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Hand In Hand Community Literacy Plan 2010 - 2011 A collaborative effort of the Regina Literacy Network and Balcarres Communities Literacy Network


Hand in Hand Community Literacy Plan

Table of Contents 1.0 Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................... 3 2.0 Community.......................................................................................................................................... 4 3.0 Community Association.................................................................................................................... 8 4.0 Literacy Needs Assessment .............................................................................................................10 4.1 Existing Literacy Services and Funding Arrangements ....................................................................... 10 4.2 Gap Analysis ....................................................................................................................................................11 4.3 Result of the Needs Assessment .................................................................................................................12

5.0 Plan Overview..................................................................................................................................20

5.1 Objectives and Outcomes .......................................................................................................................... 20 5.2 General Plan of Action .............................................................................................................................. 20 5.3 Meeting Needs ...............................................................................................................................................21 5.4 Deliverables ....................................................................................................................................................21 5.5 Evaluation Plan............................................................................................................................................22

6.0 Budget................................................................................................................................................ 24

Expenditure Items...............................................................................................................................................24 Revenue / Other Sources of Funding.............................................................................................................24

7.0 Sustainability Plan........................................................................................................................... 25

7.1 Ongoing costs.................................................................................................................................................. 25 7.2 Ongoing revenue sources............................................................................................................................ 25 7.3 Needs assessment..........................................................................................................................................25 7.4 Volunteer development.............................................................................................................................. 25

Appendix A: Existing Literacy Services .............................................................................................. 26 Appendix B: Community Demographic Charts............................................................................... 34 Appendix C: Hand in Hand Community Literacy Plan Outcomes Framework..................... 54 Appendix D: Community Literacy Plan Timeline and Action Plan ........................................... 57

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1.0 Executive Summary Over the course of the last thirteen months, the Balcarres Communities Literacy Network (BCLN) and the Regina Family Literacy Network (RFLN) have completed a needs assessment for literacy in our region. As a result of that needs assessment it was determined that because we are both relatively small organizations that serve large communities, partnering on future projects and literacy service provision in our region would be beneficial for both organizations and the community at large. In response to this we have combined our efforts to work with core project partners to develop this Community Literacy Plan. Over the next program year we will work with program partners and service providers to increase learning opportunities in our region for adult learners, parents, children, youth and practitioners. We will decrease the number of literacy programs being delivered in isolation within communities and help to increase the number of networking and partnership opportunities for service providers, parents and practitioners in this region. High populations of Aboriginal and Canadian Newcomers in our region support the need for increased Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills programming in our area. As well, there are issues of low literacy and pre-literacy skill attainment for children and youth in our community that have a lot to do with a lack of parental involvement and support in their lives. We will address these concerns for our communities via family literacy programs focused on the 40 Developmental Assets1, justice literacy and health literacy. As well, developing a family literacy program around the Convention on the Rights of a Child will help parents to understand their legal obligations to provide their children with the supports and environments that children need to succeed. This program will also be used to help children understand their basic human rights. Working in partnership within an inner-city, at risk community in Regina, and the town of Balcarres we will attempt to pilot and deliver family, workplace, justice and health literacy programs via this literacy plan that tackle these highly controversial barriers to literacy attainment for families and increase overall quality of life and determinants of health for our residents.

1

Created by the Search Institute速

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2.0 Community The Hand in Hand Community Literacy Plan will serve a large area of the province combining the service areas of the Regina Literacy Network and the Balcarres Communities Literacy Network. These two agencies are umbrella organizations, which have a strong priority in supporting other organizations in serving our communities, aside from direct community programming. In this project, we will work with urban and rural families, 18 - First Nations Communities, on and off reserve, 2 - Regional Inter-Sectoral Committees, 2 - Health Regions, 2 - Catholic and 4 - Public School Divisions, 3 - Provincial Library Regions, 3 - Tribal Councils Administrations and local businesses and business related organizations. Individuals / Families Regina Stats — Approximately 195,000 individuals / 55,000 families Rural Stats — Approximately 7000 homes/families (off reserve) Regional Maps 2 Regional Inter-sectoral Regions in Saskatchewan

2 Catholic and 4 Public School Divisions

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2 Health Regions

3 Provincial Library Regions

18 First Nation Reserves 3 Tribal Councils/Administrations窶認ile Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council, Touchwood Agency Tribal Council, Yorkton Tribal Administration Tribal Councils File Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council Touchwood Agency Tribal Council Yorkton Tribal Administration Unaffiliated First Nations

Affiliated First Nations 9, 28, 36, 40, 43, 46, 47, 51, 58, 59, 69 14, 19, 24, 39 11, 23, 25, 62, 41, 55 2, 3, 12, 16, 42, 45, 50, 63, 66

