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FOD:R PORTFOLIO, SEMESTER 1 2018 RODERICK HILL

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NAOMI NG

STUDIO 25


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Foundations of Design: Representation Portfolio, Roderick Hill 992382

CONTENTS

M1

HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT - 3

M2

FLATNESS VS PROJECTION - 7

M3

PATTERN VS SURFACE - 11

M4

FRAME VS FIELD -15 REFLECTION - 20


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M1 HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT?


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MEASURED DRAWING OF A CROISSANT

This first project introduced the basics of technical drawing techniques, as well as industry standard programs like Adobe Photoshop and Indesign.

ELEVATION, LONG

The project was also an introduction to axonometric drawing techniques, as well as plan, section and elevation.

SECTION A

The front, side and top views were photographed in a light studio, while the bottom plan view and sections were scanned. All images were then scaled to the dimensions of the scans, resulting in a 1:1 scale, measurable drawing. Students also learnt valuable information about lighting setups to represent their work in the best way possible. To further enhance and clean up the images, Adobe Photoshop was used, while different line weights and profiles in InDesign were implemented as notation.

SECTION B SCAN, BOTTOM

ELEVATION, SHORT

PHOTOGRAPHY SETUP: One key light, one fill light, set up in the fashion outlined in the Survival Guide. The Photo Booth in the FabLab was utilised.

SECTION C

PLAN, TOP

RODERICK HILL

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MODULE 1: HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT

SCALE: 1:1 AT A3


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HAND DRAWINGS

This first project introduced the basics of technical drawing techniques, as well as industry standard programs like Adobe Photoshop and Indesign.

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The project was also an introduction to axonometric drawing techniques, as well as plan, section and elevation. SECTION A

The front, side and top views were photographed in a light studio, while the bottom plan view and sections were scanned. All images were then scaled to

Students also learnt valuable information about lighting setups to represent their work in the best way possible. To further enhance and clean up the images, Adobe Photoshop was used, while different line weights and profiles in InDesign were implemented as notation.

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the dimensions of the scans, resulting in a 1:1 scale, measurable drawing.

SECTION B

C

B

A

SECTION C

RODERICK HILL

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MODULE 1: HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT

SCALE: 1:1 AT A3


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AXONOMETRIC DRAWING

This first project introduced the basics of technical drawing techniques, as well as industry standard programs like Adobe Photoshop and Indesign. The project was also an introduction to axonometric drawing techniques, as well as plan, section and elevation.

The front, side and top views were photographed in a light studio, while the bottom plan view and sections were scanned. All images were then scaled to the dimensions of the scans, resulting in a 1:1 scale, measurable drawing.

SECTION A

C

Students also learnt valuable information about lighting setups to represent their work in the best way possible. To further enhance and clean up the images, Adobe Photoshop was used, while different line weights and profiles in InDesign were implemented as notation.

FINAL AXONOMETRIC

B

A

SECTION B

Difficulties arose when attempt0.4mm fineliners were used to create both the ing to connect the sections - the “flat�and axonometric grids. Three grids like the shape of the croissant between one above were created, and then overlaid on the sections is not certain.top Thus of a each other and traced to create the final certain amount of improvisation axonometric drawing. was needed.

SECTION C

RODERICK HILL

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FINAL AXONOMETRIC

FINAL AXONOMETRIC

SCALE: SCALE: 1:1 1:1 AT AT A3A3

S


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M2 FLATNESS VS PROJECTION


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PROVIDED SECTION CUTS

Module 2 emphasised the importance of axonometric representation methods. The task tested students’ ability to think creatively, and illustrate that on a 3D world. The two provided Mario World screenshots, shown on the left, were joined together to form one cohesive unit.

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One key requirement for the task was to show the “hidden space” behind the features shown in the flat screenshots.

Mario World 9-12 was designed to be an echo of a real life city, with features such as buildings and billboards, as well as the treasury underneath, but with a Mario accent applied to them.

