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2011

co m m u n i t y

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Compassionate, quality healthcare. What a privilege it is to touch lives by making a difference in the health of our community. Our team members fulfill our mission to heal the sick and to improve the health of the community, every day. We are honored to be ranked among the Top 5 percent of hospitals for clinical excellence in the nation by HealthGrades, an independent organization that provides information to help consumers make informed decisions. While the national attention is humbling, our focus remains on you – the people of our region. We continue working to serve you better with major investments in the quality of healthcare, including the new hospital scheduled to open in 2013. We continue to invest in technology to increase our efficiency and enhance your care, including the Epic electronic medical record system, which will be fully operational in 2012. Our Community Benefit Grant Program provided over a half million dollars in grants to regional non-profit organizations. The OMHS Get Movin’ Challenge, a partnership with the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce, attracted 188 teams that exercised for a combined total of nearly four million minutes. Our decision to become smoke-free in 2012 is an important step too in our commitment to community health. We are grateful to our talented physicians, staff, partners and volunteers – great people who make a difference every day. And we thank you for trusting us to provide compassionate, quality care.

Jeff Barber, Dr. pH, FAcHe P R E S I D E N T

&

C H I E F

E X E C U T I V E

J. Alan Braden, cpA O F F I C E R

C H A I R M A N

O F T H E

B O A R D


Everything went quickly,“ Gentry says, “I truly believe I got the best care for lung cancer in the United States.

From cAncer...to tHe clAssroom A cancer diagnosis can imply an uncertain future. But for Jo Gentry, early detection of her lung cancer and less invasive robotic-assisted surgery enabled her to bounce back to daily life sooner than she could have expected. Gentry’s oncologist, Jewraj Maheshwari, M.D. recommended that she have her tumor surgically removed. Cardiothoracic Surgeon Doug Adams, M.D., suggested a robotic-assisted option and Gentry got on board. After only a three-night stay, Gentry went home. Two weeks later, she restarted her walking routine in an abbreviated fashion with her husband, Sam.


WE ArE PrOud THAT nATiOnAl OrGAnizATiOnS rAnk OMHS AMOnG THE BEST HOSPiTAlS AnyWHErE. WE ArE HuMBlEd WHEn HEAlTHCArE lEAdErS frOM ACrOSS THE COunTry CAll uS, lOOkinG fOr WAyS THEy CAn iMPrOvE. BuT Our fOCuS rEMAinS WHErE iT HAS AlWAyS BEEn – On yOu, THE PEOPlE Of Our rEGiOn.

We provide compassionate, quality care. Owensboro Medical Health System serves an 11-county region in western kentucky and southern indiana. The hospital, licensed to operate 477 beds, has received awards for clinical excellence (2009, 2010, 2011, 2012), patient safety (2010) and outstanding patient experience (2010/2011) from HealthGrades, placing OMHS among the top 5 percent of hospitals in the country for quality. it’s nice to know that we have one of the best hospitals in the country, right here at home. Most of us don’t have a lot of time to plan our hospital stays. When serious health issues arise, you need healthcare you can trust and you need it right now. OMHS is here for you.

We care. Our compassion drives our staff to improve the quality of care we provide. We know it’s not enough to say it. We have to prove it.

That’s why the rankings from HealthGrades and other statistics you’ll see in this report are so important. Those numbers, compiled by independent national organizations, provide consumers with the Ranked among information they need to the top 5% in the make informed decisions about their healthcare. nation for clinical And those numbers say excellence for the OMHS is among the best in the nation.

last four years in a row.

you know us. We have a staff of more than 3,300. We are friends, neighbors and volunteers in the region we all call home. When we are not caring for patients, you might see our staff members serving the homeless a meal, helping children with special needs discover their talents or rescuing abandoned animals from area shelters. Through our Community Benefit Program, we invest in non-profit organizations serving our region.

“Patients today have a wide array of options when it comes to choosing a healthcare provider,” said kerry Hicks, HealthGrades chief executive officer. “At HealthGrades, we are proud to have led the way for empowering patient choice based on objective clinical outcomes and access to actionable quality measures. We commend Owensboro Medical Health System for its superior quality and support of consumers and transparency.”

Our compassion drives our staff to improve the quality of care we provide. We know it’s not enough to say it. We have to prove it.


In October of 2011, HealthGrades named OMHS as the No. 1 hospital in Kentucky for neurosciences and the treatment of stroke. OMHS also received the following designations:

• One of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care • One of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Critical Care

quick Action tAken, lessons leArneD Jim Gauley will be the first to tell you that his heart attack was a shock. He became ill one day while teaching at Heritage Christian School, thinking he only had a bad case of indigestion. After a quick trip to the doctor, Gauley was sent to the emergency department right away. “They were on me like a NASCAR pit crew,” he said of the hospital staff and, “Dr. Roshan Mathew was there within minutes of my arriving.” Within 60 minutes the blockages in the arteries that had caused the heart attack had been opened. “I was so thankful to have had such good medical care from the cardiac (team) at our hospital.”

than the national average in recent years. That translates into 601 more lives saved than predicted between 2002 and 2008. OMHS is modeling the principles of a High reliability Organization. The goal is Choosing a hospital can be an important to create a culture and processes that decision. The institute for Healthcare radically reduce system failures and improvement (iHi), a national healthcare effectively respond when failures do occur. improvement organization, tracks patient We never stop looking mortality rates as one of the We never stop for ways to improve your leading indicators of the quality of care. looking for ways to care.

OMHS was ranked the best in kentucky for cardiology, cardiac care and coronary interventional procedures.

The numbers demonstrate improve your care. One example is in our heart program. The how individual hospitals OMHS program compare to the national eliminates blockages in averages for patient deaths 71 minutes, on average, compared to the 90while hospitalized. This is one measure minute standard developed by the where the lower the number, the better. American Heart Association and the The OMHS mortality rate has dramatically American College of Cardiology. improved through consistent efforts to “When a heart attack occurs, time saved is improve quality. OMHS’s patient mortality heart muscle saved,” said Christopher rate has consistently been 20 percent lower


See more of John’s minimally invasive heart surgery story...

keeping JoHn’s motor runnin’ John Stormshak and his family couldn’t believe how quickly he recovered from double bypass heart surgery. Minimally invasive heart surgeries are made possible with advanced robotics, such as the two da VinciTM systems at OMHS, in the hands of skillful surgeons like Doug Adams, MD, Stormshak’s doctor. Stormshak was eager to get back to the things he loves, including his prized 1967 Camaro, which he restored himself. “Surgery at OMHS got me back in the garage and back to my life in record time.”