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While the Hand in Hand direct programming will not take place in all of the communities mentioned above, all networking sessions, conferences and trainings will be advertised in all of the aforementioned communities. Residents from each of the communities individually highlighted have participated in meetings, networking sessions, trainings and/or special events over the course of the last 13 months while we have been gathering the data used in this community literacy plan. While the BCLN and RLN serve large populations overall – direct program delivery PILOT PROJECTS will take place in two core communities. In Regina, the inner-city community of Al Ritchie will be host to the majority of our direct programming. Balcarres will host the majority of our direct programming in the rural communities. The following data has been collected pertaining to the two core communities for completion of this Community Literacy Plan. Please refer to Appendix B for more information on the Area Demographics. Specific Locations of Pilot Projects We will pilot the Assets Alive! Afterschool Program at Arcola Community School , situated in the heart of the Al Ritchie community, an inner-city area of Regina. Currently they have 360 students registered for the upcoming school year coming from primarily Al Ritchie/Broders Annex, as well as Assiniboia Place and Glen Elm Park subdivisions of the City of Regina. We will also run a rural pilot of this program at Balcarres Community School. We will pilot the Mom’s Time Out and Dad’s Shop Talk Workplace Family Literacy and Essential Skills programs at the Al Ritchie Health Action Centre, located in the Al Ritchie Community and serves primarily the residents of this community, but other Regina residents can participate in their programs as well. We will work with their Baby’s Best Start Mom’s Group and Dad’s Support Group. These programs will also be run in Balcarres at Little Black Bear’s Wakayos Building, located directly across the street from Balcarres Community School. The Mom’s Time Out and Dad’s Shop Talk are designed as 8 – week programs that can be expanded to 16 weeks or run as individual drop in sessions. We will run a weekly family literacy program at the Al Ritchie Family Wellness Centre. We will rotate through a variety of program models such as Every Child Ready to Read, Come Read With Me, Baby Rhyme Time, LAPS, etc. This agency is situated in East Al Ritchie and provides comprehensive family support services for Children ages 0 – 6 and their families primarily located in the somewhat isolated section of the Al Ritchie Community. This area is where the majority of the community’s low income and lone parent families reside. Al Ritchie, Regina Community Demographics2,3 Note the following data is from the most recent Census data. Immigration has seriously increased for Regina and all of Saskatchewan since 2008. This neighbourhood has a large area of low income housing. There are now much higher numbers of EAL and immigrant/refugee families in our community.

2 3

Focusing on People, 2008 Edition, Doug Elliott, QED Information Systems Inc., Publisher of Sask Trends Monitor, www.sasktrends.ca Arcola Community School Learning Improvement Plan

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Al Ritchie Neighbourhood Population  Population – 7505  Age Distribution – under 5 (6.1%), 5 – 14 (10.4%), 15 – 24(16.4%), 25 – 44 (33.2%), 45 – 64 (33.2%), 65 – 74 (6.5%), 75 + (6.3%)  Family Structures – Not living in a family4 (17%), Living Alone (11%), Married with children (23%), Married without children (28%), Common Law with children (3%), Common Law with no children (10%), Lone Parent Families (34%)  Language & Diversity – Mother Tongue is not English5 (12.1%), Bilingual (4.2%), Home Language is not English (5.0%), Aboriginal Identity (11.9%), Member of Visible Minority Group (7.6%), Born Outside of Canada (9.4%) Socio-Economic Indicators  Education Levels – less than grade 12 (17%), grade 12 (33.8%), trade certificate or diploma (11.4%), other certificate or diploma (21.4%), university degree (17%)  Labour Force Participation (Adult Population 15 & Older) – working or looking for work (71%), Employment Rate(66%), Of employed – men (68%), women(65%), youth 15 -24 (60%), women with children at home (67%), adults with children at home (75%).  Employment Indicators – self employed (4.2%), work from home (2.4%), work outside Regina City (18.7%), Drive to work (83.4%), Bicycle or Walk to Work (8.3%), Take Transit to Work (6.7%)  Average Income After Taxes – Individuals ($23,020), Economic Families ($49,145), Households ($40,776)  After Tax Income Below the LICO – Individuals (10.6%), Families (30.5%), Households (16.8%)  Sources of Family Income – Employment (80%), Government Transfers(14%), Other Sources(6%) Balcarres, SK Community Demographics6 Note the following data is from the most recent Census data.7 Balcarres, SK Population  Population – 598  Age Distribution – under 5 (5%), 5 – 14 (13%), 15 – 24(11%), 25 – 44 (22%), 45 – 64 (19%), 65 – 74 (9%), 75 + (19%)  Family Structures – Married Families (63%), Common Law Families (6%), Lone Parent Families (31%)  Language & Diversity – Mother Tongue is not English8 (14%), Bilingual (0%), Aboriginal Identity (31%), Member of Visible Minority Group (8%), Born Outside of Canada (4%) Balcarres, SK Socio-Economic Indicators  Education Levels (Adult Population 15 & Older)– less than grade 12 (44%), grade 12 (10%), trade certificate or diploma (19%), other certificate or diploma (10%), university degree (11%)  Labour Force Participation (Adult Population 15 & Older) – working or looking for work (60%), Employment Rate (57%), Of employed – men (48%), women(52%)  Average Income After Taxes – Individuals ($22,178)  Sources of Family Income – Employment (64.9%), Government Transfers (20.5%), Other Sources(15.1%) Percentage of the population living in private dwellings who are not living in a family situation and not living alone could include a combination of English and another language, that is, not only English 6 Focusing on People, 2008 Edition, Doug Elliott, QED Information Systems Inc., Publisher of Sask Trends Monitor, www.sasktrends.ca 7 http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/search-recherche/frm_res.cfm?Lang=E 8 could include a combination of English and another language, that is, not only English 4 5

