RGHS Magazine 2020

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Rustenburg Girls’ High School 2020 Girls’ High School 2020 Rustenburg


VISION Rustenburg: an innovative, valuesdriven school, where we strive to create a sense of belonging and empower womxn to become compassionate leaders of change.

Contents Leaders’ Reflections

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COVID-19 Reflections

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Academic Reflections

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Pastoral Reflections

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Sport Reflections

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Extra-mural Reflections 60 Rustenburg Alumnae Reflections Anna Nagel (Grade 12)

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Monique Hefer (Grade 12)

SCHOOL MAGAZINE CREDITS EDITOR: Ms Lindsay de Klerk PORTFOLIOS: Ms Susan Schnetler (Deputy Principal: Academic Head) Ms Gillian Blackshaw (Deputy Principal: Pastoral Head) LAYOUT AND DTP: Ms Caryn Köhler DIGITAL DESIGN OF COVERS: Mr Sean Copping-Rice COVER PHOTOGRAPHER: Ms Geila Wills INNER COVERS ARTWORK: Leaders’ Reflections: Rahima Baboo (Grade 12) Alia Ismail (Grade 12)

Nuhaa Berhardien (Grade 11)

Dilshaad Regal (Grade 11)

Covid-19 Reflections: Jemma Cusens (Grade 11) Academic Reflections: Georgia Wallace (Grade 11) Pastoral Reflections: Caitlin Gronow (Grade 11) Sport Reflections: Dilshaad Regal (Grade 11) Extramural Reflections: Jemma Hallet (Grade 12) Alumnae Reflections: Azhar Phillips (Grade 11)

FINANCE OFFICE: Ms Melanie Howe Ms Lynda Niddrie Ms Morag Rijs

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER: Ms Kristina StojiljkovicCampbell

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Ms René Forbes Ms Geila Wills Cape Photo

PRINTING: Mr Darren Taljaard and 4mat Communications

PROOFING: Ms Julie Campbell OPERATIONS: Mr Graeme Broster Ms René Forbes Ms Geila Wills

PHOTO TEAM: Jemma Cusens Dayna Powell Megan Cusens Fazlin du Plessis Hanaa Adam Naadirah Adam La’eeqa Aziz Nika du Preez Alexandra Espag Caitlin Henderson Sarah Irwin Yasmeen Kazi Cindy Littlefield Nina Macedo Keona Missing Tanatswa Pepukai Emma September Amy Skinner Gadija Slamang Georgia Wallace


Reflections from the

Principal

Mr Michael Gates

They adapted so easily to the holding pond, barely a foot and a half deep, making their home amongst the string algae. They weren’t to know a better, safer pond was in their future and they did everything they could to avoid being caught to be transferred to their new home. I’m sure if they could reason they’d be grateful for the new space and excited for the new opportunities. This year has been like the holding tank. We at first felt stifled and frustrated, but have adapted to our new way of life. We may have found comfort in something familiar; or we’ve been frightened and devastated by loss, and hidden ourselves amongst the string algae. None of us has escaped the inevitable change that a worldwide pandemic has brought.

This does not mean that all is perfect and we will constantly strive to improve our systems. It will, however, mean that we no longer have to hide in the string algae and can swim freely in an education space that caters for more than just academics.

We’ve had to change the way we do school, which has been frightening, but also very exciting. The development of technology has allowed us to implement a blended learning style, with some working from home and others present in classrooms. We’ve had to think of solutions

Reflections from the

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Paired together, the COVID-19 pandemic and the Grade 12 class putting the spotlight on racist systems and practices at our school, have provided a catalyst for big changes ahead. We will be shifting systems so that there is far more attention given to the individual, and leadership opportunities for the entire Grade 12 class. Together with the work put in by our transformation team over the years, we can move to the next level of ensuring a sense of belonging.

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Leaders’ Reflections Leaders’ Reflections

to problems we hoped we’d never have to face.

Chairperson

of the School Governing Body

Mr Alistair Noyce

Chairperson: Mr Alistair Noyce Deputy Chair: Cllr Yagyah Adams Principal: Mr Michael Gates Treasurer: Ms Bahija Hashim Secretary: Mr Graeme Broster (co-opted) Parents: Mr Russell Edwards, Mr Andrew Gray, Mr Sean McGuinnes, Mr Alan Winde Elected Educator Representatives: Ms Olivia Herrendoerfer, Ms Susan Schnetler Elected Non-Educator Representative: Ms Nolundi Blayi Student Representatives: Aaliyah Salie, Faaria Mullah Co-opted Educator: Ms Gillian Blackshaw Co-opted Parents: Mr Fuad Davis, Mr Mahomed Latiff

The current SGB term of office ends at the end of 2020 and this is an opportune moment to reflect on some of our focus areas. We started the year with a workshop to develop a new vision, mission and five-year plan for the school, and capital expenditure plans to improve school security and add extra classrooms. These plans were put on hold as we concentrated on supporting the school to cope with the impact of COVID-19. Transformation The school and the broader parent representation on the SGB have started a journey of transformation but it is clear that Rustenburg needs to do more, at a faster pace, to create an environment where everyone feels comfortable to express themselves. The SGB is a key tool in this process and I encourage more parents to attend the Annual Budget and AGM meeting and support SGB elections to ensure the SGB parent representatives accurately carry the views of the parent body.

Funding Rustenburg consistently delivers exceptional results and high-performing schools are a scarce resource in South Africa. Going forward, there is likely to be less state funding for public schools in middle class neighbourhoods while there will be increasing demand for access to the quality education Rustenburg provides, often from families not able to pay the fees. Finding alternative sources of funding from our broader community will be a growing issue. We have strengthened the financial control and governance by creating a Financial Manager post and a new Communications and Fundraising role. I would like to thank all the learners, staff and parents who have served on the SGB and sub-committees. Thank you for your insights, passion and commitment to the school.

LEADERS

As I watch the fish swim in my pond, I’m mindful of how 2020 has been a year of change for them.

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Hlonelwa Zimba

I recall starting the year with the words: “2020 – a year filled with happiness, joy and growth in our sisterhood. Let us push ourselves and strive for greatness”. The year truly started off on a high note; everything was fast-paced and enjoyable as our high school days were coming to an end. As Head Prefect, I had the privilege of observing and lending a hand to those in the younger grades and to be the bridge between the learners and the school leadership. I will forever be grateful for the spirit of ubuntu displayed in the prefect body and the Rustenburg community at large. The Covid-19 pandemic did not deter us from continuing with our plans as a prefect body. We learnt

that as leaders, when a challenge arises we need to find creative solutions. 2020 has seen us face many trials and tribulations at an individual and societal level. It made us show resilience and perseverance in adapting to unforeseen challenges. I am immensely grateful for and indebted to the prefect body who presented me with a golden opportunity to lead the school through uncharted waters. I am proud of the team and I will forever cherish their support. This has been a valuable and growing experience and I appreciate the guidance that I received from Mr Gates, Ms Blackshaw, and the Management Team. To the Rustenburg community: 2020 taught us that life is unpredictable, however, we should always strive to be resilient in the face of adversity.

Reflections from the

Chairperson of the RCL

Aaliyah Salie

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Faaria Mullah (Deputy Chairperson) and I served as representatives on the School Governing Body (SGB). As learners, being on a board of influential adults felt intimidating. Finding the necessary courage was sometimes difficult; however, we pushed through our fears because of our desire to fulfil our duty. We made suggestions to the SGB regarding how they could make future RCL heads and deputies feel more empowered to represent the learners with clarity and confidence. Aside from the stresses of coping with Covid-19, academic and home pressures included, learners have had a

Reflections from the

compelling desire to advocate for justice as part of the Black Lives Matter and Gender-Based Violence movements. The RCL was involved in assisting learners in the creation of documents in which the voice of the learners, notably the class of E20, was shared with the Management Team. We then discussed this document in detail with the SGB, and thereafter communicated their responses with learners across all grades. Despite the loss of the school year we had all imagined, there is a sense of accomplishment. We have done our best to set a standard for future RCL members to emulate, and hopefully they will do even better than we ever could.

Head of Erinville

Erin Coetzee

I don’t think any of us expected that this year would turn out the way that it has, however, I do think that we have made the most of the situation with which we were presented. The Matrics were the first to return after our twomonth lockdown period and many of us were unsure as to how things were going to work at hostel, especially since we wouldn’t even be able to hug each other on our return. We found it quite challenging having to live in such close proximity to each other but still remain socially distanced. These changes have completely altered the way that we thought our Matric year and our hostel experience would be. We used the time that we had together to

do some bonding and catch up on the missed time by celebrating a few 18th birthdays that happened during lockdown. We ultimately found alternative ways to have fun and make the most of the time that we had together. Although I only had a two-year stay here at Rustenburg, my experience has been incredible and I have learned so much about myself, as well as many valuable life lessons. I am especially grateful for our lovely housemistresses, kitchen staff, and, most importantly, the boarders who have become my family. You have all been absolutely amazing and have made my experience here at Rustenburg one that I will remember for many years to come.

PRINCIPAL Mr Michael Gates: BMedSc (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec, MEd DEPUTY PRINCIPAL: ACADEMIC Ms Susan Schnetler: BSocSc, Hons (BA), HDE (PG) Sec DEPUTY PRINCIPAL: PASTORAL Ms Gillian Blackshaw: BA (MBK), HDE (PG) Sec ACADEMIC MANAGEMENT TEAM Arts: Mr Adrian Skelly: BA, HDE (PG) Sec Business and Life Skills: Ms Linda Mallon: BA, HDE Languages: Ms Lindsay de Klerk: BA, PGCE Sciences and Mathematics: Mr Graham Reggiori: BSc, HDE (PG) Sec EXTRA-CURRICULAR MANAGEMENT TEAM Director of Music: Mr Jaco Goosen: MMus, UTLM Director of Sport: Ms Renée Scott: BA (Phys Ed) HDE Head of Learner Leadership: Ms Zaandré Barrett-Theron: BEd (Psych) (Hons) Head of School Programme: Ms Renée Fourie: HDE (PG) Sec, MA Head of Societies and Service: Ms Olivia Herrendoerfer: BMus (Ed), PGCE PASTORAL MANAGEMENT TEAM Head of Grade 12: Ms Brigid Ryan: BA (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec Head of Grade 11: Mr Bernard Biermann: BA, PGCE Head of Grade 10: Ms Zargielay Rabeh: BSc, HDE (PG) Sec, BEd (Hons), ABET Head of Grade 9: Ms Rebecca Goble: BSc, PGCE Head of Grade 8: Ms Susan Viljoen: BSc (Hons), PGCE SUPPORT MANAGEMENT TEAM Campus Manager: Mr Mhlanga Nombewu Head of Finance: Ms Melanie Howe ICT Manager: Mr Francis Vogts: Dip. IT Operations Manager: Mr Graeme Broster: BSc (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec HEAD OF TECH INTEGRATION: Mr Wihan Neethling: BA (Hons), PGCE SUBJECT HEADS Accounting & EMS: Mr Gian Marneweck: BCom, PGCE Afrikaans: Ms Helene Swanson: BA, HOD Consumer Studies and Technology: Ms Christine Steenekamp: HDE (Home Economics) Design and Visual Arts: Ms Jackie Chambers: BA Fine Arts (Hons), HDE Dramatic Arts: Mr Adrian Skelly: BA, HDE (PG) Sec English: Ms Denise Campbell: BA, HDE (PG) Sec French: M. Kerwin Baartzes: BA (Hons), Licence F.L.E. Geography: Ms Brigid Ryan: BA (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec

German: Ms Renée Fourie: MA, HDE (PG) Sec History: Mr Cedric van Dyk: BA (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec ICDL: Ms Janine Myers: BTech (IT), HDE (Comm) Sec, FDE (Comp) Sec IsiXhosa: Ms Mavis Mase: BA (Hons), HDE Life Orientation: Ms Perdita Norval: BA (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec Life Sciences: Ms Zargielay Rabeh: BSc, HDE (PG) Sec, BEd (Hons), ABET Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy: Mr Paul van Koersveld: BSc; PGCE Music: Mr Jaco Goosen: MMus, UTLM Natural and Physical Sciences: Mr Graham Reggiori: BSc, HDE (PG) Sec ACADEMIC STAFF Ms Juanita Atkinson: BMus (Ed) (Hons) Ms Saeeda Bassardien: BSc, PGCE Ms Jane Behne: BSc, HDE Ms Megan Bell: BSc, PGCE Ms Emma Boshoff: MA (Ed Psych), PGCE Mr Murray Buitendag: BMus (Jazz Performance). Ms Norma Caesar: BA (Hons), HDE, MEd Ms Julie Campbell: BJourn, PGCE Ms Astrid Castle: BTech (Fine Arts) Ms Philippa Colly: BSc, PGCE Ms Nicky Cooper: BA Ms Nokutula Dyonase: BSc (Hons), PGCE Ms Karyn Gideon: BEd, Senior and FET Phases Mr William Haggard: BA (Hons), HDE (PG) Sec Mr James Hendricks: MA, PGCE Ms Sindisiwe Herbert: BA (Hons), PGCE Ms Lynette Jacobs: BA Human Ecology (Educational Course) Ms Marieta Langenhoven: BA (Hons), HDE Mr Maty Ndambi: BSc (Hons), PGCE Ms Johandrie Oosthuizen: BDram, MDram, PGCE Ms Megan Paton: BSocSc, PGCE, Med Ms Veronique Ravat: BSc, PGCE Ms Tarin Scharneck: BEd (Arts) Ms Jan Thorne: BMus (Ed) Ms Erika van As: MA, HDE Ms Kayla Voskuil: BEd, Senior and FET Phases PART-TIME MUSIC EDUCATORS Ms Toni Adams: amaAmbush accreditation Mr Justin Bellairs: MMus Ms Zanelle Britz: Post Grad Diploma (Performance) Ms Ariella Caira: BA (Hons): Theatre and Performance Ms Cheryl de Havilland: BSc (Physics/ Music), L.R.A.M. Ms Annelize de Villiers: MMus Mr Jose Dias: BMus (Hons), Post Grad Diploma (Performance) Mr Robert Jeffery: MMus, ATCL Ms Maria Raynham: MMus, LMV, UTLM Ms Marga Smith: MMus, LTCL, PGCE Ms Carla Stokes: BMus (Jazz Performance) Mr David West: BMus, LTCL, AMus TCL, ATCL

MEDIA CENTRE Ms Jordan Tame: BSocSc, PGCE, BEd (Hons) ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Ms Nolundi Blayi Ms Beth Brown Ms Linda Corbello Ms Suleilah Ebrahim Ms René Forbes Ms Lynda Niddrie Mr Alister Penny Ms Morag Rijs Ms Jackie Weston Ms Geila Wills Ms Lynne Young BUGS’ BOUTIQUE SCHOOL SHOP Ms Eugenie Solkow Ms Lydia Mostert CAMPUS SUPERVISOR Mr Stephen Nicholas CLEANING SUPERVISOR Ms Nomazizi Sapepa CAMPUS STAFF Mr Ibrahim Allie Ms Klara Constable Mr Lluwellen Giebelaar Mr Ali Ibrahim Ms Ruth Kabinda Osongo Ms Veronica Chiwala Kabinda Ms Neliswa Mjiqiza Ms Bongiswa Mketo Ms Gcobisa Mlozane Mr Checkson Mwale Mr Edward Mudiwa Mr Adrian Munnik Mr Tawanda Muyambo Mr Kudakwashe Mwaedza Ms Agnes Ndyambo Ms Nokuzola Ngxabani Ms Mandisa Nkumanda Mr Yusuf Osman Ms Bongiwe Pikini Mr Emmanuel Vureya HEAD OF ERINVILLE HOSTEL Ms Karin Evans ERINVILLE CATERING MANAGER Ms Melanie van Blerk ERINVILLE STAFF Ms Michele Bakker Ms Lauren Bates Ms Alyssa Cummings Ms Ursula Hardie Mr Gregory Isaacs Ms Theresa Muller Ms Elaine Nyhila Ms Lizette Samuels Ms Chanelle Scholtz Ms Emily Shuttleworth-White Ms Sheila Stoffels Ms Elizabeth Theunissen Ms Nomawethu Tshona Ms Doris Wyne TUCKSHOP AND CATERING Ms Michelle Haylett Ms Linda Mantshi

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It would be an understatement to say that this year turned out completely different from what we had envisioned. We began 2020 full of excitement, but as the year slowly started to change, we realised that our best bet was to make the most of a difficult situation.