Havelda, Md, a cardiologist and OMHS task force chairperson. “We established a task force to implement changes that have shortened response times and saved lives.”

and include amenities like sofa sleepers and desks to better serve families and guests. Even better – the facility’s functional design will allow nurses to spend more time with patients.

OMHS continues to invest in technology that improves patient care, such as advanced robotics for minimally invasive surgeries and a new electronic medical record system for improved patient safety and convenience.

OMHS is “an organization relentlessly in the pursuit of the highest level of quality,” according to Jim Conway, senior vice president of the institute for Healthcare improvement. He went on to praise the hospital’s “passion for care and caring and a commitment to serving their patients, families, staff and community.”

A new state-of-the-art hospital is under construction and will be open in 2013, offering the latest innovations in technology and high quality care. Patient rooms will be more spacious,

It’s incredible, hard to fathom,” Stormshak says of his quick recovery after his operation.


We offer care that is just as special as you are. in 2011, OMHS drAMATiCAlly EnHAnCEd SErviCES fOr WOMEn And CHildrEn AS WEll AS HEArT CArE And OrTHOPAEdiCS WiTH nEW PrOGrAMS And CliniCS.

Kosair Children’s Outpatient Center – Owensboro is now open. Pediatric specialists from university of louisville Pediatrics staff the center at our Parrish Avenue campus.

BriDget BursHeArs, mD, in tHe neonAtAl intensive cAre unit At omHs

“We are thrilled to have kosair Children’s Hospital as a partner,” said Jeff Barber, president and CEO of OMHS. “We are confident that bringing in specialty care for children will better serve families in our region.” This outpatient clinic at OMHS allows us to treat children in our own community, keeping families together and closer to home. The program grew from a partnership already established with the university of louisville’s neonatal Associates, which provides neonatal services for premature babies and infants with short-term illnesses.

OMHS acquired Green River Heart in late 2010, and the change has enhanced the high quality rosHAn k. mAtHew, mD preventative, cArDiologist medical and rehabilitative heart services the clinic is known for. “Together with OMHS, we are able to provide the very best and latest in cardiac care to patients in this area,” said roshan k. Mathew, Md, cardiologist at Green river Heart.

We are thrilled to have Kosair as a partner We are confident that bringing in specialty care for children will better serve families in our region. JeFF BArBer, Dr.pH presiDent AnD ceo, omHs


The Bone & Joint Center, a new orthopaedic clinic, brought Dr. Anthony McBride to Owensboro when it opened in July.

The Center for Integrative Medicine offers a new concept for our region by offering primary medical care blended with complementary therapies for women.

AntHony mcBriDe, mD ortHopAeDic surgeon

McBride offers complete orthopaedic care, including an innovative treatment called anterior hip replacement, where the patient’s hip joint is accessed from the front of the body instead of the traditional backside approach. The direct anterior method allows the hip to be replaced without detaching muscle from the pelvis or thigh bone, and offers a number of advantages for patients when compared to conventional surgery, including a hospital stay of four days or less – compared to as much as 10 days. “direct anterior hip surgery allows us to work through the body’s natural space between the muscles,” McBride said. “it leaves the most essential muscles for hip function undisturbed and, therefore, leads to quicker recovery after surgery.”

“Our focus is on women because we often are unsuccessful in making our healthcare a priority,” said kay Corpus, Md, the center’s family medicine physician. if you have high blood pressure, Corpus might recommend medication, but she may also suggest quiet meditation. The center offers traditional medicine as well as alternative therapies. “it cherry picks the best of all worlds,” she said. “integrative medicine gives you a broader treatment plan for your illness, putting together the best of what’s out there.”

kAy corpus, mD integrAtive meDicine expert

Just ask OMHS Employees– Providing quality, compassionate care feels pretty good. So does giving back.

With a heart for kids, Brenda Berry, OMHS Case Management – gives back in numerous ways. Brenda Berry recently started a youth group at her church and is looking forward to mentoring a child through Mentor Kids Kentucky. Berry, a secretary in OMHS case management, moved to Utica two years ago from Washington state. “In Washington, I had mentored a girl from second grade through high school,” said Berry, a mother of two. She is awaiting her new assignment through Mentor Kids.

Since moving to the Owensboro area, she has organized a youth group at Century Christian Church. The group includes middle school and high school students.

“I want to help them find their own faith, not just their parent’s faith,” she said. She meets with the group on Wednesday evenings, helping them see the connection between lessons in the Bible and their everyday lives. She also organizes activities for the youth such as cooking and serving at the Daniel Pitino Shelter. “They need to volunteer,” she said. “The kids are great, and I want them to learn that they need to give back.”


Growth for OMHS means reaching out to serve you better, no matter where you are. WE HAvE OPEnEd A nEW CliniC AT WAlMArT And ExPAndEd THE MCAulEy CliniC And PriMAry CArE CEnTEr, SO yOu CAn GET THE BASiC HEAlTHCArE yOu nEEd WHEn yOu nEEd iT.

“We are glad we can serve families in our community when they need us,” says Ronda Reynolds, Manager of the OMHS Clinics at Walmart.

The Clinic at Walmart recently opened in the South frederica store in Owensboro. Just like our similar clinics in newburgh (in), Henderson and the kentucky 54 location in Owensboro, this clinic serves busy people who have minor medical needs, especially after hours and on weekends. it provides affordable basic services, seven days a week, with no appointment necessary. “Our experience with walk-in clinics in Walmart has shown us the importance of offering convenient, affordable, quality care for patients,” said ronda reynolds, manager of the OMHS Clinics at Walmart. “We are glad we can serve families in our community when they need us.”

mAry DAnHAuer, Aprn, At tHe mcAuley clinic

A growing number of residents in our community have no health insurance and have few options for medical care. OMHS has responded by tripling the size of the McAuley Clinic, which serves the uninsured. “The need is tremendous,” said Mary danhauer, the clinic’s advanced practice registered nurse. “We have seen 80 to 100 new patients per month.” Through a partnership with Wendell foster’s Campus for developmental disabilities, OMHS was able to move the clinic from the daniel Pitino Shelter to ninth and Center Streets. The former location had just two exam rooms. The new facility has five.


