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REVIEW THE PILGRIM

SPRING/SUMMER 2019

SCHOOL OF THE YEAR AWARD FOR PASTORAL CARE AND WELLBEING TES INDEPENDENT SCHOOL AWARDS

SPECTACULAR TEACHING ISI INSPECTOR

SCHOOL OF THE YEAR AWARD FOR COMMUNITY OUTREACH INDEPENDENT SCHOOL PARENT


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HEAD GIRL AND HEAD BOY’S MESSAGE ...I BELIEVE THAT THIS EDITION OF THE PILGRIM REVIEW DEMONSTRATES THAT WE ARE NOT JUST A SCHOOL: WE ARE A COMMUNITY.

FROM THE HEAD GIRL AND HEAD BOY

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am and I would like to congratulate everyone on a very successful first half of this academic year. Inevitably there have been highs and lows but as a community we continue to show great resilience and for that we should all be proud. We would also like to emphasise the amazing quality and quantity of the Art, Drama, Sport and Music that we have seen since September. The Pilgrim Review gives us a wonderful opportunity to reflect on the last few months, as well as set goals for the rest of the year. Although the content included is just the tip of the iceberg of all that’s happened at RGS so far this year, it demonstrates the variety of what Reigatians can achieve. It is impossible to quantify how much the support of parents and teachers underpins and elevates RGS students’ successes, but we all know that it is immense and exceptionally valued. From a student’s perspective I would like to take this chance to thank everyone who makes RGS such an amazing place to grow up. Through acknowledging the people who help us to flourish, I believe that this edition of the Pilgrim Review demonstrates that we are not just a school: we are a community. Best wishes to all,

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would like to begin by wishing everyone a Happy New Year! The New Year marks a change in year, but also allows us to reflect on the things that constantly change around us. While we can sometimes in everyday life be left with a feeling that nothing around us alters, this could not be more wrong. The only thing that we can be certain of is that whatever we are experiencing will change. Everything from our friendships and the friendship groups we have to the pressures of work and the pressures from those who surround us, change is always present. None of us know what the future holds and none of us can know what is around the corner. But who we are and how we live will be mostly defined by the way that we react and cooperate with change. It is fair to say that from 2019 and over the next year, we are all going to change in one way or another. Whilst this may feel daunting, I think we should all try not to let it feel so. Let’s try not to fear change or be surprised by it. Let’s seek it, celebrate it and embrace it. So, I wish you all a wonderful 2019, and encourage us all to change in the most positive way we can. Let’s have fun, laugh a lot and enjoy everything around us whilst it’s happening. We never know how long it will be until things change again. All the best,

Ellie Kim Head Girl

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Sam Archer Head Boy


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HEADMASTER’S WELCOME ...FROM THAT PASTORAL FOUNDATION WE CAN LIGHT THE TOUCH PAPER TO SEE SUCCESS BURST OUT LIKE A FIREWORK IN ALL AREAS OF A CHILD’S JOURNEY TO YOUNG ADULTHOOD. FROM THE HEADMASTER

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he Pilgrim Review celebrates the full and varied lives of Reigatians – another few months of amazing adventures, making life-long friends, securing memories and developing talents and experiences that are all part of how we cherish childhood.

believe that children also need to feel valued and understood, secure amongst friends, looked after by adults and aware that older children are on their side – from that pastoral foundation we can light the touch paper to see success burst out like a firework in all areas of a child’s journey to young adulthood.

Reigate Grammar School was awarded a School of the Year 2019 award for work in pastoral care and wellbeing in the annual, prestigious Times Education Supplement (TES) Independent School Awards 2019.

“The TES Independent School Awards are a roll-call of the most impressive institutions and individuals” said the Editor of the TES, Ann Mroz. Reigate Grammar School was nominated for more awards than any other school in the country and we were in good company with other nominated schools including Eton College, Wellington College, Brighton College, Caterham and Epsom College.

I am delighted that the people in the RGS community have been given this award because children’s wellbeing and happiness is the most important aspect of a great education. The lead judge was Natasha Devon MBE, former Government Mental Health supporter. Natasha said RGS stood out as a “school which understands mental health as a universal issue”. She added: “They have embedded it into many aspects of school life rather than confining it to PHSCE or a ‘wellbeing week’.”. One parent said they had “never seen such positivity from any other school”. Judges were impressed at the way that RGS takes a wholeschool approach to wellbeing for both staff and students. This commitment is clearly not simply through excellent Heads of Year and Tutors. This is about each and every member of our community, adult and child, understanding the importance of being nice to each other, of caring enough to make a difference. The judges understood that our priority as a school is pastoral care based upon a belief that happy and healthy children go on to become high achieving. The school scores some of the best exam results in the country so the RGS approach to focus on the whole child seems to work well! I think it helped that RGS could refer to our last full ISI inspection report where we were the first school of our kind in the country to secure the judgement of Exceptional. Of course, at RGS securing excellent exam results is an imperative because they open doors of opportunity that will help secure future success and wellbeing. However, I think we all

This award comes just after winning the Independent School Parent award for RGS’s partnership work and community outreach. We were delighted to be recognised by another independent organisation for the work we are doing within the community including sharing our facilities, school partnership projects with the state sector, volunteering work our Reigatians carry out and the impressive Changing Lives bursary programme that helps with social mobility. Of course, it is the daily experience of each child in our care that matters more than any award and we need to remain conscious that we will always have students, families and staff in our community where, for a variety of reasons, things can be and are very tough indeed. It is nice to see our work affirmed in both our overwhelming inspection report from ISI and these ‘School of the Year' awards, which we should definitely celebrate, but this recognition must only serve as a spur to do even more to help children and others in our community to stay healthy and to support them when things are far from easy. I hope that you enjoy this edition of the Pilgrim Review. Shaun Fenton Headmaster 2


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NATIONAL SUCCESS FOR RGS RGS was awarded a School of the Year award for its work in pastoral care and wellbeing at the annual, prestigious Times Educational Supplement (TES) Independent School Awards. RGS was shortlisted for four awards in 2019, more than any other school in the country.

The lead judge was Natasha Devon MBE, former Government Mental Health supporter. Natasha said RGS stood out as “a school which understands mental health as a universal issue”. She added: “They have embedded it into many aspects of school life rather than confining it to PHSCE or a ‘wellbeing week’.” One parent said they had “never seen such positivity from any other school”. Judges were impressed at the way that RGS takes a whole-school approach to wellbeing for both its staff and students.

THE AWARD REFLECTS OUR PASSION FOR INNOVATION AND OUR DRIVE FOR CONSTANT IMPROVEMENT IN THE EDUCATION WE OFFER.