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3.0 Community Association In May 2009 the Regina Family Literacy Network (RFLN) and Balcarres Communities Literacy Network (BCLN) formed the Hand in Hand Mentorship Project. This project saw the RFLN mentoring the BCLN through the process of an inclusive strategic visioning and outcomes session. This resulted in the formation of a new Vision, Mission, Values, Goals and Community Engagement Plan for the BCLN. Over the course of the last 13 months, the BCLN and RFLN have worked together to continue this partnership by co-hosting a regional conference, delivering regional networking sessions, forming project subcommittees, hosting focus group sessions and co-facilitating a number of Introduction to Family Literacy Trainings in our region. One of the biggest developments over the course of the last year was the changes that began in June 2010 for the Regina Family Literacy Network. Prior to June 10th, 2010 Regina and Surrounding area had one organization being funded as a Family Literacy Hub (RFLN) and another member organization (Regina Literacy Association ( RLA)) acting as the support organization for the Adult Literacy practitioners and organizations. Although the RLA was not a formally incorporated entity it had membership from most of the adult literacy serving organizations in our region. Because it had no formal funding or staff the work of this organization was primarily being done by the RFLN staff as a volunteer. Even though the RFLN was a very active member of the RLA, it was seen by other organizations and funders in the community as being a primarily family literacy organization and faced limitations because of this. At a series of meetings on June 10th, 2010, the RLA and RFLN formally closed their operations. A new community based organization called the Regina Literacy Network was formed with membership from both of the aforementioned groups and is currently going through the process of provincial incorporation. The new organization will be run by a board of directors consisting of a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 12 members. There are two designated positions on the board for an Adult Learner and a Parent to be represented. The original board of directors for this new regional organization has two rural representatives, one adult learner, one parent rep, a post secondary rep, a public elementary school rep, a separate elementary school rep, a business woman, and a retiree amongst its membership. The organization will be managed by the Executive Director coming from the previous RFLN. Although the Community Literacy Plan will be co-delivered by the Executive Directors of the Regina Literacy Network and the Balcarres Communities Literacy Network the main project contact will be RLN Executive Director and due to the incorporation status of the RLN not being complete the Financial Contact to receive the funds will be the BCLN. The partnering agencies that formed this community literacy plan will have representatives participating on an advisory committee for the Community Literacy Plan. This advisory committee will work with the RLN and BCLN to ensure the deliverables of the Community Literacy Plan are met in a responsible and fiscally sound manner.

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See Organization Chart Below.

RLN Board of Directors

BCLN Board of Directors

RLN Executive Director

BCLN Executive Director

Community Literacy Plan Advisory Committee

Core Members of the Hand in Hand Community Literacy Plan: 1. Regina Literacy Network 2. Balcarres Communities Literacy Network 3. File Hills Employment and Training Center 4. EsTeam Consulting 5. Al Ritchie Health Action Center, RQHR

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4.0 Literacy Needs Assessment Please refer to Appendix A – Existing Literacy Services in our Region for more detailed information collected through Needs Assessment. 4.1 Existing Literacy Services and Funding Arrangements Over 70% of the service providers listed in the Appendix B – Existing Literacy Services document currently participate in regional training, programming or networking with either the RLN, BCLN or both. As well, 4 of the core project partners for this plan have been providing the following literacy services in our region: Regina Literacy Network (services described were delivered by the Regina Family Literacy Network and funded through Regional Family Literacy Hub Funding (Literacy Office), fee for service and/or Raise A Reader. 1. Literacy Outreach Program (Literacy and Parenting Skills, Every Child Ready to Read, I Am Your Child, Baby Rhyme Time, Assets Alive! And Come Read With Me) 2. Regional Adult Literacy Support Group 3. Curriculum and Program Development 4. Regional Practitioner Networking Sessions 5. Practitioner Training 6. Regional Family Literacy Conference 7. Support and assistance to regional literacy practitioners and organizations serving our community. Balcarres Communities Literacy Network (services described were funded through Regional Family Literacy Hub Funding (Literacy Office), Community Initiatives, fee for service and/or Raise A Reader. 1. Every Child Ready to Read, Travelling Trunks – Reading Adventure Program, Family Adventure Camps and Mom’s Time Out (Pilot). 2. Curriculum and Program Development 3. Regional Practitioner Networking Sessions 4. Practitioner Training 5. Regional Family Literacy Conference 6. Support and assistance to regional literacy practitioners and organizations serving our community. File Hills Employment and Training Centre (services described were funded primarily through Advanced Education Employment and Labour). 1. Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills 2. Participation in BCLN Advisory Group. Al Ritchie Health Action Centre, RQHR (services described were primarily funded through RQHR and/or done in partnership with RFLN). 1. Baby’s Best Start - I Am Your Child Video Workshop Series 2. Always Dads Support Group – Literacy and Parenting Skills

