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å FROM THE FOUNDERS

Family. Friends. Fun. Community.

Time flies when you’re having fun

and even more so when you enjoy what you do! Here at 35801 Magazine no two days are the same, and we never know what tomorrow will bring. The one thing we can guarantee is 35801 is always evolving, changing, growing, and welcoming new residents with open arms. In 2016, we’re going to continue the evolution of 35801 Magazine. We are increasing our content and introducing new features that we are excited to share. Please join us in that effort. Our community is important to so many, and there is so much to see and do, that it’s difficult to squeeze it all in. So let’s get out and see local, shop local, and support local businesses. Many thanks to our advertisers, partners, and friends (new and old) that help make this effort possible. If you haven’t been to CT Garvin or the new UG White Mercantile, Pints and Pixels upstairs, or visited the Kaffeeklatsch lately, you’re missing out on some great local downtown institutions. If you have a story to share, a family or child you would like to nominate, or have a comment about any of our features or articles, please go to our web site and let us know. We will leave no stone unturned. 35801 Magazine will always be just that, 35801 Magazine with more features and profiles about the people, places, events, and the local culture that makes 35801 so special. Come grow with us.

It’s time to break out the flip-flops

, put on some sunscreen and ice down the popsicles. I am sure your children are so thrilled and full of excitement just thinking about their upcoming summer vacation. When you think of summer growing up, what are some of your favorite childhood memories? Did you spend countless hours by the pool, on vacation with your family at the beach, or did you recklessly run through the sprinklers, time after time? Playing in a creek catching tadpoles or running through the woods were my all time favorites, and picnics never got old. Hours spent being lazy in a hammock were always cherished. Those were the days, am I right? Summer has always been, and still is, magical time. The days of counting down the seconds until summer break from school may be over, but the excitement does not have to dwindle. Huntsville has so many awesome summer events to take part in. From attending Friday Night Art Walk to attending a live Concert in the Park, there are so many memories to be made! This summer be sure you check out the fun events highlighted in our Calendar of Events. Whether you decide to visit Lowe Mill 3rd Floor or attend Cirque du Soleil, it will be time well spent. So, this summer, when your kids are begging to have a campout in the backyard or to stay up past their bedtime, think of all the great memories they will take away from the experience. Grab the ingredients for some s’mores and join in the fun! Fire up the grill and make a splash in the pool. Embrace the illusion of time slowing down for a few months so that every day is one for the books! Sometimes, seemingly simple summer traditions can make a long-lasting impression on your family.

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35801 MAGAZINE

.com

VOL 1 • ISSUE 4 • June/July 2016

35801 Magazine.com

is published 6x yearly by The 35Group P.O. Box 7141 • Huntsville, AL 35807 Phone: (256) 534-0244 www.35801magazine.com Publisher/Co-founder Mike Barnes Co-founder/Director of Business Development Lori Hepfner Account Executive Jessica Augustine Layout & Design/Ad Design Denny Cannon Graphics/Ad Design Heather Troupe Contributing Writers Donald Christian, Dianne Burch, Mike Chappell, Harvey Cotten, Joanne Johnson, Beth Thames Contributing Photographers Donald Christian, Mandi Cook, Lori Hepfner, Charlie Scott, Cathy Lamberth, Hans-Edmund Glomme, Lance Cooper Copy Editor Margaret Vann Proofing Tracy Christian, Bob Miller Printed by ColorXPress Madison, Alabama Direct Mailed by MailXPress (256) 774-3600 To have your story or business featured in 35801 Magazine.com, contact our office at (256) 534-0244 ©2016 The 35Group, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction by any means of the whole or in part of this publication without written permission is prohibited. All information and graphic material contained in this publication is obtained through reliable sources, but the publisher cannot be held responsible for any mistakes or misinformation within the contents of this publication, nor will The 35Group be responsible for copyright infringement incurred by advertisers who use other agencies to create their ad(s) for this publication. The 35Group will not be held responsible for any errors contained in advertising or stories approved prior to publication.