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The Senior School of the Year nomination placed RGS in the top eight in the country for the second year running. RGS is the only co-educational school in Surrey to have been shortlisted for this award. With over 3,000 independent schools in the UK, it is remarkable that RGS was also a winner of the Wellbeing Initiative and a finalist in the categories of IndependentState School Partnership and Strategic Education Initiative. The Independent-State School Partnership entry detailed the dozens of local school and community partnerships which enable more than 1,000 state school pupils to take part in RGS activities, over 5,000 hours of

volunteering each year from RGS students and the numerous charity and community events supported by staff and students. In addition, the RGS Foundation Changing Lives campaign promotes life-changing social mobility projects, raising millions to fund more than 170 bursaries to enable children from all backgrounds to access a RGS education. High Performance Learning is at the heart of the RGS experience and being a finalist in the Strategic Education Initiative category of the TES Awards recognises the ground-breaking work underway at RGS helping children to be high achievers, to grow their intelligence and to succeed in all areas of life. It has transformed the school’s attitude to learning and improving students’ learning experience. Headmaster, Mr Fenton, said, “The daily experience of each child entrusted to our care is much more important than any national award, but it is a fantastic achievement for RGS to be recognised for the work we are doing in such a variety of areas. It reflects our passion for innovation and our drive for constant improvement in the education we offer to the families who choose RGS for their children.”


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AWARD WINNING OUTREACH RGS has been awarded Independent School of the Year for Community Outreach. The awards, in association with Independent School Parent magazine, were judged by a panel comprised of leading figures from the education sector and chaired by Dr Helen Wright, international education advisor and past Vice Chair of the Independent Schools Council (ISC).

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he judging panel recognised RGS for its school partnership projects such as ‘crime scene’ forensic science and ‘I’m a Geographer get me out of here’ in academic areas such as science, humanities and the arts, the sharing of their facilities and the music, theatre, art, sports and languages workshops and events that they run with local schools. Judges were also pleased by the work RGS does with other local senior schools, inviting students to attend its Higher Education evening, employment talks, careers conventions, universities events and Oxbridge preparation programmes. In total, over 1000 local state school children benefit from Reigate Grammar School’s community programmes. The judges also commended the volunteering work that RGS students and staff engage in, helping care homes, charities, and environmental projects, community groups for the elderly, residential homes, foodbanks and primary schools. The

award submission highlighted the new RGS Saturday Music College and the sports camps we host in the holidays for local children, which are open to all children from the surrounding community to participate in at weekends and in the school holidays. The judges were also impressed by the work that Reigate Grammar School does to drive social mobility within the school with approximately 170 children at RGS being on means tested bursaries. Headmaster Shaun Fenton said, “It is such a magnificent award and we are so pleased to be recognised for all the important work we are doing within our community partnership programme. This award comes in a term where we have also won the TES award for wellbeing and been shortlisted for three other TES awards. Further to this we were also highly commended for Co-educational School of the Year by ISP. Above and beyond any award

though, it is fundamental that we do this work as it is integral to our core values of making the world a better place, developing responsibility and moral purpose and helping our students become conscientious and committed individuals. Nevertheless, I am also delighted that our work is being celebrated by independent organisations and education specialists, further highlighting its importance.”

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CHARITY AND OUTREACH ZUMBATHON FOR LEPRA The entire First Form donned dancing shoes and colourful outfits for a mass Zumbathon in aid of Lepra. It was the culmination of a two-week fundraising challenge and students enthusiastically 'single, single, doubled' for the leprosy charity. Lepra works directly with communities in Bangladesh, India and Mozambique to find, treat and rehabilitate people affected by leprosy. RGS has supported them for many years and the charity is now the focus of the First Form two-week fundraising challenge each year. Anna Ansted, Lepra’s representative, visited students in October to talk about the charity’s work to combat leprosy around the world. This really enthused the year group who thought up weird and wonderful ways to raise as much money as possible within two weeks. They arranged raffles, sweet sales and even photos with the characters of Despicable Me! Anna returned two weeks later with a Zumba specialist who led the entire First Form and many staff in a sponsored Zumbathon to round off the two-week challenge. Students enjoyed dressing in garish and brightly coloured clothing and enthusiastically dancing to a range of funky music tracks. Head of Lower School, Sarah Leck, said, “Anna really inspired the students and I am delighted with the way in which they have used their imagination and ingenuity to raise money for this fantastic charity. The Zumbathon was a fabulous finish to their fundraising challenge.” Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, said, “The school’s ongoing links with Lepra and other charities are an important part of the students’ education and I am proud of the First Form for their ideas and enthusiasm in support of such a worthwhile cause."

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LOVEWORKS CONCERT RGS and RSM have strong links with local charity Loveworks. Choristers from both schools hosted a wonderful teatime concert for elderly residents and students in the Third and Fourth Forms took to Reigate High Street to collect for the charity’s foodbank. Loveworks aims to improve the lives of some of the most vulnerable groups of people in the local community, from the elderly to the hungry. As part of RGS's community outreach, RGS and RSM joined forces with the Reigate based charity to perform a charity concert for elderly people in the community. RGS's Head of Choral Music, Tali Glynne Jones, devised a wonderful programme of songs which were beautifully performed by the RGS Godfrey Searle Choristers (made up of students from both schools) at St Mary’s Church Centre. The audience included local elderly residents and the concert was accompanied by a delicious afternoon tea donated by Harrison catering. It was served by student volunteers from RGS who, along with the choristers, chatted with the audience during performance intervals. The concert ended with a group ‘sing-a-long’ to some well-known wartime classics which everyone thoroughly enjoyed. The charity received additional support from the schools when RGS Third and Fourth Form students braved the January cold the following week, to collect donations for the Loveworks foodbank from members of the public on Reigate High Street. Lesley Nicholson (RSM Year 5 Tutor) and Priya Nair (RGS's Assistant Head of English) who coordinate community outreach at both schools are delighted with the success of the projects undertaken so far which reflect the growing links between RGS, RSM and the wider community.

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RGS CHINA BRAND LAUNCH

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n Friday 11 January 2019, RGS Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, and RGS International Director, Sean Davey, attended the official ground-breaking ceremony and RGS China brand launch in Nanjing. The ground-breaking ceremony marked the exciting building phase for the first Sino-British school in the ancient city of Nanjing. It was thrilling to have the support and endorsement of senior government officials as well as Carma Elliot, Head of the British Council in China, and Tony Clemson, Deputy-General for the British Consulate. This special ceremony was followed by the brand launch at the Grand Mansion Hotel with speeches and media coverage. Phase one of RGS Nanjing, the Kindergarten, will open in September 2019. Therefore, the support of RSM's Head of Early

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Years, Mrs Samantha Selkirk, and Mrs Sherry Churchley (whose son attends RSM kindergarten and originates from Nanjing) was very well received by all attendees. The following day, over 500 prospective parents attended an RGS Nanjing information event to learn about this special collaboration and how to register their child ahead of the official opening. With speeches and presentations from RGS and partners Kaiyuan Education, there was huge interest and demand for places. RGS Nanjing is the first of an anticipated five schools to be established in China over the next 10 years. We look forward to the varied educational opportunities this will provide for our own students and staff, particularly through cultural and international exchange and interaction.