Rustenburg Staff

LEADERS

Head Prefect

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Reflections from the

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Staff News

Retiring Staff

Following 43 years in the teaching profession, nine of which were at Rustenburg, Ms Marieta Langenhoven retired from our Afrikaans Department on 31 August. Known for her generous, kind nature, Ms Langenhoven’s brightly-coloured outfits and friendly conversation will be missed. What can one say of the larger-than-life Head of History, Mr Cedric van Dyk? His classroom reverberates with character and rock ’n roll music. His learners produce sterling NSC results. One of the things of which he is most proud, is the introduction to Rustenburg of the assemblies dedicated to the celebration of Human Rights’ Day, Youth Day, Women’s Day, etc. He has invited speakers like Rivonia trialist, Dennis Goldberg, Mary Burton of the Black Sash and Jonathan Shapiro (aka Zapiro). These assemblies speak to more than just the history learners.

At the start of 2020, the Mathematics Department welcomed Ms Megan Bell and Ms Sindisiwe Herbert. Ms Veronique Ravat was appointed into a part-time Mathematics post. Ms Saeeda Bassardien, a Rustenburg past pupil, joined the Physics Department and Ms Beth Brown took up an administrative role in the Music Department. The Physics Department said goodbye to Ms Tracey Henry at the end of March after four years at Rustenburg. Sadly, the new incumbent has been unable to take up their post due to lockdown and limits on travel. At the end of the year, we had to say farewell to Ms Phillipa Colly in the Mathematics Department, who will be pursuing her dream of being involved with computers and computer programming. In the Finance Office, we bid farewell to Ms Melanie Howe, our Finance Manager. She does, however, continue to assist us in a consulting capacity. Assistant Bursar, Ms Morag Rijs, took early retirement at the end of September following ten and a half years at Rustenburg. We are very grateful to her for the outstanding job she did and we wish her and her husband, Theo, every happiness in this new chapter of their lives. Rustenburg’s Bursar of the last fourteen years, Ms Lynda Niddrie, is taking up an opportunity at another school. She will be sorely missed for her kindness, patience and her quiet determination to get the job done.

Ms Denise Campbell, Head of the English Department, takes her retirement officially at the end of this year. Her maternal nature and deep care for the learners will be missed. With over forty years in the profession, she takes with her a wealth of experience. Happily, though, she will stand in for Ms Lindsay de Klerk who is expecting a baby in January; a little sister to three-year-old Jesse. We are fortunate to have Ms Campbell’s expertise to draw on and wish Ms de Klerk and her family every joy with their new addition. Other additions to the Rustenburg family are daughters to Ms Gloria Mlozana, who gave birth to Nkazimlo Christine in February, and Mr Kudakwashe Mwaedza, whose wife gave birth to little Praise in March. Ms Bongiswa Mketo is expecting in the first week of November. Mother to two daughters, she is absolutely delighted to have a little boy this time. An old friend of the school who has stepped in before, Ms Cecelia Xawuka, will join the cleaning team while Ms Mketo is away. Both Mr Murray Buitendag and Ms Emma Boshoff had to postpone their weddings to their respective fiancés because of lockdown and Covid-19, but we look forward to celebrating their nuptials next year. We hope that 2021 brings many more exciting events.

It is hard to imagine Rustenburg without the vibrant, strong personality that is Ms Biddy Ryan. Her deep love for the school is clearly evident in the fact that she has spent more time at Rustenburg than in any other place in the world. Not only did she teach here for 34 years but she was also a pupil at the school. Ms Ryan has been here for so long, that she has even taught daughters of past pupils. Ms Ryan began her teaching career in 1983 at Groenvlei High School as Head of Geography. She taught there until 1985 and then set off to travel the world - destinations included Europe, Israel, Morocco, Turkey and Ireland. At the end of 1986, Ms Ryan returned to South Africa and took up a position at Rustenburg. The principal at the time was Mrs Mc Intyre, who had been Ms Ryan’s Grade 12 Form Teacher. Ms Ryan served as the Head of the Geography department for 26 years. There is no doubt that this is where she made the biggest impact. Ms Ryan has been a mentor to many teachers in the department and has guided and assisted teachers outside the department too. I have learned practically everything I know about teaching Geography from Ms Ryan and am grateful to have had such a patient, encouraging and knowledgeable mentor. Her passion for the subject was clearly evident to those who have worked with her and to those taught by her. Ms Ryan has also been involved in a number of extramurals over her time at Rustenburg including fencing, squash, tennis, Busty Bugs, Ecology Club, Lerato’s Hope and SU (Ignition). Lerato’s Hope (a non-profit organisation initially formed to focus on care, treatment, and support for poor families affected by HIV and AIDS) holds a special place in Ms Ryan’s heart as it is named after her niece, Lerato). Ms Ryan introduced the President’s Award and

World Challenge to Rustenburg. She organised the Matric Dance for a number of years and has taken many Matric Geography students down the Orange River. Ms Ryan has been a Head of House, Teacher in Charge of the RCL, a Grade Head and also served on the School Management Team for 19 years. Ms Ryan has gone beyond the call of duty and done a number of things that may have gone unnoticed by many such as arranging sponsorships for Matrics who couldn’t afford tickets and dresses for their Matric Dance. Ms Ryan has a wide variety of interests and hobbies outside of school. She is well-read and loves a good novel. She crochets, hikes and enjoys an early morning swim at Dale Brook. Ms Ryan enjoys spending time with her family, especially her four nieces and her grand-nieces and grand-nephew too. Mrs Weston says the following about Ms Ryan, “Biddy is very kind and super generous with a wonderful sense of humour. She has a special love for her brother’s daughter, Lolo. When she used to play with Lolo, Biddy was like a child herself. Her childlike spirit is evident in her love of children’s books; she certainly knows her Winnie the Pooh, Peppa Pig, Elmer the Elephant and, most recently, Charlie Mackesy’s “The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse”. Biddy is a good friend. When I broke my foot, she took me Christmas shopping. When I had my knee operation, she came and hung up my washing, offered to shop for me and took me out. I am sure that there are a great many others who have experienced this kind of hands-on, real practical help and one has to love her for that”. We wish a valued member of staff, teacher, colleague and good friend all the best for the next chapter in her life. Ms Gillian Blackshaw

LEADERS

Ms Brigid Ryan retires

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Mr Mhlanga Nombewu, our Campus Manager, added a new dimension to his portfolio this year. For those Grade 8s wishing to take isiXhosa as a third language, Mr Nombewu gives them an opportunity to learn conversational isiXhosa.

Photo: Ms Charmaine Gates

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In a year that nobody could have anticipated, the Rustenburg staff have learned to roll with the punches and to continue to give their all at school.

A Rustenburg alumna herself, Ms Brigid Ryan leaves Rustenburg after an astonishing 34 years in the Geography Department. As Head of Geography, she has built the department into something of which to be proud. Taking full advantage of some of the most advanced technology available to schools, Ms Ryan has made it her business to stay abreast of developments pertinent to her subject. Well-travelled, well read, with interesting stories to tell, she has brought an array of skills and knowledge to her department. She has touched the lives of colleagues and learners in a positive, uplifting manner with her care and good humour.

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Retiring Staff At the end of August we said good-bye to Marieta Langenhoven when she took up retirement after seven years of service at Rustenburg. She joined the Afrikaans Department in April 2013 when she moved to Cape Town from the North West Province where she taught for many years. She always lived up to her Afrikaans heritage that is reflected in her surname. She is indeed related to the well-known Afrikaans author, C.J.Langenhoven, who wrote part of our anthem “Uit die blou van onse hemel…”.

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Mr Cedric van Dyk retires Mr Cedric van Dyk is gregarious, with a booming voice and an unrestrained laugh which resonates from deep within. He is a fervent force to be reckoned with; a consummate man-at-arms who vehemently defends his pupils, his colleagues and his subject, and fights for justice. He is emotionally invested during each of his engrossing History lessons. Rustenburg’s countless young historians have sat enthralled, enraptured. The sheer scope of his expansive general knowledge has inspired learners year in and year out. Perhaps one of the greatest compliments has inadvertently come from the Matric class of 2020, which formally requested that more pupils of the school are exposed to lessons about social conscience and equity that come from the History classrooms. They have recognised the long-term benefits to South Africa which will come from a study of a decolonised curriculum. In the earlier years of his teaching career, Mr van Dyk was actively involved in the Struggle, along with some former Rustenburg colleagues. From their shared flat, they organised protests against the apartheid regime and

often attended marches. When one of them was absent from work, it was found out they’d been sprayed with purple dye by the police or sometimes even locked up. Anyone who has spent time in Mr van Dyk’s classes feels intellectually enriched and more philanthropic. What underpins his approach to the subject is humanism. He recognises that everyone has the potential to do better and be more. This is revealed also through the hours he spends crafting individual feedback to each History pupil. The goal is always to bring a heightened awareness about why History can repeat itself. How will History remember Mr van Dyk? For bringing new life and energy to the department when he took over the reins and increased its intake exponentially? As the great orator himself who led the Debating Society to national success? As the unofficial Erinville Hostel ‘dad’ who ran homework sessions for the Pink Boarding House? As the curator of countless History exhibitions in the Kemp Hall foyer? As the real inspiration behind Rustenburg’s Youth Day assemblies? As a stalwart patron of Cape Town’s Holocaust and Genocide Centre? As the natural leader who was unafraid and stood up for his beliefs? As the colleague, with a twinkle in his eye, who prioritised Friday afternoon conversations? As the father-now-grandfather who showered love on those close to his heart? As the quintessential wit? A survivor? He is all and more. Marching to the beat of his own drum. Humming in his head the tunes of Eric Clapton, Sting and the Beatles. With a legacy as striking as the many Madiba shirts which he proudly wears. Mr Adrian Skelly

Marieta’s love for Afrikaans reached beyond the syllabus and classroom. She spent many hours preparing learners for the Afrikaans Spelling Competition. They once represented Rustenburg on national television when participating in a final round. She was also in charge of Afrikaans Olympiads which gave learners the opportunity to compete successfully on national level. Both her colleagues and learners benefited greatly from her knowledge of and passion for the language. As a tennis enthusiast, she played an organisational role in Team Tennis since her arrival at the school. Surely, she will not miss spending her afternoons next to our tennis courts, when she has time to watch Nadal and Djokovic instead. We say farewell to Ms Langenhhoven with these Afrikaans words from Ms Anita Pretorius, a former member of the Afrikaans Department: In die Covid-19 jaar en Grendelstaat Groet ons omdat jy ons nou verlaat Met Langenhoven-gene in jou bloed Kon jy leerders deeglik in Afrikaans opvoed Maar nou’s dit totsiens aan die groot rooi pen Geen merkwerk en spelreëls om te ken Niks meer vroeg opstaan en druk verkeer En Engelse wat nie Afrikaans wil leer Na baie jare kan jy nou rustig aftree Vir jou wil ons net die mooiste wense gee Ms Helene Swanson

If you were to walk past Room C13 on any given day, you would hear the absolute silence (punctuated by peals of laughter) of a class on the edge of their seats. Famous for her storytelling, Ms Denise Campbell’s ability to act out stories with different voices, demonstrations and carefully-chosen words, has made for very exciting English lessons - as well as breaks in the staff room! Ms Campbell began her teaching career at The Settlers High School in the late 1970s. There were three Denises teaching there at the time and so, owing to her warmth and kindness, our Denise earned herself the nickname Denice. This very apt nickname followed her all the way to Rustenburg. A nickname is not the only thing she gained working at her first school: The Settlers is also where she met her husband, Dave. Their meeting and subsequent elopement to Wales is a story in itself, a romantic tale which is hers alone to share. Ms Campbell then went on to teach at a variety of institutions, from co-educational schools such as Abbots and Somerset College, to single-sex schools including St Cyprian’s and St John’s. She was the Head of English at a number, and even lectured at Cape Technikon. Armed with this wealth of experience, knowledge and a variety of skills, Ms Campbell joined Rustenburg in 2016 as the Head of English. As a teacher abreast of current affairs and passionate about equity and diversity, Ms Campbell made some changes to our English syllabus. Eurocentric texts about boys and men were replaced with African novels with more of a focus on girls and women. This has allowed for increasing engagement with issues of racism and identity. She also introduced Advanced Programme English for those learners who are passionate about the subject, as well as a Writing Club. Ms Campbell has led the English Department with pride and dedication and has invested emotionally in the members of staff under her care. She has brought her natural maternal instinct and caring nature to school, to the benefit of both her colleagues and pupils. In this very challenging year, she has steered the department through the COVID storm and the daily challenges it brought. We know that, in retirement, Ms Campbell will go on to write a whole new chapter to her story and have many more tales to tell. Ms Lindsay de Klerk

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Photo: Ms Charmaine Gates

As a teacher, Ms Langenhoven’s passion is Afrikaans. Her learners’ involvement during her lessons and the decorative posters in her classroom, are testament to this. She was a marker for FAL Paper 3 for the Senior Certificate. Her thorough subject knowledge and diligence enabled her learners to obtain excellent results annually. All learners who have passed through Ms Langenhoven’s doors fondly remember her “nuusbrokkies”, where they had to bring a newspaper report to share with the rest of the class. Ms Langenhoven made sure her students always stayed up to date with current affairs.

Ms Denise Campbell retires

LEADERS

Ms Marieta Langenhoven retires

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Retiring Staff

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Reflections from the

Campus & Operations Managers

Mr Mhlanga Nombewu & Mr Graeme Broster

This year has been one for the record books in Health & Safety at schools. No-one ever imagined that the cleaning and ground staff would learn new, different skills and accept challenges which varied so greatly from their usual job descriptions. In 2020, our support staff have become the first line of defence in making the campus a safe environment for the staff and learners of Rustenburg Girls’ High School.

Training took place on how to record temperatures and capture data on iPads, suitable cleaning protocols, and how to sanitise classrooms between lessons. We had to screen everyone who came on to campus, fog every classroom at least once a day, and make sure that we adhered to all the Education Department Standard Operating Procedures for COVID-19 containment. We had a soft start with first the administrative staff returning, then the teaching staff, followed by the Matrics’ return. As a team, we could tweak and perfect our systems and procedures in preparation for the other grades’ staggered return.

COVID-19

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COVID-19 Reflections COVID-19 Reflections

Preparing to return from lockdown began long before staff and learners ever thought about coming back to school – we waded through volumes of regulation and medical advice so as to formulate a strategy for managing the safety of everyone on campus. A COVID-19 Management Policy was developed, and procedures put in place to manage a variety of scenarios. Personal protective equipment had to be sourced and secured, along with crates of bleach and hand sanitiser. The campus staff came to school earlier than anyone else to clean and sanitise everything in preparation for the staff and learners returning.

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COVID-19 Reflections

As lessons began, we were confronted with the realities of this pandemic, as learners and staff first reported exposure to cases of COVID-19 and then reports of positive tests for the disease began to appear.

All students matter but no student should be left behind In this turbulent and unprecedented time of COVID-19 many schools have closed down. Since many students’ education has been halted for over three months the question has become whether or not schools should open again or, rather, which schools should open again. Culpable homicide: My friends always say that I overuse this analogy but I think that it is apt. Even though one may not have actively killed the other person, by doing nothing one is just as much to blame as the actual suspect. Thus, having bystander status does not exonerate one from the crime.

The protocols we had put in place helped us to manage these occurrences, inform those who might have been exposed, act quickly to ensure that any remaining contaminations were eliminated and keep all stakeholders informed. During August we finally welcomed back the last of the learners back to school.