OMHS is now a Primary Stroke Center

When you suffer a stroke, every second counts. The Journal of the American Medical Association reports that people who suffered acute ischemic stroke – one caused by a clot that stops blood flow to the brain – are more likely to survive if they receive care at a primary stroke center like Owensboro Medical Health System.

Primary stroke centers are more likely to rapidly give patients an intravenous (IV) drug used to dissolve blood clots. Getting that quick treatment allows brain flow to resume. Any delay in treatment increases the risk that brain tissue will die. “Patients who seek care quickly have greater chances of fully recovering from the effects of the stroke,” said Joni Sims, director of medicalsurgical nursing at OMHS. Each year, about 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke, which is the nation’s fourth leading cause of death and the number one cause of serious, long term disability in the

OMHS renovated the building, which it rents from Wendell foster for just $1 per year. “By joining our resources, we hope to help meet a need that might not have been possible without mutual effort,” said Terry Brownson, chief executive officer for the Wendell foster Campus.

Dirck curry, Do, At tHe primAry cAre center

The Primary Care Center has moved to a larger facility in the Breckenridge Medical Office Building near the main hospital. if you don’t have a primary care physician, the center can help with a variety of services, including preventative medicine.

United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds and someone dies of a stroke every four minutes. “When a patient has a stroke-like symptom, it is important to call 911 immediately so they can be taken to the closest hospital emergency department to be evaluated,” Sims said. “The quick response increases a person’s chances of being a candidate for the clotbusting drug, which can only be given within three hours of initial stroke symptoms.”

Just ask OMHS Employees– Providing quality, compassionate care feels pretty good. So does giving back. Daniel and Thompson keep in close contact with the shelter. Because of limited resources, dogs can only stay at the shelter five days before they are euthanized. Working through a network of rescue organizations and resources such as www.petfinder.com, the friends group can usually find homes for the animals within five to six weeks.

Through an effort started by two animal lovers, 600 dogs in Ohio County have been rescued. When Susan Daniel and Tina Thompson learned that 80 percent of the dogs that end up at the Ohio County Animal Shelter are euthanized, they decided to do something about it. They formed the Friends of the Ohio County Animal Shelter. Thompson serves as president of the group, and Daniel serves as vice president. They provide foster care for the dogs, either at their homes or at the homes of other volunteers, until they can find permanent homes for the animals. Daniel, a nurse practitioner at the OMHS Primary Care Center, has had about 250 dogs at her home in Hartford over the past year. “I have 7 right now, and I think Tina has 23. We have another 10 divided up among other families,” she said. “We’ve had over 600 dogs in our care over the past year.”

See more of Susan’s story and how employees are giving back...


Our mission is everything. We exist to heal the sick and to improve the health of our community. WE ASPirE TO HElP yOu TO STAy WEll. A healthy organization needs healthy employees. in 2011, Owensboro Medical Health System launched the Get Movin’ Wellness Committee, a group of employees focused on healthy initiatives for their co-workers. “Over the last 15 years, our organization has operated with a mission to heal the sick and to improve the health of the community,” said Jeff Barber, OMHS president and chief executive officer. “There’s no better place to renew our efforts for health improvement than with our own workforce.”

“leaning on the expertise of our HealthPark staff and building on the success of the Get Movin’ Challenge, we continue to create new and fun ways to increase physical activity for our employees,” Barber said. “We also have expanded education about eating healthy.”

The second half of our Mission, to improve the health of our community, is sharply in focus.

As OMHS transitions to the new hospital, the employee wellness committee is focused on increasing health education, physical activity and exercise and efforts to reduce obesity. Employees and their spouses have the opportunity to participate in health assessments that measure body mass index, blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.

The committee recommended that all OMHS facilities – including the hospital, clinics, diagnostic centers and physician practices – have smoke-free grounds starting January 1, 2012.

The HealthPark has maintained smoke-free grounds since it opened in 1998. The organization offers free smoking cessation classes for employees. “As the region’s leading healthcare organization, we need to work together to improve the health of our community,” Barber said. “Making OMHS a smokefree system will help us get there.”


tAking steps to move ForwArD Aaron Johnson made a move to do regular strength training and cardiovascular exercise. He’s lost weight, can run farther and feels significantly better than before he started working out regularly. Aaron does strength training utilizing the personal training expertise of Charles Pettigrew and runs three days a week.

See more of Aaron’s story and how the HealthPark is helping people move forward...

All Owensboro Medical Health System facilities are now smoke-free. “it wasn’t the easiest decision, but it is the right one for patients and employees alike,” said Jeff Barber, dr. PH, OMHS president and chief executive officer. “i am proud of OMHS for taking this important step to lead our community to better health.” Smoking is not allowed on any part of the hospital grounds, OMHS clinics, diagnostic facilities or physician offices. Smoking is the leading cause of disease and preventable death in the united States, and secondhand smoke poses health risks to non-smokers. “Providing areas to smoke does not support our goals and mission to create a healthier environment for our patients, their families, our employees and community,” Barber said. The smoke-free grounds policy applies to everyone on any property owned or leased by OMHS – employees, physicians, contractors, vendors, patients, visitors, volunteers – anyone. “if you smoke, we encourage you to consider how becoming a non-smoker will help you feel better, give you more energy and even save your hard-earned money,” Barber said.

Much of the damage caused by smoking is reversible, so it's never too late to quit. "Put out that final cigarette and your health will improve in just 20 minutes," said kay Corpus, Md, a family medicine physician at the Center for integrative Medicine. “your risk of suffering a heart attack decreases in 24 hours and your ability to taste and smell is enhanced in 48 hours.” Choosing not to smoke lowers your risk of cancer and heart disease. it also improves the health of those around you. OMHS is dedicated to helping you achieve your goal of living a smoke-free life. We work along with others to provide education, resources, support and encouragement. for a list of resources on smoking cessation, visit omhs.org.

