Page 1

REVISION: SOME TIPS AND HOW THE LIBRARY CAN HELP YOU

DON’T PANIC!  (thank you, Douglas Adams – good  advice for boys as well as galactic  hitchhikers) 


GET THE TIMING RIGHT  Research  has  shown  that  the  best  period  for  recall  and  understanding  is  20‐60  minutes,  so  work  in chunks  of  time  –  not  too  short  and  not  too  long.    Don’t  spend  too  long  on  one  topic;  if  you  switch  studying  between  ideas,  go  back  over  them  in  different  orders and think about the links between them, it will help your recollection.  Take regular short breaks – even if you feel it’s going well.  Recall dips a long  way in the middle of a longer session – with breaks, you get more beginnings  and endings and more recall.   After  a  learning  period,  review  time  is  essential  to  allow  your  brain  to  integrate all the things you’ve learned and to transfer them from short‐term  into long‐term memory.  If you have a short break, recall from the section just  studied  will  increase  and  your  brain  will  be  more  ready  to  learn  in  the  next  session.  To boost your recall even further, do a quick review of what you have read at  the end of the session – maybe by flicking through the flashcards you’ve made  or  drawing  an  outline  diagram,  or  just  stretching  out  with  your  eyes  closed  and running over it in your mind.    STAY HEALTHY  Resist  the  temptation  to  use  fizzy  or  energy  drinks  or  coffee  to  keep  you  focussed – take breaks and get some fresh air instead  Don’t  have  too  much  sugary  stuff  –  you’ll  get  a  rush of energy and then a crash.  Have fruit  or nuts instead.  Drink plenty of water.   Get enough sleep, especially the night before the exam.  If you’re wound up,  take an hour to chill before bed – have a bath, read a favourite story or watch  something  relaxing  (but  don’t  start  shooting  aliens  in  a  game!  it’s  too  exciting). TFF 

2

17/04/2018


BE PREPARED  You can’t revise things that aren’t there.  So take time to make  sure  that  none  of  your  notes  are  missing.    Ask  a  teacher  or  friend to help you fill any gaps.   Make sure you have all your pens and anything else you need for  your exams ready the night before.  REMEMBER, IT’S YOU THAT MATTERS  Don’t take any notice of friends who say they have done loads on one topic,  or  none  on  another.    You  know  what  you  need  to  do  and  which  topics  you  need to work most on. Listen to your teachers, but make up your own mind  about what you need to do, and the best way for you to do it.  Use the strategies which suit you; we don’t all learn in the same way so try a  few of these ideas and see what works best, or use a combination of two or  more things.  Most  of  us  respond  well  to  visual  techniques,  and  benefit  from  using colour, shapes, patterns and mindmaps for revision notes:  in the exam, close your eyes and visualise the page as an image.   Write  or  highlight  notes  in  different  coloured  pens,  add  patterns, symbols and doodles, or turn information into a comic  strip, infographic, timeline or sketch.  Some  people  respond  well  to  auditory  clues  (sounds),  so  if  this is you, try playing a specific piece of music when revising  a  topic,  and  “replaying”  the  tune  will  trigger  your  memory.   (Don’t hum in the exam!)  Say things aloud when revising, or  record yourself and play it back later.  Try chanting lists in a  rhythm, or even making up a rap or poem.   There are also those who remember the movements they made  when  learning  something,  and  they  may  benefit  from  being  active when revising – this can mean moving about, but can also  TFF 

3

17/04/2018


mean cutting up revision notes to make a jigsaw and practising putting it back  together  until  you  can  do  it  in  your  head  in  the  exam,  or  using  plasticine  to  make a 3D image of something you are trying to learn.   USE BOTH HALVES OF YOUR BRAIN              Allan Ajifo CC-BY-2.0

Although  different  parts  of  the  brain  are  responsible  for  different  functions,  research has shown that they don’t work independently of each other; there’s  no such thing as a right‐brained or left‐brained person:   the  right  side  of  your  brain  is  traditionally  thought  of  as  the  “creative”  side,  responsible  for  visual  and  spatial  understanding  (rhythm,  colour,  patterns);   the  left  side  is  associated  with  logic  and  responsible  for  language,  numbers, lists, analysis, association.  If you can use both sides of the brain together when you learn, it will be most  effective.  HELP YOUR BRAIN TO STORE AND RECALL INFORMATION  You need to store information but more importantly, you need to be able to  recall it when you need to.  Your brain is programmed to remember:   the first and last things it encounters in a learning session   things which are associated or linked   things which are outstanding, exaggerated, humorous or unique  TFF 