In South Africa’s case, the district government seems not to be actively trying to aid the underprivileged learners and is therefore to blame for learners’ failures. It is and always has been obvious that the South African wealth gap is one of the largest in the world. Coronavirus

the BIPOC communities in a state of everlasting inequity. Although the teacher unions seem to have had their demands met, maybe rightly so, the National government seems to be using education as a means to achieve political victory, rather than an end. On the flip side, the district government has not aided poor learners for decades. So, if only the rich and wealthy can afford a good education, healthcare and fundamental human rights, the government is thereby curtailing the future of an entire facet of society. [Not to be a conspiracy fiend or anything but this is similar to….] Whether the government opens or closes schools, the privileged learner will be fine but the less privileged will remain in purgatory. What are you going to do about it? Thami Giyosi (Grade 11)

The Matrics are still on course for writing the standardised NSC examinations. However, standardised testing without a large part of the student population being taught can only lead to mass failure – not at the fault of the students. During these past few months of lockdown and the subsequent return to school, our Rustenburg community has showed its strength in togetherness in dealing with this virus. Whether it is by patrolling the grounds during break to ensure that leaners maintain social distancing, encouraging everyone to wash their hands frequently, or wiping down the door handles four times a day, each person has played their part. The school would like to thank the Safety Committee, the cleaning, grounds, maintenance, administrative and teaching staff who have all played a big role in making our campus a safer environment.

The science apparently backs up the political powers in the district of the Western Cape by suggesting that children contract milder strains of COVID-19 and they heal faster. This is without taking into account the socio-economic effects of the virus. Needless to say, underprivileged learners will contract Coronavirus at a disproportionate rate to learners who have protective measures. To make it worse, if students do go back to school they might not have transport since many parents are unemployed or have lost their jobs as a result of lockdown. Whether students go back to school or not, the underprivileged learner will suffer the most. Historically and systemically disadvantaged South African students have been on the back foot since before ‘94, and now even after ‘94 the government seems not to have done as much as needed in the communities that suffer the most, with

My name is Hannah Duncan. I am in Grade 8 and I’m 14 years old. I go to Rustenburg Girls’ High School. I consider myself to be privileged because my learning during lockdown has not been disrupted. I am very fortunate to have unlimited Wi-Fi access in my home and all the relevant devices to facilitate my learning. At Rustenburg Girls’ High School we will most definitely be able to practise social distancing once school has started. We have the luxury of space and limited number of learners per classroom. This has got me thinking about the poor and vulnerable in South Africa. There are at least fifty to sixty children in ONE classroom. How will they practise social distancing? How will teachers

Artworks: Madison Beley (Grade 12) Abigayle Cohen (Grade 12) Alia Ismail (Grade 12) Oliwia Suter (Grade 11) Oliwia Suter (Grade 11)

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is only heightening that wealth gap and, as a student, this can be seen through the lens of education.

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I find online learning easy because my school provides iPads for all learners in my grade. We get daily emails saying that we have new work posted up on Google Classroom. I love the fact that we can manage our own time. I find it easy because I have a good work ethic. I found it fun learning outside of my schooling environment. I was able to learn from my parents, older brother and sister – and not only within the classroom. I enjoyed having a bigger picture of the South African authenticity due to all the media and openness of COVID-19 and the many voices that spoke about the discrimination in South Africa. BUT this is NOT the reality for many other 14-year-olds and this is why I wish that I could have a voice to challenge the injustice in the South African education system today.

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Megan du Plessis (Grade 12)

Dear COVID-19 Danica Gussenhoven (Grade 9)

“Until we get equality in education we won’t have an equal society” – Sonia Sotomayor. We need equality in education before equality in society. With the opening of schools on 1 June, the rural areas are at a disadvantage to the children that have had continuous access to learning. This is unfair because now when they go back, they have to rush all their work they haven’t learned into just 6 months! How are we all going to write the SAME matric exams when resources are plenty for some and nothing for others? My parents and many other black South Africans missed a whole year of school in 1985 due to Apartheid. Most of them turned out just fine. Instead of using this time to send children back to school, why does the government not take this time and work on the problems in South Africa’s education? We need a new curriculum, we need equal access and we need equal resources. If we don’t fix this now it will just become worse and when we face the next crisis the inequalities will again be ripped wide open. As a 14-year-old I do have a voice and I will use my voice to continuously challenge inequalities in my country.

I appreciate life much more thanks to you. I feel that it is a precious gift! I choose not to wallow in the negativity of what cannot be or what could’ve been, but I choose to make new marks of what can be and what can make a more meaningful impact on my life and the lives of others.

Hannah Duncan (Grade 8) Published in Professor Jonathan Jansen and past pupil Emily O’Ryan’s book, Learning Under Lockdown: Voices of South Africa’s Children.

I can only try to live by this quote in my Matric year of 2020. “i stand on the sacrifices of a million women before me thinking what can i do to make this mountain taller so the women after me can see farther.” – legacy (rupi kaur) xxxx Alexandra De Meuter (Grade 12)

Academic Reflections Academic Reflections

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I have started, however, to reflect on many aspects in my life. Now that I have expressed my hatred towards you, let me thank you. I would like to express my gratitude towards you for allowing me to be able to think more – to think more about the type of person that I would like to be. I want to be a more gentle, compassionate person who is more conscious of what is happening around me. I want to be someone who attempts to display the humanity that our flawed society lacks. Before you came along, I used to think that drifting through school meant not being involved in much, however, my life used to be filled with school involvements and now I realise that I, too, was drifting through life. I was not being fully conscious of others around me and I was not taking moments to breathe, process and make more meaningful impacts on others’ lives. You took away the physical connection and embrace of others which made me appreciate the human connection that one can so easily dismiss. You have made me realise that sometimes letting go of something opens up room for me to grow in another aspect of my life.

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Sending the Grade 12s and 7s back to school during this time, especially in the rural areas, is a crazy idea! Most rural areas don’t even have running water and proper bathroom facilities. How are the learners going to get to school safely? Taxis, Golden Arrow buses and lift clubs are going to get even fuller, which creates more of a risk. I wonder how many learners have had no access and no learning for this entire lockdown. COVID-19 has again exposed the inequalities in our country. Nothing has changed in our country for the poor and vulnerable.

How I wished that you never gifted this world with your presence. I could go on for days thinking of perfectly valid reasons as to why I wish that you never existed. The numerous deaths, the strained economy, the poverty that has been exacerbated and the many more losses. This year was meant to be the class of 2020’s big bang of a Matric year. We had high expectations and hopes for what this year was going to entail. COVID-19, you came along and took all of that away.

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manage all the added responsibilities pertaining to health and safety of learners in poorer schools?

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Ms Susan Schnetler

This year has been unprecedented and it seems like an age since I accompanied Mr Gates to collect the 2019 National Senior Certificate (NSC) results and to Leeuwenhof for the Western Cape NSC Awards Ceremony.

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Justine Verwey, our top candidate, placed 5th overall in the NSC examinations in the Western Cape, with a remarkable aggregate of 96%. Jamie Fraser (eight A symbols) and Kaitlynn Watt were also ranked as one of the Western Cape’s Top 20 NSC candidates and, like Justine, received Ministerial Awards in recognition of this outstanding accomplishment.

This year saw a surge in innovation and in the professional growth of our teaching staff. Collaboration, technology, adaptability, creativity and problem-solving have dominated their year. For our students, this year has been mixed. Some have enjoyed the flexibility of learning at home, while others have missed the social contact and the reassurance that comes with having their teachers close at hand to engage with regarding their work. They, too, have learnt and grown over this unusual period. Timemanagement skills, adaptability, resilience, responsibility and self-discipline have been tested and they have been pushed to develop many new competencies. Without doubt, the impact of this pandemic on the academic environment has been significant and schooling, as we know it, will never be the same again. The education landscape is an exciting place to be right now and the prospects for teaching and learning are most promising.

For the Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, the year started as all others - full of promise. Then, at the end of Term 1, we had to say good-bye to Ms Henry. While being a teacher down, we then had to face challenges that COVID-19 brought. The challenges, however, brought opportunities for growth. The teachers learned about online learning and live streaming, how to use their iPads effectively and just plain thinking on their feet. The whole team is healthy, hardier and enriched from the experiences of 2020.

Languages Faculty: Ms Lindsay de Klerk As the Faculty of Languages, we are in the business of words. This year has forced us to familiarise ourselves with terms such as “social distancing”. It has also brought about some fun neologisms - babies born after lockdown are warmly referred to as “coronials”. Our faculty has developed new skills to help us through this “coronacoaster”; and the learners have produced some of their most creative and thought-provoking work. One word we know all too well is “farewell” - we sadly say goodbye to Ms Langenhoven and Ms Campbell, and wish them well on their retirement.

Reflections From The: Head of Tech Integration: Mr Wihan Neethling To start with a cliché: what an unprecedented year this has been! With Covid-19 bringing the whole world to a standstill, we had to adapt very quickly to a new way of learning.

Reflections From The:

Teachers’ ability to move resources online allowed us to continue learning even without seeing our students face-to-face. This was a challenge, and I think what most people missed was the interaction. Welcoming students back to school was a joyous occasion.

Arts Faculty: Mr Adrian Skelly

A vital component of the integration of technology is not just putting a device in the hand of a teacher or student, but thinking about the ways in which the technology can enhance learning. Having access to the internet at the touch of a button allows both teachers and students to access information very quickly, and teaching our learners the skills to disseminate a lot of information is a vital part of what we do.

In the year of social distancing, the Arts Faculty worked harder than ever to pull together when it seemed like the world wanted to keep everything apart. The initial lockdown resulted in increased resourcefulness; focussing the eye, imagination and ingenuity more acutely in response to the immediate environment. Understanding how to engage with the camera, for innovative online learning, was an exciting challenge. The great irony was not lost. While face masks covered our mouths, the voices and beating hearts of Rustenburg’s creatives were heard just as loudly as before.

Business & Life Skills Faculty: Ms Linda Mallon In this strange year, following COVID safety protocols during Consumer Studies practicals proved to be a major challenge, however the Grade 12s rose to the occasion and produced a high standard of work. 18 Grade 11 and 12 learners were entered in the Proverto National High School Olympiad (Accounting), and 10 learners made it through to the second round. Maryam Badsha (Grade 12) was placed in the top 11 in the 2020 Computer Applications Olympiad, achieving joint 2nd place in the Western Cape. Grade 8 and 9 have focused on Coding in ICT.

Not only were lessons live streamed to students who were unable to attend school, they were also recorded so that they could be watched later. When our Grade 8s and 9s returned to school, we had to separate form classes to comply with social distancing regulations and teachers taught one half of the class “live”, while the other half watched a live stream of the lesson in the classroom next door.

At Rustenburg we are fortunate to have started our digital learning journey a few years ago, which meant we were better prepared than other schools may have been for the challenges that lay ahead. The training of staff had to happen very quickly to enable online learning, which also evolves constantly as we are faced with new challenges.

We were also very excited to receive our Tello drones, which will be used to teach coding in grades 8 and 9. The concepts of aerodynamics, flight paths and the physics of movement all come together to create an amazing opportunity for cross-curricular learning. Apart from the obvious career opportunities, coding is also something which will help our learners to develop transferable problem-solving skills needed to succeed in the world of work.

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All of our 2019 Matrics attained Bachelors passes, the minimum requirement for acceptance to a university undergraduate course. 10 subject departments achieved aggregates of 80% or higher and another six fell into the 70 to 79% range. A total of 614 subject distinctions were spread over the 166 students. 93 candidates achieved four or more subject distinctions and 10 produced impressive aggregates of 90% or more. The average aggregate for the grade was a commendable 76,45%.

Everyone’s experience of the 2020 academic year has been somewhat different. While the trials and uncertainties have challenged us, the COVID-19 pandemic has also provided many wonderful opportunities to learn and teach differently, develop skills, experiment in various spheres of the school, try new hybrid methodologies, work better as a team and make much needed changes in a schooling system that has long been outdated.

Sciences and Mathematics Faculty: Mr Graham Reggiori

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Deputy Principal (Academic)

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Reflections from the

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First row from left: Isabella Gray (Grade 11); Keona Missing (Grade 11); Maxine Carr (Grade 11) Second row, from left: Kate Birch (Grade 11); Kate Birch (Grade 11); Manina Viljoen (Grade 10) Third row, from left: Manina Viljoen (Grade 10); Gabby Venter (Grade 10); Hannah Grimbeek (Grade 10) Fourth row, from left: Chloe Pentz (Grade 10); Chrystal Wan (Grade 10); Taylor Ackerman (Grade 10) Fifth row, from left: Isabella Gray (Grade 11); Megan Oosthuisen (Grade 11); Nuhaa Behardien (Grade 11)

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First row from left: Emma Smith (Grade 12) Anna Nagel (Grade 12); Caitlin Gronow (Grade 12); Chloe Adams (Grade 12) Second row, from left: Alia Ismail (Grade 12); Aniqa Omar (Grade 12); Claudia Vieira (Grade 12) Third row, from left: Almas Gafoor (Grade 12) Hannah Stronach (Grade 12); Isabella Webster (Grade 12) Fourth row, from left: Kirsten Fick (Grade 12); Lauren Winde (Grade 12); Megan du Plessis (Grade 12) Fifth row, from left: Dilshaad Regal (Grade 11); Hope Hadebe (Grade 11); Isabella Gray (Grade 11)

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First row from left: Caitlin Jackson (Grade 9); Chidochashe Pepukai (Grade 9); Dominique Cunningham (Grade 9); Erin Griffiths (Grade 11); Jodi James (Grade 9) Second row, from left: Kate Biggs (Grade 9); Katherine Andrews (Grade 9); Sarah Irwin (Grade 11); Tayla Swan (Grade 10); Yueh-Tswen Tseng (Grade 9) Third row, from left: Megan Oosthuisen (Grade 11); Megan Oosthuisen (Grade 11); Emma Cusens (Grade 11) Fourth row, from left: Rachel Stramrood (Grade 10); Jessica Mayers (Grade 10) Fifth row, from left: Anjelica Romero (Grade 11); Alyssa Grinnell (Grade 10)

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Creative Writing In her quiet office in the bowels of the school, I hear the soft chatter of coffee shop patrons mingling with the rumble of the engine of my mom’s Mercedes Vito. The counsellor smiles reassuringly at me as she explains the process of career counselling. Her words are punctuated by the sound of classmates shuffling behind their desks that echoes in my head. “Where do you want to study?”

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Her eyes crinkle at me as she changes tack. “What careers are you interested in?” Computer science and linguistics—my mother’s words push at my dumb tongue. I can clearly picture her fighting the steering wheel as she regales me with facts from interesting articles about the newest developments in machine learning and computational linguistics. Her enthusiasm is matched by the excitable shouts of taxi drivers and every now and then a car horn blares its encouragement. As she delves deeper into the intricate field of natural language processing, I watch the strong brown bricks of Lower Campus blur past my window while the laughter of students lazing on Jameson Steps seems to mock me. She clears her throat, “How about we look at what your strengths are?” My science teacher would have no trouble answering that question. His baritone assertions that a future in research science is the single most suitable path for me, echo in my mind. My classmates shuffle in their seats and the bored clicking of pens harmonises with his enthused assessments that my strengths lie in mathematics and a scientific curiosity. The regular tick, tick of the formula clock mounted on the wall marks my increasing discomfort. Her swivel chair creaks as she leans back and considers me in exasperated silence. The pokey, hole-in-a-wall office is drowned in the cacophonous racket of coffee orders being called out, street vendors hawking beaded animals and a school bell clanging. Her wrinkled eyes continue to search my face for answers while my swollen tongue tries in vain to

Finally, she sighs and gets up to open the door. “Ask a trusted adult for help thinking about these questions,” she says. Nika Hofmeyr (Grade 12)

AFRIKAANS Maskerade Eerstespan-netbal. Mooi. Gewild. Hierdie is van die woorde wat mense sal assosieer met wie hulle dink ek is, maar daar is baie wat mense nie van my weet of verwag nie. Baie mense sal my opsom as ’n oop boek. Hulle dink ek is maklik om te lees, want ek kan nie my gevoelens wegsteek nie. ’n Mens sal dadelik weet of ek geïrriteerd of opgewonde is deur bloot na my gesig te kyk. Maar ek is soos ’n ui wat uit baie verskillende lae bestaan en ’n mens moet my eers laag vir laag afskil sodat my ware self kan verskyn. Baie mense beskou my as hierdie sportiewe, dom, Afrikaanse poppie. Mense se eerste gedagte van ’n sportiewe meisie spring altyd na haar intelligensie toe. Die meeste mense dink dat, as jy goed is in sport, dit jou enigste talent is. Ek het ook al baie gehoor dat mense verbaas is as hulle hoor ek vaar goed op skool, want hulle verwag nie dat ’n sportiewe mens slim kan wees nie. Ek word ook baie gestereotipeer sodra mense hoor dat ek Afrikaanssprekend is. Hulle hele houding verander. Hulle is óf baie geïnteresseerd óf hulle dink dat ek hierdie rassistiese mens is wat eendag op ‘n plaas gaan bly en vir haar man gaan kosmaak. Baie mense dink ook hulle kan op my trap, want ek vergewe mense baie vinnig en ek sien altyd die goed in mense raak. Hulle dink ook, omdat ek maklik vergewe, ek maklik vertrou, maar as gevolg van gebeurtenisse in die verlede, is dit vir my baie moeilik om mense te vertrou. Dit neem nou baie tyd om my vertroue te wen. Ek het oor die jare ‘n masker ontwikkel om myself te beskerm teen hartseer en teleurstelling. Dit neem ‘n spesiale mens om agter my masker in te kruip en te sien wie ek werklik is. Dani van Breda (Grade 12)

FRENCH Should one forgive everything? À mon avis, il est nécessaire de tout pardonner, parce que faire des erreurs fait partie de la nature humaine. Donc, je pense que cela devrait aussi faire partie de la nature humaine d’accepter les erreurs des autres. Par exemple, je crois qu’on doit pardonner à quelqu’un d’avoir fait un accident de voiture parce qu’il ne l’a pas fait à dessein. Je crois qu’une personne fait du mal aux autres parce qu’elle a déjà été blessée auparavant. En pardonnant, on brise un

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I hear the sharp whistle of compressed steam escaping from a coffee machine as if in response to the question. Across from me, my father is excitedly explaining the prospects of studying in America. The hubbub of the corner coffee shop rises and falls in tune to the starts and lapses of his monologue. He tells me about his colleagues in Seattle who have connections at the University of Washington, but his words are sucked up by the harsh sound of an industrial coffee grinder that fills the room. I take a scalding sip of the filter coffee that she placed in front of me.

convey the deafening turmoil inside my head.