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3. Essential Skills EsTeam Consulting (Dr. Sally Cleland) (services provided through fee for service and in-kind work of the business). 1. Member of Regina’s Healthy Communities Healthy Youth – Alliance of Asset Champions. 2. Board Member, Saskatchewan Association of School Councils (SASC) 3. Board Member, Regina Literacy Network (Parent Rep) 4. Member, Dr. Perry School Community Council, Regina Public School Division 5. Safety Liaison with for SASC for the Saskatchewan Safety Strategy 4.2 Gap Analysis There are not enough service providers, programs and funding for literacy service providers in our region to meet the current needs and trends for our region. The following priority areas have been named for this Community Literacy Plan as a result of the Needs Assessment that has been done in our Region. After each priority area we have listed the programs and services that this Community Literacy Plan will attempt to provide to fill the gaps in services provided. Community Literacy Plan Priority Areas: 1. Practitioner Networking a. Regional Family Literacy Conference b. Regional Networking Sessions 2. Professional Development a. Regional Learning Opportunities Partnership 3. Adult Learner Support a. Regional Adult Learner Support Group b. Adult Learner Book Club 4. Early Literacy a. Every Child Ready To Read b. Come Read With Me c. I Am Your Child Video Workshop Series d. Baby Rhyme Time e. Music and Movement 5. Literacy Friendly Environments a. Literacy Audit Project b. Employer Outreach Program c. Saskatchewan Safety Strategy 6. Workplace Family Literacy and Essential Skills a. Mom’s Time Out b. Dad’s Shop Talk c. Digital Portfolio Program 7. Health and Literacy a. Literacy Activity Education and Play (LEAP) b. LEAP into PAINT c. Family Adventure Camp d. Music and Movement 8. Parental Involvement and Literacy and Numeracy Improvement for Youth a. Assets Alive! 11 of 60


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b. Literacy and Parenting Skills (LAPS) c. Travelling Trunks – Reading Adventure Program d. Focus on Families – Families in the School Regional Family Literacy Conference 9. Justice Literacy a. Parenting After Violence b. Keys to Family Literacy For Men c. Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of a Child 10. Cultural Preservation and Storytelling a. Tales From The Tree b. Through Grandma’s Eyes 4.3 Result of the Needs Assessment Our Needs Assessment was completed over a 13 month time frame. Methods of collecting information included:  Research  Focus Groups  Regional Literacy Café  Regional and Local Networking Sessions  Regional Family Literacy Conference  Training Evaluations Research Findings Through the What Really Matters in Family Literacy? Provincial Research Project 9 we have learned that fragmented funding for all literacy service providers in our region has literacy services fragmented as well. There is a strong need for networking and partnerships in our region in order to avoid any overlap in services and attempt to meet the needs of our community. Our region has very high populations of First Nations (on and off reserve) and Canadian Newcomers. Their healthy and successful integration into the community and workforce is critical to the overall success of the families and individuals we serve. Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills programming must increase in these communities. As well, these programs must happen in a family friendly way that allow for the greatest opportunities for equitable access without the barriers of transportation and childcare – especially in our rural communities. Working with the reserves to provide these programs is the best possible way to ensure this happens in our rural constituencies. The need for early literacy programs (family literacy) is even more evident due to the recent work of Understanding the Early Years Projects all over the country. There is new evidence from this study completed in 2009, which has just been released in reports for Regina and South East Saskatchewan that support this research. 9

Funded by Saskatchewan Ministry of Education, Literacy Office.

