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The understanding of illusion and it’s every impossible quality has been the focus of scientists, writers and artists for centuries. It deceptively bridges the gaps between some of the most respective academic and creative fields. Encapsulating the minds and lives of many a man, and will continue to do so for years to come.

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FOREWORD

Illusions place in art and design has always given a fantasias view to the works created around it. Breeding misunderstanding and challenging the way our brains have been programmed to absorb visual information. Developing through movements in art such as surrealism and more recently ‘Op-Art’, illusion


has been present but critcised for it’s obscure beauty for years. The research into illusion started by questioning the place it held within the art & design field. Can it add to or take away from visual communication? Do it’s artists abuse a knowledge and understanding that unreadable to some? Similarly neuroscientists, psychologists and perceptual theorists have been back and forth

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FOREWORD

7 working out what mistakes lie in the brain and its relationship with our eyes that can create such ambiguous outcomes. More importantly we are in an age where we have the knowledge and technology to answer these questions, but will the answers ever solve such a trick?


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This book documents the year with visual and written explorations from the initial research topics and findings and works its way into the future for Noisulli and this subject that has come in the form of a hypothetically proposed movement and what the future is for the work Noisulli will curate and complete around this subject.

INTRODUCTION

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Over the course of just one year; many documents, presentations, and a dissertation have helped me to understand and approach the subject with a critical and academic view of the surrounding ideas and practicioners that have also approached the subject.


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INTRODUCTION

A sub aim for this book. Is also your interaction as a reader. How is the book to be viewed. Does it draw you into the subject? Does it enhance or disrupt your view on illusion? And can a book be more than a static object?

Making the book more than a flat object intends to evoke play within the viewer, challenging them to discover the hidden details and showing them first hand some of the visual deceptions that occur within our world.


Also symbolising and encapsulating the birth of Noisulli as a movement, its working methodology and a manifesto that respects, and reuses 21st century knowledge, theories and findings that surround Noisulli’s interests and ideas.

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The name, NOISULLI, comes directly from the ambiguity of what it is representing. Noisulli subtly mirrors ideas and understandings that come with, and are influenced by illusion.  

INTRODUCTION

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INTRODUCTION

But, at the same time by being a complete reflection of the term it has created something new. Working toward a reinvention but also seen as a homage to the minds and hands that have made this subject so hard to place for many years.

More detail will be taken into the explaining of Noisulli. But first the history of our influence. The knowledge of the subject, and the initial interests that Noisulli gained over the years of 2009 - 2010.


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Selected quotes, research points and artists discovered and documented through academic thesis. The context and subsequent application of Noisulli came from a research dissertation written and compiled by Ross Bennett during his 3rd year Design programme at Camberwell College of Art.

THESIS

IMAGE: Thesis Document, Ross Bennett (2010)

Through a critically set academic research thesis exploring the question “How can Illusions enhance or disrupt our view of art?�, The subject was explored in-depth focusing on illusions place within art and the way it can alter our perception on visual artwork.


The Dissertation brought up and examined a multitude of arguments that have surrounded this deceptive subject for many years. Through artist and scientific analysis of fact, theory and fiction, conclusions were made and relayed.

“Our eyes only tell us part of what we need to be able to see. The other part is done by the brain, taking the input from the eyes and making guesses or inferences about what’s out there in the environment. Usually these inferences are very accurate, but sometimes they lead us astray in the form of visual illusions.”

QUOTE: Scott Murray (2009)

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THESIS

The story follows. From selected points of the research and understanding.


In a quote from Gregory’s recent article for ‘New Scientist’, he finishes up his short but decisive piece by saying;

41 “Visual images consisting of repetitive patterns can elicit striking illusory motion percepts”. For years scientists have been debating whether this type of illusion originates in the Eye or the Brain, now they’ve concluded that; “We show that microsaccades, a type of miniature eye movement produced during visual řxation, can drive illusory motion in Enigma.”

THESIS

QUOTE: R.L Gregory - Newscientist (2009)

“As we have seen, there are a great variety of causes of these phenomena of seeing we call illusions. Many are imperfectly understood, and some have wildly different explanations. But illusions are invaluable because the clues they hold to how we see simply could not be found elsewhere.”