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ENGLISH The noise of other people’s opinions

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First row from left: Hanna Wafai (Grade 12); IsabellaLittle (Grade 12); Jenna Dugmore (Grade 12) Second row, from left: JennaDugmore (Grade 12); Kirsten Fick (Grade 12); Laila Samodien (Grade 12) Third row, from left: Laya Gersowsky (Grade 12) ChristyRobbins ((Grade 12); CealaghRedelinghuys (Grade 12) Fourth row, from left: MadisonBeley (Grade 12); Lauren Winde (Grade 12); Zahrah Dramat (Grade 12); Jemma Hallett (Grade 12) Fifth row, from left: Rahima Baboo (Grade 12)

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cercle vicieux et on empêche de projeter sa souffrance sur les autres par vengeance. Faaria Mullah (Grade 12)

ISIXHOSA INKCUBEKO YAM

Je suis totalement d’accord que tout le monde devrait toujours pardonner aux gens, mais ils ne doivent pas oublier ce que les fauteurs avaient fait, car il est plus facile de pardonner que d’oublier. Pardonner n’est pas forcément facile, mais si on ne pardonne pas à quelqu’un, cela limite l’opportunité d’avancer en tant qu’être humain pour enfin construire une vie heureuse. Caitlin Henderson (Grade 12)

IsiNtu yindlela esikhuliswa ngayo silusapho lakwaXhosa. Ubuntu bungasebenza ngendlela yokuqeqesha umntwana akhule engumntu olungileyo kwaye olaziyo isiko lakowabo. Izinto ezinjengamasiko, isinxibo neemfundiso zizo ezakha umntwana. UbuXhosa bam bundakhile bandibumba ndade ndaba ngulomntu ndinguye namhlanje. Umntu ozidlayo nozithandayo ngobuXhosa bakhe.

Mein Haus ist warm und riecht immer nach Essen. Meine Familie lacht und spricht laut mit einander. Es gibt nie Stille. Ich fühle mich sehr glücklich, weil es so viele Erinnerungen in jedem Zimmer gibt.. Aaliyah Salie (Grade 12) In der Kurzgeschichte ‚Kakao ohne Unterschrift’ wartet der Sprecher auf sie und gibt ihnen Kakao ... Er will haben, dass sie sich zu Hause fühlen und ein Gefühl von Zugehörigkeit irgendwo haben. ... dieses Gefühle sind, was uns menschlich machen. Lara Stulting (Grade 12) Menschen, die aus politischen und anderen Gründen in ein neues Land ziehen müssen, vermissen dieses Gefühl von einem Zuhause. Kleine Momente und Erfahrungen so wie von jemandem Kakao zu bekommen oder mit anderen über einen Scherz zu lachen, führen zu diesem Gefühl der Zugehörigkeit. Dieses Gefühl wird von Migranten oft vermisst. Mikaela van Otterlo (Grade 12) Zuhause ist nicht nur ein sehr wichtiger Ort, aber auch ein wichtiges Gefühl. Jeder braucht ein Zuhause, selbst Migranten und Austauschschülerinnen. Zuhause ist wo man sich gemütlich fühlt. Amy Whyte (Grade 12)

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IsiXhosa sindifundise izifundo endingasoze ndahlukane nazo njengokubaluleka kwentlonipho. Kubalulekile ukuhlonipha abantu bonke ingakumbi abantu abadala. Ekhaya ndifundiswe ubuntu nendlela yokuziphatha kakuhle njengomntwana oyintombazana. Iflegi yesiXhosa ibhabha kude kwamanye amazwe. Olu lwimi lukhethwe kuzo zonke ezaseMzantsi Afrika lasetyenziswa kumboniso bhanya-bhanya u ‘Black Panther’ yaseHolywood. Ulwimi lwethu lwaphinda lasetyenziswa kwibhanya-bhanya u-‘Lion King’ ngo-2019. Le nto ibonisa umgangatho wolu lwimi kwaye yenza ndizingce ngobuXhosa bam. KwaXhosa sinamaqhawe namaqhawekazi anjengoNelson Mandela, Steve Biko, Zozibini Tunzi noTrevor Noah abazalelwa kumhlaba wakwaXhosa eMpuma Koloni. Ndibulela uMdali ngokundipha ubuXhosa bam, nangona abantu belijongela phantsi olu lwimi. Nokuba ndingaya phi nokuba ndingafudukela emazweni andisoze ndibushiye ubuXhosa bam. Andiyonto ngaphandle kobuXhosa bam. Iviwe Yeki (Grade 12)

Pastoral Reflections Pastoral Reflections

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Mein Zuhause ist sehr gemütlich und bequem. Ich habe seit mehr als einem Jahrzehnt hier gewohnt! ... Es gibt viele Gerüche im Haus, wie die Duft der Blumen aus unseren Garten, dass Moussaka, das meine Mutter in der Küche kocht und der Geruch von frischgewaschner Kleidung. ... Ein gutes Zuhause zu haben, ist bedeutend für die geistige Gesundheit, aber die Unterstützung der Familie ist noch wichtiger. Wenn man von denen umgeben ist, die man liebt, scheinen selbst die größten Schwierigkeiten kleiner zu sein. Mia Baraschenkov (Grade 12)

Igama lam, Iviwe imithandazo yethu, lithetha okukhulu kulwimi lwam ngoba libonisa ubuhle bolwimi lwasekhaya. Isiduko somntu simdibanisa nezinto zakhe kunye nookhokho bakhe. NdingumaZikhali, uJojo, Mbizana ubutsolo beentonga. Isiduko sam siyandigodusa kwaye sindidibanisa nezinyanya zam eziziphila ubomi bomXhosa –xho ezilalini, kumhlaba wabo waseMpuma Koloni.

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Ndikhule ndibona imigidi, kuvuyelwa amadoda noobhuti abatsha. Ndibona ootata noomalume bethumela iileta zokucela inkosikazi. Oomama besenza imiqombothi, kusombelwa ngumntu wonke iingoma zesiXhosa. Ezi zinto zindibonise ukubaluleka kwenkcubeko yam, kwaye zandibonisa ubuntu. Le nto ndiyibona ekubeni wonke umntu uyafikelela ezokuvuyela olunye usapho ngemini yomcimbi walo.

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Il est très difficile de pardonner les crimes graves sans les châtiments. Le système juridique existe pour punir les criminels qui commettent les crimes impardonnables pour obtenir la justice. C’est plus facile de pardonner à quelqu’un pour des actions affectantes qui sont de peu d’importance. Aman Abrahams (Grade 12)

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Ms Gillian Blackshaw

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Ms Blackshaw with Ms Lovelyn Nwadeyi

If I had to choose one word to describe this year, it would be the word “loss”. We have all experienced loss in some way, whether it was the loss of connection with family and friends during lockdown, the loss of important events in a Matric year, the loss of income or simply just the loss of ‘normal’ life.

The Black Lives Matter movement during lockdown allowed many of our learners time to reflect on their experiences at Rustenburg. The result was a protest by our Matric learners accompanied by their call to end institutional racism and for all members of our school community to commit to anti-racism. I thank the Matrics for taking a stand, as their action pushed the staff to commit to and speed up the transformation work we have been doing over the last few years. We have started working with Ms Lovelyn Nwadeyi of L&N Advisors and will continue to do so into 2021. Staff study sessions started in August and covered topics such as positionality, normative culture, microaggressions, anti-racism, white fragility, intersectionality, misogynoir and adultification, to name just a few.

THE MATRIC MEMORANDUM In June, sparked by a photograph posted on Rustenburg’s social media accounts of some Matric learners supporting the Black Lives Matter movement, the Matric class of 2020 staged a protest on the Main Quad. Khadeeja Allie-Ebrahim, Zipho Tom and Iviwe Yeki, on behalf of the Matrics, handed over a memorandum to Mr Gates, Ms Schnetler and Ms Blackshaw.

My heart goes out to those in our school community who are grieving the loss of loved ones and struggling with the loss of employment. This hasn’t been an easy year and I can’t imagine anyone would reflect on 2020 without a sense of loss or experience of grief of some sort.

I am hopeful that the work the staff have committed to do will transform Rustenburg into a place where every individual feels valued and accepted. However, we can’t do this alone. All members of our school community pupils, parents, guardians, past pupils and staff - have the social responsibility to inform and educate themselves. While we will continue to provide these opportunities for engagement, education and growth for members of the school community, each individual is ultimately accountable for their own development and I urge you to play your part.

Khadeeja explains the state of mind of the Matric learners leading up to the memorandum: “In Term 1, there were Dialogue Days to discuss racism, its history, white privilege, colourism, reverse racism and other issues relating to race. While these conversations are essential for change, they can often be mentally taxing on BPOC (Black People of Colour) and POC (People of Colour) who are constantly expected to have all the answers i.e. the solution to racism.

Lockdown and the COVID-19 pandemic have stripped us of many things and, in so doing, have brought many realities to the fore and amplified them. Inequality in South Africa has never been so apparent - this was clearly evident in our schools. Privileged schools like Rustenburg managed to ensure education and learning continued while other schools were essentially closed for the better part of the year.

Dialogue Day

Rustenburg was able to hold one Dialogue Day before COVID-19 hit and large gatherings were no longer permitted. The theme for Term 1 was race and racism in our schools and society.

On 20 February Khadeeja Allie-Ebrahim, Jenna Dugmore, Zipho Tom, all Grade 12 learners, led an assembly period where they taught the school all about the history of racism and systemic oppression. They used case studies, images and compelling storytelling to show the school just how far back systemic racism goes. On 24 February the whole school was involved in a Dialogue Day session which followed on from the assembly period. Each class and their facilitators discussed a series of statements on race, privilege, and the importance of talking about these issues.

The terminology surrounding racism was revised, and race as a social construct was discussed. The learners heard about privilege, and white privilege. As a case study of institutionalised racism in practice, a video about the famous Doll Test was shown. The video shows the impact of internalised oppression on children, and provoked much interest and debate amongst the learners. Next, the classes had a look at in what ways racism is still an issue in South African schools, and shared some of their own stories. On 5 March, a further follow-up session was held where each class was given the opportunity to listen to stories of how racism has affected the lives of members of our school community, from learners to teachers to ground and support staff. The learners were then given a chance in the session to share their own experiences. The session concluded with the learners looking into the future, and trying to identify what they as individuals can do to make changes in their communities, and to work actively against racism.

Lockdown played such an important role in helping us heal. It was a time where we were wholeheartedly immersed in our cultures and could be ourselves candidly. It was a time when we didn’t have to change our accents or worry about correcting people who mispronounced our names. Coming back to school was difficult for everyone. Coming back to school as a BPOC and POC after the murders of George Floyd, Collins Khosa and many others, as well as the emotions evoked by the #blacklivesmatter movement was even more challenging.” Soon after their return to school, on 3 June, the Grade 12s dressed in black to show their support for the Black Lives Matter movement. The subsequent post on Instagram and Facebook, with the photograph taken in the quad, angered both past and present pupils. The comments on the post spoke of the experiences of racism at the school, and therefore the hypocrisy of the photograph and its message. In the weeks that followed, various meetings were held to discuss the feelings of the present and past pupils. These meetings included Mr Gates, Ms Schnetler, Ms Blackshaw, members of the Transformation Team, counsellors, the prefects, the RCL, past pupils and Matrics. These events are what led to the Matric protest on 10 June. The memorandum that was handed over included a list of demands and testimonials about staff members who they felt had caused hurt with their actions, racist remarks or micro-aggressions. As Khadeeja explains, “The goal of the

memorandum was for BPOC and POC to no longer feel othered at Rustenburg.” Further discussions were held and Ms Lovelyn Nwadeyi of L&N Advisors was consulted. She held various meetings with members of the Management Team and also with a number of Matric representatives. Mr Gates, along with various members of the Transformation Team, met with the teachers who were named in the testimonials to discuss what was said, and how to address these experiences of hurt. On 24 June feedback on the memorandum was given to all the Matrics. As the other grades began to return to school after lockdown, debriefing sessions were held with each class. These sessions included engagement on their lockdown experiences, the Black Lives Matter movement as well as what had happened at school. Since then, there have been many discussions on the way forward, and L&N advisors have been working closely with the school to put a programme in place to help the school achieve its goal of being anti-racist. In August all staff attended a two-day Racial Literacy study group session and some members of Management began their Brave Spaces course (based on the book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo) which took place over a number of weeks. An online parent engagement meeting to discuss the steps taken since the Grade 12 call to action, and to invite parent feedback regarding transformation at Rustenburg, was facilitated by Ms Nwadeyi on 16 September. As part of the school’s commitment to anti-racism, Ms Nwadeyi will continue to work with the staff, learners, parents and greater school community over the coming months. These final words also come from Khadeeja: “Change cannot happen overnight. True progress will come with transforming mindsets, but this is something that takes time and patience. In order to combat racism, you need to acknowledge your implicit (and explicit) biases. In order to fix a problem, you need to know that it’s there. Systemic racism often embodies itself within microaggressions. While some of these aggressions are easy to explain and point out to white people, many of them are difficult to put into words because they are feelings of exclusion. It is nearly impossible to describe these feelings to people who will never experience them. Each matric year leaves something behind. We want E20 to be remembered for something more than a drinking fountain or a bench. We want to be remembered for our zeal in the fight against racism. We want future learners to attend a racism-free school.”

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Black Lives Matter Movement

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Deputy Principal (Pastoral)

Reflections on the

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During the first few days of June, many former Model C schools in the Western Cape posted images or text on Instagram and Facebook in support of the worldwide Black Lives Matter movement. I’m sure they didn’t expect the reaction they got.

As if my gender was not enough The amount of melanin Drenching my skin Is making me a victim, Kelly Johnson (Grade 11)

Past and present pupils from these schools were outraged by the posts, commenting within minutes of their release. Many described the posts as ‘performative activism’ and proceeded to let everyone know what they experienced at these schools.

Black lives matter, xenophobia, gender-based violence As a woman My body has been made a tool for pleasure My ‘No’s have been translated to echoing ‘Yes’s My screams are a sign of enjoyment And the breath in my lungs is nothing but temporaryIn the hands of a man.

I was delighted that people were finally expressing the hurt they had been harbouring for years - decades for some. However, in the back of my head a small voice couldn’t help but call out ‘what is this going to do?’ A brilliant question with a likely unwanted answer.