As the region’s leading healthcare organization, we need to work together to improve the health of our community.


Wellness is respecting who you are and all that you can become. Compassionate, quality preventative care is what we do. OWEnSBOrO MEdiCAl HEAlTH SySTEM JOinEd fOrCES WiTH THE GrEATEr OWEnSBOrO CHAMBEr Of COMMErCE in 2011 fOr THE GET MOvin’ CHAllEnGE. And, wow, did our community move.

“it has made an unbelievable difference in my life,” he said. He not only feels better, but he is happy to be setting an example for a healthy lifestyle for his children.

More than 1,500 participated on 188 teams. nearly half of the teams exercised up to 30 minutes or more per day. By the end of the The Get Movin’ Challenge encourages competition, the participants logged almost participants to lead four million minutes of exercise healthier lifestyles and and shed about 1,100 pounds. At OMHS - we exist add more physical to heal the sick and activity to their Now, that’s moving. to improve the health routines. nine groups received grants of our community. Health professionals and prizes. And Brian recommend 30 Hofstrom would tell you he got minutes of exercise at even more. least five days a week for optimum health. Hofstrom won the most improved weight “The importance of regular physical activity category among other honors. He lost 30 pounds during the 12-week competition and cannot be overstated,” said Collette Carter, lost 40 more in the months that followed. director of the OMHS HealthPark. “Helping people increase their levels of activity will pay big dividends in health and wellness.”


Hofstrom won the most improved weight category among other honors. He lost 30 pounds during the 12week competition and lost 40 more in the months that followed. BriAn HoFstrom DroppeD 70 pounDs AnD set A gooD exAmple oF HeAltH For His kiDs While Brian Hofstrom took home a handful of first place prizes in the Get Movin’ 2011 Challenge, he’s more apt to tout what he considers to be his most valuable rewards: A healthier lifestyle and the positive example he’s setting for his children.

regular exercise can lower blood pressure while increasing energy. it is a key component in maintaining a healthy weight, which lowers the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and arthritis.

It has made an unbelievable difference in my life,” Brian said. He not only feels better, but he is happy to be setting an example for a healthy lifestyle for his children.


epic soFtwAre encourAges inFormeD pAtients, Better cAre Your medical records are available to all of your doctors and healthcare providers.

“Getting information and requesting appointments are

WiTH A nEW MEdiCAl rECOrd SySTEM, APTly CAllEd EPiC, HEAlTHCArE WOrkErS And PHySiCiAnS AT OWEnSBOrO MEdiCAl

HEAlTH SySTEM And in HOSPiTAl-OWnEd CliniCS Will HAvE yOur

easier, more convenient for

lATEST infOrMATiOn inSTAnTly. THE SySTEM EnHAnCES PATiEnT

patients in MyChart,” said

SAfETy, COnvEniEnCE And CArE.

David Danhauer, MD, who is leading the electronic medical record project. “Giving patients information online allows them to become more active and informed participants in their own healthcare.”

That’s good medicine. The Epic system also includes MyChart, a feature that will allow you to communicate more easily with your physician and other healthcare providers. lab results, appointments, medications and more can be accessed securely online from your home computer – 24 hours a day. “Getting information and requesting appointments is easier, more convenient for patients in MyChart,” said david danhauer, Md, who is leading the electronic

medical record project. “Giving patients information online allows them to become more active and informed participants in their own healthcare.” Epic is a premier electronic medical record (EMr) system. One-third of the nation’s doctors are using or will soon be using the system. That adds up to 80 million patient charts, and that number grows daily. The system means better care for patients. for example, if a patient arrives at the emergency room


Advancing technology makes everything better and easier – communication, shopping, banking and even healthcare. OCTC President Jim klauber said the college is proud to have partnered with OMHS to provide approximately 5,000 training hours for hospital employees. Epic will streamline Working with sharing of information, community partners, such as OCTC, is one whether it’s between of the ways OMHS provides quality, departments at the compassionate hospital, between healthcare for the OMHS and your doctor people in our region.

with chest pain, the clinicians there can instantly access medical records from his doctor, a comprehensive medical history and any recent test results. “There’s no way of knowing how much we can do for patients in years to come with an EMr like Epic,” danhauer said. “The evidence is out there; we know it will help us save lives.” The system includes safety checks at every click. Patient rooms equipped with computer work stations allow nurses to scan patient wrist bands and medications when administering care. in the unlikely event a mistake is made, a warning would appear on the computer screen. it’s another layer of safety to improve patient care.

or between OMHS and another hospital across the country.

Patient safety is always at the top or our list – whether that chart is on paper or in a computer database. Staff members from all OMHS facilities have gone through a rigorous training process to ensure a smooth transition to the electronic system. Owensboro Community and Technical College partnered with OMHS to secure a $500,000 grant through ky WinS to help defray the training costs.

Epic will streamline sharing of information, whether it’s between departments at the hospital, between OMHS and your doctor or between OMHS and another hospital across the country.

“The new system will affect every part of the hospital,” danhauer said. “Therefore, the installation will give us opportunities to look at and improve patient care and our processes in every area.”


A new day is dawning in healthcare. AlTHOuGH THE nEW OMHS HOSPiTAl WOn’T OPEn unTil 2013, iT HAS AlrEAdy HAd A TrEMEndOuS iMPACT On Our COMMuniTy. The net result is a healthy bottom line for our region. After the hospital opens, it will mean even more. “With the guidance and input of our community, we are striving to create a center for healing and wellness for generations to come,” Barber said.

The project has resulted in more than $52 million in contracts for area companies. it has created approximately 650 construction jobs and generated $31 million in wages. it’s no coincidence that daviess County’s unemployment rate dropped two percent from May to October, 2011, according to the u.S. Bureau of labor Statistics.

The new hospital is designed to enhance patient care – from life-saving technology to comfortable rooms for patients. And then there are the windows – lots of

“The skyline has changed dramatically since last winter,” said Jeff Barber, dr.PH, Construction Jobs: Peak Manpower by Trade president of OMHS. “i appreciate the 7 17 36 30 tremendous effort being put forth by 5 25 5 everyone involved in the project.” 15 211 66

And we’re just getting started. *The Greater Owensboro Economic development Corporation (EdC) projected in 2009 that the new hospital will lead to the creation of 500 new long-term healthcare jobs. And so far, 300 have been added. Because healthcare impacts so many parts of the regional economy, EdC also estimated that the new facility would generate a total of 800 new jobs throughout the region and more than $24 million in new payroll earnings.