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WELLBEING

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he Wellbeing Festival has been a brilliant opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of developing an ‘emotional health tool-kit’. In other words, a range of personal resources to manage the challenges and opportunities of everyday life. Students have had the opportunity to explore yoga and mindfulness, to hear about the psychology of happiness, to consider what resilience means to them and how open-mindedness and flexibility of thought can support positive emotional wellbeing. Students focused on the power of reading as part of Drop Everything and Read Week, and went beyond the classroom with lectures on topics such as Virtual Reality.

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Reflection: personal & spiritual growth Students have worked together in House Singing, Activities Day, Run Reigate, the Zumbathon, volunteering and supporting charities such as Loveworks. They have swapped chocolate spread on toast for healthy breakfasts… the smoothies were a particular favourite and are now making a regular appearance. We have welcomed a wide-range of speakers from Dr Aric Sigman to the SelfEsteem Team, from Bob Tait to Robert Higgs. Alicia Drummond delivered a powerful student session and then returned to speak to parents, examining ways we can support teenagers with anxiety and developing positive and healthy coping mechanisms for everyday life.

Community & giving

KIND

Curious minds


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Excercise & nutrition

DNESS

Sustainability

Family & friends

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OUSE NEWS

he house competition got off to an exciting start with House Singing in October. Enthusiasm from the Sixth Form could not be faulted as they rallied the troops, motivating them to sing in a loud and (mostly) tuneful fashion. Congratulations to Bird on singing their way to victory. First Form House Art continues to grow in popularity from year to year with, once again, a record number of entries. Congratulations to Cranston who won with a combination of a high number of entries and artistic talent. What the House Cannon Run lacked in warm weather was more than made up for in whole school support. The four Houses raced around the course, dismantling and re-assembling their cannons twice per round when they reached the gate. A hard-fought competition saw Williamson crowned overall winners. House Football was a very close competition. Congratulations to Williamson on their win. House Bake-Off saw some very impressive entries, especially from the First Form and it was great to see them volunteering to represent their Houses. Cranston found the recipe to success, coming first overall. Unfortunately, the British weather prevented teams from competing on the Rugby pitches during Winter House Sports but thanks to Hartswood's two all-weather pitches, Hockey went ahead as planned. As with all the competitions it was a close battle, which eventually found Cranston in first place just one point ahead of Bird.

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In the House standings with the Summer and Autumn terms added together, Williamson is currently one point ahead of Bird, who are a point ahead of Cranston, who are just ahead of Hodgson. It's all to play for in the Spring term! Williamson - 1st Bird - 2nd Cranston - 3rd Hodgson - 4th


MOLLY AND THE STARDUST This magical Christmas production saw over 100 students performing or working backstage to produce a spectacular festive frolic. Molly and the Stardust thrilled audiences old and young as the Concert Hall was transformed into pirate ships, sea storms, mermaid grottos and jungles. The enchanting story explains how Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Wendy and Tinkerbell all came to exist - a theatrical prequel to JM Barrie’s tale, Peter Pan. Students give up precious time to create theatre for our audiences and the show was a sumptuous feast of joy!


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DRAMA - CARNAGE Carnage is a new termly satirical comedy where students write, direct and perform 20 plays in 40 minutes against the clock. The first round went down a storm across two performances in the brand new Drama Studio 2.

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DRAMA - JUNIOR MONOSLAM First and Second Formers dazzled the audience in the new Drama Studio 2 (DS2) during the annual Junior MonoSlam competition in which they ‘slammed’ out a oneminute monologue from any published play. The winning students were announced by our guest judges: Matt Burns (Reigatian 2011, former staff and professional actor), Jennie Branston and Sue Edwards (yes – Miss Branston and Mr Edwards’ mums!). The monologues were diverse, from Harry Potter to My Mother Said I Never Should, and ranged from comedy to political satire. Congratulations to all the performers for launching the first public performance in DS2 so enthusiastically. Well done to overall winner, Julia P and special mentions to Thomas C, Charlie PG, Edie W and Sofia D for their prize winning performances.

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RGS IN CONCERT AT DORKING HALLS RGS in Concert at Dorking Halls was impressive. The Concert Band opened the evening with the theme to Downton Abbey and a show-stopping medley from Wicked. The Boys’ Choir performed a heartfelt rendition of the Elvis classic, Can’t Help Falling In Love, and an a cappella arrangement of Take On Me. The Swing Band ended the first half in great style with a flamboyant performance including accomplished solos by Bernie C-W, Jack R, Lakith G and Finlay N. The young players of Sinfonia opened the second half with impressive confidence and an excellent sound. As a new addition to the programme, the whole First Form delighted the packed house with two lustily performed songs, supported by a talented band and pianists recruited entirely from the year group. The concert was brought to a close by the Symphony Orchestra, which performed a heavyweight orchestral repertoire with great skill. This concert featured over 200 RGS students performing to an audience of more than 400. Special thanks go to the Upper School stage crew team who provided entertaining choreography between items.


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MUSIC DOMINIC PECKHAM CHORAL WORKSHOP Choral expert Dominic Peckham delighted the First Form with his exuberant choral workshop. Students were fantastically responsive, singing three and four-part songs complete with choreography within half an hour under his inspiring instruction. Dominic is internationally renowned for his conducting and pioneering educational work, regularly appearing on TV and radio as a presenter and choral expert. He is also a director of The National Youth Choir.

UNPLUGGED RGS Unplugged was a spectacular night of acoustic music in the Recital Room. The concert showcased students of all ages performing songs that ranged from Frank Sinatra to Adele and Ed Sheeran. Students performed brilliantly, singing with emotion and accompanied by a fantastic house string quartet.

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CABARET

The Cabaret Evening saw students from the First to Upper Sixth Forms perform songs from a wide variety of musical theatre shows to a large, appreciative audience. From Cole Porter to Billy Elliot, My Fair Lady to Little Shop of Horrors, all the performances were of an exceptionally high standard and, accompanied by a professional band, rose to the occasion admirably.

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MUSIC RGS CHORAL CATHEDRAL TOUR The RGS Godfrey Searle Choir and Polyphony travelled to the West Country to sing evensong in the beautiful Exeter Cathedral. Reigatian and former head boy Jonathan Greener (RGS 1972-79), the recently appointed Dean, welcomed the choir and led the service before hosting a reception for alumni given by the RGS Foundation. Following on from Exeter, the choirs sang another evensong at Winchester Cathedral, relishing the candlelit atmosphere and resonant acoustics of the majestic building.

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT St Mary’s Church was resplendent for this atmospheric celebration of music and lessons for Christmas, marking the start of the festivities for many, and once again packed with parents, staff, students and Reigatians. All of the school’s choirs contributed, with a wide range of musical offerings. It was great to see the boys’ choir giving a powerful rendition of the ever-popular O Holy Night, among many other highlights. Beautiful and poised vocal solos were provided by Jemima H, Ruari G and Freya M, while Zachary S, Josie W, Isobel R and Olivia M combined to form a sensitive instrumental ensemble. The congregational carols were accompanied by a spectacular brass ensemble, led by Mr Maxwell.