This quote explains what needs to be done perfectly. An immense amount of teamwork and reflection is needed. To truly make a difference, every single one of us, no matter our colour, needs to do a voluntary inward reflection. We need to dissect our thoughts and actions and recognise how we contribute to the problem. We need to accept our privilege and position in society and decide how we will use our abundance of resources to support real change. Wallowing in our hardships will not move us forward. As young people, we need to be the ones who are pushing for transformation in our country. It’s difficult and exhausting work but if we all dedicate ourselves to doing the internal work, we can finally start progressing. Only once we’ve accepted our own identities can we begin to help others accept theirs. Sarah Philander (Grade 11)

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If we want to move forward, we should turn to the heroes of our past and learn from them. The great and underappreciated freedom fighter, Steve Biko, once said: “Whites must be made to realise that they are only human, not superior. Same with blacks. They must be made to realise that they are also human, not inferior.”

Jessica Mayers (Grade 10)

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The answer that no-one wants to hear is that this outcry has the potential to do absolutely nothing. We’ve all seen this pattern before. Huge social outburst, cry for help, a few weeks of conversation and then... nothing. We crawl back into the safety of our bubbles and take no further action.

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Moving Forward

Hope Hadebe (Grade 11)

It is a privilege: to forget the taste of oppression To not be constantly reminded of your pigmentation and its limitations. It is a privilege to not have your skin be a weapon, a target on your back, a handicap, an extra step on your ladder to success, a reason for your death. I live in a society where racial segregation and systematic racism Lurk in every school, street and household. 26 years later and to be black is still a crime. Being black and being a woman Is a struggle on its own But to live in society that is white-washed to see their fellow Africans as threats As if we were not all one before colonisation As if we are holding closed your doors to greatness Xenophobic attacks Have me questioning parts of my culture Have me ashamed of my ancestors Have me speaking English to my parents in public It’s funny how foreign equates to black and caucasians who aren’t native are untouched and unquestioned

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Isabella Gray (Grade 11)

Gabriella Venter (Grade 10 )

Being black, a woman and an immigrant living in South Africa Is a death wish.

Acid smoke fills the air, caused by the deceitful ones’ lies Protest, looting, shots fired Watchers behind an innocent eye But they’re the ones who take to take, resist the system’s ways. But if the system’s broken, acid smoke is smoking, how could they not deny what was unrighteously kept at bay? Kept behind the islands of violence, taught by teachless others. With their weaponised abuse in uniforms of blacks and blues. To accuse horrid doings of moral doers. Changing the world, leaving it altered and hollow. Justice for George, Breonna and Atatiana And, if evil succumbs, the rest to follow Because it’s not their culture, it’s not their mentality, it’s not a ‘savage way’ that reaps. It’s the systems, the eyes of pride, the horrid patterns repeat. It’s none of that. But the poison pride others hold. The bitter hate they seep Salma Adams (Grade 8)

Temwa Ng’ambi (Grade 12) Nuhaa Berhardien (Grade 11)


Isabella Gray (Grade 11)

Hope Hadebe (Grade 11)

Megan Berrisford (Grade 9)

Megan Oosthuisen (Grade 11)

Dishaad Regal (Grade 11)

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Laila Samodien (Grade 12)

PASTORAL

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Sarah Irwin (Grade 11)

Alia Ismail (Grade 12)

Iman Hashim (Grade 10)

Alia Ismail (Grade 12)

Alia Ismail (Grade 12)

Azhar Phillips (Grade 11)


Head Prefect: Hlonelwa Zimba Deputy Head Prefect of Seniors: Qailah Bhamjee Deputy Head Prefect of Juniors: Lara Stulting School Prefects: Khadeeja Allie-Ebrahim, Megan Barnard, Saar-rah Chilwan, Alexandra De Meuter, Zoe Dennis, Jenna Dugmore, Nika Hofmeyr, Amani Hoosen, Luyandza Khoza, Mia Lazarus, Faaria Mullah, Nada Nyakaza, Aaliyah Salie, Megan Sorour, Zipho Tom and Mikaela van Otterlo.

The prefects of 2020 faced a year like no other. We were a body of passionate, resolute students who strived to create change and lead by example. Our vision and mission were formulated around promoting unity through individuality and diminishing the idea of “us” and “them” in a school context. We drew inspiration from personal experiences and endeavoured to display qualities of respect, honesty and humility. Our journey as prefects began at our prefects’ camp. The camp involved us getting to know ourselves and one another and using this awareness to formulate our vision and mission for 2020. Not only did the camp teach us how to lead side-by-side, but it also created a body that enjoyed every moment of working together.

The day before the Grade 8s started school the prefect body helped host the Grade 8 Orientation Day. This involved introducing the Grade 8s to their mentors, playing games to break the ice and giving them a tour of the school. The prefects also hosted the Grade 8 Gala, where the Grade 8s bonded with their house captains, mentors and the prefects. The Grade 8 and 9 evenings were held during Term 1 and were a refreshing break from the busyness of school life. Prefect-led assemblies were a means of promoting our vision and interacting with the school in a way to alleviate stress and brighten up a Thursday morning. We planned

Prefects Back row: Nika Hofmeyr, Nada Nyakaza, Mikaela van Otterlo, Mia Lazarus, Megan Sorour, Megan Barnard, Khadeeja AllieEbrahim Middle row: Zoë Dennis, Amani Hoosen, Saar-rah Chilwan, Aaliyah Salie, Faaria Mullah, Jenna Dugmore, Zipho Tom, Luyandza Khoza Front row: Lara Stulting, Ms Gillian Blackshaw, Hlonelwa Zimba, Mr Michael Gates, Qailah Bhamjee, Ms Zaandré BarrettTheron, Alexandra De Meuter

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During the lockdown period, meetings were held via Zoom. As a prefect body we felt that although the circumstances made it incredibly hard to lead, it was a time in which leadership was most needed. Bearing this in mind, we decided to create a video to raise the spirits of our school and create a sense of unity during a time in which we were so far apart. Due to the circumstances of this year, we were unable to hold many of the events that we had planned. We had planned a new event, Opening Night, which was going to feature performances from each matric form class, the prefects and the teachers. The aim of this event was to reinforce our vision by promoting the integration of students and teachers. The prefects also planned the Matric Evening, which was going to consist of music and food, and feature a presentation of childhood photographs. The Matric Dance Fashion Show and the Riff Off were two other events that we were unable to have. These events of school bonding were missed, but we tried to be mindful when reviewing our lost moments. Although we longed for a matric year like those before us, we tried as a grade to remain humbled by our privilege, and conscious about those who were struggling in day-to-day life. In place of the Matric events that were lost, we arranged a week of “dress up” days and a collection of donations for the Saartjie Baartman Centre for Women and Children. As a prefect body we have all been so privileged to have been part of such a strong and passionate group of leaders and to have been guided along our journey by Ms Blackshaw and Ms Barrett-Theron. We will forever hold onto the countless skills that we have acquired and the memories that we have made on this journey together.

Chairperson: Aaliyah Salie Deputy Chairperson: Faaria Mullah Grade 12 Representatives: Sakeena Lagardien, Temwa Nieka Ng’ambi Grade 11 Representatives: Samira Anwar, Kate Birch, Thami Giyose, Hope Hadebe Grade 10 Representatives: Nazia Cassim, Aaishah Khan, Gia Paulse Grade 9 Representatives: Zeetha Gain, Payal Somai, Angie White Grade 8 Representatives: Trinity Ngaka, Kailin Louw, Caitlyn Walter

The Representative Council of Learners (RCL) came into 2020 with such passion for change and grand expectations, our minds set on creating a better environment for our fellow students: an environment filled with positivity, inclusivity, and empowerment. Little did we know that 2020 was going to throw us a massive curveball, and that our environment for a section of the year would be the comfort of our own homes. At the beginning of the year, the senior RCL members spent hours on end planning the year with Management and Transformation teams, the SGB, and other school leaders. It was an enlightening and incredible experience where we were given the opportunity to safely and freely share our thoughts, hopes, and concerns regarding the school and its transformation process. Each meeting was a chance to interact and initiate change, marginal or monumental, with a variety of people from the Rustenburg community. Three RCL members were selected to represent the students in the re-creation of the Rustenburg Vision and Mission Statement. This process was an amazing occasion for the selected representatives to build bonds with the staff as well as have a say in what Rustenburg should strive towards for the next decade or so. Although challenging and overwhelming, this year has compelled us to grow out of our comfort zones, get used to uncertainty, and to adapt. The COVID-19 pandemic has given us time to reflect, and a space to practise gratitude. The 2020 RCL members had to change their form of communication with the students to solely virtual communication. Whether it was by making videos for the school, sending texts to form classes, or hosting video calls - nothing was going to stop the RCL from ensuring that every student’s voice was heard. Encouraged by the Grade 12s’ Black Lives Matter (BLM) protest, one of our Grade 10 members initiated a Zoom call with her grade to create a safe platform in which the

learners could discuss the BLM movement, focusing on racism in the school and greater community as well as other social injustices. This year we have been forced to gain a collective consciousness towards the social injustices in our communities, country, and the world. It is evident that the students have a voice and that they need to be heard and as an RCL body we have done everything in our power to relay all suggestions to the SGB, Management and Transformation teams. As an RCL body, we had to acknowledge that Rustenburg hosts a diverse group of students from a variety of backgrounds and that not every student would have the privilege to access online learning, so we made every effort to connect with our respective classes and ensure that our fellow students were coping. One of our priorities during the lockdown period was to make sure that each student felt heard and understood. The entire Rustenburg Community has overcome extraordinary circumstances this year. It has not been easy, but it has taught us that we do not know what tomorrow holds, so we should grab every opportunity granted to us every day. Due to the pandemic, the RCL was forced to cancel many exciting events that were to take place. It was disappointing to see some of our initiatives put on hold, however, we hope that the RCL of 2021 will take up the challenge to put these initiatives and projects into action. We are grateful to have played a part in the school’s transformation journey and we cannot wait to see Rustenburg Girls’ High School eventually become a place where everyone feels that they belong.

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Our first event was the Grade 7 braai. The goal was to allow the 2020 Grade 8s to bond with one another before entering the school year. It was the first year of having the braai in the year before the Grade 8s start high school and it was an immense success as they were able to start the year being met by familiar faces.

short role plays and videos with the aim of encouraging school unity while promoting individualism.

Representative Council of Learners

Reflections from the

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Prefect Body

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Ms Karin Evans

Erinville started 2020 with hope and excitement not knowing how the year would unfold, or what different stresses and joys it would bring.

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Ms Brigid Ryan

We have all had such different experiences through this time but I think that the Es of 2020 learnt many skills that will stand them in good stead for their future, ranging from baking banana bread, to cutting their own hair or learning to manage their time on their own! Some learners actually enjoyed the freedom of working at home and at their own pace, and being able to spend more time on sections that they struggled with or really enjoyed. Others found it quite difficult to remain focussed without the structure of the timetable. I think everyone developed resilience and coping skills that will always be with us. Although it is probably a year filled with some aspects everyone would like to forget, I think this year will be lodged in our memories forever.

For us, the most difficult of all the COVID-19 regulations was that we could no longer hug. Social distancing was unfamiliar territory. There is genuine affection in the hostel amongst many of the boarders. The Matrics, however, settled very quickly into the new systems and when the other grades returned, they took the lead in explaining the new rules.

The grade displayed their usual enthusiasm and commitment in the way in which they embraced the

I want to commend our Head Prefect and Deputy, Erin and Ally, together with the prefects and the Matrics for guiding the house in this challenging year. The unusualness of 2020 has put emphasis on the importance of family, people and our relationships. Certain things we saw as vital, we no longer see as that important. Certain rules we saw as essential, we no longer see as necessary. In spite of all the difficulty and worry of 2020, we wish our Matrics well, and know that they will “go forth and conquer”.

Black Lives Matter movement, encouraging the school to make necessary changes at a faster pace. On the Friday before what would have been the Matric Dance, many of the Matrics came to school all “heeled and glittered” to mark the occasion. They gathered in the quad at break and were given beautiful beaded flowers as a small token and memory, to mark what should have been. The grade has enjoyed coming to school in civvies and it has been lovely to see people’s personalities revealed in their choice of clothes. We have seen everything from hippy to glamour with a few pyjamas slipping in, too. Classes have felt more like university lectures and the Matrics have had to take more ownership of their learning this year. The Grade 12s have had to learn to cope with bitter disappointment and heartfelt loss. They have had to let so many markers or rites of passage go by, without being able to celebrate them together. The certainties of such things as the Matric Dance, Forty Days, the awards and accolades and achievements in academics, on the sports field and in cultural spheres, disappeared into a haze of change and uncertainty. This could have destroyed all their hopes and dreams, and crushed their spirit, but they made a choice to continue under these strange and difficult circumstances and to strive to complete the year and finish strongly. We wish the Matrics all the best for the future. If they can survive 2020, then there is no doubt that, with the fortitude and strength of character they have gained this year, they will be able to survive anything that life throws their way, and will definitely still come out on top.

Hostel Prefects Back row: Meghan Dyck, Bernice Ntirukirwa, Ms Karin Evans, Robyn Gernetzky. Front row: : Ms Doris Wyne, Erin Coetzee (Head of Hostel), Mr Michael Gates, Alexandra De Meuter (Deputy of Hostel), Ms Michele Bakker

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Head of Grade 12

Well, never in a million years did we expect a year like 2020! After 11 years of anticipating being the seniors of the school, being the leaders of teams and societies, planning for the Matric Dance and working hard to get accepted into a university or college, bam, just like that, everything changed. E2020 was just getting into their stride when it felt as if we had all been sent to jail.

Term 1 was filled with all the usual activities like New Pots, the beach outing and Miss Erinville. We then began hearing about COVID-19 as one of our Grade 10s, Savanna, was due to go to Italy to attend school there for a while. She kept us updated on what was happening and when they closed the schools, we were all quite shocked. Savanna decided not to go, and, soon after, our president announced that our country was going into Lockdown Level 5 and our schools would also be closed. At that stage we did not know when the boarders would be returning and after two months only the Matrics returned on Sunday 31 May – to a very different hostel.