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10

As you can see from the graph above, there are sensitive periods of brain development, where all of the “hardwiring” for learning, language, hearing and vision, emotional and social skills occur. The majority of development occurs in these critical early years, before Canadian children begin formal schooling, with 90% of brain development occurring by age 6. At age three children brains are twice as active as those of adults. Critical, or sensitive periods of brain development peak between birth and age 5. During these time-limited sensitive periods, our brains are at their most “plastic”, and are primed to learn. As we age, we use higher levels of brain circuits. These higher levels of brain circuits depend on precise, reliable information from lower levels in order to accomplish their function. While sensitive periods for development of lower level circuits ends early in life, high level circuits remain plastic for a longer period.11 How a brain develops hinges on a complex interplay between genes and lived experiences, early experiences have a decisive impact on the architecture of the 10

Doherty, G. (1997). Zero to Six: the Basis for School Readiness. Applied Research Branch R-97-3E Ottawa: Human Resources Development Canada. / McCain & Mustard (1999). Early Years Study. Toronto, Ontario: Publications Ontario. / Shonkoff, Jack (Ed) (2000). From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. 11

Knudsen, 2004

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brain. Because critical periods occur prior to school entry, it is important to ensure that adequate supports are available to babies, young children, parents, and caregivers to ensure that all children have the chance to maximize development during sensitive periods. For children who are vulnerable in one or more of developmental areas, interventions are much more likely to succeed if they are provided in the early years when neural systems are most plastic, and can most easily be affected. With appropriate interventions, trajectories for children with developmental vulnerabilities can be improved; however, later interventions are more difficult and less effective. Areas of development are interdependent. The kind of attachments children have formed with their primary caregivers at one year predict teacher ratings, behaviour problems and quality of relationships with peers in preschool and can predict children’s later school achievement. Emotional development and academic learning are far more closely intertwined in the early years than previously understood. For young children, emotional and behavioral problems serve as kind of a red flag. Without help, research suggests these emotional and behavioral difficulties may stabilize or escalate and negatively affect early school performance. In turn early school performance is predictive of later school outcomes. The parent/child relationship is the most powerful influence on children's early brain development, particularly in the first two years. Parents learn by doing alongside other parents, caregivers and early childhood staff. Participation in early child development programs strengthens parents’ engagement in their own children’s early learning and development. The quality of services is critical. Inexpensive services that do not meet quality standards are a waste of money. The striking shortage of well-trained personnel indicates a need for substantial investment in training, recruiting and retaining a high quality workforce.12 For every $1 invested in early childhood programs, a minimum return of $3 is estimated to be returned to society, making early childhood a very effective time for investments.13 The benefits produced by public spending on young children are not justification for reducing educational resources for older children or adults. A child’s school readiness can not be realized in a dysfunctional school. Adult education, whether aimed at parenting, language or employment skills, is associated with better outcomes for children. In Canadian sample (n=167,000 children), 10% of all children fall into the most “vulnerable” group (those who score below the lowest 10th percentile of the distribution). If children in Regina had the same level of vulnerability as their Canadian peers, we would expect 10% of children to be in the “vulnerable” group. 12 13

Understanding The Early Years – Findings for Regina and Area, 2010 Understanding The Early Years – Findings for Regina and Area, 2010

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However, in all 5 major areas of development, Regina has a significantly higher percentage of children considered “vulnerable”. The areas of Physical Health and Well-Being and Language and Cognitive Skills have the greatest number of vulnerable children (17.0& and 16.6% respectively). Factors that promote Physical health and Well being include lots of indoor and outdoor play areas , both formal and informal; a variety of accessible recreation programs; limiting time spent with TV and video games; food security programs in place that are friendly to families and children; provision of accessible health services such as public health and medical care; children are seen and there are places where people knowledgeable about normal development observe children to identify delays. Factors that promote Social Competence: parent education programs that promote social and emotional development; places for children to play games with their peers; quality childcare, preschools and other learning opportunities; places for parents and children to get together to play and learn. Factors that promote Language and Cognitive Development; talking with children; early literacy initiatives such as story times a priority; reading to children; playing games with numbers as part of every day life; quality early learning programs; accessible health care services such as hearing and vision screening. The Regina Regional Inter-sectoral Committee and Regina & Area Early Childhood Network have formed a group of individuals representing the city of Regina to shape how our community values and supports our children via a Children’s Charter. Developing a Charter will solidify what we believe as a community about the needs and rights of children. We have representation on that committee and have invited this group to launch the Children’s Charter at a gala fundraising event on Saturday, November 20th, 2010 in honour of International Children’s Day. We will be hosting this event to signify the beginning of our Family Literacy Project – Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is our ultimate hope that the program will increase awareness of Children’s Rights as well as Parental Obligations. The recent study titled Domestic Violence and the Experiences Rural Women in East Central Saskatchewan14 explains that Rural women in East Central Saskatchewan experience family violence in significant numbers. Many of the women stayed in abusive situations for years because they had come to accept the abuse as normal. They had been convinced that the abuse was their fault. Lack of knowledge, embarrassment, fear of reprisal and fear of not being believed caused women to remain silent about the abuse. Intergenerational abuse was present in 90% of the cases in this study. Abusers came from households in which their mothers and their siblings were abused. In turn, the abusers' children are witnessing the abuse of their mothers and in many cases are verbally abused themselves. This is particular cause for concern in rural Saskatchewan because there is little counselling for children outside of the limited resources of the school system. A concerted effort must be 14

Funded by the Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence (PWHCE).