Where as the BBC broadcasting team reported it as because it was disrupting their work. The idea, and view of an illusion has it’s place as both an ‘Enigma’ and will continue it’s reign of intrigue in the subject with scientists arguing over it, Artists manipulating it, and everyone else just getting annoyed with it. The disturbance an

IMAGE: Isia Leviant, Enigma (DATE)

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THESIS

The ‘trickling motion’ that describes Leviant’s motion illusion was previously discovered by a BBC broadcasting team who complained about illusionary shadows running up and down blank strips between parallel lines. It was Leviant who then enhanced this into his piece ‘Enigma’ In 1981. By Leviant recreating this idea into art he obviously see’s it as an enhancing feature to the view of art.


illusion can have is completely subjective to the context in which you view it. After this initial process of finding the scientific theory to help explain but also back up the idea of illusion I moved on to construct my debate within a subject that I found to be interesting. ‘Illusion within art’

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subject matter has been played with for centuries being touched upon and toyed with by artists such as ; Dali, Mattisse, Vassarely, and Riley. These artists and many more have had us question the connection we have between eye and brain, sight and understanding. Their work transformed canvas’ into screens, they demanded that we visually process their work again and again for

THESIS

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With a whole host of illusion (or before scientific explanation, surrealist) artists the


Music, drugs and sociality took a dramatic change being freely welcomed amongst groups of people the art took the back seat by it was subtly echoed within the whole system.

IMAGE: RenĂŠ Magritte, Horse (1965) ----

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THESIS

longer stints of time, going away but always coming back to it with a fresh and constant misunderstanding, they allowed the viewers of these times to question what could be made with a set of art tools and gave birth to a whole era of experimentation not only within art but within society.


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but now given the freedom and acceptance within the most prestigious galleries around the world. With the public’s growing interest in the indecipherable, the art scene turns to work that tackles the brain and it’s ability to process information and images.

THESIS

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Illusion is more and more finding it’s way to being accepted into contemporary art. Having earlier being hidden or misunderstood with such artists as Dali and Rene Mattise acclaiming far more recognition as our perceptions on art grew into the 21st century. No longer belonging to the underground scene of studio squatting artists


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THESIS

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Taking Inspiration and influence from a diverse set of artists, and many more, Noisulli worked on a proposed approach for what it wanted to do within this field.

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Noisulli was born in uncomprehendable obscurity, built and influenced by the surreal, the impossible and the undecipherable.

NOISULLI

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In almost every movement or established art period there has been an artist, writer, or academic that has approached the subject of illuision. The theories and visuals that it has produced have been debated and questioned for years.


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NOISULLI

Alot has happened before Noisulli was developed. In regards to graphic language, visual experimentation and research documents all over the place. To start with the artist names were substitued for numbers to take the emphasis away from who they were and focus on what they do.

An approach was then recorded that came from their individual works and from what I could see, a visual mehtodology. Constructing the Noisulli method of working. A preferable way of working for delivering design and publication through autonomous thinking.


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#9_Beau Lotto

The works, findings and creations of these 9 people have created and influenced generations of writers, scientists and yet more artists.

PRACTITIONERS

IMAGES: respective to individual artists

#3_Christofer Chin

#1_R.L Gregory


#5_Charles Avery

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#4_Scott Kim

Collectively they have worked on the subject for hundreds of years and each has seen/lived through or been involved in some of the greatest movements to hit our art world.

IMAGES: respective to individual artists

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PRACTITIONERS

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#2_Bridget Riley


Professor of Neuropsycholoy. Founding editor of the journal Perception.

42 He has without a doubt influenced many a creative on this subject. Alot was learnt from this famous scientist, his writings on the subject have gone on for decades and are still going to this present day.

PRACTITIONERS

IMAGE: Ame’s Window experiment - R.L.Gregory (DATE)

The academic approach and understanding of everything regarding visual perception, the way it works and the way we can be tricked through it, puts him at the beginning of this movement.


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PRACTITIONERS

But to capture a methodology for Noisulli this idea of full thinking was noted a paraphrased into a short but decisive point.