4

17/04/2018


 things which appeal to your senses   things which appeal to your interests   patterns and sequences    The ideas which follow are all things which work for people – try a few and  see  which  work  for  you.    You  may  find  that  some  work  for  you  in  some  subjects, but others are better elsewhere.  USE MINDMAPS                 

Vitaly Kolesnik (CC BY‐NC‐SA 2.0) 

 Start with the central idea or topic and radiate out.   Use  keywords  for  key  areas  –  like  chapter  headings  –  and  then  sub‐ topics.   Use colours to code and emphasise.   Use images to stimulate creativity in your brain and create associations.   Vary text size, width of lines.   Use arrows and other links to show connections and create movement.   Use symbols to code related items.   Use numbers if you need to remember things in order.   Don’t worry if it gets messy!  TFF 

5

17/04/2018


USE MNEMONICS  These are words, pictures, sequences and other things which help you recall  information.  You can use:   sentences  (Never  Eat  Shredded  Wheat  –  compass  points  in  order)  –  rhythm helps   poems (Thirty days hath September, April, June and November....)   shapes  and  pictures  (a  dromedary’s  hump  is  like  a  letter  D;  a  Bactrian  camel’s is a B)   stories,  especially  if  they  make  you  smile  (a  French  chicken says “oeuf” when she lays an egg; a Spanish  one says “huevo” – like heave‐ho)    acrostics  and  acronyms,  using  key  or  initial  words  to  spell  out  another  one  (SMART  targets  are  Specific,  Measurable,  Achievable,  Relevant,  Time‐based)  These all act as triggers and links between the two halves of your brain, and  between new and old information stored, working with your brain’s strengths.  You  can  make  up  your  own  mnemonics  using  your  own  imagination  –  make  them as silly as you like!  USE SEQUENCES  Number labels on a diagram, or arrange them alphabetically.  USE “LOOK, COVER, WRITE, CHECK”  Just  as  you  used  it  for  spellings  in  primary  school,  you  can  use  it  now  –  especially for lists, verb endings, vocabulary, formulae.  You  can  use  a  similar  technique  to  learn  the  labels  for  a  diagram,  by  filling  them  in  on  a  blank  version.    Or  you  can  write  or  sketch  what  you  can  remember about a topic.  Don’t forget to check that you’ve got it right! 

TFF

6

17/04/2018


USE FLASHCARDS AND JIGSAWS  You can make flashcards with headings on one side and details  on  the  other.    Use  colour,  images,  etc  to  make  them  stick  in  your memory. Handy to carry with you.  You can make online flashcards too: there are free websites and apps which  allow  you  to  make  the  “cards”  on  your  computer  and  access  them  via  the  web: if you have a smartphone you can use them on that too.    USE TEACHING  If  you  can  explain  something  to  someone  else,  then  you  know  it!    Get  someone  to  test  you  or  just  use  them  as  a  sounding  board.    Or  set  each  other  quizzes  –  some  websites which help you do this are listed below.     REPEAT  Aim to review and repeat a topic several times – ideally five – at regular  intervals.  The more you go over it – even if it’s just a quick reminder – the  more your brain will link it to other information and fix it in your memory.

TFF

7

17/04/2018


WEB TOOLS TO TRY  There are links to all of these and more on the Library’s Revision and Exams  page on Firefly:  http://intranet.rgs‐guildford.co.uk/skills‐for‐learning/revision‐and‐exams  Some of these sites are for age 13+ only; if you are too young, be sure to talk  to your parents first as they will have to create an account for you to use.    Flashcards – include the ability to view on a phone app  www.cramberry.net  www.quizlet.com    Revision Games and self‐testing  www.getrevising.co.uk – make cards, quizzes, wordsearches or even podcasts  for free.  https://bubbl.us – mindmapping   

FURTHER READING & BIBLIOGRAPHY  Buzan, Tony. 2003. Mind maps for kids: the shortcut to success at school.  London: HarperThorsons.  Buzan, Tony. 2007. The Buzan Study Skills Handbook. Harlow: BBC Active.  Cherry, Kendra. 2018. "Left Brain vs. Right Brain Dominance: The Surprising  Truth." Verywell. Accessed April 16, 2018.  https://www.verywell.com/left‐brain‐vs‐right‐brain‐2795005.  Cottrell, Stella. 2006. The Exam Skills Handbook : achieving peak performance.  London: Palgrave Macmillan.  Darvill, Andy. "Revision tips." Andy Darvill's Science Site. Accessed April 16,  2018. http://www.darvill.clara.net/revtips.htm.  Smith, Megan, et al. The Learning Scientists. Accessed April 16, 2018.  http://www.learningscientists.org. 

TFF

8

17/04/2018

Revision tips leaflet 2018  
Revision tips leaflet 2018  
Advertisement