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made to find ways to deliver counselling and support to rural children experiencing family violence in order to break this pattern. This study also proved that Women were unaware of the services available to them and their children when they left their abusive relationship. Upon leaving, most of the women saw counsellors and many interacted with the police and lawyers. Women also used the services of the clergy, doctors, safe houses, and social services. None of these services was adequate to meet all their needs. The urban bias of specialized services for family violence, combined with the centralization of more generalized services such as Social Services, Legal Aid, and some aspects of the police service creates a serious issue of accessibility for rural women and their families. As a result rural people must either find the resources to travel for these services or forego them. Women who leave abusive situations are often impoverished and may not be able to afford the time or the money to travel to the larger urban center. Women in rural areas are also disadvantaged by the lack of subsidized daycare, inadequate employment opportunities, and lack of access to affordable housing. There is a critical need for knowledge about domestic violence, for both survivors of abuse and the general public. Information and education is necessary to break the cycle of abuse, to teach children and adults what abuse is and how to deal with conflict in constructive ways. Rural women in abusive situations need information to deal with the complex issues of the impact of domestic violence on them and their children. They also require information on their legal rights and on financial issues. “In our contemporary society, it is unfortunate that many people are unable to fully participate in everyday social life due to limitations caused by not being able to read and write. In Canada today, this represents about 48% of our population, and about 62% of our incarcerated population. When people with limited literacy skills come into contact with the criminal justice system, the added literacy demands of this situation complicates judicial procedure, compromises due process as well as the right to understand, and ultimately, results in a high percentage of prisoners with limited literacy skills. Beyond the ability to read, write, and understand, being fully literate in this day and age enables people to open new doors to the world and to fully participate in our society while living a law abiding life style.” 15 Literacy is one of the major influences of health status. However health is defined or measured, people with limited literacy are worse off than others with higher literacy skills. Literacy is a major factor underlying most other determinants of health.16

15 16

Excerpt from John Howard Society’s Justice Literacy Website – www.justiceliteracy.org Health Canada, 2003

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Health literacy is a new concept that links our level of literacy with our ability to act upon health information and, ultimately, take control of our health. It builds upon the idea that both health and literacy are critical resources for everyday living.17 The Executive Director of the RLN has been asked to work with the Saskatchewan Association of School Council’s Safety Liaison and the Chief Executive Officer of Safe Saskatchewan to ensure that Saskatchewan’s new Safety Strategy will be implemented in plain language improving health and safety of families in our province, regardless of their socio-economic status and/or literacy level. This will become work of the Literacy Outreach Portion of the Community Literacy Plan if funding is secured from SaskSmart. Addressing health literacy means breaking down the barriers to health that low literacy creates and finding ways to enable all people to:     

Access the services and supports they need Understand and use information to promote their health and prevent disease Make informed health decisions about self-care and treatment of illness Advocate for their own health, as well as that of their family and community Gain greater control over their health and well-being.

This area of the province has particularly high incidence of Type 2 Diabetes, Childhood and Adult Obesity and other health related issues. Working with families to improve their health literacy is a clear priority for this region. Focus Groups Adult Learners and Parent participants in our programs have been surveyed and or responded through program evaluations. Their specific needs/requests for our region include but are not limited to:  Equitable access to ESL tutor programs (most programs require permanent residency or enrolment in specific training institutions)  Pronunciation and Conversational English Practice  Parenting Support (Mainstream and Canadian Specific)  Everyday Living Skills Assistance (Shopping Tours, Health Presentations, Banking)  They want to tell their stories and they want to be considered and included in program planning to meet their needs.

17

Beyond Words – The Health-Literacy Connection, Canadian Health Network

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Regional Literacy Café Literacy Service Providers from our region gathered in June 2010 to discuss questions related to literacy service delivery in our region. Results of that Café included the following concerns:  Lack of ESL/EAL programming available to families in our region.  Lack of involvement of parents in the school and early literacy.  Lack of advocacy for learners and children.  Need for Literacy Friendly environments in Government, workplaces, schools and communities.  Lack of Literacy Funding. Regional and Local Networking Sessions Strongest outcome of the networking sessions was simple. Programming is harder to accomplish in a rural setting! Transportation and childcare are huge issues in these communities. Community services are lacking as well. While there often tends to be more community spirit in a small town environment, the services available to the community tend to rest on the shoulders of the schools, health authorities and/or libraries. With limited funds available to provide literacy services – it often results in these rural communities missing out. In Regina, the biggest thing we discovered is that there are not enough service providers to meet the needs of everyone who requires our help. As well, limited skills and budgets make it difficult to publicize our programs in ways that reach some of the people who need our programs the most. Transportation and childcare tend to be an issue in this urban centre as well when we refer to inner-city communities. The number of victims of domestic and family violence as well as overall crime and gang activity are high in some of the rural communities as well as Regina’s innercity communities. More work needs to be done to support justice literacy programming in these areas to ensure lower transiency and drop out rates in this region. Regional Family Literacy Conference Attendees of the Regional Family Literacy Conference thoroughly appreciated the opportunity to network with others from all over the province. We learned that more “Adult Literacy” providers are starting to find Family Literacy is a very effective method of addressing adult learning needs. We also found that regardless of where we came from throughout the province most organizations were battling the same barriers. Training Evaluations We have also determined that there is a need for organizations that provide literacy services to explore new and innovative funding sources and programs.