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PIANO SHOWCASE CONCERT The Piano Showcase Concert saw many of RGS's best pianists perform fluently. Students from the full breadth of the school performed a variety of works from Scott Joplin to Bach, to a hugely appreciative audience in the Recital Room. A particular highlight was a performance by four pianists at two pianos of the famed Danse Macabre by Saint-SaÍns – a hugely impressive feat of virtuosic pianism and co-ordination.


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ART First Form students created a range of bold black and white collages exploring negative and positive space for their project, taking inspiration from Cubist still life pictures. The Second Form has been studying Van Gogh's landscape paintings for their project this term and students have produced a series of colourful relief prints exploring Van Gogh’s expressive markmaking and bold use of colour.

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ART AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY PROSTHETIC MAKEUP & CASUALTY EFFECTS Prosthetic makeup and casualty effects students learnt how to sculpt, apply and colour their own silicone appliance. For the final lesson they teamed up with the First Aid elective students for a fun and, at times, quite gruesome afternoon applying and painting real-life injuries, using the same techniques seen on film and television. Students applied a selection of ready-made silicone prosthetics, adding realism through painting and makeup effects with some fantastic and very believable results - not for the fainthearted!

YOUNG ENTERPRISE PROJECT Third Form Design Technology students embarked on an Enterprise project with the aim of raising as much money for charity as possible. Their brief was simple - design and make a product or a range of products fitting the theme of Christmas. In groups, students assigned themselves roles from designer to manufacturer, researcher to marketeer and aimed their products at specific markets. The photos show a sample of some of the gorgeous products created, the variety of which was outstanding, demonstrating the creativity of RGS students. The final sum raised came to over ÂŁ800 which will be donated to local charity George and the Giant Pledge.

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ART - NOTABLE WORK

Alex M (Sixth Form)

Issie B (Fifth Form)


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Charles H (Fifth Form)

Emily B (Fifth Form)

Lauren C (Fifth Form)

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PHOTOGRAPHY Photography students use a variety of analogue and digital photographic techniques and experiment with digital media using programmes such as Adobe Photoshop. They also spend time analysing and researching the work of inspiring photographers, designers and artists. Recent works of note include: Sofia T - An investigation of different photographic techniques and styles through architecture; Laura B-L – How does the manipulation of colour, light and pattern create abstract imagery in photography? Stephanie W – Comparing and contrasting English and American street photography; Rebecca H – A study of early photography techniques.

Laura B-L (Sixth Form)

Rebecca H (Sixth Form)

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Sofia T (Si


ixth Form)

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Stephanie W (Sixth Form)

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CCF ARMY AND RAF FIELD DAYS Navy Cadets developed their sailing and kayaking skills alongside valuable leadership and teamwork tasks. Hawley Lake provided a beautiful backdrop for their training. Sail power, paddle power and even doggy paddle techniques (perfect in no wind!) were tested - some more successfully than others! Army and RAF Cadets ‘survived’ their bushcraft training out in the depths of the forest near Liss. Activities included lighting fires by friction, feathering wood for kindling and honing their dart-shooting skills. They enjoyed tips and stories from survival experts on surviving out in the field.

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DofE CONSERVATION DAY As part of their Bronze Duke of Edinburgh (DofE) award programme, 25 students completed their final conservation day on Redhill Common. Working together they cleared substantial quantities of alien laurel trees from the forest, opening up the ground for native species to flourish and providing habitats for native animals and birds. The students worked incredibly hard all day and were enormously successful in opening up the woods.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

WIRED NEXT GENERATION CONFERENCE Sixty Computer Science and ICT students spent the day at the Wired Next Generation Conference held in the Tanks Gallery at The Tate Modern. Students enjoyed a range of inspiring talks from speakers such as Zak Parrish, Senior Developer Tech Artist for Epic Games; Lizzie Daly, a wildlife biologist and presenter; teenage activist Amika George; Alex Wuttke, a VFX supervisor for Industrial Light and Magic; James Young, a filmmaker and BBC presenter; and John Underkoffler, the CEO of Oblong Industries. Students also had the opportunity to participate in two workshops of their choice, ranging from exploring electromagnetism circuits with the Royal Institution to learning how to become a successful YouTube creator.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE IN ACTION A Level Computer Science students had the amazing opportunity to attend the Computer Science in Action conference at the Emmanuel Centre in London. This inspirational day gives students the opportunity to hear about cutting edge fields such as computer vision, software development, algorithms, pure programming and computer systems from renowned speakers from universities, industry and the media. Talks included: •

Tushar Sharma from Blippar who spoke about how computer vision is changing the way we visually recognise objects on a massive scale;

Paul Curzon from Queen Mary University of London explored the magic of computer science and algorithms and discussed how the design and programming of interfaces can impact the user;

Nigel Shadbolt from the University of Oxford discussed current research developments in artificial intelligence (AI) along with its practical impact now and in the future;

Mandy Chessell from IBM explored software development and the movement of data whilst giving advice on how to succeed and progress in this area;

Jaimi Anderson explored developments in and the importance of digital forensics and how it fits into society.

UK BEBRAS COMPUTATIONAL THINKING CHALLENGE More than 250 Computer Science students participated in the UK Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge, an online competition comprising a set of short problems called Bebras tasks. They are fun, engaging and based on problems that computer scientists frequently encounter and enjoy solving. The tasks may be solved without prior knowledge, instead requiring logical thinking. Students are awarded certificates for participation, merit, distinction and best in school. The top 10% of students in the age groups are also invited to enter the TCS Oxford Computing Challenge in March. The students awarded best in school for RGS were: •

Juniors - Matthew O

Intermediates - Oli F

Seniors - Charlie H

Elite - Ollie B

IET FARADAY CHALLENGE Austin B, Tom S, Jamie M, Annabel D, Heulwen K and Ellie W took part in an Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Faraday Challenge Day, where they had the opportunity to become real-life engineers for a day. Together they researched, designed and built solutions to real engineering problems. The day is one of 176 events taking place across the UK. At each event teams of local school students compete to find the best solution to an engineering-related challenge. Natalie Clerke, IET Faraday Education Manager, said, “Students who take part in the Faraday Challenge Days this year will experience working as an engineer through hands-on and practical engagement with real-life challenges relating to the James Webb Space Telescope. "There is huge demand for new engineers and technicians and we’re confident that this will challenge young people’s perceptions of engineers and inspire the next generation by giving them an insight into the life of a real engineer, the variety a career in engineering can offer and just how exciting and creative engineering is.” 34


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ENGLISH

NATIONAL POETRY DAY National Poetry Day once again brought warmth to a misty October day, allowing language to roam free. A visit from the poet Paul Canon Harris inspired, engaged and challenged students to look at how they use language and the power it has in every utterance and scribble. Paul worked with classes across the school and used his performance poetry to broach topics as far-ranging as dementia and the England World Cup team.