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Reflections from the

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Head of Erinville

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E2

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Back Row: Iviwe Yeki, Amber Reid, Ansela Sloman, Mia Lazarus Third Row: Chloe Netta, Kyra Welch, Isabella Little, Megan Sorour, Ashleigh Smith, Erin Coetzee, Georgia Grant, Isabella Bosman Second Row: Aaliyah Salie, Faaria Mullah, Aniqa Omar, Kyla Oberholster, Sarah Murashiki, Hlonelwa Zimba, Ashleigh Gouws, Emma Smith Front Row: Luyandza Khoza, Abigayle Cohen, Chloe Adams, Ms Megan Paton, Olwethu Mthembu, Zipho Tom, Zoë Dennis Absent: Amy Singe

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Back row: Nicole Rix, Christy Robbins, Madilyn Berga, Emma de-Beger, Kirsten Fick, Mikaela van Otterlo, Hannah Olarogun Third row: Hudaa Arend, Elizabeth Wucherpfennig, Mia Barashenkov, Imaan Mohamed, Megan Phillipson, Yumna Abrahams, Hannah Stronach Second row: Ainslee Khamal, Sarah Hammer, Hayley Budge, Amy Cornelius, Hailie-Jane Aspeling, Layla Allie, Rachel Doms, Aviella-Loren Abrahams Front row: Amani Hoosen, Meagan Jacobs, Temwa Ng’ambi, Ms Emma Boshoff, Kristin Munian, Maxine Meyer, Robyn Gernetzky

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Back row; Natasha Roomes, Juliet Fiet, Ameera Behardien, Gabriella van Vuuren, Megan Barnard, Hanna Wafai, Erin Poulter Third row: Cameron Bultemeier, Nika Hofmeyr, Sabreen Mohamed, Nabeela Jaffer, Sarah Bassett, Jessie Cragg, Aman Abrahams Second row: Kelsey Hutchinson, Younsung Kim, Laya Gersowsky, Lara Stulting, Monique Hefer, Nanzeba Arif, Olivia Noon, Bibi Ayesha Dalvie Front row: Imaan Shaik, Nazneen Allie, Lwazi Mgoduka, Mr William Haggard, Zahrah Dramat, Aaminah Leonard, Alexandra De Meuter

Back Row: Juliet Lunn, Maxine Broughton, Caitlin Henderson, Holly-May Nowers, Tobechukwu Emeruem, Khadeeja Allie-Ebrahim Third Row: Azrah Waggie, Jordyn Campbell, Michaela Jansen, Cameryn Millar, Zoe Bunn, Sabeeha Vawda, Megan de Villiers Second Row: Quaani-ah Barnes, Nazneen Dalvie, Neve Grinnell, Leigh Toet, Tyra Ingold, Amy Skinner, Qailah Bhamjee, Ayesha Moosa Front Row: Fazlin Du Plessis, Aabidah Royker, Salma Essack, Ms Jacqueline Chambers, Bianca Ravell, Sakeena Lagardien, Angelique Murray

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Matric Life

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Back Row: Gemma Watermeyer, Amaarah Adams, Megan Ray, Danielle van Breda, Keto Jenkins Third Row: Anna Nagel, Mia de Vries, Emma Allkin, Skye Williams, Lauren Heiberg, Erryn Morrison, Bernice Ntirukirwa Second Row: Saar-rah Chilwan, Tayyibah Martin, Claudia Vieira, Lekia Thaver, Caitlin Gronow, Jessica Davids, Nurah Firfirey, Alia Ismail Front Row: Rahima Baboo, Thaakirah Majiet, Gadija Slamang, Mr James Hendricks, Megan du Plessis, Aarzoo Bray, Kathia Oppelt Absent: Laila Samodien

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E6

Back Row: Madison Beley, Catalina Althoff-Thomson, Hannah Faure, Shelby van der Watt Third Row: Cealagh Redelinghuys, Jemma Hallett, Tegan Voigt, Lauren Winde, Kim Sendin, Nada Nyakaza, Maryam Badsha Second Row: Angela Briton, Jenna Dugmore, Lisa Slingers, Claire Neave, Meghan Dyck, Almas Gafoor, Farheen Parker, Isabella Webster Front Row: Nikita Daya, Amy Whyte, Lindsay Jacobs, Ms Denise Campbell, Kayla Henry, Aaliyah Khalfe, Kristina Semmelink Absent: Josslyn Langford


Matric Picnic

Reflections from the

Grade Heads

Reflections from the Grade 8 Head: Ms Susan Viljoen Starting at a new school is always a daunting experience. You make new friends, join societies, take part in different sporting codes and learn new skills in different academic subjects. The year started off with a bang when the pandemic forced the world to take a step back. It has been a rollercoaster of stress, hope and many emotions. The year forced us to be introspective, to get creative, and to fight for what we believe in. It gave us an opportunity to look inside ourselves and see that we might have been missing out on practising gratitude for our health, our jobs, homes and loved ones. This year’s Grade 8s showed determination and perseverance through difficult circumstances and successfully navigated their first year through high school. Our motto for the year was ‘every person is fighting a battle that no one knows about. So be kind.’ I am proud to say that as a grade we lived up to that motto.

Reflections from the Grade 9 Head: Ms Rebecca Goble The Grade 9s entered 2020 with a huge amount of enthusiasm. They got involved in many aspects of school life and participated keenly. The Grade 9s had lots of laughs at their Prefect evening where they saw which classmates are not to be rivalled with in a dance-off!

Term 1 was “business as usual”, with learners enjoying the normal school life. We were, however, aware of the approaching COVID-19 pandemic. We were fortunate to hold our various calendar events in the first few months of the year, but the abrupt end to the term and a longer break meant that school life would change. During the lockdown, families had more time to spend together and these are special experiences that many learners will treasure. The teachers made sure that education still continued through online learning. Terms such as “Google Meet” and “Google Classroom” became the new normal. On the opening day of school for the Grade 10s, there was an overall atmosphere of happiness to finally see friends again, even though it was behind a variety of beautifully- patterned masks and with the enforcement of a social distancing. The grade will definitely go into 2021 with a fresh perspective on school life.

Reflections from the Grade 11 Head: Mr Bernard Biermann The year started with much anticipation and excitement as the Grade 11s geared up to start their penultimate school year. A few days before the end of Term 1, their bags were packed and they were all ready to go on the much-awaited Leadership Camp. Then, lockdown happened and our world was turned upside down. If I can summarise the grade in one word, however, it has to be “resilient”. The pupils quickly adapted to online learning and then later had to adapt to only coming to school every other day, due to the COVID-19 regulations. They still remained positive and made the most of every learning experience under very strange circumstances. Even though they never really got to know their Grade Head or Form Teachers, they still stayed connected to one another. Grade 11s, I know this year is not the year you expected it to be, but I am very proud of you. You showed all the other grades what true resilience looks like.

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Reflections from the Grade 10 Head: Ms Zargielay Rabeh 2020 was indeed a challenging year that will never be forgotten.

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Their camp was fully organised, dorms chosen, and the excitement was mounting before the school and country went into lockdown and they did not return for five full months. Many online calls were spent catching up with the classes, learning about the healthy and unhealthy habits that developed during the time spent at home. When they returned to school in August, the Grade 9s were excited, and also nervous, to be back. Slowly but surely they settled into their live stream lessons, and a new normal was established. I am sure they will enter 2021 with the same energy as they did for 2020.

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Reflections from the

Director of Sport

Ms Renée Scott

We were particularly saddened for all our learners who participate in Winter Sports as lockdown, due to COVID-19, was implemented at the end of Term 1. By this time we had already selected our teams to represent us at the NGSF that was to be held in Bloemfontein. Not only was this event cancelled but we also had to cancel our own Champions Cup Netball and Hockey tournament for which we had selected our U16A teams. Fortunately, our U14A and U16A Hockey teams each participated in a pre-season Hockey Tournament which was to be the beginning and the end of their seasons. For the first time our 1st Hockey and Netball NGSF Teams underwent

Term 2 took on a completely new look. We offered six weekly online Hockey sessions, a Cross Country and a Netball Google Classroom in which we made use of the Sports Psychology platform, BelievePerform. Our newly employed 1st Team Hockey Coach, Olu Ncukana, kept our players extremely fit throughout lockdown as well as offering outstanding goal keeping sessions for our goal keepers. Many virtual running challenges were completed, too. We know that the advantage of keeping fit and active throughout lockdown will benefit our students as we move out of this pandemic. Even though the entire Winter Sports programme did not happen, Rustenburg still boasted 45 provincial representatives in seven different sporting codes.

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Term 1 was a very busy term enjoyed by all who participated in one of the many activities offered. We added SelfDefence to our Social Sport offering and these sessions proved to be very popular.

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pre-season concussion testing. The tests were administered by the Sports Science Institute of South Africa.

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Sport Reflections Sport Reflections

The year started off very well with an additional early morning time slot allocated to sport as school started at 9am on Wednesdays. This extra 90 minute session was allocated to our U16A and 1st Water Polo Teams, our National All Girls’ Schools Festival (NGSF) Cross Country runners and to our Grade 8 tennis players. However, a very strange and different year was experienced by the Sports Department and all of us involved in sport at Rustenburg.

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Western Province BIATHLON

DEEP SEA ANGLING

Skye Micklethwaite (Gr 8) Karla Rautmann (Gr 9)

Sports

INDOOR HOCKEY

Jodie Blows (Gr 9)

Representatives TOUCH RUGBY

Alhaan Emeran (Gr 9)

Alexanda Arendse (Gr 9)

INDOOR HOCKEY

Georgia Haarhof (Gr 9)

Imaan Samodien (Gr 11)

Azhar Phillips (Gr 11)

Hanaan Shaikjee (Gr 11)

Yasmeen Kazi (Gr 11 )

Alexandra de Meuter (Gr 12)

Hudaa Arend (Gr 12)

Aarzoo Bray (Gr 12)

TOUCH RUGBY

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Azrah Dick (Gr 10)

INDOOR HOCKEY

Alhaan Emeran (Gr 9)

Rachel Noyce (Gr 11)

TENNIS

Danielle van Breda (Gr 12) Isabella Little (Gr 12)

TOUCH RUGBY

UNDERWATER HOCKEY

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WATER POLO

Kathryn Hendricks (Gr 10) Ammaarah Samaai (Gr 11) Razan Hassan (Gr 11) Ameera Behardien (Gr 12) Skye Williams (Gr 12) Erryn Morrison (Gr 12) Ms Viljoen (Staff) Nika Hofmeyr (Gr 10)

Gemma Watermeyer (Gr 12)

Lisa Penney (Gr 9)

Juliana Barrish (Gr 10)

Lisa Penney (Gr 9)

TOUCH RUGBY

Saarah Magiet (Gr 9)

Ms Barrett-Theron (Staff)

Lara Perrow (Gr 8)

Stella Lazarus (Gr 9)

Anna Gray (Gr 10)

Hannah Hillman (Gr 11)

Robyn van Zijl (Gr 11)

Madison Beley (Gr 12)

WATER POLO

Aaleyah Khan(Gr 9)

Layla Worrall (Gr 9)

Sarah Krone (Gr 9)

Alhaan Emeran (Gr 9)

Jaime Kelly (Gr 10)

Chloe Sampson (Gr 11)

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Ashleigh Dixon (Gr 9)


The 2020 season started with three teams and 30 keen and dedicated hockey players. There were no matches in Term 4 as the league is only played in Term 1. The 1st and 2nd Teams practised twice a week as usual at the Westerford Indoor Centre. The 3rd Team practised once a week on our own AstroTurf making use of the new set-up of rebound boards that were purchased. A new addition was the introduction of a Grade 8 Indoor Hockey group who trained on our AstroTurf before school on Wednesdays. The three Rustenburg teams travelled every Wednesday evening to participate in league matches. We played against Pinelands, Westerford, Herschel, Fairmont, St Cyprians and Durbanville. We had mixed results throughout the season, however, the players displayed great development of their technical abilities and each player showed yet again the importance of building on team work and skill.

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We are not short of talent, as the progress of each player throughout the season is a better indicator than any game won or lost. The players attended their training sessions and displayed their acquired skills significantly week after week. Indoor hockey has enjoyed a successful and promising season. The following players made Pro Series Indoor Hockey Teams this season: Nika Hofmeyr and Gemma Watermeyer (U18); Azrah Dick and Rachel Noyce (U16); Robyn Biccard, Jodie Blows, Ashleigh Dixon, Alhaan Emeran, Lisa Penney and Ashleigh Rix (U14).

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Renée Scott Coach: Ms Vivienne Williams Captain: Hannah Faure Vice-captain: Nicole Rix

A very full and fun season was had by our swimmers. Coach Viv was able to correct strokes, work on techniques, teach the swimmers timing and keep them enthusiastic about training sensibly and well. The squad was made up of 28 swimmers from all grades, with most swimmers being current Grade 8s. The hope is that these fortunate swimmers will continue with their commitment to swimming largely owing to the fact that they received excellent coaching and great improvements were shown by all who attended regularly. The season ended with a fun session arranged by the swimming captains. The Team competed in seven galas in Term 1. We competed in various types of galas: individual, combined and a relay gala hosted by Fish Hoek, which we won. The variety of galas allowed us to include different swimmers every week which meant not only our top swimmers gained experience in representing Rustenburg. We travelled every Thursday to venues throughout the Peninsula, ranging from Curro, Durbanville to Wynberg and Rondebosch to Fish Hoek. The strength of our three age-groups, U14, U16 and U19 was very even and contributed equally to our total points every week. Rustenburg placed in the top two schools on every occasion. We placed third at the PGSGU Gala hosted by Springfield. The highlight of the season was the A-League Gala, hosted by Rondebosch Boys’ High School. This gala was last held in 2017 so it was a wonderful addition to the 2020 swimming calendar and a great way to end off the season. Rustenburg enjoyed great support from the learners and cheerleaders and went on to place second behind Herschel. Individual swimmers shone at various regional level galas throughout the country. Erin Daffarn, Ashleé Pretorius, Jenna Renecle and Skye Micklethwaite qualified to compete at the SA Level 3 Championships in March. Due to the Coronavirus pandemic these Championships were all unfortunately cancelled.

Swimming 1st Team Indoor Hockey Back row: Jodie Blows Middle row: Rachel Noyce, Azrah Dick, Sophie Macdonald, Lisa Penney, Tyra Ingold, Josie Malherbe Front row: Erin Coetzee (Vice-captain), Ms Erika van As (Coach), Gemma Watermeyer (Captain), Ms Sasha Sivertsen (Coach), Nika Hofmeyr

Back row: Tyra Phipson, Anna Gray, Jenna Pickering, Allegra Smith Third row: Anna Zylstra, Mia Odendaal, Hannah Burger, Sofie Watermeyer, Jenna Bransby, Ashleé Pretorius, Katherine Wucherpfennig Second row: Eugenie Delpierre, Skye Micklethwaite, Abigail Meyer, Jenna Bischoff, Katherine Elliott, Ruth Jones, Morgan Russell, Jenna Renecle Front row: Hannah Hillman, Nicole Rix (Vicecaptain), Ms Renée Scott (Coach), Hannah Faure (Captain), Ms Vivienne Williams (Coach), Robyn van Zijl, Erin Daffarn

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The PGSGU Hockey Tournament, held at Herschel’s Sports Centre, saw our 1st Team competing at a very high standard. The 1st Team players must be congratulated on showing outstanding sportsmanship in the spirit of the annual event. We were thankful to Olu Ncukana who coached the team on the day and the excellent leadership by Gemma and Erin. They showed extraordinary persistence and fighting power during each game. Rustenburg ended in fourth place.

Swimming

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Erika van As Coach: Ms Sasha Sivertsen Captain: Gemma Watermeyer Vice-captain: Erin Coetzee

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Rustenburg entered six teams into various leagues. The teams are determined by the ladder and are therefore made up of a combination of four learners from different grades.

Rustenburg had another very successful year of Touch Rugby. We entered three teams into the Western Province Schools’ League and offered social touch rugby to all newcomers and those interested.

Each team played six league matches at various venues across the Peninsula. Rustenburg is fortunate in that we have eight courts so many matches were played at home. The 1st Team started the season off with a convincing win against Springfield. Their second match against Herschel was greatly contested but unfortunately did not go Rustenburg’s way. At the end of the season the 1st Team participated in the A league playoffs and finished third.

Touch Rugby remains a very popular sport at Rustenburg and learners get an opportunity to interact and play with pupils from different grades. The 1st Team won the pool stages of the league convincingly against opposition like Norman Henshilwood, Groote Schuur and Voortrekker. Both the 1st and 2nd Teams progressed to the semifinals where the 1st Team beat Norman Henshilwood 4-0. They faced Wynberg Girls’ in the final and won 7-1 to secure the trophy for the eighth consecutive year. The senior players in the team set an exemplary example of hard work and dedication, which set the tone for a very positive season.

The top four junior and top six senior tennis players represented Rustenburg at the PGSGU Tournament. The tournament was hosted by St Cyprians but played on the Rustenburg courts. Despite the sweltering heat they played some spectacular tennis. The Senior Team finished second and the Junior Team finished fourth.

Rustenburg sent a combination of 1st and 2nd Team players, who showed great promise in the season, to the annual Century City Tournament in February. The 2nd Team lost narrowly to Kraaifontein High School in the semi-finals, while the 1st Team progressed to the final. Our 1st Team lost 2-4 and walked away with silver medals.

Coach Hayley’s dedication and passion was evident at every practice. The team worked extremely hard to keep improving their skills. Their positive attitude and dedication was evident in how the teams never gave up and always had a smile on their faces. Practice sessions were energetic, enthusiastic and always filled with fun. We welcomed some budding talent from Grade 8 into the team this year. We look forward to seeing them grow and succeed next year.

Once again, we were fortunate to welcome back past pupils who became part of the coaching staff. Ms Razaan Phillips and Ms Zoë Naude coached the 2nd Team and Ms Roxi Francke and Ms Britney Price the 3rd and social teams. Their experience and passion for the sport was invaluable and created a sense of camaraderie and belonging for all in their teams.

A session for talented Grade 8s, who did not make one of the six teams, was introduced. These players enjoyed a practice session every Wednesday morning with Coach Hayley. These sessions were introduced to ensure that Rustenburg has sufficient talent coming through for the future. Congratulations to our Western Province Representatives for 2020: Juliana Barrish (U16) and Lisa Penney (U15).