*To understand a visual illusion one must first gain the knowledge of the object and understand the rules of vision. Once this is overcome human perception can be played with through optical knowledge.


#2

Her incredible knowledge of colour and the optical awareness she shows within her work sits beautifully on top of my question, balancing enhancement or disruption when it comes to ones view of her art. Growing up in London, studying at Goldsmiths and later the RCA, Riley has been exposed to the birth and growth of commercial art in Europe. Going on to develop her own style, and

PRACTITIONERS

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Celebrated for her distinctive, optically vibrant paintings. She explored optical phenomena and juxtaposed colour either by using a chromatic technique of identifiable hues of by selecting achromatic colours ( black, white or grey )”. – Introduction taken from ‘Bridget Riley & Op Art’.


subsequently a movement, she has played a vital role in the conjoining of art and science as one synchronized idea.

subtle and visually obtrusive way. Her art isn’t purposefully looking to optically distort the visual experience for the viewer but find a colour chart that both enhances each colour and sits naturally together.

Bridget Riley, Blaze 1 (1967)

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PRACTITIONERS

Through her art, Riley has always said she’s searching for those perfect colour combinations, something that she seems able to get in both a


82 It was during the start of the 1960s, and Riley’s self proclaimed dive into ‘Op art’, that her work started to become noticed, and by 1962 she had her first solo show. Both the public and critics perceived her work very differently. Many an un-trained art viewer said her work gave them the sensation of ‘sea-sickness and sky diving’, whilst art critics and the educated reviewers of

PRACTITIONERS

IMAGE - Bridget Riley (DATE)

“presenting unmediated looking. Of course what we as viewers bring to what we see is undeniably complex, an overflowing baggage of past experience and present mood but her clarity of thought and its economic translation onto canvas surely demand a similar rinsing of our eyes and minds”.


*Explore your subject and it’s constraints to their ultimate limits. With this understanding of your tools and their performance you can have complete control of your medium.

-----------, Portrait (1967)

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PRACTITIONERS

the time said the work defined the era - a period where people started to challenge the notion of mind-body duality leading to experimenting with hallucinogenic drugs, and the concerns and likenesses the future of science and art.


Californian contemporary artist has a great understanding of composition and colour balance. Along with tremendous control of his tools that add the same mathematical precision that Riley is so well known for.

#3

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#4

a word or name written so it reads in more than one way. Douglas Hofstadter coined ambigrams the generic word for inversions. S.Kim was a particular interest and influence toward Noisulli due to his recognised status that bridges the science and design gap. Respected by Scientists and artists alike his work is

PRACTITIONERS

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The Escher of the Alphabet Scott Kim lives and works in California where he has a strong following behind his visual ambigrams using type. Designer of visual puzzles and games for the web, computer games, magazines and toys. His puzzles are in the spirit of Tetris and M.C Escher Visually stimulating, thought provoking, broadly appealing, and highly original. An inversion is


He draws on a deep understanding of letter forms and visual perception, and the resulting designs are highly original and gratifying. Many people will be delighted by what they see; some – I hope a good number – will go on to explore their own corners of the enchanting artistic space that Scott has revealed, for Inversions is an inspiring work.

Scott Kim, Inversion Type. (DATE)

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PRACTITIONERS

approached with a particularly high degree of knowledge. Which is probably due to his Phd In Computers and Design. He has contributed to many fields within the subject for many years now. Follow some quotes; Scott Kim has perfect a personal art form – one with grace, elegance, subtlety, and surprises.


IMAGE: Scott Kim.

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His book is … interspersed with provocative observations on the nature of symmetry, its philosophical aspects and its embodiment in art and music as well as in wordplay … Over the years Kim has developed the magical ability to take

just about any word or short phrase and letter it in a such a way that it exhibits some kind of striking geometrical symmetry. In 1994 Random House published Kim’s Puzzle Workout, a collection of 42 brilliant puzzles reprinted from his puzzle column in New Media

PRACTITIONERS

QUOTE: Douglas Hofstadter, Pulitzer Prize Winning Author of Gödel.

Scott Kim’s Inversions…is one of the most astonishing and delightful books ever printed.