A NOVEL APPROACH Students rooted deep into the soil of literature this term and were both analytical and creative in their approaches to literature. Many students planned entries to the Tower Poetry competition on the theme of underwater - we’re hoping one or two of the poems make a big splash! Students have also explored the subtle, dark humour and social commentary of Alan Bennett, and considered the influence of G M Hopkins’ 35

religious poetry on the later writing of Seamus Heaney. For Halloween, our reading group was bitten by the chthonic nature of the vampire, enjoying poetic representations of the undead throughout the nineteenth century. Plath’s poetry has been another revenant encountered across weekly meetings. The department looks forward to another year to come of digging into the rich soil of English literature.

THE TOWER POETRY COMPETITIONS 2019

UNDERWATER


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HOW RGS DROPPED EVERYTHING AND READ Poetry, novels, short stories, academic articles: just some of the resources that students (and staff) were reading during RGS's first Drop Everything And Read event, part of the school’s Wellbeing Festival to promote reflection, curiosity and personal growth. The library staff and junior librarians hosted a book swap for students. The Get Caught Reading competition drew lots of interest, particularly from Lower School students and the display of the finalists’ entries in the library showed how you can be completely engrossed in a good book whether at the Blackpool Illuminations, on the edge of the Grand Canyon or surrounded by pumpkins. For students across the school, written homework was replaced with a reading task; feedback from students suggested that many really appreciated the opportunity and encouragement to spend time with a book or academic journal.

BARBICAN THEATRE TRIP The trip to the Barbican theatre in London to see the Royal Shakespeare Company's latest production of Macbeth was a treat. Christopher Eccleston took on the role of the protagonist and gave students the opportunity to see the play they have been studying in an original production.

UPPER SCHOOL READING GROUP The Upper School reading group has tackled a particularly challenging read this term - Cormac McCarthy’s dystopian nightmare, The Road. Cited by critics as a read which will not only knock the breath from your lungs but also leave you thrilled and mesmerised. Students have indeed been highly engaged with this text, which raises so many pertinent questions for our globally-warmed generation.

The Road Cormac McCarthy Upper School Reading Group

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GEOGRAPHY A BUSY TERM... The Autumn term was a busy one for Geography students which, amongst other things, included several fun and engaging field trips. In Brixton students observed the changes that have occurred during the period of rapid transformation which has taken place in recent years, and looked at changes and perceptions of place from a variety of different viewpoints. A trip to Seven Sisters Country Park and Cuckmere Haven saw students investigating coastal features and debating the pros and cons of proposals to end the maintenance of sea defences, allowing the sea to flood the valley.

Weather and climate change featured significantly during a trip to Gatwick Airport, hosted by Ian Waghorn, Gatwick's Water Quality Engineer. Security clearance provided unprecedented access to air-side facilities including being alongside the runway as an Emirates A380 took off - a spectacular sight. Following the Gatwick Airport trip, a visit to Box Hill allowed students the opportunity to measure infiltration rates. A walking tour of Spitalfields and a visit to BT’s Sky Garden allowed for stunning panoramic views over London. Students considered many issues including waves of immigration, more recent regeneration

and the Great Plague. A series of talks in London included A Travel Guide to the Centre of the Earth (Prof Dougal Jerram aka Dr Volcano); Landscape Systems in the Anthropocene (Martin Evans); Changing Places: Communities, Relationships and Participation (Sally Lloyd-Evans); Lessons in Sustainability: An Explorer’s Tale (Jason Lewis); and Beyond Borders: Changing Geographies of Migration and Asylum (Jonathan Darling). The final trip of 2018 was to Siemen’s Crystal and the Olympic Park. Both visits focused on urban sustainability with students seeing the positive side of redevelopment.


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FOOD & NUTRITION

SCIENCE

BLUE COW BUTCHERY COURSE

Physicists visited the Emmanuel Centre in London for Science lectures on topics ranging from astrophysics to medicine and also UCL and the Wellcome Collection.

Third Form Food and Nutrition students were treated to a masterclass in de-boning a whole chicken by Jack, the Butcher. The meat was then used to create a delicious curry.

Thank Science it’s Friday has seen a large number of student speakers this term with topics ranging from the future of energy production to gene differentiation. The Biology field-trip to Nettlecombe in Somerset was‌ wet. Students were immersed in ecology in action, spending five days in a range of ecosystems and living in the busy field centre.

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MATHS

SENIOR TEAM MATHS CHALLENGE A squad of RGS's brightest Sixth Form mathematicians trained and competed for places in the United Kingdom Mathematics Trust (UKMT) Senior Team Maths Challenge squad. RGS has a fine record in the competition – this year's team was striving for a fourth successive appearance in the national final. The regional final saw RGS competing against schools across the South East in a group round, cross-number and shuttle round. After a tough selection process, Andrew H, Adam J, Barnaby M and Chris M secured places in team Reigate. On the day, tough competitions saw RGS narrowly miss out on a win. Despite this it was a great day of competition, thoroughly enjoyed by all.

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HANS WOYDA Team RGS has been victorious in all of its first round matches in the Hans Woyda competition, battling against teams from Woldingham School, Wallington High School for Girls and Nonsuch School for Girls. Thomas K, Lakith G, Chris M and Andrew H displayed calm heads and an impressive ability to solve complex maths problems under serious time pressure, both as a team and independently. They won every match making RGS league winners!


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MFL

GERMAN TRIP TO BERLIN The Second Form German trip to Berlin was an enjoyable visit and gave a good introduction to the cosmopolitan city. After an early flight on Sunday, the group made the most of the first day from the word go. They visited different Christmas markets on Alexanderplatz and Potsdamer Platz, where they shopped and tasted German food specialities and had a go at speaking German. In the evening bowling was enjoyed by all. The group also visited the Jewish Museum and learnt about its architecture and Jewish culture and religion. In the Checkpoint Charlie Museum students learnt about the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall and the Cold War.

YERMA - SPANISH THEATRE TRIP VISIT Spanish students visited the Cervantes Theatre to see the play Yerma by Lorca. At the end of the play the students had the chance to ask the director and actors questions about the show.

SPANISH ONATTI PLAY The Onatti Theatre Company visited RGS to perform a Spanish play, El Viejo Saloon. It was a fantastic and interactive play where the language used by the actors directly linked to the themes studied in class.

The final day included a trip to the Reichstag, the German parliament. Its glass dome was amazing with fantastic views all over Berlin.

