life of Manila before transacting business first hour the following day. According to Rolly Estabillo, vice president for corporate communications, Dumaguete air traffic has now increased so much that PAL has to allot two flights to Manila daily. On such test, according to a regular Dumageute flier, while the plane is full, you do not have a single Dumageute acquaintance on board. He said: “We used to know almost everyone on board flights to Manila. Today, I’m surprised I do not recognize even one among the hundred or so, passengers how much more on a much bigger plane now.” This means that for every hundred or so plane passengers, they could most definitely mean they are transients, visitors, investors, students, overseas workers, and even down right balikbayans, who also no longer recognize most people even their own neighbors.

The State of Northern Mindanao, The State of Southern Mindanao, The State of Bangsamoro and the Federal Administrative Region of Metro Manila. But the country will remain presidential with the three branches of government literally separated. The Legislative Branch will be in the Visayas, the Judiciary in Mindanao and the chief executive remaining in Malacanang. The Federal Republic of the Philippines will still have a single constitution, one police force, one foreign policy, one Armed Force to maintain the integrity of the national territory and one judiciary but with 11 branches of the Court of Appeals By Pimentel’s reckoning, some sixteen or seventeen of his colleagues in the upper chamber have endorsed the concept of federalizing the country but as to the mode of how to revise the constitution to effect the shift whether thru Constituent Assembly or Constitutional Convention “varies from one Senator to another.” Surprisingly, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has also expressed support to the resolution. Negros Oriental’s three district representatives Jocelyn Limkaichong (1st District), George Arnaiz (2nd District) and Pryde Henry Teves (3rd District) like their counterparts in the Lower House have already endorsed the resolution. Pimentel also won over the support of most mayors after he presented the measure during a consultation hosted by the local government unit of Amlan, Friday.

35

Simply charge Electricity 4 to 6 hours Runs up to 1500 km non-stop! *Using E.R.M. *Exclusive regenerative module

Students criticize ... (From page 1)

It takes A ...

(Jenny)

(From page 5)

There are two versions feed their lust for more long-time city chief detective Lt. Antonio “Tonying” which I would like us to redrugs.”

The Silliman University College of Nursing Association or SUCNA which governs the welfare of nursing students at SU, wrote the city mayor and the city council expressing their great alarm on the rampant incidents of snatching in the City. “We do not feel the protection of our law enforcement agencies in the midst of our daily activities. As students we usually end up late in our scholastic work…..We have night duty exposure.. We usually work till the late hours to maximize our time,” wrote SUCNA student government president Rochelle Bacay as noted by SU nursing dean Dr Teresita SySinda. Sinda noted how sophisticated crime commission has developed through the years in Dumaguete when there was a time when one can walk through the entire Perdices street at night without being harmed or robbed. Sinda is the daughter of

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Sy who was respected and feared by the people. His team also swooped down over city crime joints in no time after the first report. But not anymore today.

They recommended the following: More police visibility especially along Hibbard and Silliman Ave where most students reside; activate the Tanods in downtown barangays; apprehend non-registered motorcycles; surveillance on motorbike rentals where robbers patronize; and wider information dissemination campaign in school campuses through leaflets on how and what to watch out and when fighting criminality. One nursing student was killed years back when a robber entered her boarding house thinking it was empty. Taken were her lap top and cell phones. Most of the loot are lap tops, cell phones, wallets, jewelry under threat of being shot or harmed.

visit: Luke 18:15-17 says, ‘People were bringing even infants to him that he might touch them; and when the disciples saw it, they sternly ordered them not to do it. But Jesus called for them and said, “Let the little children come to me and do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs. Truly I tell you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” While, Matthew 18:1-5. At that time the disciples came to Jesus and asked, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” He called a child whom he put among the, and said, “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever becomes humble like this child

The robbers did not even spare student editorial journalists and student government officials.

is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me.” Indeed, we have much to learn from children. Here are some examples of what they say. I am sure we can learn a thing or to from them. Not all learning can be measured by grades. –(Beth, age 16) When you don’t know what you’re doing, ask for help before you mess up. –(Jennifer, age 14) I should never make a decision unless I’m willing to accept the consequences. (Stacey, age 17) Sometimes the most loving answer is no. (-Leslie, age 12) It is OK to fail, but it is not OK to give up. – (Kate, age 8) You should be careful around those younger than you. It is surprising how much of an impact a word or action can make on them. – (Sarah, age 12) They are small voices but they ring loud and true. In a country drowning in a sea of bad decisions and wrong choices, perhaps when we finally listen and humble ourselves like children, we will find our way back home.


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Aug 17 2008  

Dumaguete City, Philippines, Sunday AUGUST 17, 2008 VOL. 35 No. 10 less, are supporting the transfer of the center of power to 11 re- gions...

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