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Many of the family literacy programs in particular have been used throughout the region for many years. New programs with a focus on Physical Activity for instance like Literacy Education Activity and Play (LEAP) or programs linking literacy and libraries like Every Child Ready to Read, have swept the region over the last 18 months to 2 years. As hubs in our region the RLN and BCLN have also found through training evaluations and networking sessions that service providers were/are looking for family literacy program models to improve mainstream Adult and Workplace Literacy skills. We realize that Parents have a natural incentive to improve their literacy, numeracy and essential skills for the sake of their families and children. As well, family literacy programs tend to use “real life” every day living skills examples to highlight the literacy, numeracy, essential and transferable skills that we need to master – making the learning environment for adults more relevant and therefore more successful. Literacy Service Providers also have very limited funds for the most part for operational needs. This means that it is difficult to staff organizations sufficiently with people who specialize in each of the organization’s needs – i.e.: Communications Staff to do publicity and advertising for the organization. This means there needs to be low or no cost training accessible wherever possible in our region for practitioner training in areas such as management, volunteer management, and media awareness for example in addition to the training needs for program models.

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5.0 Plan Overview 5.1 Objectives and Outcomes 1. Increased number of learning opportunities in our region for adult learners, parents, children, youth and practitioners. 2. Decreased number of literacy programs being delivered in isolation within communities. 3. Increased number of networking and partnership opportunities for service providers, parents and practitioners in this region. 4. Increased Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills programming in our area. 5. Increased Family, Health and Justice Literacy programming in our area. 6. Increased number of certified literacy program facilitators in our region. 7. Increased parental involvement in schools and community. 8. Increased awareness of children’s rights and parent’s responsibilities. 9. Increased number of assets experienced by youth in our communities. 10. Increased literacy and numeracy scores in After School Program Participants. 11. Improved overall quality of life and determinants of health for our residents. 5.2 General Plan of Action Human, Financial and Physical Resources needed:  Staff Time/ Wages/Benefits  Money  Office Supplies/Program Materials  1 Desktop Computer  3 Laptop Computers  3 Mobile Internet Sticks/Contracts  1 Cellular Telephone  Access to 6 computer labs equipped with internet  Community Resources  Volunteers  Snacks  Facilities  Community Partners Key Milestones 1. Assets Alive! Afterschool Program and Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of a Child Curriculum developed 2. Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of a Child Program Model developed 3. New Programs Piloted in Balcarres Community 4. New Programs Piloted in Regina 5. Special Events have taken place Timelines including roles and responsibilities of staff; and, Role of all involved partners.  See Appendix D: Community Literacy Plan Timeline and Action Plan 20 of 60


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5.3 Meeting Needs Please see Appendix C: Hand In Hand Community Literacy Plan Outcomes Framework for more information. 5.4 Deliverables Recruitment & Program Set Up 1. Proposals on behalf of RLN and/or BCLN to: a. Community Initiatives—Summer Grant b. Community Initiatives—Annual Grant c. Raise A Reader d. Canadian Heritage—Human Rights Grant Program e. Women’s Inter-Church Council of Canada f. Literacy Office—Hub Funding 2. 100 print copies of Community Literacy Plan 3. Publicity via—Print/Email/Web Program Delivery 1. 40 Regional Adult Learner Support Group Meetings 2. 2 Adult Learner Workshops 3. Direct Delivery of 137 Literacy Programs (34/BCLN, 25/RLN) totally 364 Sessions and 728 Hours 4. 2—32 week After School Programs (Urban/Rural) 5. 6—10 Literacy Audits 6. 8 Regional Newsletters/E-News Evaluation and Dissemination 1. 4 quarterly reports 2. 4 mid-term reports 3. 10 Final reports 4. 1 Environmental Scan 5. 1 Needs Assessment 6. Revised Community Literacy Plan 7. Program Evaluations 8. Plan Evaluation Special Events 1. Gala Fundraising Event in honour of International Children’s Day 2. 8 Facilitator Trainings 3. 6 Introduction to Family Literacy Trainings 4. 8 Practitioner Workshops 5. 1 Regional Family Literacy Conference 6. 8 Regional Networking Sessions in Regina and Balcarres 7. 8 Advisory Committee Meetings

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5.5 Evaluation Plan How will you determine and measure success (success indicators) at both the program and individual participant level? How will you demonstrate that the objectives have been reached? 1. 2.