FRENCH ONATTI PLAY The Onatti Theatre Company returned to RGS putting on a French play about two very competitive friends called Jeremy and Alice. It was interesting and we picked up the story fairly easily due to the excellent acting. Mollie F and Zabi B (Second Form)

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THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR WITH PROFESSOR STEPHEN LAW “Is morality relative?” Stephen Law asked us at the Philosophy lecture. We debated this in depth and there was a lot of discussion on what makes something moral or immoral. He then posed the question “Is killing wrong because God says it is or does God say it’s wrong because it is?” He made us think. I enjoyed it very much. Eloise J (Third Form)

YOUNG THEOLOGIANS: RESPONSES TO EVIL AND SUFFERING CONFERENCE T&P students attended a conference on responses to evil and suffering. The conference started with the problem of evil: “How can God be both omni-benevolent and omnipotent?” This stirred up some interesting debate.

account on how a tragic accident affected their long-held faith and how they struggled with religion after experiencing suffering first hand. Many of us thought that this was really poignant and heartwrenching.

Chris and Denise Arthey gave a powerful

Lavinia B (Fifth Form)

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HOW CAN GOD BE BOTH OMNIBENEVOLENT AND OMNIPOTENT?


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CAN WE KNOW GOD? T&P students have been working on a project in class to explore the question, “Can we ‘know’ God?”. Students have used their studies of Eastern Philosophy and Judaeo-Christian teachings to consider their own personal response to the question and produced some beautiful work: some in the form of paintings, some models, and even a couple of edible interpretations!

THE ACADEMY The Academy debating society runs every Friday lunchtime and all issues presented have provoked fierce discussion. The debates have ranged from ethical issues like “Should we erase history?” to philosophical and religious debates such as “When does religious satire go too far?”

Can satire ever be acceptable?

My money, my rights: should benefits be freely spent?

Will AI kill off humanity?

THE ACADEMY

The NHS should refuse care for self-inflicted illness.

How were the Charlie Hebdo images controversial?

Is the erosion of history based on current political ideologies ever justifiable?

Refusing to vaccinate your children is neglect!

Are we the snowflake generation?

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HISTORY & POLITICS CREATIVE WRITING COMPETITION WINNER Third Form student Rebekah B won first prize in the Exeter University creative writing competition for her World War One poem One Bullet, which she wrote as part of her History course. The judges were impressed with how the moving piece captured the essence and emotion of the conflict. Rebekah’s poem was singled out for

MAYOR'S DEBATE To coincide with the Wellbeing Festival and Mental Health Wellbeing Day, the History and Politics Society took a group of students, including co-chairs James D and Fraser C, to Reigate and Banstead Council Chambers to take part in the inaugural Mayor's Debate. The discussion centred around the issue of mental health and what local councils can do to improve mental health provision. James D (Upper Sixth Form)

praise by the panel. They said, “This piece really grasped the senselessness of the original atrocity, and how it escalated to become the world's greatest tragedy, and how easily that can happen.” Rebekah’s poem was read at the school remembrance service in a moving tribute to all those who served in the various wars over the past 100 years.

ONE BULLET One Bullet. Shot by one gun. Held by one assassin. Killing one duke. One duke of one country. Bordering one other country Who started one war. Involving 32 countries. Sending thousands, millions of men, To hundreds of different places, New places, Confusing places, Never knowing What would happen next. One Bullet, Out of millions Flying over the battlefields, Mowing men down, Buried where they died, Thousands of broken hearts And families. Grieving mothers. Crying wives. Weeping children. One Bullet. Larger bullets Targeting towns. Villages. Cities. Destroying the area Where they landed. For miles around. Lists in the newspapers. Proclaiming lovers lost. Children gone. Wiped out forever. How could just One Bullet Cause so much damage? So much destruction. So much pain. For something so tiny. Insignificant, even. So small, and yet So catastrophic. One Bullet. Rebekah B (Second Form)

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MOSCOW TRIP During half term A Level History and Politics students travelled to Moscow and St Petersburg. They visited key sights such as Red Square, Lenin’s mausoleum, the Kremlin and the Hermitage. Local guides enhanced the experience by sharing their personal stories and those of their families.

The whole group felt it was a privilege to engage with Russian history and culture and to see at first-hand these two remarkable cities. The trip has made a lasting impression and certainly no one will forget travelling by train at night from Moscow to St Petersburg.


R EI G AT E G R A M M A R SC H OO L

CRICKET

TOP 100 SCHOOLS

RGS CRICKET GAINS TOP 100 SCHOOLS ACCOLADE FOR THE SECOND YEAR RUNNING RGS has again been selected by national magazine The Cricketer as one of the top 100 schools in the country for excellence in Cricket. The Playing Fields of England annual report recognises schools that have the best coaching, facilities, results, fixture lists, community engagement and sustained support for the wider game and its players. Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, said, “I always enjoy seeing our boys and girls take to the cricket pitch with such enthusiasm each summer. Our excellent cricket programme and links with outside cricket clubs continue to be instrumental in the development of the game locally.” 45

“I AM DELIGHTED OUTSTANDING THAT CRICKET OPPORTUNITIES TO AT RGS HAS BEEN EXCEL AT THE SPORT RECOGNISED FOR AND WE AIM TO THE SECOND YEAR DEVELOP WITHIN IN A ROW. OUR THEM A LIFELONG STUDENTS HAVE LOVE OF THE GAME”. MR JAMES LECK, RGS HEAD OF CRICKET


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SCHOOL NEWS The U15 girls successfully qualified as the South East Regional representatives for the next round of the Surrey County Indoor Competition. At Dunottar school, #TeamReigate first played Woldingham, bowling out the opposition for 30 but narrowly losing out by four wickets overall. Next up was Dunottar. Having lost the toss and been asked to bat, #TeamReigate smashed their way to 96 for 4. They followed this up with a clinical display in the field to win by 67 runs. In the play-off match against Dunottar, #TeamReigate were equally polished both in the field and with the ball in hand. The girls knocked off the runs ending two down in the fourth over. Opponents and the location of the next round will be announced in due course.

RGS girls Lucy A, Millie H, Jas F, Lilly F, Emily B, and Lucy H and RGS boys Tommy B, Jacob L and Alex B have been selected to attend the 2019 Surrey County Cricket programme, and Lucy A gained a place on the County Emerging Player Programme (EPP). 46


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RUGBY #TeamReigate has had a season of great progress on the rugby pitches with all teams tasting a great deal of success. Season highlights include an undefeated season for the U14 team who won all 13 fixtures and the U15 squad who reached the last 32 of the NatWest Vase, a competition that has over 250 entries. Huge congratulations to Ellie G who has had an amazing season thus far. She has not only established herself as fly-half for Harlequins Ladies 1st XV but has also been selected for the England U20 squad and, most impressively, was invited to become a member of the full England Ladies training squad.

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HOCKEY

F

orty RGS Hockey players have been selected to play at county, regional and national level this year and Peggy W is one of only 26 players in the country to be selected for the England U16 squad. #TeamReigate Hockey is on a high with two teams last year at U15 and U13 level reaching national finals and the U13 team going on to win the national Independent Schools Hockey Cup. This term, #TeamReigate hosted the England National Hockey South of England Pool U18 and U16 competitions. RGS teams topped their groups and will play Bradfield and Wellington College in the next round.