The 35Group Media Publication

www.35801magazine.com


Issue 4 • June/July 2016 On the Cover Whistle Stop

Photo: Donald Christian

32 Out & About

See what’s happening in your community

DEPARTMENTS/FEATURES

8 Meet Your Neighbor

The Little Family by Joanne Johnson

12 Busy Bees

Plight of the Honey Bee by Harvey Cotten

37 In the Mood

Huntsville Concert Band by Dianne Burch

41 Natural Healing

OsteoStrong by Dianne Burch

42 Growing Forward

Greene Street Market by Donald Christian

17 Student Standout

44 At the Library

18 In Your Back Yard

46 Neighborhood Chalkboard

Maggie Fleischmann by Mike Chappell

The Birdman of Blossomwood by Harvey Cotten

Huntsville main library June events

Say hello to friends & family

21 Class Reunions

HHS 55 Year Reunion by Diane Burch

22 Calendar of Events Local 35801 events

24 Spotlight on Business

Flint River Armory by Donald Christian

28 Habit Forming

Alisha Daniels, local hero by Donald Christian

30 A Perfect Match

We want to hear from you!

Get published: submit your local event, nominate a friend or neighbor, or submit a standout student... go to 35801magazine.com.

Madison Guy and service dog, “Buck” by Donald Christian www.35801magazine.com

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

L-R: Campbell (with “Tuna”), Alan, Maryanne (with “Maple”), and Madalyn

A Beautiful Balance in Blossomwood

F

by Joanne Johnson | Photos: Mandi Cook

rom the outside, Alan and Maryanne Little’s home is a lovely brick ranch-style house that blends nicely into the neighborhood known as Blossomwood. As the doors open, a dramatic yet subtle design unfolds and welcomes one into beautiful spaces and a backdrop of white paint with strategically selected black accent walls and exposed beams. It creates a wonderful gallery effect that showcases a well curated art collection. Remodeled windows and an expanded kitchen makeover are so inviting one wants to taste whatever might be cooking. Alan explains that he and Maryanne have done much of the design and labor on their own. “We love dreaming together,” he says. He credits her with the vision for design and order by sweetly saying, “She guides those dreams.” His gift for words with depth comes naturally. Alan is known locally as a singer/songwriter. He co-founded Listen Local Huntsville, a venue he created to “showcase the artist that is up there to be heard without the clatter-in-a-bar setting.” Most of their events are hosted at the VBC playhouse. It is a local-talent production patterned after his friend’s popular program, Jim

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Parker’s Songwriters Series. Alan’s likeable personality is an asset for his day job, and is one half of another business partnership with good friend Ben Wilson. They are mortgage lenders who specialize in new home purchases, refinances, renovation loans, and new construction. They are known as The WilsonLittle Team of PrimeLending. Maryanne went to school for Management of Technology and works in her college major for Mercury Systems, an engineering firm where she has spent 13 years in various management roles within Supply Chain/Operations. A fifth generation Californian, Maryanne moved here from Southern California in 1992, encouraged by her aunt and uncle, Walt and Therise Collier, who settled in Mooresville and established a local vineyard and wedding venue, Creekside at Collier’s End. Through their influence she developed her passion for cooking and entertaining. Maryanne and Alan first met in 2000 through mutual friends and after several casual run-ins over the years they had their first real conversation in July 2003 in Downtown Huntsville. He invited her to go for a ride on his Harley that night. They knew within two weeks they wanted to marry and made it official the www.35801magazine.com


This family is sincerely committed to life in “the 01,” their nickname for the area.