3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

8.

9.

10.

Increased number of learning opportunities in our region for adult learners, parents, children, youth and practitioners. a. # of trainings held, # of programs delivered, attendance records Decreased number of literacy programs being delivered in isolation within communities. a. # of programs delivered in partnership in our region, Environmental Scan and Needs Assessment Increased number of networking and partnership opportunities for service providers, parents and practitioners in this region. a. # of special events, trainings and networking sessions hosted in our region. Increased Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills programming in our area. a. # of trainings held, # of programs delivered, attendance records Increased Family, Health and Justice Literacy programming in our area. a. # of trainings held, # of programs delivered, attendance records Increased number of certified literacy program facilitators in our region. a. # of trainings held, # of workshops delivered, attendance records Increased parental involvement in schools and community. a. Asset Inventories taken through Assets Alive! After School Program b. Feedback from participants (verbal and evaluation forms) c. Feedback from School Councils and School Administrators in the Region Increased awareness of children’s rights and parent’s responsibilities. a. # of Program Kits disseminated from Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of a Child b. # of requests for Program Kits c. Participation and Attendance at Gala Fundraiser Event Increased number of assets experienced by youth in our communities. a. Asset Inventories taken through Assets Alive! After School Program b. Feedback from participants (verbal and evaluation forms) c. Feedback from School Councils and School Administrators in the Region Increased literacy and numeracy scores in After School Program Participants. a. Students have grown at least one full year using the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment. b. Junior students can demonstrate an understanding of numbers by having moved forward one descriptor on the Grade 4 Math Value Added Assessments.

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How will you collect and report the evaluation data?

Data Collection & Evaluation Methods/Tools  Research  Environmental Scan  Needs Assessment  Focus Groups  Individual Intake and Assessment Forms/Process  Project monitoring of participants via Essential skills passports and portfolio and resume development  One-to-one counselling/tutor sessions  Individual Session Evaluations  Project Evaluations  Overall Project evaluation  Employer, Board, Advisory Group and community partner meetings Evaluation and Dissemination 1. 4 quarterly reports 2. 4 mid-term reports 3. 10 Final reports 4. 1 Environmental Scan 5. 1 Needs Assessment 6. Revised Community Literacy Plan incorporating best practices and lessons learned 7. Program Evaluations 8. Plan Evaluation 9. Community Literacy Plans and Needs Assessment will be posted to website and distributed to funders and program partners How will you report best practices and lessons learned? 

This will be incorporated into the revised Community Literacy Plan and included in project reports and evaluation.

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6.0 Budget Expenditure Items Expenses for this project include Salaries and benefits, contract fees, honorariums, staff and participant travel expenses, childcare costs, facility rentals, professional development, program materials, office supplies, children’s books, Liability and property insurance, audits, and administrative overhead costs for both the BCLN and RLN. Revenue / Other Sources of Funding The BCLN and RLN receive annual Family Literacy Hub funding. This money will all be directed towards the delivery of this plan. In addition to this we will be applying to Community Initiatives (Annual and Summer Grant Funding), Raise a Reader, the Women’s Inter-Church Council of Canada as well as Federal Human Rights funding.

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7.0 Sustainability Plan 7.1 Ongoing costs As the Community Literacy Plan is a response to needs in our community, what is needed could change from year to year. Many of the priorities of the plan can be maintained through our annual Family Literacy Hub funding. Annual applications to such funding sources as Community Initiatives, Raise A Reader, Women’s InterChurch Council of Canada and other funders will continue to be applied for on an annual basis. Some of this plan’s activities will only be done once – for example the project Demystifying the Convention on the Rights of a Child will only be done once. Once the materials and curriculum have been developed, organizations can purchase the materials and deliver this family literacy program for parents and children on their own using our materials. 7.2 Ongoing revenue sources Our annual Family Literacy Hub funding totalling approximately $65,000 will continue to be used to support the Community Literacy Plan for our region on an annual basis. As the plan changes, the additional funding sources needed each year will change as well. 7.3 Needs assessment We will continue to monitor the needs and trends in our region via evaluations, focus groups and research throughout the life of this project. Each year, a new needs assessment and environmental scan will be done to determine new trends and needs for the area. 7.4 Volunteer development Each program we deliver has volunteer opportunities attached to it. We will continue to seek volunteers from parent groups, community members, staff, practitioners and other literacy service providers. Other volunteer opportunities through this program include but are not limited to board positions, advisory group positions, prep volunteers, childcare providers and English Language and Homework tutors. A full volunteer recruitment, retention and recognition program for both BCLN and RLN will be developed through the course of this year.

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Appendix A: Existing Literacy Services

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Appendix B: Community Demographic Charts

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Appendix C: Hand in Hand Community Literacy Plan Outcomes Framework


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