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Key Achievements • The pre-season Holland tour saw 54 hockey players take on three training sessions and three matches each. Great preparation for the season ahead! • U15s Surrey and London Champions • U16s Winners in the Surrey and South final (top 16 in the country) • U18s South Indoor, South final (top 16 in the country) • 40th Rugby School guest match – invited to this prestigious event

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T

he journey from Gatwick airport to Turin was, aside from a couple of missing passport moments (no names!), smooth and uneventful which, on a school trip during the busy season just before Christmas, is about all you can wish for. Over the next six days the group had fantastic snow, some days of glorious sunshine and a great deal of fun.

Three nights of heavy snow led to waistdeep powder on the preceding days making for some exceptional skiing. As the experienced skiers honed their skills and tried to beat Mr Crook's record, the beginners made incredible progress, especially Jack WS who made it to a black run before the week was out. The hotel's location was brilliant, at the foot of the beautiful Marteau blue run. On the last day, the group skied all the way to the boot room! Other highlights included Tom G's birthday (where better to spend your 18th?!), Le Bercail - the best spot for hot chocolate on the mountain and the biggest baked alaska ever seen. When the week was done and the drones had been cleared from Gatwick the group arrived home safe, happy, a little exhausted but without an injury in sight. Roll on 2020 when it all happens again!

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SENIOR SKI TRIP

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SWIMMING

#TeamReigate had a very successful term in the pool with county medals awarded and national finals reached. Galas have been won against Caterham, Epsom College, St John’s, Hawthorns and Sevenoaks. With A, B and C teams across all year groups, RGS's largest team numbered over 70! At the Surrey Schools' Relay Championships RGS came away as County Champions with five sets of team medals. Success in the Surrey relays lead to success at national level. RGS initially qualified in the top 30 of both the senior and inter girls’ freestyle relay and made the reserve list (31-35 in the country) for four others. The inters swam a superb relay, finishing 8th from the 231 schools that entered.

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BIATHLON

Along with success in the pool, RGS has also had a number of successes in Biathlon competitions and the National Biathlon Championships. Following these competitions a number of students qualified for the National Biathlon Championships in Leeds. RGS's U14 boys had their totals combined to be awarded a bronze team medal. In due course it will be announced how many RGS students have qualified for the British Schools' Championships in March.

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NETBALL #TeamReigate competed in a record number of Netball competitions this year. The U13, U15 and U19 teams were entered into the Independent School's Netball Cup (ISNC) and the U12, U14 and U19 teams were entered into a new national cup called SISTERS n SPORT which is a knockout open competition for all schools. The girls have been working really hard and their efforts have been certainly paid off. In the SISTERS n SPORT competition the U12s made it through to the top 16 out of 143 schools in the country, narrowly losing out to St Catherine's by only three goals. The U14s are also through to the top 16 (out of 128). The U19s made it to the last 16 and are currently top eight nationally in the ISNC. In the next round of the ISNC they face Epsom College for a place in the final top four nationally.

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SPORTING SNIPPETS

GABI HOLLAND

JAMES MUNNS

ETHAN PATTERSON

Gabi is a Modern Pentathlete. Every week her training schedule includes swimming, running, shooting, fencing and riding (show jumping).

James is a Surrey County squad player. Amongst his many golfing achievements he was winner of day 1, day 2 and overall winner of the European Junior Golf Tour finals at Silvermere Golf Club. He also placed 3rd in the European Spanish tour finals.

Having joined RGS in September 2018, Ethan has really hit the ground running. He has a long-standing passion for Rugby which sees him training and playing for the U12A team, but also enjoys Hockey, again playing for the U12As, despite never having played Hockey before coming to RGS.

Modern Pentathlon

Gabi "We compete in lots of different combinations of the event - not always all five disciplines - and that is what I love about the sport." Last year Gabi was British U13 Modern Triathlon and Tetrathlon Champion and was lucky enough to represent Team GB at the European and World Championships. She is now building up her training for the British Biathlon Championships in March and British Tetrathlon Championships in April. Alongside this Gabi has qualifiers each month for selection back into Team GB. If successful she will have European and World Championships to look forward to later in the year.

Golf

James is a Leadbetter Academy Junior world development player and has received coaching from county coach Sam Truman at Reigate Hill and pro-tour coach Ron Grotjan at Leadbetter Academy, Florida.

Rugby

Ethan "We have had a very successful Rugby season and we play really well as a team, which has helped me make lots of new friends at my new school. "The coaches have been amazing and have helped me develop new rugby skills which I also get to use at weekends when I play for Dorking Rugby Club. "My personal highlights of the year so far have been scoring four tries in one match and making it into the Hockey A team. "I am really looking forward to representing the school in Rugby, Rugby Sevens and Hockey and I hope to be part of the 1st XV in the future."

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LUCY DÉNECÉ

BRIANNA EDMUNDS

NIKI OVERTOOM

Lucy has been competing in Cross Country for the last four years and the start of this season has been particularly busy.

Maintaining a balance between 1st team Netball, Hockey and Rugby along with school-work takes some doing, but it is a challenge that Brianna says she has enjoyed every minute of. Both Hockey and Netball teams have had some incredible results this year with the Hockey 1st Xl making it through to the South of England finals, and the 1st Vll Netball team to the top eight in the country with a quarter final match still to play. Outside school, Brianna has been selected for both county Hockey and Rugby where she will gain experience with the skilful coaches and players.

Niki is vice-captain of the RGS 1st VII Netball team which has been entered into two prestigious national tournaments this year, the Independent Schools' Netball Cup (ISNC) and the other run by SISTERS n SPORT. The team made it into the top eight counties nationally for the ISNC and top 16 for the SISTERS n SPORT contest.

Cross country

Following good results in the Surrey league races she was selected to run at the South of England inter-counties in Oxford where she won a Surrey team silver medal. Shortly after, Lucy came 2nd at the Surrey Cross Country Championships in Croydon, leading to selection to run for the Surrey team at the County Athletic Union (CAU) National inter-counties in Loughborough. Most recently, a 4th place at the Surrey Schools' Cross Country Championships has given her an automatic selection for the prestigious English Schools' Cross Country Championships, a home international selector race in Leeds. Both events take place in March. Lucy "With the South of England Championships and the National Championships both before this, I am looking forward to the experience of competing on these big occasions. "I really enjoy taking part in lots of other sports both at school and club level and this year I am also part of the Surrey Hockey U13 Lions team."

Hockey

Despite a hectic schedule Brianna has ambitions to involve herself in upcoming Drama productions and is hoping to begin singing lessons soon as a Gold DofE award skill. Brianna “From the past two years or so I have discovered that there just aren’t enough hours in a day for someone like me who wants to do everything and be everywhere. Throughout the rest of the year I’m looking forward to our upcoming Rugby tournaments and Netball fixtures that are sure to rack up a competitive storm. I also can’t wait to see what the new Hockey season will bring in September.”