107

3 18 46

171 10 35

8

171

Site Grading/Site Utilities Soil Improvement Site Water Site Concrete & Roadway Improvements Landscaping Interior Masonry Structural Concrete  Structural Steel Cranes/Hoisting Spray Fireproofing Exterior Cladding Roofing Drywall Painting Flooring & Tile Pneumatic Tube System Electrical Mechanical/Plumbing Fire Sprinklers Turner Construction (non-office labor) TOTAL

36 30 5 25 5 15 66 107 3 18 46 10 171 8 5 3 171 211 7 17 959

windows – to offer every patient an expansive view of nature to promote healing.

*As reported by the Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corp. using U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis multipliers.


growing to Best serve you AnD tHose you love The new hospital will offer the latest in technological advances and healthcare. It is our sincere hope that all of the added attention to detail will make it a place where healing is less stressful and more relaxing.

ones close by makes everyone feel better. The At OMHS, we are working every day to heal OMHS fitness Trail will allow employees and the sick and to improve the health of the guests to relieve stress and community. Every inch of enjoy the beauty of the the new hospital is 160-acre campus between designed to promote With the guidance Pleasant valley road and healing and wellness. and input of our daniels lane. The patient rooms will be comfortable for patients community, we are The new hospital isn’t just and their families. They an OMHS project, but it’s a striving to create a will accommodate the community project that has latest technology, center for healing received gifts from including bedside and wellness for individuals and electronic charting, to organizations across the generations to allow our doctors, nurses region. Two gifts totaling and other staff to provide come,” Barber said. $1.25 million – one from the highest quality patient the OMHS volunteer care. Auxiliary and another from the Michael E. Horn family foundation – will go toward a The new facility will include hospitality suites chapel, courtyard and water feature. for families of patients who are receiving care far from home. We know having your loved

The patient rooms will be comfortable for patients and their families. They will accommodate the latest technology, including bedside electronic charting, to allow our doctors, nurses and other staff to provide the highest quality patient care.


“The gifts made by these donors will enable us to construct a beautiful and peaceful chapel for patients, visitors and family members,” said Waitman Taylor, executive director of the OMHS foundation for Health. “Our desire is that the chapel will provide a supportive environment for prayer, reading and reflection.” The foundation for Health acts as a bridge between the community and OMHS, providing others with the opportunity to support the mission of the hospital. foundation members are working to raise $5 million to enhance patient amenities at the new hospital.

The new facility will include hospitality suites for families of patients who are receiving care far from home. We know having your loved ones close by makes everyone feel better.

“Giving to the new OMHS hospital will make a big difference in the services we provide the community in the years to come,” said dean Jones, chairman of the foundation’s campaign. “it’s also a way to say thank you. if you’ve appreciated the medical care you’ve received, it’s nice to think about helping to provide that care to others.” A renDering oF A HospitAlity suite.


OMHS Impacts Local and Regional Economy

Awarded Contracts as of Oct. 15, 2011

Value of subcontracts/purchase orders to all KY contractors/vendors to-date: $116,000,000 Total value of subcontracts/purchase orders to Evansville contractors/vendors to-date: $10,372,485

Total Value of subcontracts/purchase orders awarded/issued to-date:  $231,200,000

Estimated value of labor/payroll to local labor (on site construction workers):  $31,000,000

Value of subcontracts/purchase orders to local contractors/vendors to-date:  $52,200,000* *Local refers to Owensboro firms and those within 50 miles of project site.

Manpower: 630 – 650 workers on site

3218

3147

3057

2789 2454 ‘02

2496

‘01

2422

‘00

2557

‘99

2439

‘98

2318

2163 ‘97

2373

‘96

2281

‘95

2058

2019

3033

3383

OMHS Workforce Continues to Grow

‘03

‘04

‘05

‘06

‘07

‘08

‘09

‘10

‘11

AnD growing... When the Owensboro-Daviess County and Mercy hospitals merged in 1995 the combined employment of both organizations stood at just above 2,000. We’ve continued to see our hospital and clinics grow, adding jobs year after year. Today, we’ve become the region’s largest employer with more than 3,300 employees.


Our mission to heal the sick and to improve the health of the community doesn’t end at our doorstep. That’s why the OMHS Community Benefit Program is so important. “WE ArE COMMiTTEd TO SuPPOrTinG nOn-PrOfiT COMMuniTy OrGAnizATiOnS And PuBliC EnTiTiES WHOSE CHAriTABlE PurPOSES AliGn WiTH Our MiSSiOn,” SAid dEBBiE zuErnEr JOHnSOn,

OMHS MAnAGEr Of COMMuniTy OuTrEACH.

OMHS awards over a half million dollars to grant recipients each year.

the Community needs Health Assessment. This new addition to our website includes data on the numerous health issues facing our community. This information is valuable to any organization considering making a grant application.

“OMHS provided funding for 49 deserving organizations, set a record for united Way funding, and rolled out a new website to Visit www.omhs.org for the latest measure information on the Community community health,” said Jeff Needs Health Assessment. This new Barber. “OMHS addition to our website includes data truly has a heart for the people we on the numerous health issues facing serve.”

our community.

non-profit organizations that provide services and programs addressing health needs may apply for financial assistance through the Community Benefit Program. To qualify, activities must demonstrate measurable improvement in health status, access to care or use of healthcare resources. Grant applicants, or anyone who is interested, may visit www.omhs.org for the latest information on

Employees from throughout OMHS serve on a 19-member committee that reviews all applications and makes recommendations. The process has become more detailed in recent years as OMHS has required applicants to show measurable outcomes. Two basic reasons exist for the changes - the hospital wants to make sure it is investing its grant dollars wisely to make the largest impact on health issues in the community, and also to be mindful of the changing irS regulations that govern the way it makes grants.


Boulware Mission: Community Benefit Recipient

Good nutrition and physical activity are important to all of us. See more of how Boulware’s clients are benefitting from regular exercise and a healthier lifestyle...