Magazine. It is the only book of puzzles known to me in which every single puzzle is totally original with the author.

PRACTITIONERS

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QUOTES: Martin Gardner, Scientific American IMAGE: ---------, Inversion Front Cover. (1994)

*Interaction, be it through a tactile game or visual puzzle. Work needs to encapsulate the viewer and draw them in with every sense.


CA’s work was based around a fictitious narrative that he had been writing for many years named ‘the islanders’

63 these beings in their natural environment, for the place is utterly subjective.” Avery has a beautiful approach and attitude to his work. Throwing the question back to the viewer, “what is real?” and opening up a whole topic of perceived reality are brought up taught and educated to know what is real what is surreal

PRACTITIONERS

#5 QUOTE. ‘The Islanders’ Charles Avery (2008)

“I cannot tell you how the island really is – I have no idea – I can state only the facts as I perceive them. you must be satisfied with this or you must travel there yourself sometime, and see


*Reality. You are the maker of your concepts, dream away from reality and settle on fantasy. After all what is the nature of truth and how is it measured.

IMAGE A trio smoking. (2008)

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PRACTITIONERS

and what is completely impossible. But without facts and evidence to disprove one mans theories, idea’s or stories, what right does anyone have to comment on the reality of someone else’s work.


#6

The complexity of spacial usage when he approaches his work is complimented beautifully by the simplicity in which he visualises his idea’s.

PRACTITIONERS

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Spacial awareness. Perception playing illustrator. Negative space visualist. There’s always more once start searching and stop starring blankly. Inviting perceptual challengers to look again, with a prize for the ones that do.


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PRACTITIONERS

93 *Sometimes what isn’t there is more interesting than what is. Use the space you have, in a way that somebody else hasn’t.


The godfather of Optical Art Hungarian Born VV’s work has influenced decades of work that follows in his optical trickery.

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art until 1947. Some decade before popularly believed Op Art starter Riley was being noticed.

PRACTITIONERS

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VV has been experimenting with perspective and visual textures since the 1920s. But didn’t settle down into his deceptive geometric optical


PRACTITIONERS

IMAGE Victor Vassarley, Zebra (DATE)

14 *Static Movement. Why can’t static image have movement. Who declared this. Kinetic visual experimentation has the ability to turn the flat surface into a world of unending possibilities.


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Our hope is to engender a more empathic view of nature and human nature by creating spaces of understanding that are indifferent to the contrived boundaries between disciplines. (And people within those disciplines).

PRACTITIONERS

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Lottolab studio creates installations, musical performances and educational programmes, and performs carefully controlled experiments on the perception and behaviour of humans, bumblebees and evolved artificial life systems in laboratory and public realms.


though usually to say something that is actually wrong.

Definitely. And they have been ... (including by me)

Definitely not! And it never will, since the optical nightmares discovered were they’ve been and loved by many different people.

>Should illusion stay within it’s research field and just be used by scientists when exploring our methods of perception?

>Obviously their are no rules in art - but do you think by using the idea’s of optical illusion within art could be seen as a intrusion of peoples minds? No. It’s important to intrude in this way to wake people up. Of course illusions have been used in art for many years for this reason,

>Questions Black by Ross Bennett. Answers Blue Beau Lotto.

EMAIL Q&A with Beau Lotto (2009)

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PRACTITIONERS

>Do you think that artists, designers, architects of the 21st century should use such illusionary methods to create visual distortions to viewers and public within their own environments?


Even at the Masters level science education is usually a process of rediscovering the wheel. Which means science education is usually devoid of real science. And yet there is nothing special about science, much less those who do it.

44 interest in children and adults in understand the brain. In the project Blackawton Bees (in collaboration with Head Teach Dave Strudwick and tech Tina Wadwellyn) we again have performed truly novel experiments on bumblebees at a primary school in Devon. Except this time we have completely

PRACTITIONERS

All text copyright and---property of Lottolab.org

For several years now we have been blurring the boundary between the lab, studio and public spaces by performing real research on bumblebees in the public, which has stimulated tremendous


Some questions asked by the children about bees: What if... we had a colour in the tube that connects the hive to the arena, and then they have to go to that colour on the flower wall?