next May. Shortly after the wedding, Alan sold the Harley he’d had only three years. He chose to sell it without encouragement. “She never said a word,” Alan says. He traded it for a riding lawn mower, a final payment on her engagement ring, and a down payment on their home. That’s a commitment. They celebrate their 12th anniversary this year and are apparently a good balance for one another. She is more reserved and organized while he is very outgoing and spontaneous. They make their relationship a priority with attention to family time as well as themselves. They love to plan family vacations and use the even years to get away on an adult vacation. Both sides of the ancestral tree are filled with musicians and visual artists, so their talents are inherited and deeply rooted, though not limited to music and art. This family of foodies enjoys cooking, baking, and all things outdoors –camping, hiking, and biking together. They also love their rescue dogs, Tuna and Maple, who likely have some musical talents of their own. Their oldest daughter, Madalyn, age 19, is a transferring sophomore starting at Auburn in August. She is an adventurous, free-spirit. Her future plans began with Art, a fleeting switch to Business and Marketing, and has landed on Interior Design. Likely, she has her mother’s flair for balancing color, texture, and space. She’s an avid reader who enjoys singing and participated in school and church choirs for 10 years. Their youngest daughter, Campbell, has career aspirations that are leaning toward politics (also a family tradition) as she is the granddaughter of retired Circuit Court Judge Buddy Little and artist Maggie Little. Her flair for campaigning is natural as she introduced herself very confidently. She keeps up on current political affairs and has her own strong opinions about the candidates. She plays piano, bakes cookies, and is ‘besties’ with Cruce Carroll, the boy next door. They have been friends since birth. Like Wilson and Tim in Home Improvement, they grew up communicating through the wooden fence. Their dads created a speakeasy opening low to the ground when the children were small. Now they use it as a foothold to scale the fence into the other’s yard. They are “thick as thieves” and spend lots of time together riding bikes and general good-kid stuff. This family is sincerely committed to life in “the 01,” their nickname for the area. Maryanne tells everyone that “Huntsville is the 10-minute town. From downtown, you can be almost www.35801magazine.com

anywhere in the city in about 10 minutes. What I love is its nice, tidy, small social circles but enough bite in it to keep me interested. And geographically, if you need bigger, it’s just a few hours’ drive in any direction.” Alan was born and raised here. His children are 4th generation Huntsvillians. Maryanne has now lived here longer than anywhere else and can’t imagine ever wanting to leave. If Huntsville was a feeling, it would be “A warm hug,” Maryanne says. Alan’s response is “Welcoming. It’s like Mayberry – always seeing people you know.” In this modest home, in a familiar neighborhood, they made a commitment. Here they have grown; first as man and wife, then as a family. They share their lives with friends, family, and their community. When asked where they see themselves 25 years from now, this sums up their joint reply: “Happily together with a few grandkids to spoil.” n

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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35801

MAGAZINE.com Cover Contest

Enter your photograph or illustration to be used on the cover of one of our future magazines! 35801 Magazine Cover Contest Rules 1. How To Enter: The Promotion begins at 12:00:01 a.m. CT on June 1, 2016 and ends at 11:59:59 p.m. CT on September 30, 2016 (“Promotion Period”). To enter, visit 35801magazine.com (“Website”), go to the Cover Contest entry link, and follow the online instructions to submit a digital photo or illustration and complete the entry process. The 35 Group’s computer will be the official time clock for the Promotion. 2. Winner Selection and Criteria: At least one and up to six winning photographs or illustrations, the final number in The 35 Group’s sole discretion will be selected by The 35 Group and based on the criteria below. The decisions are final and binding in all matters related to judging the Promotion. The 35 Group will notify winners by email approximately 30 days after the end of the promotion period shown in Section 1 above. The chances of winning depend on the number of entries received and on the opinions of The 35 Group regarding suitability of photos for the cover and their meeting the following criteria: a. Photo or illustration must be original, unpublished, and not copyrighted. b. Photo or illustration must be of a person, place, or thing pertaining to 35801. c. Photo or illustration should depict the subject in a manner consistent with The 35 Group brand and lifestyle. d. Photo or illustration must fit the specification & dimensions listed at point of entry. Prizes & Retail Value: Winning photo(s) or illustration(s) will be used on a future cover(s) of 35801 Magazine as determined by Sponsor. No retail value. No substitution or transfer of prize by winners is permitted. Winners List: To see the names of the winner(s) visit 35801Magazine.com approximately 60 days after the end of the promotion periods shown in Section 1 above.

Visit 35801magazine.com to enter and for full contest details and rules. 10

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

If you know any woman currently undergoing Chemo, please pass the word to her that there is a cleaning service that provides FREE housEClEanIng - 1 time per month for 4 months while she is in treatment. all she has to do is sign up and have her doctor fax a note confirming the treatment. Cleaning for a Reason will have a participating maid service in her zip code area arrange for the free service. Please pass this information on to bless a woman going through Breast Cancer treatment. This organization serves the entire usa and currently has 547 partners to help these women. It’s our job to pass the word and let them know that there are people out there that care. Be a blessing to someone and pass this information along.