When the homeless come to mind, we may think only of housing needs and substance abuse or recovery – but it’s important to focus on good nutrition and physical activity as well to help develop a healthy lifestyle. With the help of a grant from OMHS, Boulware Mission has added a fitness room and offers nutrition classes for residents to help them learn to make healthier lifestyle choices.

The Boulware Mission strives to alleviate homelessness, one life at a time, through education, treatment and services. The focus is on recovery from the root causes that brought about homelessness in the first place.

Boulware offers both emergency shelter and long term, comprehensive services for homeless men, women and children. Boulware primarily serves the Green River Area Development District, which includes Daviess, Hancock, Henderson, McLean, Ohio, Union and Webster counties in western Kentucky.

The Way of Rockport: Community Benefit Recipient

BoulwAre mission HAs ADDeD A Fitness room AnD oFFers nutrition clAsses For clients

As a faith-based organization, The Way of Rockport operates with a mission to restore the lives of individuals broken by substance abuse. Its programs include Celebrate Recovery and The Landing, along with a transitional housing facility.

tHe wAy oF rockport’s celeBrAtion stAtion oFFers cHilDren oF pArticipAnts A new outlook

While parents work with a topic at a Celebrate Recovery meeting, children learn about the same issue at a Celebration Station meeting— but on a level and in language they understand. Bi-weekly sessions include songs, games, skits, carefully selected scripture stories, journaling and free play.

Restore the lives of individuals broken by substance abuse.

Thanks to grant funding, The Way of Rockport created programs for children to help break the cycle of substance abuse in families. While Celebrate Recovery is a program to help adults recover from addictions, Celebration Station was created for their children.

Children also discover important life skills in a safe place where they can share their feelings.


Grants also are available to non-profit groups providing activities that are not directly related to healthcare. However, those organizations must describe how their services address root causes of community health issues. Eligible groups include economic, educational, civic and cultural organizations. Programs, services and activities must serve people in the OMHS service area, including daviess, Hancock, Ohio, Henderson, Hopkins, Mclean, Muhlenberg, Breckinridge

and Webster counties in kentucky and Spencer and Perry counties in indiana. This year, OMHS moved to a single funding cycle with the application process beginning in the spring. Organizations are required to submit a letter of intent. The committee selects the programs that best align with the OMHS mission, and those organizations are invited to proceed with the grant process. OMHS continues to offer mini grants of up to $1,000 throughout the year.

Care Net Pregnancy Center of Owensboro: Community Benefit Recipient

OMHS and Care Net Pregnancy Center are both bonkers when it comes to babies. Care Net, a Christian non-profit organization, is able to offer Operation Ultrasound and Bonkers for Babies programs with the help of a grant from OMHS. Operation Ultrasound allows women to have ultrasounds as early in the pregnancy as possible to ensure early prenatal care. Bonkers for Babies empowers women to lead healthy lifestyles during and after pregnancy through educational classes and material assistance.

See more of Care Net’s impact on the community through their benevolent involvement in young girls’ lives...

The goal is for women to begin seeking prenatal care as early as possible and lead healthy lifestyles during pregnancy. Care Net clients enroll in weekly or bi-weekly classes to prepare for motherhood. With each class completed, the clients earn "Bonker Bucks" they spend on supplies in the Bonkers for Babies Boutique. The program is designed to meet the spiritual, emotional, and material needs of the Care Net clients.


Two Rivers Buddy Ball: Community Benefit Recipient

Everyone loves a good sport.

“Without the support from OMHS and others, it would not be possible for the special needs kids of Two Rivers Buddy Ball to experience the love of sports as we do not charge anything for the kids to be involved,” said Bill Shain, Buddy Ball league president.

Buddy Ball began as a baseball program, serving ages 5-20, in 2008. It has since expanded to include basketball, bowling, soccer, cheerleading, swimming and fishing. Although the league is lots of fun, organizers are very serious about the health benefits. With its Fitness through Sports program, they hope to tackle childhood obesity and other issues. Shane said most of the participants are from Owensboro and Daviess County, but the league also serves youth and young adults from other western Kentucky counties as well as southern Indiana.

In its first season, Buddy Ball had 43 participants. Today, more than 175 participants get to be good sports through Buddy Ball.

Just ask OMHS Employees– Providing quality, compassionate care feels pretty good. So does giving back.

The attacks of September 11, 2001 forever changed us. For Justin Bloomfield, an OMHS unit clerk and certified nurse assistant, he decided to make things better not more bitter. For Justin Bloomfield, a unit clerk and certified nurse assistant at OMHS, the reaction was very personal. “I didn’t know any of the victims who died, but it completely changed me,” he said.

His most recent volunteer effort is on behalf of the Honor Flight Network, a non-profit organization created solely to honor America's veterans for all their sacrifices.

Bloomfield enlisted in the Army shortly after the 9-11 tragedy. He served in the Army from 2002 to 2006, including tours in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The organization transports veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit their memorials. Top priority is given to the senior veterans – World War II survivors, along with those other veterans who may be terminally ill. The organization also serves veterans of the Korean and Vietnam wars.

After completing his military service, he began volunteering to serve other veterans. When he is not working in OMHS’s labor and delivery unit, attending nursing classes or caring for his daughter, he gives his time to veterans.

“I’m a veteran myself, so that was something that interested me very much,” Bloomfield said. “I want to be part of honoring people who deserve to be honored.”