Netball

Niki "I train four times a week and have a weekly match, be it for school or for my club - Old Reigatians. For me this has been a massive achievement and is the best way to end my school Netball career with an amazing team and coaches. On top of this I'm a senior prefect and co-run the Eco committee at school which has helped me further my passion for Geography and the environment. I've done a lot of Netball coaching at the RGS sports camps over the holidays and I am just about to start coaching in school in lunchtimes."

#TeamReigate

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CAREERS

A

s always the Careers department has run a packed schedule of talks, guidance sessions and industry specific evenings to help students from RGS and the wider community to make informed decisions about their futures. Decisions about what to do next are never easy, but the RGS Careers department is available throughout the journey and does everything it can to make planning for the future as painless and productive as possible. The Digital Careers Evening was a huge success, attended by over 200 guests from RGS and local schools. Nicky Dunderdale from Psyon and Paul Featherstone from Capita SIMS delivered insightful talks. Thanks also go to Marcus Thornley, Alex Upstone, Simon Knibbs, John Hosegood, Josh Gallager, Phil Maryland, Shirisha Musthyala and Pippa Lewty for volunteering their time to answer student questions. Prospective medics, dentists, vets and midwives were put through their paces by RGS staff during MMI (Multiple Mini Interview) practice sessions. Interview techniques for these subjects rarely follow the traditional format; instead, they generally involve applicants going to a number of stations, one after another, to undertake short tasks or interviews. Many of these situations are non-medical and non-science related, instead requiring interviewees to demonstrate empathy, honesty, decision-making ability or the skills required to break bad news. The Engineering Careers Evening was also well attended by RGS students and those from other local schools. Guest speakers Rob Thatcher and Stefanos Stylianou from the University of Surrey, provided information about Engineering courses; Dr Hossein Saidpour from the University of Hertfordshire explained the differences between Engineering degree courses and degree apprenticeship courses. Kerry George from Thales provided a brief insight into apprenticeships from an employer’s point of 59

view. The speakers, as well as Sue Caccavones (Reigatian parent) from Black and Veatch and Chris Binns (Reigatian parent), Chief Engineer at Crossrail, were invited to take questions from the audience. The Careers department is very grateful to all RGS parents, former students and teachers who gave up their time to help students to prepare for university interviews and to those who came in to speak to students as a part of the careers programme: Natasha Rees (Reigatian) on Graduate Schemes; Piers-Rex Murray (Reigatian) on Training to be a Pilot; Dr Sandeep Cliff (Reigatian parent) on medicine interviews; Steve Brooks (Reigatian parent) on Life as a Vet; and Harry Kernick and Alex Iqbal (Reigatian parent), who shared their experiences of working for Douse Associates during their Gap Years in Financial Services.


A SEASON FOR REUNIONS This year the RGS Foundation held a series of reunions for alumni. The school was delighted to see so many former students and staff reunite to reminisce and reconnect. Back to School Day (1939–1975) RGS hosted 150 alumni and their partners for a Back to School Day for those who left prior to 1975 (right). With representatives spanning five decades, including former staff from this golden era. Class of 2008 Reunion (10 Years On) Our special thanks go to Emma Eisenberg (née Gabe) for helping to bring everyone together in Covent Garden – it couldn’t have happened without her. Class of 2014 Graduation Brunch The school was delighted to welcome back over 60 of the Class of 2014 for the popular Graduation Brunch. Headmaster, Mr Fenton, made a toast to the Class of 2014 and all their successes. South Africa 1998 Rugby Tour Reunion Three-quarters of the original 1998 RGS touring squad with their families met at the Pilgrim Brewery, Reigate for their 20-year reunion, feeling not a week older than when they left (right). Some made it from as far away as New Zealand and Australia. The Brewery commissioned a special ale for the reunion. Canada 1978 Rugby Tour Reunion At Old Reigatians Rugby Club the 1978 tour party reunited 40 years after the original tour with some back from New Zealand, the US and Germany, some for the first time since leaving school.

RGS PROFESSIONALS @ BRYAN CAVE LEIGHTON PAISNER The RGS Professionals group met at the London headquarters of global law firm Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner (BCLP), for the much anticipated Diversity Dilemma themed evening. We are extremely thankful to our host for the evening James Knox (’80), a Partner of BCLP.

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RGS PROFESSIONALS CHARITY GOLF DAY The annual RGS Professionals Charity Golf Day took place at the Royal Ashdown Forest Golf Club. Thank you to our sponsor vision4sport, owned by current RGS parent Karl Wesson (also a former golf professional).


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RUN REIGATE 2018 The RGS Run Reigate team once again laced up their running shoes in September in support of the Changing Lives campaign. Join the team on 15 September 2019 as they do it all over again!

CITY BREAKFAST – FINANCIAL LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT A packed house provided the backdrop for the RGS City Breakfast at the award winning M Restaurant. Hosted by the charismatic David Allard (’79), CEO of Financial Lifestyle Management (FLM), guests enjoyed presentations from four RGS alumni, now working in the FLM team: Imogen Allard (’13), James Feneley (’08), Ed Forsyth (’08) and Harry Vaughan (’09).

LEGACY APPEAL LAUNCH The RGS Foundation launched its legacy appeal with the première of the new Changing Lives film this autumn, inviting people to consider remembering RGS in their Will. RGS was founded through the legacy gift left by Henry Smith in his Will, and remains committed to creating lifechanging opportunities for children from less advantaged backgrounds through bursarial support.

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RGS Hartswood Sports Ground

CATCH UP ONLINE As this Review illustrates, RGS is an action-packed school with a wealth of news and activities happening around the clock. To keep up to date, visit our website or join in with RGS online:

facebook.com/reigategrammarschool

 Follow our news and views on Twitter: Headmaster @rgsheadmaster

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RGS Foundation @foundationRGS

RGS Music @rgs_music

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RGS Geography @RGSGeography

RGS Netball @RGSNetball

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RGS Computing @RGSComputing

RGS History @History_RGS

RGS Rugby @ReigateGSrugby

RGS Williamson @RGS_Williamson

RGS Cranston @RGS_Cranston

RGS Hockey @HockeyRGS

RGS Scholarships @RGSScholars

RGS Weather @RGSweather

Reigate Grammar School, Reigate Road, Reigate, Surrey RH2 0QS 01737 222231 info@reigategrammar.org reigategrammar.org

Profile for RGS

RGS Review Spring/Summer 2019  

The RGS Review magazine includes the highlights of each term at RGS, including reports on extra-curricular achievements and trips abroad.

RGS Review Spring/Summer 2019  

The RGS Review magazine includes the highlights of each term at RGS, including reports on extra-curricular achievements and trips abroad.

Profile for rgs-it