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ĂĽ BUSY BEES

Plight of the Honey Bee

T

by Harvey Cotten

oday, one cannot help but read about the plight of the honey bee in the media. Wherever you look, whether it is gardening magazines or national press outlets, the honey bee has been in the news. For many years we have read reports of declining numbers of bees and what that would mean to our food supply. Honey bees and other pollinators account for the pollination of one-third of the food we eat each and every day. Therefore, the declining number of bees could have a detrimental effect on the food produced, whether by big agriculture or backyard gardeners. Many theories have been put forward for the reasons of this decline, and sadly there is no one answer to this phenomenon. One thing we can conclude is that a multitude of factors that contribute to the decline of bees, including loss of forage habitat, queen failure, parasites, diseases, pesticides, and genetic weakness. By far, pesticide use has garnered the most attention and for good reason. Pesticides, specifically insecticides, are developed to kill insects; bees are insects. Therefore, it is imperative that we as gardeners act responsibly in our use of pesticides as it relates to pollinators in general and bees in particular. I believe that each of us should adopt the use of IPM (Integrated Pest Management) as we try to control pests in our garden. Planting species that are pest and disease resistant and using biological, organic, or cultural controls first before resorting to insecticides are best management practices to follow. Whenever one must resort to insecticide use in the garden, be sure to read and follow label directions meticulously, paying particular attention to time of spraying and spraying when plants are in flower. While we have the responsibility to use pesticides correctly, we also have the ability to promote pollinator health in a positive way by planting forage plants for our bees and butterflies. One major factor in the decline of bee and butterfly populations has been the loss of habitat where these pollinators can forage and sustain themselves. Whether it is urban/suburban sprawl www.35801magazine.com

or increased agricultural use, bees and butterflies have lost tremendous amounts of land that can provide nourishment. Planting nectar sources in our gardens is a simple and easy thing for each of us to do that will have an immediate impact on pollinator health. Nectar plants come in all shapes and sizes from trees, shrubs, annuals, and perennials with the most important trait being having something in bloom throughout the whole year. We as gardeners desire to have a beautiful garden throughout the year anyway, so having plants that serve the dual purpose of providing color and beauty for us while providing nectar for our pollinators is a win-win situation. Pay particular attention to using native plants in your landscape. These are plants that have provided nectar sources for years. You should then augment your plant palette with other nectar producing plants to ensure all your pollinators have plenty to feed upon. Many books list the best pollinator attracting plants, or use your local Cooperative Extension office to provide a list of pollinator friendly plants for your landscape. One excellent resource is the Pollinator Partnership at www.pollinator.org that provides extensive plant lists for many different areas of the country. This emphasis on pollinator health has reached a national crescendo, especially with the White House joining the fight. Last year they launched the National Task Force on Pollinator Health emphasizing improving habitats for honey bees and monarch butterflies. An offshoot of this program is the launch of the Million Garden Pollinator Challenge (www.millionpollinatorgardens.org) where the desire is to plant and register one million gardens, regardless of size, across the country that will support pollinator health. Whether it is a garden in a container, window box, or hanging basket to a large park or meadow, pollinator gardens need to be an integral part of our landscapes. I encourage everyone in 35801 to join the challenge. Plant a garden, register your site, and watch these incredible creatures flourish in your beautiful landscape. n

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å STUDENT STANDOUT

Maggie Fleischmann is Always On Her Toes by Mike Chappell | Photos: Charlie Scott

At a glance NAME Maggie Fleischmann AGE 10 GRADE 4 SCHOOL Blossomwood Elementary PARENTS Kevin & Margaret SIBLINGS Kyle & Sara PETS Sophie, Bonnie & Clyde, Ella Ray