Community BeneďŹ t Annual Grant Fund Recipients - Fiscal Year 2011 Alma Randolph Charitable Foundation American Cancer Society American Heart Association American Red Cross Apollo High School Aubrey's Song Foundation Audubon Area Community Services Beacon Central High School Bicycle Owensboro Boulware Mission Brescia University CareNet Pregnancy Center of Owensboro Catholic Diocese of Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Greater Owensboro Children's Advocacy Center Cli Hagan Boys & Girls Club Committee of Concerned Caregivers Community Dental Clinic Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Daniel Pitino Shelter Daviess County Emergency Management Daviess County Diabetes Coalition Daviess County High School Daviess County Public Schools Daviess County Senior Services Munday Center Daviess County Youth Soccer Association DC-CAP Dream Riders of Kentucky, Inc. Epilepsy Foundation of Kentuckiana, Inc. Fellowship of Christian Athletes First Presbyterian Church Fordsville Elementary School Friends of Sinners Gateway Foundation Girls Incorporated Girls Scouts of Kentuckiana Good News Jail & Prison Ministry Green River Area Development District Green River Area Down Syndrome Association Green River Marching Band Green River Outreach Family Resource & Youth Services Center Habitat for Humanity Hancock County 4-H Hancock County Extension Service Hancock County High School Hancock County Industrial Foundation Hancock County Partners Coalition Heritage Christian School Homeless Council

Hopkins County Community Clinic Hospice of the Ohio Valley Hugh E. Sandefur Training Center, Inc. Imagination Library of Daviess Co./AACS Impact 100 International Bluegrass Music Museum Junior Achievement Junior League of Owensboro Kelly Autism Program Kentucky United Methodist Homes for Children & Youth Kentucky Wesleyan College Kiwanis Club of Owensboro Lighthouse Recovery Services Lincolnland Economic Development Corporation March of Dimes Mary Kendall Campus Matthew 25 Aids Services McLean County Fiscal Court Ambulance Services McLean County High School McLean County Senior Services Meadowlands Playground Mentor Kids Kentucky Messenger-Inquirer National Multiple Sclerosis Society New Beginnings Sexual Assault Support Services North Spencer County School Corporation North Spencer High School OCTC Ohio County High School Ohio County School System Ohio County Together We Care Owensboro Area Museum of Science and History Owensboro Career Development Association Owensboro Catholic High School Owensboro Community & Technical College Owensboro Dance Theatre Owensboro Daviess County Babe Ruth Owensboro Daviess County Christmas Parade Association Owensboro Family YMCA Owensboro Fire Department Owensboro High School Owensboro Human Relations Commission Owensboro Museum of Fine Art Owensboro Museum of Science/History & Western Kentucky Botanical Garden Owensboro Public Schools

Owensboro Regional Suicide Prevention Coalition, Inc. Owensboro Symphony Alliance Owensboro Symphony Orchestra Owensboro United Soccer Club Patriot Days Relay for Life RiverPark Center RiverValley Behavioral Health Salvation Army Shelter for Women & Children South Spencer High School South Spencer Music Parents Band Contest Spencer County Fair St. Meinrad Chamber of Commerce Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tenth Street Baptist Church The Arc of Owensboro, Inc. The Way of Rockport Tri-State Multiple Sclerosis Association Two Rivers Buddy Ball UK Center for Rural Health We Are Downtown Wendell Foster's Campus for Developmental Disabilities West Kentucky Regional Migrant Program Western Kentucky Botanical Garden Whitesville Playground

In addition to Community Benefit Annual Grant Fund recipients, OMHS is also a financial supporter of: The United Way of the Ohio Valley Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corporation Breckinridge County Chamber of Commerce Hancock County Industrial Foundation Hancock County Chamber of Commerce Henderson County Chamber of Commerce Madisonville-Hopkins County Chamber of Commerce Madisonville-Hopkins County Economic Development Corporation Muhlenberg County Chamber of Commerce McLean County Chamber of Commerce Ohio County Chamber of Commerce Perry County Indiana Chamber of Commerce Spencer County Indiana Chamber of Commerce Webster County Chamber of Commerce


OMHS - every day we are going forward by giving back. Through our Community Benefit program we enhance programs, services and organizations in our community that strive to make the health and lives of those around us better.

OMHS Community Benefit and Community Building Contributions June 1, 2010- May 31, 2011 13

Health Professions Education

985,837

Research

449,122

Cash and In-kind Contributions (Community Benefit)

633,779

Community Building Activities

147,896

12

11

10

6

5

Other Benefits

2,892,598 4

**Charity Care at Cost

13,156,000 3

TOTAL

$

19,089,092 2

**OMHS Indpendent Audited Consolidated Financial Statements FYE 5/31/2011 All other line items are from the OMHS Community Benefit Tracker Summary and the 2010 Schedule H 990

1

0

Just ask OMHS Employees– Providing quality, compassionate care feels pretty good. So does giving back. Reynolds said he has been touched by how grateful the residents of the shelter are for the help. “Most of them are really trying to get a leg up on their situation,” he said.

Reynolds serves those in our community, simply by ‘serving.’ On most Wednesday nights, you can find Butch Reynolds serving meals at St. Benedict’s Homeless Shelter in Owensboro. “I believe in giving back to my community. That was instilled in me in the military,” said Reynolds, an Army veteran and OMHS manager of radiology. He learned about the need for shelter volunteers through his church, Settle Memorial United Methodist in Owensboro. “The church kept asking for help, and it seemed like they weren’t getting enough,” he said.

He said volunteering at the shelter is an eye-opening experience. “It makes you appreciate what you’ve got,” he said. “We need more people volunteering for things like that.”

Research

7

Health Professions Education

8

Community Health Improvement and Community Benefit Operations

9

Charity Care at Cost

823,860

Other Benefits

Community Health Improvement and $ Community Benefit Operations

Community Building Activities

Amount

Cash and In-kind Contributions (Community Benefit)

Category


Our Reach

June 1, 2010 – May 31, 2011

Licensed to Operate (beds) ................................................................................................................................................................................................................*477 Employees ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3,383 Medical Sta ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................212 Admissions ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18,349 Total Surgical Procedures ................................................................................................................................................................................................................18,465 Births ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................1,820 Open-Heart Procedures..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................273 Emergency Department Visits......................................................................................................................................................................................................63,043 Convenient Care Visits ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................47,255 Total Outpatient Visits ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................539,642 daVinciTM Surgery Procedures ............................................................................................................................................................................................................594 Hip & Knee Replacements ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................436 Outpatient Diagnostic Imaging....................................................................................................................................................................................................69,959 Inpatient Diagnostic Imaging ....................................................................................................................................................................................................120,561 Lab Tests (Inpatient & Outpatient) ........................................................................................................................................................................................1,276,210 *Includes 30 Transitional Care Beds

Indiana

Perry Spencer

Hancock Henderson

NEW Hospital

Existing Hospital

Breckinridge

Daviess

Webster

Ohio McLean Crittenden

Caldwell

Hopkins

Muhlenberg

Kentucky

Primary Service Area Secondary Service Area Service Locations


Investing in the Future and Keeping Solid Financial Footing OMHS maintains solid ďŹ nancial solvency in the year ending May 31, 2011, gross revenue increased by nearly $105 million over the previous year. Similarly, operating revenues increased by over $37 million. Our financial statement indicates that attaining quality goals and establishing lEAn process improvements assists in improving patient outcomes and controlling costs.