The Inter-Provincial Senior Touch Rugby Tournament took place in March this year and many of our current and past pupils represented Western Province at this prestigious tournament. The following players represented Western Province: Isabella Little and Danielle van Breda (Ladies A), Alexandra de Meuter (Ladies B); Yasmeen Kazi, Azhar Phillips, Hanaan Shaikjee and Skye Williams (WP U21). The following players represented Western Province at the Junior Inter-Provincial Tournament in September last year: Erin Hector and Erryn Morrison (U19A); Hudaa Arend, Ameera Behardien, Yasmeen Kazi, Isabella Little, Azhar Phillips, Hanaan Shaikjee, Danielle van Breda and Skye Williams (U17A); Aarzoo Bray, Razaan Hassan, Ammaarah Samaai and Imaan Samodien (U17B); Jesse Daniels, Alhaan Emeran, Georgia Haarhoff, Kathryn Hendricks, Aaleyah Khan, Sarah Krone, Saarah Magiet and Layla Worrall (U15A).

1st Team Touch Rugby

1st Team Tennis Back row: Juliana Barrish, Lisa Penney, Hannah Stronach (Vice-captain). Front row: Ms Hayley Nel (Coach), Megan Phillipson (Captain), Ms Megan Bell (Manager)

Back row: Alhaan Emeran, Azhar Phillips, Georgia Haarhoff, Yasmeen Kazi, Kathryn Hendricks, Saarah Magiet Front row: Hanaan Shaikjee, Danielle van Breda, Alexandra De Meuter (Captain), Ms Zaandré Barrett-Theron (Coach), Isabella Little (Vice-captain), Skye Williams, Erryn Morrison

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Zaandré Barrett-Theron Coach: Ms Zaandré Barrett-Theron Captain: Alexandra de Meuter Vice-captain: Isabella Little

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Megan Bell Coach: Ms Hayley Nel Captain: Megan Phillipson Vice-captain: Hannah Stronach

Touch Rugby

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Water Polo

Coaches: Ms Renée Scott and Ms Vivienne Williams

The U16As travelled to Port Elizabeth to take part in the Alex Road Girls’ Water Polo Tournament. It was fantastic to see the team play as a unit. The brilliant teamwork was the culmination of all the hard work throughout the season. They showed great team spirit and camaraderie, and we look forward to seeing how they progress next season as they move up the ranks.

At the end of the term a team of eight runners was selected to represent Rustenburg at the National All Girls’ Schools Festival. In order to qualify for this team the top eight times recorded from any Parkrun event were used. Unfortunately, the NGSF was cancelled and the Cross Country runners kept themselves fit by following online programmes and completing weekly activation exercise drills. It was very sad that our four Grade 12 runners lost out on their last opportunity to run and represent Rustenburg during the winter season. The eight NGSF runners are currently in Grades 8 to 10 so will fortunately get another opportunity in their school careers.

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We entered a number of tournaments during the season. At the start of the season, the U19A Team entered the Reddam Girls’ U19 Water Polo Tournament at Reddam Constantia and the Somerset College Girls’ Stayers Tournament at Somerset College. The highlight for the 1st Team was the Old Petrians Water Polo Tournament at St Peter’s College in Johannesburg. Despite some players getting sick while on tour, which affected the team’s overall performance, the team played some of the best water polo they had played all season! Between the lightning and the losses the team remained upbeat. Two of the highlights were the tight games against DSG (lost 5 – 6) and Collegiate (lost 5 – 8).

Throughout Term 1 Coach Viv coached a very talented group of runners on Wednesday mornings with the focus being on running drills, strength and speed endurance.

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Our 1st Team played some good polo this season, even if the results did not reflect this. They grew in their skills as they diligently trained each week, and from early in the season, formed a tight unit. Both the U14 and U16As made it to the knockouts in March.

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Teacher-in-charge: Mr Gian Marneweck Coach: Mr Devon Card Captain: Mia Lazarus Vice-captain: Madison Beley

This year was the first year that we have had a full set of fixtures since the drought two years ago. We continued to make use of the Pinelands High School and SACS water polo pools for training sessions. The teams all did their fitness training in our own pool before school in the mornings.

Cross Country

55 Annie Malherbe (Grade 9)

Biancha Witbooi (Grade 8)

Caitlin Anstey (Grade 9)

Kayla Ross (Grade 10)

Megan Renecle (Grade 10)

Kira Billimore (Grade 9)

Robyn Biccard (Grade 9)

Skye Micklethwaite (Grade 8)

Qailah Bhamjee (Grade 12)

Lara Stulting (Grade 12)

Laya Gersowsky (Grade 12)

Megan Phillipson (Grade 12)

The U14 Water Polo Team took part in the Dave Pitcairn Tournament hosted by Reddam. They showed resilience and tenacity, and learnt new skills, while also making new friends. The following players represented Western Province this season: Madison Beley (U19B); Hannah Hillman (U16A), Jaime Kelly, Chloë Sampson and Robyn van Zijl (U16B); Anna Gray and Rose Williamson (U15B) and Stella Lazarus (U14A).


Hockey

Netball

The 2020 season did not take place because of Covid-19. However, our U14A, U16A and 1st Teams were selected and the U14 and U16A Teams were fortunate in that they each participated in a pre-season tournament.

The 2020 season did not take place because of COVID-19. Trials were held, however, and an U14A/B Squad, an U16A and 1st Team were selected. The U16A Team were due to participate in the Rustenburg Champions Cup event and the 1st Team in the NGSF Tournament. Both tournaments were cancelled.

Coach: Mr Olu Ncukana Captain: Nika Hofmeyr Vice-captain: Tyra Ingold

Coach: Ms Vanessa Lingeveldt Captain: Danielle van Breda Vice-captain: Isabella Little

U16 SPAR Team

The U14 Tournament Team was invited to the two-day DF Malan tournament in early March. The Rustenburg Team won 3, drew 1 and lost 3 matches. Coach Sasha Sivertsen presented the Most Promising Player award to Rachel Kane and the Most Coachable Player award went to Lucy Kane.

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Our 1st Team did not get to play this year, however, they continued to keep fit and sharpen their skills through online Hockey sessions with Coach Olu.

Vice-captain and Captain

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Jodie Blows (Gr 9)

Lisa Penney (Gr 9)

Cataline Ross GK (Gr 10)

Micaela Ceruti (Gr 10)

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U14 DF Malan Team

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The U16A Team participated in the one-day SPAR Tournament, previously a tournament for the schools’ 1st Teams. The Rustenburg Team won 1, drew 1 and lost 2 matches. Coach Sasha Sivertsen presented the Most Promising Player award to Robyn Biccard and the Most Valuable Player award went to Kelly Prowse.

Alhaan Emeran (Gr 9)

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Zeetha Gain (Grade 9)

Anna Gray (Grade 10)

Charite Strauss (Grade 10)

Result Machiya (Grade 10)

Danielle van Breda (Grade 12)

Emma de Beger (Grade 12)

Isabella Little (Grade 12)

Mia Lazarus (Grade 12)

Sa’rah Murashiki (Grade 12)

Vice-captain and Captain

Nina von den Heyden (Gr 10)

Azrah Dick (Gr 11)

Erin le Roux (Gr 11)

Isabella Lethbridge (Gr 11) Josie Malherbe (Gr 11)

Kelly Johnson (Gr 11)

Rachel Noyce (Gr 11)

Erin Coetzee (Gr 12)

Gemma Watermeyer (Gr 12) Nika Hofmeyr (Gr 12)

Tyra Ingold (Gr 12)


Squash

Social Sport Coach: : Mr André Naude

The 2020 season did not take place because of COVID-19. However, a team of five players was selected to represent Rustenburg at the National All Girls’ Schools Festival: Nicole Bransby, Isabella Rossouw, Amy-Raie Bernberg, Roxanne Comyn (all Grade 11s) and Amy Basson (Grade 10). Our only Grade 12 Squash player, Jordyn Campbell, unfortunately missed her entire season, sadly after representing Western Province in 2019.

In 2020 Rustenburg offered the following sports on a Social level; Cricket, Fast 5s, Yoga, Netball, Water Polo, Walking Club, Running Club, Self-Defence, Soccer, Swimming and Learn-to-Swim.

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59 Amy Basson (Grade 10)

Isabella Rossouw (Grade 11)

Amy-Raie Bernberg (Grade 11)

Nicole Bransby (Grade 11)

Roxanne Comyn (Grade 11)

Jordyn Campbell (Grade 12)


Services Audio Visual Team

Teacher-in-charge: Mr Francis Vogts Head: Farheen Parker The Audio Visual Team started the year as busy as ever. Since our team is used to adapting to change and functioning under pressure, the unexpected turn that 2020 took only made us stronger. We still managed to cover our busiest event, the Inter-House Plays, which was extremely exhilarating. The year has had many stressful times, yet each taught us new lessons about ourselves and one another. It has been nothing but rewarding to work and bond with the AV Team.

Computer Centre Monitresses

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Janine Myers Head: Maryam Badsha Being head of the Computer Monitresses has taught me patience, listening skills and teamwork. We have learnt valuable computer skills and developed a strong work ethic. This comes from the small, close-knit group of monitresses led by Ms Myers who provides us with emotional support during tough times. With the knowledge that we have acquired, we have gladly been able to assist learners in the computer room with a range of problems over the course of this year. The computer room is always the best place to be! Being a computer monitress has built deep, lasting friendships across grades.

First Aid and Blood Donor

Bugs Boutique

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Eugenie Solkow Head: Alexandra de Meuter With years of serving the school as a Bugs Boutique monitor, one learns social skills and how to converse with the incoming school students and their parents. Bugs Boutique equips the learners who are monitors with the values of serving the school, having commitment and thinking on their feet, as they need to help enquiring parents who need to feel that they are ready with the school uniform for the years to come. It is a humbling experience to give up your time to serve the school community.

Matric Mentors

Teacher-in-charge: Helene Swanson Being mentored is one of the most valuable and effective opportunities that Matric leaders can offer the Rustenburg community. This year, our mentors have gone the extra mile and have served the school community with dedication and passion amidst the pandemic. Our Grade 8 learners have gained practical advice, encouragement and support through this programme. Not only have the mentors developed various leadership skills, but they have also gained a personal sense of satisfaction from knowing that they have helped those in their first year of high school.

EXTRA-MURAL

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Lynette Jacobs Head: Kristina Semmelink Bon Appétit has always strived to create the best possible experience with our catering and dishes. This year was no exception. Before COVID-19 hit we had amazing success with different events. We tried out a range of new recipes such as our coffee cream meringues and savoury profita rolls to add to classic favorites such as our chicken pies and chocolate eclairs. With hard work and dedication our team was able to band together through long hours in order to create the magnitude of products needed for each event. Even though we did not have a complete year, we know that the time we did have, was a success.

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Bon Appétit

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Extra-Mural Reflections Extra-Mural Reflections

Teachers-in-charge: Ms Zargielay Rabeh and Mr Gian Marneweck Head: Saar-rah Chilwan (First Aid) and Nabeela Jaffer (Blood Donor) We would like to extend our warmest gratitude and appreciation to our Rustenburg First Aiders. These learners, for the last two years, have selflessly given up their time to help others and assist wherever they are needed. It is always so heart-warming to see all the learners who are willing to volunteer their hours to First Aid at sport matches or take part in the two-day training course to qualify as a First Aider. We are equally grateful to all the learners who continue to donate blood every year, as there is a great need for it in our country.

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Music Committee

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Peer Tutoring

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Perdita Norval Head: Aaminah Leonard The Peer Tutoring Committee has been continuing to help learners with our ongoing tutor programme. We have started annual second-hand book sales and introduced a stationery drive, however, helping people improve their academic work has always been our goal. Our English Creative Writing exam tips workshop, with the help of the English Department, was a great success and we look forward to having more of those in the future. Our lessons usually take the form of individual support in a specific subject requested by the student. We hope that this important service will continue to flourish.

Photo Team

Teacher-in-charge: Ms René Forbes Head: Jemma Cusens The Photo Team has pushed me out of my comfort zone, and it has allowed me to make valuable connections with people that share the same interest as me. The most memorable event for me was photographing the Matric Dance Pre-drinks portraits in 2019. This was daunting and exciting at the same time and I gained valuable experience in the process, as it was my first time using a studio light with a remote flash. The Photo Team is such a strong society as everyone shares a passion for capturing meaningful moments made throughout their high school careers.

The Bug Magazine

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Julie Campbell Head: Erin Coull Earlier this year The Bug Magazine went digital but little did we know that we were ahead of the game. When lockdown arrived, we took it in our stride as we had already discussed and put into practice how to communicate our thoughts and opinions in a visually engaging way across a digital platform. After this, Zoom was a piece of cake! We are excited about the space for diverse conversations that the Bug Magazine has created. Future editions can build on the impactful, sustainable and sometimes funny template that we are proud to have been part of.

Tuckshop Monitresses

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Michelle Haylett Head: Kirsten MacArthur Although we were unable to serve the school during the COVID-19 pandemic, the tuckshop monitresses assisted the school community faithfully alongside some wonderful parents in Term 1. Our role typically involves serving food and beverages to the school community on a daily basis, replenishing stock and general housekeeping. Some monitresses even go above the call of duty and support special event days and other important school functions. Being a tuckshop monitress has taught us valuable social skills and the ability to work under pressure.

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Juanita Atkinson Head: Kate Birch I have had a truly wonderful time in the Music Committee. The drive and determination of my fellow members never fails to amaze me. In the two years I have been part of the committee, we have pulled off some initially daunting tasks and managed to stick together with a common goal in mind. Lockdown halted some of our big plans but I know that when we can return to normal duties, the Music Committee will be back better than ever! Sarah Philander (Deputy Head)

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Geila Wills Head: Lekia Thaver The members of this service group have grown tremendously, not only in their writing and communication abilities but also in their endurance through unforeseen challenges. During this pandemic, our service group has continued to work behind the scenes to bring relevant updates and articles to our school’s media platforms. We have also had the opportunity to forge friendships through Google Meet, where we have been able to share our experiences during the lockdown and check in on one another. I am grateful for all I have learnt and the friendships I have made while a part of this team.

Societies

EXTRA-MURAL

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Jordan Tame Head: Nabeela Jaffer The Media Centre is not just a library to the many learners who work in it; it is a family of peculiar and wonderful people. The stress of the school day is soon forgotten when spending time with fellow monitresses and doing our bit to better our school. The library holds a lot of knowledge, not only in books but also in lessons that we learn from each other. We aimed to make the library a safe and comforting environment to learn or to de-stress with your nose in a book.

Public Relations Team

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Media Centre Monitresses

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Cultural Society

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Debating Teacher-in-charge: Mr Cedric van Dyk Head: Kristina Semmelink Debating has always been a place of sanctuary where people can share thoughts, ideas and gain perspective on the opinions of others. The debating year was called off due to COVID-19, but what we have all learnt in debating is being used every day in order to allow us to navigate this tricky road. Before COVID-19 hit the seniors won all three of their debates, while the juniors learnt the fundamentals of debating and how to work together. Even though we did not have a complete year, we know that the time we did have was a success.

Earth Children

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Jackie Chambers Head: Mikaela van Otterlo Over the past few years, the Earth Children have grown from strength to strength and have managed to contribute immensely not only to the school itself, but also to the greater Rustenburg community. We have been deeply involved in many conversations during breaks surrounding present topics such as Fair Trade and living ethical sustainable lifestyles. From our Movie Night and Clothing Swop last year, to our very successful “De-stress and Spekboom planting picnic” earlier this year, we had hoped to launch some new ideas in 2020, and we look forward to handing them over to next year’s team.

Habitat for Humanity

Teachers-in-charge: Ms Tracey Henry and Ms Sindisiwe Herbert Head: Maryam Badsha Habitat for Humanity has taught me lifelong skills including teamwork, communication and leadership. The exciting, but high stress environment at the Cyclathons has created lasting friendships through sleepdeprived conversations, as we survived over 25 hours at the Waterfront with lots of coffee! This was a rewarding experience as we were actively involved in bettering our communities. We helped to build the house that we raised money towards and met the family and community we were assisting. Being a part of the Habitat society was an unforgettable experience with friendships that will last a lifetime.