IMAGES - Blackawton Bees Proposal. LottoLab.org

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PRACTITIONERS

removed all boundaries: The experiments were not devised by the ‘scientist’, but by twenty five 8-year-old children. The children devised the questions; they reasoned an answer; they designed the experiments; and they did all the data analysis. They are now writing up their findings, which they will submit for publication.


What if... we could find bees will go through in For instance, they have out of the way to get a

out how much effort the order to get a reward? to move something heavy reward.

What if... we could find out if they prefer warm or cold nectar?

64 What if... we could discover if bees can learn to go to certain colours depending on how sweet they are? What if... we could find out if some bees could learn faster than others? What if... we could find out how many colours they could remember?

PRACTITIONERS

TEXT: All text courtesy of LottoLab

What if... we could find out if they could follow a route of colour?


IMAGE Courtousey of LottoLab.org

PRACTITIONERS

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The subject is ever changing much like the practice of art new information and tools are used within science much like new approaches and concepts for an artists. But more than just a straight bridge between art and science Noisulli focus’ its subject experiments in the direction of illusion,

MANIFESTO

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A manifesto was the best way for Noisulli to approach what would eventually be a movement. Working closely within the subject of interest and constantly researching into new idea’s and theories our background knowledge has grown into a wealth of artists designers, theorists and scientists.


deception, visual impairments,(not due to physical neural condition) but by the forces of static image and the form and line juxtaposition that is played with to confuse our most fragile organ.

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MANIFESTO

As a methodology of working a point in context was made on each artist. These points transgressed

the style, way of working and approach that these people had taken to their practice. The nine points taken from the artists were paraphrased forming the structure of the Noisulli manifesto.


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↘Apply historical context, do not rely on contemporaries. History brings tradition; where modern techniques can hinder the process. ↖To understand visual illusion, one must first obtain knowledge of the object and understand the rules of vision. Once this is overcome, perception on optics can be manipulated

MANIFESTO

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↘We must experiment, by merging different disciplines and combining their knowledge our work will become full of context and rationale. ↖Determine our relationship with the human mind and the behavioral effects you have on it. Why do something that sits comfortably in the brain when you have the ability to challenge it and leave an impression.


↘Reality, what is the nature of truth and how is it measured? Realise the potential of our available space. Use the space we have in a way someone else hasn’t. ↖Static movement there is no reason why static image can’t have movement. Kinetic visual experimentation turns the flat surface into a world of unending possibilities.

TEXT Noisulli Manifesto (2010)

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MANIFESTO

↘Explore our subject and its constraints to their ultimate limits. With this understanding of our tools and their performance we will have complete control of our medium and subsequently message. ↖Interact, be it through a tactile game or a visual puzzle. Work must encapsulate the viewer and entirely occupy their senses.


The manifesto points were paraphrased in order for it to work as a document, script, brief or fit into any format necessary.

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Due to the careful building of the manifesto. It moulded perfectly into any new form Noisulli chose to shape it into.

MANIFESTO

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Reverting back to it’s initial pointed form to then be broken up and used for future Noisulli events. (more can be read in futures p--)


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MANIFESTO

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IMAGE: Early Noisulli Doodles and ideas.

CONTENTS


IMAGE: Early Noisulli Doodles and ideas.

CONTENTS

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a manifesto then made into portrayed following will at a manifesto for everything

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The broken font acts a metaphor for illusion and it’s incomplete vision. These styles of fonts were to be taken as Noisulli headers introducing everything with a subtle hint of illegibility. Taken and distorted the type was fitted in with the manifesto by exploring the nature of abstraction with only the use of tools that were at hand. Results as follows.

MOVEMENT

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In order to show that Noisulli was for the creative, experiments were the graphic style that would to be along with their idea’s. The pages develop through a style and end up poster that acts as starting point Noisulli from now on.


Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk Extra Bold Concdensed italic. Missing outlines.