Maggie and Rachel Butler, director of Huntsville Ballet School

www.35801magazine.com

M

aggie Fleischmann is one busy young lady. She dances with Huntsville Ballet Company where she has danced for six years, competes with the Blossomwood Chess Club, swims for the Blossomwood Barracudas, sings in the church choir, and is in the GATE program for gifted students at school. Did I mention that she is only ten years old? Maggie’s nanny, Emily Gangl, describes her as “the Energizer Bunny” because she is always on the go and always ready for the next adventure. Maggie and I sat down recently at a local coffee shop, and it was here that I learned about this energetic little girl. A current fourth grader at Blossomwood Elementary School, Maggie balances her life between academics and extra curricular activities. When asked what her favorites are, she is quick to tell me that she enjoys ballet and swimming (free style is her favorite stroke). Then she matter of factly states that her favorite subjects are math and writing. In fact, this soon-to-be fifth grader may very well be onto a story. “I started writing this story a while ago,” she says with those eyes that only a writer can express. She “sees” her story unfolding. “I call it THE LOST ORBS” because it’s about an orb in space who is with other orbs. One contains fire, one ice, one water, one wind, another light, and the last contains animals. Together they will combine forces to stop evil.” Not only is Maggie conjuring up images of galactic heroes, she is also taking on the role here on Earth. Maggie recently completed a research assignment in which she was to “choose a real world problem and learn why it is.” She chose to learn more about cancer. We talked about how she not only learned about the disease, but also decided to do something about it. With a friend, Maggie walked the neighborhood and collected money for St. Jude Children’s Hospital. We talked about how doing for others makes us feel good about ourselves. Maggie is curious, intelligent, spunky, witty, and energetic. I enjoyed meeting her, and I hope to hear more about her in the future. Who knows, one day I might be reading one of her books to my grandchildren. I look forward to that day in the future. I know that the future is bright with children like Maggie Fleischmann who want to make the world a better place. n

We want to hear about your unique friends, neighbors, family members, and students. Go to our web site. 35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å IN YOUR BACK YARD

meet Herb Lewis

The Birdman of Blossomwood part two

Herb and Terry Lewis

Blossomwood is still welcoming new neighbors...

Now, Ones with Feathers

I

by Harvey Cotten

n the last issue of 35801, we were all introduced to The Birdman of Blossomwood – Herb Lewis. I hope that after reading this introductory article it spurred you on to do several things – first to have a greater appreciation of what is possible in your own backyard space and second to visit Herb’s web site www.creativebirding.com to see the wealth of information and fantastic photographs of all the amazing creatures that have visited this special place in the heart of Blossomwood. In fact, it is the remarkable success that Herb has had in attracting so many species of birds to his backyard oasis that has fueled his passion to keep improving and adapting his garden to see what new visitors he can entice to stop by for a visit. Since Herb received his Certified Backyard Habitat notification, he has documented more than 100 different species of birds in his garden. He has counted more than 55 species of birds at his natural water feature alone – including many species of birds he has never seen, and Herb has been interested in birds since he was 10 years old. He has fully come to believe that water is the true attraction, and that has been proven over and over again as he has seen numerous migratory birds like Vireos, Tanagers, and Warblers visiting his garden. These birds are not here for the food. They feed on insects, not seed, so they visit

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35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

to drink, bathe, and even sun themselves while migrating from the tropics to Canada and vice versa. While the fall migration will yield more results as far as number of species, it is the spring migration that is so exciting to witness. Spring is mating season so the plumage of the different male birds is on full display. What a show it can provide for those who are lucky enough to see this up close and personal. Herb has placed his water feature right under his sunroom giving him an unobstructed view of all of these beautiful birds that come and visit for a short while. Herb takes pictures of many of these birds and then consults the guide books for correct identification. Some of his most exciting finds include the Yellowbreasted Chat, the Red-eyed Vireo, the American Redstart, the Tennessee and Hooded Warbler, and the Indigo Bunting. While each day may bring new discoveries in his small backyard oasis, one thing that Herb had missed seeing in his garden is the Eastern Bluebird. This is not uncommon since Bluebirds like open spaces, and Herb’s garden is a small space in the middle of a developed neighborhood. But this desire to see and attract this beautiful bird led Herb and Terry to an interesting scenario – the www.35801magazine.com