Helen Keller

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Kayla Voskuil Head: Kathia Oppelt We have, unfortunately, not been able to visit our ‘grandparents’ during this high-risk time. Over the last few years, however, we have listened in awe to their countless stories of the lives they lived and the families that they grew. The bonds that were created with our ‘grandparent/s’ were filled with such love and appreciation for each other. The afternoons were always well spent with our grandparents and our fellow society members. The memories made and the lessons taught will never be forgotten and will hold a special place in each of our hearts.

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Jordan Tame Head: Megan de Villiers 2020 has taught us that you can never know what might come across your path. We were blessed to be able to hold our annual Christian Union Camp at Rocklands in Term 1, together with Rondebosch and Wynberg Boys and Girls. This was a very special weekend where friendships grew stronger and new ones were formed. Over the isolating and difficult period of lockdown, we were able to support the learners with weekly messages and verses of encouragement over our social media platforms. This year we’ve been reminded that the Lord never changes and is always there.

Interact

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Philippa Colly Head: Lara Stulting Being a part of Interact has been the source of some of my most cherished high school memories. The Interact Christmas Party held every year has allowed each year to end on a high note for not only the Klipfontein Primary learners, but also the Rustenburg learners involved in the event. Interact has breathed life into the quote “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others,” by Mahatma Ghandi. In a year where we all feel so lost, the best way to find ourselves is through helping others.

Jabulani

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Mavis Mase Head: Hlonelwa Zimba The Jabulani Society has helped me to develop a greater understanding of my African heritage through poetry, song and dance. I have formed many friendships which I will cherish for a lifetime. Jabulani has allowed me to do this through attending many Cultural Evenings which were hosted by our neighbouring schools, the annual Cultural Evening we hosted and the charity events we took part in. I have learnt many life lessons which have reminded me to stay true to who I am: a strong and confident African woman.

Societies Muslim Students’ Association

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Zargielay Rabeh Head: Farheen Parker The Muslim Students’ Association (MSA) has always been a tightly-knit group of learners. We hosted our annual Fun Day at the beginning of the year, which was truly rewarding and a great success. The unexpected turn that 2020 took has resulted in our other events being cancelled; however, the MSA remains strong and committed. This dynamic group of learners displays great teamwork, and they have supported one another throughout this year. The bond between the members is unfaltering and working with them has been both a humbling and rewarding experience.

Pride

Teacher-in-charge: Ms Emma Boshoff Heads: Kyla Oberholzer and Ansela Sloman This year we continued to provide a safe space within the school for the LGBT community and advocate for acceptance and education on LGBT issues. We marched in the Cape Town Pride March, which was such an inspiring showcase of the love, acceptance and diversity within the queer community. It was also an opportunity to reflect on our own privilege and a reminder to be grateful for how far we have come – and how far we still have to go. The Pride society looks forward to continuing the important dialogue we started with the school around transformation, acceptance and tolerance.

Retro

Teacher-in-charge: Mr Cedric van Dyk Head: Cameryn Millar Despite the challenges that the year presented, we were still able to have our annual photoshoot surrounding women empowerment, which the entire society enjoyed. We gave our time to the Adonis Musati Project (which seeks to empower refugees) by attending their workshop where we had the privilege of meeting the refugees of all ages. We sold some treats at the movie evening to raise funds for the AMP. Retro is about helping and empowering others, and is a place where we can truly be ourselves with no judgement.

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Denise Campbell Head: Amani Hoosen 2020 took us on an unpredictable journey, but the Cultural Society still managed to connect with one another. At the beginning of the year, we hosted a discussion on culture, where we discussed various subjects, including cultural appropriation as well as the interwoven aspects of race and culture. Our featured event of the year was sadly cancelled, but I am immensely proud to have been part of such an incredible team. It has been an honour to work with such a diligent group, but more so, to get to know them all personally and to learn from them.

Societies

Ignition

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Teacher-in-charge: Ms Tarin Scharneck Head: Jenna Dugmore I loved being part of the Busty Bugs because of the rewarding work and intergrade relationships that are formed. The Coin Collection (which we launched this year) has been my favourite, and our most successful, initiative. Committee members dressed up in funky pink outfits and collected ‘small change for a big change’ from the parents, with all proceeds going to Pink Drive. As October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the majority of Busty Bugs’ well-known events were postponed due to COVID-19. All the memories and friendships over the past five years will, however, have an everlasting impression on me.

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Busty Bugs

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Inter-House

Competitions

House Captains: Erin Coetzee, Lauren Heiberg, Tayyibah Martin, Sarah Murashiki and Kim Sendin Deputy House Captains: Madison Beley, Hayley Budge, Temwa Ng’ambi, Danielle van Breda and Isabella Webster

This year some of the Inter-house events had to be curtailed by the COVID-19 pandemic, however, we had an exceptionally busy Term 1 before the lockdown came into effect.

In the Senior section of the competition, Bleby, who were excellently led by their chairperson, Zahraa Solomons explored all angles of their topic: All People are Ultimately Good. Their speakers were Gia Paulse, Lekia Thaver, Aman Abrahams and Madison Beley. Bleby again came first, Michiel Vos came second and Cambridge came third. The Senior Speaker Awards were as follows: Best Chairperson: Zahraa Solomons (Bleby) First Best Speaker: Shelby van der Watt (Cambridge) Second Best Speaker: Madison Beley (Bleby) Most Promising Speaker: Vivienne Banks (Marchand) Lastly, the House Plays took place on the evening of 12 March. It was a night filled with entertainment, laughter and school spirit. The five houses came together and each presented a play of their own that revolved around the theme “secrets”. The talent of many learners was showcased, with all the plays being of an exceptionally high standard. Marchand took the lead and won first place with its best lead actress, Lara Stulting, who portrayed Dr Evil. What a perfect way to close Term 1.

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After break, the learners settled down for the Forum Discussion Competition. Bleby’s Junior Team (Tamsyn Arendse, Jenna Meredith, Kate Ferguson, Lucy Kane and Kierha Smythe) ensured that the topic, We Live in a World of Instant but Not Always Effective Communication, was discussed with clarity and enthusiasm. Bleby came first, Michiel Vos came second and Marchand came third. The Junior Speaker Awards were as follows: Best Chairperson: Kate Ferguson (Bleby) First Best Speaker: Tamsyn Arendse (Bleby) Second Best Speaker: Tia Morrow (Michiel Vos) Most Promising Speaker: Robyn Gordon (Marchand)

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This year’s Inter-house Gala on 6 February was yet again a memorable event. There was much excitement in the air while the various houses prepared for their grand entrance leading down to the swimming pool area, holding their banners and chanting their war cries. Once everyone was seated, the races began; and what an exciting day it turned out to be! In the end Marchand took first place, with Innes (second place) and Bleby (third place) hot on their heels. The adjudicators had a hard time choosing the house with the most spirit, but in the end they decided that the Spirit Cup had to go to Bleby! Mr Anton Faure (1st Team Swimming Captain Hannah Faure’s father) came to present the certificates and trophies to the winners.

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Music Term 1

Reflections from the

Director of Music

Mr Jaco Goosen

The annual Subject Music outing to a rehearsal of the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra took place in February. They presented a vibrant programme by composers Mendelssohn, Wienawski and Sibelius. The combined Music Welcome Meeting and Music Workshop were well received. This year Maileen Jamey, one of our former music teachers, presented a workshop on musical theatre to the music students.

Despite all the challenges that the year brought, it was also a time to listen, support, and reflect. One day we’ll look back and wonder how we actually managed to function in this ‘new normal’. I can’t help but feel that we will come out of this stronger and even better.

The Grade 10 and 11 ensemble concert, and Grade 12 concert piece performance gave many non-music students a chance to attend live performances during the lunch break. The Sunset Picnic concert in the Main Quad took place towards the end of Term 1. The combination of blue skies, a carnival atmosphere, an appreciative audience, and stunning music performed by a variety of our ensembles, made for an incredibly enjoyable evening. And then...COVID-19 and lockdown hit us and everything changed. Terms such as “online teaching”, “Google Classroom”, “Zoom”, “Hangouts”, and “virtual performances” became

Mr Goosen spending some quality time with the family during lockdown.

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Our Music students are embracing the choice between the Classical and Jazz. This emphasizes our department’s desire to be more inclusive of a variety of music styles.

When we finally returned to school Charlie’s Hope was transformed into a classroom with desks 1.5 meters apart. The music practical time table had to be adjusted in order to allow the wind instruments to exclusively use the bigger venues in the music block. Sanitising the pianos with special piano sanitiser became the norm for the piano students and having your violin lesson with your mask on became second nature.

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We celebrated the success of the Grade 12 Music Class of 2019 in their NSC music examinations. The class received an average of 83% with 8 As and 4 Bs. We welcomed Ms Ariella Caira (parttime cello), and Mr Jose Dias (part-time piano) to the Music Department. Both of them have been wonderful additions to the department and their expertise and enthusiasm has been invaluable.

the norm. Data became a luxury and you were lucky if your lesson went uninterrupted without a technical issue of some kind. We started to get used to the iPad not coping with the high sounds of the third register on the flute or the lower register of the double bass, or the mouth movements and sound of the singers not being in sync. The music team kept going, however, and made the most of it.

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How does one even begin to describe this year? Well, let’s start at the very beginning, when we thought it was going to be just another year.

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Music in Lockdown

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Reflections on

Hope Hadebe (Grade 11) would have been Veruca Salt “I was ecstatic when I first heard that I’d been cast as Veruca, one of the main roles, in the 2020 theatre production. This excitement took off during our first rehearsals especially. There were so many new people to meet in this large cast. My favourite part about the rehearsals was spending time with friends. There was lots of laughter as we watched people get into their eccentric characters. I loved having a song to sing with my Salt family; the singing rehearsals brought us even closer together and helped us all to become even more comfortable within our roles. Getting into Veruca’s character was a challenge, but the directors really helped in getting the hang of it. Veruca is a mean, selfish, manipulative and immature girl (I believe that I’m the opposite). She would have been angry that she didn’t get a chance to shine on stage.”

Taylor Ackermann (Grade 10) would have been Violet Beauregarde “The production of “Wonka” was going to be the highlight of my year. Although the show was cut short and the cast wasn’t able to perform before an audience, the months of rehearsals were worth every second! When I heard that I had been cast as Violet, I was over the moon. Violet is an absolute brat, but was so much fun to portray. She often says aloud what so many teenagers are thinking! Working on the stage, I felt absolutely myself (which was ironic because I was acting as someone else). The entire cast and crew were so welcoming. Mr Skelly and Ms HicksonMahony brought so much energy and humour to every rehearsal, but it wasn’t all fun and games. The ongoing advice and constructive criticism helped us to develop our characters. It was immensely rewarding to spend so much time in the company of others who were equally passionate about theatre.”

Khanya Mtati (Grade 8) would have been Augustina Gloop “I loved rehearsing for “Wonka” in the first few months of this year. We made a cast rule: if someone arrived late, then they had to bring baked goods for the next rehearsal. Secretly many of us hoped that there would be late-comers so that more evenings could begin with delicious treats! My character, Augustina Gloop, was a rounded German girl who has an obsession with food, especially chocolate. Portraying her was such fun. There was never a dull moment when Augustina was on stage. My favourite scene was the duet sung by Augustina and her mother. The song was about Augustina’s great love for chocolate and just how wonderful she thought she was. Being part of “Wonka” made my first year of high school incredible. With the help of the directors, I definitely developed as a performer. The cast started to feel like a family.”

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CAST MR WILLY WONKA: Matthew Lubbé CHARLIE BUCKET: Likho Madubela GRANDPA JOE: Connor le Borgne VERUCA SALT: Hope Hadebe VIOLET BEAUREGARDE: Taylor Ackermann AUGUSTINA GLOOP: Khanya Mtati MIKE TEEVEE: Connor Peddie OOMPA LOOMPAS: Uminathi William, Trinity Ngaka, Lindokuhle Mdunyelwa, Nihaal Effendi, Mariam Halday, Jaime Wray, Caitlin Wilson, Lucy Tough, Holly Burroughs MRS SWEET: Lauren Heiberg MR SWEET: Alex Lorimer MRS GLOOP: Nicole Bransby MRS SALT: Jenna Edwards MR SALT: Johann Lorimer MRS BEAUREGARDE: Ashley Gernetzy MRS TEEVEE: Layla Worrell MR BUCKET: Ben Wittenberg MRS BUCKET: Chloe Sampson GRANDMA JOSEPHINE: Sienna Musikanth GRANDPA GEORGE: Tauriq Petersen GRANDMA GEORGINA: Yakira Davidson LONDONERS: Shafiyah Daniels, Inga Jwaai, Sasha Apolles, Danielle Sabor, Miyo Jappie, Sanchia Bristow, Jaime Wray, Gaby Sampson, Hannah Domisse, Cameron Paschen

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DIRECTORS: Mr Adrian Skelly, Ms Carey Hickson-Mahony (Cape Academy of Dramatic Arts) MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Ms Vasti Knoessen ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE: Ms Janet Pienaar PRODUCER: Mr Graeme Broster RONDEBOSCH LIAISONS: Mr Kevin Jenkins, Ms Lauren Snyders COSTUME DESIGNER: Mr Victor Kok THEATRICAL MAKE-UP AND STYLING: Ms Roxanne Boehme PUPIL PRODUCER: Isabella Bosman PRODUCTION TEAM: Ruth Bateman, Saskia Beattie, Imaan Latiff, Erin McCoy

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Music Class of 2020

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Wonka

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Reflections from the President of the Rustenburg

Alumnae

Ms Ruth Romburgh

2020 has definitely been a year with a difference. Along with COVID-19 came lockdown, home schooling, social-distancing, masks and learning a completely new way of living. I have to say I have not missed the material things, but I have missed family time and gatherings with friends, celebrating milestone birthdays, and hugs from my grandchildren. In our June newsletter we featured alumnae as well as current learners who have been making a difference in the lives of others, especially with regard to COVID-19. If you have not read the Newsletter please go to the Rustenburg Alumnae website where all our newsletters can be found: www.alumnae.rustenburggirls.org.za Committee meetings have been held via Zoom which has enabled more members to “attend”. A sub-committee has been formed to liaise with both the junior and high schools and their transformation committees, to form a platform where our alumnae can address concerns and experiences which they would like to bring to the attention of the current Management Team. If you are keen to be part of the transformation process and would like to be co-opted onto the sub-committee, please email alumnae@ rustenburggirls.org.za.

2. Alison Jennings (Dall, E’92) has joined the distinguished and select band of RAs to become a headmistress. The lucky school is the Junior School of St Mary’s Diocesan School for Girls in Pretoria, known generally as DSG. DSG is an Anglican Church school and so Alison was installed by the Bishop of Pretoria. 3. Corinne Hudson (E’69) visited the RGHS library to donate prize books won by her aunt in the 1940s. Corinne’s family has a strong connection with Rustenburg, with her two aunts and her daughter (E’98) all being former Rustybugs.

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Some interesting snippets of news: 1. Grace McDonald (Skelton) is set to turn 100 in November this year. Grace attended Rustenburg Girls’ High in the 1930s. Some of her family members have also been Rustybugs, including her brother Arthur and sister Marion, her daughter Lesley Satchel (McDonald, E’63) and her great-granddaughters Ashleigh (E’19) and Rachel Noyce (current Grade 11).

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Alumnae Reflections Alumnae Reflections

The Ubuntu Award was awarded to Lara Rule (Grade 11). This award, instituted by the Matric class of 1956, is presented each year to the learner who shows awareness of and concern for the plight and needs of others and reacts compassionately and humanely to these needs.

Thank you to my committee for their continued dedication and support, and a huge thank you must go to Ms Petersen and Mr Gates for managing and navigating these unknown waters and keeping all staff and learners as safe as possible.

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Founders’ Day was once again a time of meeting up with old friends, attending a tea, assembly and a luncheon. The guest speaker was Dr Leila Amien (E’12) who shared her story with us from her experience at Rustenburg to her active involvement in Operation Smile South Africa (OSSA).

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Jemma Hallett (Grade 11)

Kate Birch (Grade 11)


RUSTENBURG GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL

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ALUMNAE

ADDRESS: Campground Road, Rondebosch, 7700 PHONE: (021) 686 4066 FAX: (021) 686 7114 E-MAIL: info@rghs.org.za

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RUSTENBURG GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL PHONE: (021) 686 4066 FAX: (021) 686 7114 E-MAIL: info@rghs.org.za ADDRESS: Campground Road, Rondebosch, 7700

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