VISION

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Image Copyright of Noisulli (2010)

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VISION


Noisulli Manifesto Poseter (2010)

VISION

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IMAGE: The first manifesto poster produced by Noisulli (2010)

CONTENTS


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CONTENTS

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“Once the rules of practice are understood. The approach can be applied to anything.�

66 design and then fall back into academia. Without the constraints of an outcome artists can act like writers, designers like scientists, with everyone taking on the role of experimenter. An position with room for almost any idea to run free from the brain and to be tried and tested through a set of loose briefs.

NOISULLI

QUOTE: Noisulli (2010)

A quote taken in early 2010 from Noisulli sums up what they were trying to say with their manifesto. It gives more than just a straight reflection of design, but a practice, or practise. This collection of academic research could and would be applied to contemporary writing, art,


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NOISULLI

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In order to sustain Noisulli as a movement, but also allow it to grow through exploration a set of future events, experiments, talks and projects have already been thought of.

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movement, to evoke questions and challenges through the subject but almost as importantly it has briefs already set out within it’s form. This next section will document the future of Noisulli through predetermined rules and outlined briefs, the way they could work within society, and the way they might be recieved by said society. Movements and manifesto’s come from a collective of like minded individuals that want

FUTURES

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Initially Noisulli will experiment immediately through the first piece of literature that it produced. The manifesto was written with a few things in mind. The idea of explaining a


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FUTURES

to break the mould that is becoming overly formed in whichever practice they might be involved in. Noisulli is slightly different in this sense. Not from a hatred or destain as to what the creative world is producing. But from a love and interest of theories, writings, facts, and fictions around the subject of illusion. It doesn’t intend to create with any other motive other than out of passion and a want to gain and to share

knowledge into this misunderstood subject. Once this exploration has ended the movement will stop the physical act of exploring and publish, the findings, events, writings, and creations that happened over the duration of Noisulli.


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1/ Static Movement. There is no is reason why static image can’t have movement. Kinetic visual experimentation turns the flat surface into a world of unending possibilities. The first proposal following this book takes on the most debated and recognisable trait from an illusion. The idea that an image can have movement whilst remaining a piece of static

FUTURES

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The first proposed events for Noisulli’s future have been directly lifted, each from a different point of the manifesto. This helps to keep them nice and open allowing the artist to research and explore in whichever way they want, knowing that it is tied together through Noisulli’s initial research. Justifying the initial process but making sure the focus is on creating new material. From historical research and theory.


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STATIC MOVEMENT

printed matter. The research surrounding this is now very indepth and is believed to be related, as with most visual illusions, between the relationship of our eyes and mind. As a brief it opens up the artist to subject of illusion in a particularly playful way. Allowing them to instantly have connotations, images, and idea’s flowing through their head by the sheer ambiguity that is represented in the language of it.


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STATIC MOVEMENT

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STATIC MOVEMENT

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81

STATIC MOVEMENT

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STATIC MOVEMENT

c e il tak sea al me br Th n i r e l us n ch to t ef st e p i s a m on la th t cr oti rt- at . ce at an it va po em a d ic te in en st nd fr al r t t, p a ou es t es ai kn rev nda tc h hi ea ms ow io rd om vi nk rc t n us is es ew in h, o Th te ly ed , s g of e ch u o fr an s va ni se r om th d ki ri qu d wi e me ll at es an di ll ap th s io . d ve e pl od et n rs xh ic s s it ib an of y it ts of t he

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n . so n t ea me r t. ve is ge en a m ns Mo m no i ve ur o c o t ti is ic m l nt a n i ta e at ve su io ng ‘S er st ha vi at ce di Th y t c nt rfa en wh n’ ti me su un s’. ca ne ri t of ie Ki pe fla d it ex e rl il th wo ib a ss po


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84

STATIC MOVEMENT

---‘ Th Sta r er ti im eas e c h ag on is Mov Ki ave e w n em ex ne m ca hy o i en t pe ti ov n’ st s t. at su urn ri c eme t ic wo rf s me vis nt n po rl ac th ta ua . ss d e e t l ib of in fla ion Fr il u to t p om it ne a un oin t ie nd de t hi s’ in s o r Th st f . g i is e an cr ni s di it ti t br ng ic al as tat o ie . al fie y em ex f a ld ou en pl tt t o T di r c . re ach to he r ct e As t ed st ge wo at at o hi es iv pe s im at th rk . e nl it pe em er is y wi i ra en vi a an th s ti t s a ll v bu d s lo e o th t t pr om ok th It is ie d th of e ed at i s at es ri i g n is sio ou to r al nal re is ad m y