2011 - 2010 Consolidated Financial Statement*

(In Thousands)

FY 2011

FY 2010

892,221 25,894 918,115

799,023 14,266 813,289

430,269 188 33,967

368,001 2,671 26,286

464,424

396,958

net Operating revenue

453,691

416,331

Operating Expenses: Salaries, Wages and Benefits Professional fees Supplies and Services Patient Bad debt depreciation interest Other

191,751 28,261 83,021 29,454 24,747 5,060 42,037

173,687 26,230 81,098 26,416 23,314 5,592 39,872

404,331

376,209

Amount retained for future needs, Services, and debt retirement

49,360

40,122

non-Operating income items

12,600

21,749

61,960

61,871

Billed for services: Patients revenue received from other sources Total Gross revenue

$

Hospital charges which we cannot collect: Medicare, Medicaid, insurance Administrative Adjustments Charity Care Provided Total

Total Operating Expenses

Excess (deficiency) of revenue and Gains over Expenses and losses Source: OMHS Independent Audited Financial Statements FYE 5/31/2011 *Represents hospital and all related business entities

$


Uncompensated care at OMHS now exceeds $33 million Cost of uncompensated care at OMHS exceeds $33 million supported by records that identify and monitor the level of charity, bad debt and uncompensated care. Charity care includes charges for which OMHS did not receive payment for services and supplies furnished, as defined by the hospital’s charity care policy and the estimated cost of those services and supplies.

Uncompensated Care Charges And Costs June 01, 2010–May 31, 2011 (In Thousands, Hospital Only) fy 2011

fy 2010

$

33,202 27,504

25,856 25,021

$

60,706

50,877

fy 2011

fy 2010

13,156 10,898

10,930 10,578

24,054

21,508

9,235

8,392

33,289

29,900

CHARGES

Charity Care Bad debt

1

1

Total Charity Care and Bad debt

1

COSTS

incurred to Provide Charity Care incurred for Bad debt

$

1

1

Total incurred for Charity Care and Bad debt uncompensated Costs to Provide Medicare & Medicaid

2,3

TOTAl COSTS Of unCOMPEnSATEd CArE

$

1

Source: OMHS Independent Audited Financial Statements FYE 5/31/2011 Source: 990 Final FYE 5/31/2011 3 Source: Medicaid Cost Report FYE 5/31/2011 2

When compared to other regional hospitals, OMHS continues to offer outstanding value. The chart represents how much other regional hospitals would charge for the same level of service provided by OMHS.

Value of $1 Charged Owensboro Medical Health System

$1.00

The Medical Center (Bowling Green)

$1.08

Deaconess Hospital (Evansville)

$1.18

St. Mary’s Medical Center (Evansville)

$1.20

Vanderbilt University Hospital (Nashville) $1.34 Methodist Hospital (Henderson)

$1.38

Norton Hospital (Louisville)

$1.41

Source: Cleverly & Associates, 2010


Tax payments keep the regional economy moving forward OMHS remitted over $14 million in taxes to state and municipal governments last year. At the state level, OMHS Provider Tax payments of approximately $5.8 million were used to match federal Medicaid* dollars, bringing more money into the state and regional economy. With more than 3,300 employees, OMHS payroll taxes of $8,483,342 represented a valuable source of revenue for government operations and programming. *Medicaid payments for the hospital totaled $17,374,234 for FY 2010.

Fiscal Year 2011 Remitted Taxes 7

$

5,791,746

State Payroll

6,616,964

Owensboro City Payroll Taxes

1,866,378

6

5

OMHS Sales Tax

TOTAL

151,823

4

$ 14,426,911

Source: OMHS Payroll and Accounting

3

State Payroll

1

Provider

2

OMHS Sales Tax

Provider

Amount

Owensboro City Payroll Taxes

Category

0

With more than 3,300 employees, OMHS payroll reached $191,751* million during the last year—the largest in our history. The new jobs, along with increases in salaries and benefits funneled an additional $18 million into the regional economy. Our reach as a medical center also impacts several regional counties with good paying, stable employment. *Consolidated represents the hospital and all related business entities

Consolidated Annual Payroll County Daviess Secondary Service Area: Ohio Others McLean Hopkins Hancock Spencer Henderson Muhlenberg Perry Webster Breckinridge

TOTAL *OMHS Independent Audited Financial Statements FYE 5/31/2011

$

Amount 137,091,655 9,209,812 8,342,022 7,580,395 6,681,016 5,820,855 5,124,639 3,868,475 3,708,016 2,121,352 1,216,187 986,576

$ 191,751,000*


Compassionate, Quality Leadership

omHs BoArD oF Directors The OMHS Board of Directors consists of 14 volunteer members, including four appointees from the community, selected by nominations from local organizations. Additional representation is provided by three physicians – nominated by the hospital's medical staff – along with seven directors appointed by city and county government, one of whom is also a physician.

TOP ROW:

BOTTOM ROW:

J. Alan Braden, Chairman

Jeff Rice

Charles Bea, MD

Robert D. Knight, MD

Deborah Nunley

Robert Schell, MD

George Henderson, Jr.

Ron Presser

Gerald Poynter

Suzanne Northern Blazar

Janice Scherm

G. Ted Smith

Tom Maddox, MD

Terry Woodward


Expansive Service, Quality Care Owensboro Medical Health System serves an 11-county region in western Kentucky and southern Indiana. The hospital has received awards for clinical excellence (2009, 2010, 2011, 2012), patient safety (2010) and outstanding patient experience (2010/2011) from HealthGrades, placing it among the top five percent of hospitals in the nation for quality. Cooperative Health Services, an affiliate of OMHS, also operates the HealthPark – a medical-based fitness center – and a number of clinics and diagnostic centers in Beaver Dam and Madisonville (KY) and Tell City (IN) as well as The Clinic at Wal-Mart in Owensboro, Henderson (KY) and Newburgh (IN).


report to the community