The body of water in the middle, designed to separate the two worlds, is also common to many cities such as New York and Hong Kong. The colour scheme, tonal gradation and lighting effects such as reflections and bloom conveys a sense of realism and depth, in a typically “flat” paraline drawing.


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MARIO WORLD ITERATIONS

Initial drawing progress, showing where each world is pro-

The fineliner pen is being applied over the pencil markings,

This is the drawing fully traced in Adobe Illustrator, with pink lines between 1 and

jected from. Forty-five degree lines have been projected

and the basement alignment is being corrected. Some ad-

2pt thick to show which lines have been done and which have not. Layers were

Thisatwas the very initialobject. drawing, where up to the drawing the bottom of every Variation

I ditional design elements Inhave this been second drawing, explored options added, eg. theIextra positioned all of the elements from the for a basement level, as well as adding in thickness and how far things are projected is utilised. hills behind the block with the pyramid structures in it. two elevations some more details to the overworld. I also refined the shape of the body of water to better work with the shapes of the provided objects.

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all the lines in the done one at aThis time illustrates to reduce confusion. Coinspresent and shelving structures, as well final Illustrator-rendered piece. I decided to complete the basement details on duplicated, making my workflowto much more the computer make myefficient. work more efficient.

as the ropes, were all done totally on the computer as they were very easily


COLOUR PALETTE AND SELECTED GRADIENTS

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M3 PATTERN VS SURFACE


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MARIO WORLD ITERATIONS

Module 3 was an introduction to 3D modelling via Rhino, the task being to create a panelled landscape using 100 3D modules, stitched together. The final model to the left, and the five different modules above. The five modules were intended to morph from one truncated ppyramid into the next. However, the addition of more types of modules would have made this more effective.

An attractor point was used to exaggerate the height of the already existing terrain underneath the modules.


PAPER LANDSCAPE

The paper landscape was created with the unrolling of all 100 individual modules, the nets for which were printed onto heavy paper, folded and attached together to complete the model. Each module was tested thoroughly to ensure it was a developable surface. Scoring the fold lines made each fold much cleaner and sharper than it would have been otherwise.

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FURTHER MATERIAL

Two examples of scored strips. Each fold is very clear and sharp.

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M4 FRAME VS FIELD


ISOMETRIC CUTAWAY

Module 4 explored the ideas of frame and field. The task was to describe a Marco Polo story using two perspective views and an isometric cutaway. The module required students to apply their knowledge of Adobe’s software and Rhino modelling. My isometric drawing is based on the idea of Marco Polo, upon reaching the Invisible City of Tamara, exploring a Quadrangle - a public space, with a more private shrine to the gods in the middle. Upon entering the Quadrangle Marco Polo is slowed by crowds. Upon turning a left hand corner, he proceeds through a “time wall”, something only he can see. In this altered state or reality, Polo sees the future, one where the Quadrangle is abandoned and dilapidated through the passage of time. Therefore, the Quadrangle represents the cyclical nature of time, where nature will reclaim the land where nature once was.

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PERSPECTIVE 1

Perspective 1 is Polo’s first look into the city of Tamara.

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PERSPECTIVE 2

Perspective 2 is Marco Polo’s insight into the future, neglected and dilapidated old quad. In the background is another collapsing building in Venice.

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FURTHER MATERIALS

A 3DS Max script called Fracture Voronoi was used to destroy the Quad for Perspective 2.

This is a trial of lighting, with Rhino’s skylight function on. This would have been very useful in the case that torches were implemented in the corners of each quad “module”. Light seems to be emanating from around that region.


REFLECTION Throughout the semester I learnt a lot about the key skills and techniques required for the successful representation of a thing. There was a progression from the key foundational skills such as recognising and distinguishing plan, section and elevation, towards more critical and creative thinking with Module 4. Although I had some experience using the Adobe Suite, Foundations of Design: Representation has furthered my skills. The subject has also introduced me to 3D modelling applications such as Rhino.

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Roderick Hill FOD:R Portfolio  
Roderick Hill FOD:R Portfolio  
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