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85

STATIC MOVEMENT

IE

d he on s be fini e , k t o t as ta ma s n or ng ted Ca f r i , o nd en e. um e Fi res cl di iz e. p rti me s nc a ny d, ma s d e: st ate an e a oun or l i c th f s er ca rt oll e s a m p y ee n c ti b at m h d t e f e th d. Ti e be o in k se c e m r o On ave al er wo op han c h s et f pr t a e d o e er ). b ype b ng hs t ill lo nt w No mo ( ix s

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86

STATIC MOVEMENT

---T EV cu his EN wi ra fi T an ll te rs t a d b d wi lon pu e by ev th gs bl do N en i c o t Th a ide sh um is as e bo a ed en ul h ex a ev te li ok lo wi eld yo po p en d, . ng i sh b k ur se la t a nto es y un now c a tf wi li t t an a de le re nd or ll tt he o yo St an lso rs dg at e m a le s de ne c y a x w i e t pu d t il ti to an , vi pl ou l s t b mo ubj ve th ar l e ty ai r el l c di a at d a e i re c a t, c c i n , n f s m an se a ol ov sp g h t . th ny d t t d ri s id em a at cr es hr th la bu de o q wi es th if en sh su l ea ig ou e y t ac si ue ll o e y t pr ow bj ea ti n gh f fi i g s a t v r e i in ov n c n e n he ade ne ti co e rs t’ d r i t or te id g ol a mi rs on nt ve t s n p n i ig re e pa an g ro e ca a t in t n Br in st th ss d ab ce an rol he ue s Th d i e s n ou s a id al in e io d e f e de mic a i t m n bo nd gi pr or ev re g a os c si s s n ou un br ng ta iv a en su nd t an gn e d r pr lk at we t a t lt . fie ari ki he es s, e ek wi s. ld es ng g en w sh . ll s. b t ap ta or ow Wi l . et he ti ks in th as we t on ho gs en s ps , to , be

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87

as nt d e l ne aym e il g o b w i p in nt of ll at th e i m y w th ry t, e n As wa ok ed ev ve es, d e fil n a bo uc e a a rod ur he ro n t t p o p ea f rom st gs n s rk tio se f rti in o w uc es he a rit e d cc t s w th pro su ng lk d d lo ta ed un the an a e nt m, o e h e ar nd es om t es for u c a ss ll pr t e i hat A e en nc n d t ay. b um ie io ve d. w ill oc ud at ol te n w n d a ip nv gh ru t l n . i ith ic i li il pri ce w art ly gh w i 0 p igh hi s a rv 10 k e h nd o g s t e . a bo win d us av ste n j y s e o a b Th oll em ng e to wa d i m f n t i h nd o rin t ap a P t a gr ts a iso os r n c o

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d an be n ig to y s b de ion d e l t t 速. Al ura le li c omp ul c ois N

----

STATIC MOVEMENT

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----

88

STATIC MOVEMENT

T th he j e do pr ust sh cu in b ow me t e A w nt an le il at th co d ft l io t e ns te d no n th hat st ta xt ow t of n a we e g t t . n as ek co oe ic i to m s u , an a rs o mo ag t n s d h e n v e be oli es in at o du eme of r nt e hi di se st i f br ven nd fy nt al s s the ing i l i oa t t t a a e pr nte dc wi hi he lly tio t u n p om rn as ll s fir ide ot et t Th b a s e io a vi t a e na nd a sc st im th l w an il ag DV as e at ill c l e D. a a o s o t b m f h ac ver he e er t ows t t al e in a he th ime as l ve p tha sl the m e li a im nt la t it an ove vi ne s ag . T ce d me si s ta e h fr nt to ho ti wi e l eq , rs wc c l ue re , as nc ac th in y. ti ei g on r s DO C U ME NT A TI ON

~

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89


90

STATIC MOVEMENT

F co or p nc an yo rop er y t ur os ni ma el o fi i al ng tt N se nd nt , t er th ois p o er to his s e ul le ut es r fo li as a t, el NO ll t e ny o ay IS ow hr co th r U +4 LL in ou nt in 4 I@ g. gh ac g (0 MA t ) IL 79 .C 47 OM 91 88 13

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~

CO NT AC T


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FUTURES

58


2/ Determine your relationship with the human mind and the behavioural effects you have on it why do something that sits comfortably in the brain when you have the ability to cause it discomfort and leave an impression.

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strong is the connection between our eyes and mind and what can be done within the creative field to evoke difficulty for the viewer allowing them to question the detail behind the wiring of our brain, the development of our mind, but also the development of our environment and how they haven’t necessarily grown hand in hand.

FUTURES

68

The second in the line of proposals takes side of the scientific research that sits behind the subject, and has been talked about for years, how


3/ To understand a visual illusion, one must first obtain knowledge of the object and understand the rules of vision. Once this is overcome, perception on optics can be manipulated. Explore your subject and its constraints to their ultimate limits.

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FUTURES

Number three in the line of proposals is the final research proposal. Asking the artists to

think look more into the rules, and constraints that need to be applied visually in order to create an illusion. Requiring the artists too then apply their recently discovered knowledge of the subject and put it into context within their desired medium.


4/ Apply Historical context, do not rely on contemporaries. History brings tradition; where modern techniques can hinder the process.

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idea and how it can in turn add to the concept of an idea. By looking into our history we have the ability to enhance traditional technique with contemporary knowledge.

FUTURES

88

Proposals four to six work more on getting the artists to think about what they are creating as pieces and not so much about the research beforehand. Getting the artists to explore the process in which they finish or even approach an


5/ Reality; What is the nature of truth and how is it measured?

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FUTURES

Proposal five is looking to become more abstract in the run up to the final manifesto point. Inspired by the unimpossible fiction of certain writers and artists that create vast and elaborate worlds that could quite happily fit into reality or fantasy.

6/ Realise the potential of your available space. Use the space you have in a way someone else hasn’t.


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published alongside all aritsts and the works that have built up to this point. Seperate proposals will be published for each of the events that will take place under the curation of Noisulli.

FUTURES

09

Noisulli’s final proposal for a show taken from the initial manifesto simply asks for participants to take into account spacial perception. This brief openly allows for many adaptations, through sound, space, vision and touch. It is through this final proposal that Noisulli’s research on illusion and perception can be concluded and it’s final works will be


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FUTURES

19


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The publications aren’t looking to be pure Noisulli content but will allow Noisulli as a research and development platform, to explore the correlation between content and applied typography layout to act as curator for the content it chooses to publish. The publications a traditional education structure and testing it’s interactivity through unconvential design techniques. Exploring the connotations that are

FUTURES

29

Running parallel to Noisulli’s constant research and production is their tireless efforts in sharing knowledge around the subject of illusion. To hold this Idea as a viable platform Noisulli will publish annual books papers and models from the innovators and academics around the subject.


The first published paper will be released mid 2010 along with Noisulli book. Boarder Locking and the CafĂŠ Wall Illusion (R.L.GREGORY) Published 2010.

IMAGE: Boarder Locking and the CafĂŠ Wall Illusion (R.L.GREGORY) Published 2010.

39

FUTURES

set out within design. And whether or not a subject like illusion has a solid place in the Art & Design world. Now Noisulli is to explore whether these same principles that meet on a canvas or are talked about it through illusion papers can be transferred and applied with a Designers mentality.


Bibliography and further reading can all be found through the online archive.

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www.lottolab.org/ www.scottkim.com/ www.richardgregory.org/ www.bridgetriley.com/ www.dextersinister.org/ www.vasarely.com/ www.dutchuncle.co.uk/ illustrators/du/noma-bar

www.list.co.uk/ article/14587-charlesavery/ www.toferchin.com/ www.stgs.wordpress.com/ http://www.michaelbach. de/ot/ang_cafewall/ index.html

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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http://noisulli.wordpress.com


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BIBLIOGRAPHY

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