opportunity to purchase an open lot right behind their house in order to expand the garden. As we are seeing throughout Blossomwood, a turnover of home ownership is occurring. In the house directly behind Herb and Terry lived one of the members of von Braun’s rocket team. As the house changed hands and the new owners went to remodel, they determined that razing the house and starting over would be a better option moving forward. When the Lewises saw the empty lot after the house was removed, the wheels starting turning and the idea of an expanded garden took shape. They contacted the owner and in a manner of hours negotiated a sale, and in one fell swoop they quadrupled the size of their backyard garden. All of this happened in April of last year. Since that time it has been an interesting and challenging project for an engineer to undertake. To begin, Herb had the lot cleared and brought in additional soil and mulch so that he could get started on the garden areas. Right after the last load of mulch was spread, Huntsville experienced a five-inch rain event and needless to say, all of the additions were washed down the street. The idea of planting a garden went away, and the need for improving the drainage and handling the water became paramount. This is where Herb’s background as an engineer paid great dividends. He has taken a very logical, systematic approach to developing this property, prioritizing the most immediate needs and getting the fundamentals done first and correctly. A dry creek bed has been installed down the east side of the garden and more than 150 feet of French drains have been buried throughout the site to facilitate the drainage. This has taken quite a bit of time but has proven to be necessary since there have been four “flooding” events since last summer. The one thing Herb did do before the flooding began was locate and install the water feature for this new garden – a large bubbling rock. As you would imagine there is a direct site line from his sunroom so that he can observe and photograph all of his new visitors. Now what is left to do is install the gardens themselves. After seven months of planning, engineering, site preparation and improving the drainage, it is finally time to install the plants. Herb has more than 100 plants already selected and on site in his “backyard nursery” ready to be placed in the appropriate places. Like all gardens this is a work in progress and will always be tweaked and improved. That is just what gardeners do. Herb is every bit a gardener even if he is just doing it for the birds. Although the “Outback Garden” (the name affectionately given to this new acquisition since every time Terry would ask where he was going, he would respond – Outback) is not close to being finished, Herb and Terry have noticed some newcomers checking out the neighborhood. After installing two Eastern Bluebird boxes along the perimeter, the happy couple has spotted two different pairs of Bluebirds looking over the new digs, just like so many others (both human and animal) in Blossomwood. It appears that adding the “Outback Garden” has already paid dividends by enticing those ever elusive Bluebirds to hopefully take up residence in our lovely 35801 just as the members of the von Braun team did so many years ago. n www.35801magazine.com

The monumental challenge of flooding

Dry creek bed installation

Bubbling rock

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å CLASS REUNIONS

55

HHS 55th Class Reunion

I

Years in the Making by Dianne Burch/dianneburch.com | Photos: Lori Hepfner

t’s often said that good friends are like stars. You don’t always see them, but you know they are always there. This old saying might sum up the feelings shared by the regular attendees at the monthly gatherings of Huntsville High School Class of 1961 who have planned a formal 55th reunion for May 28th. At the beginning of their senior year, Marshall Space Flight Center was being officially dedicated by President Eisenhower. As these graduates prepared to don their cap and gowns, President Kennedy was announcing his plans for the moon. Many of our now major thoroughfares were still dirt roads and young men were being drafted for the Vietnam War. Like most graduating classes, the individuals would journey on diverse paths. Friendships continued and evolved along with their lives. Rubye and Bob Jones’ friendship turned to romance in their senior year and they’ve spent the past 54 years as husband and wife. Two went on to become judges; Madison County Circuit www.35801magazine.com

Court Judge, Joe Battle (uncle to Mayor Tommy Battle) and Lynwood Smith, Senior District Judge of the U. S. District Court. Phillip and Betty (Miller) Bentley would set up The Dr. Frank Crim Compassion Fund for Children with Cancer to honor their life-long friends and classmates, Dr. Frank and Joyce (King) Crim. Hall Bryant continued the family tradition of the H.C. Blake company while George Bennett chose to beautify the landscapes of his hometown. Others slipped quietly away to lead lives in distant places, some left this earth far too soon, and some remained to blend quietly into the mainstream of the community. No matter their paths, the bonds that began in school periodically tug at them all to return and reconnect with familiar faces from their days of youth. A common theme of shared memories seems to stir the deepest feelings; a feeling of acceptance. Those who had come from other districts or other states shared stories of being welcomed. Betty (Massey) Kemp, trumpeter in the band, said she’d been painfully shy and spoke of the popular girl who greeted her with a warm smile every day. “Her smile pulled me through! A few years ago, I finally told her, ‘You were my angel’. She never knew and I am glad I got to tell her.” Joan (Marcus) May moved from Pennsylvania and recalls, “What open arms these people had!” Cecil Morgan says it was just a simpler time, “Nobody had money. We’d hang out at Shoney’s or Jerry’s Drive-in ‘til they made us leave. When the gas ran out, you went home. There wasn’t much to do but spend time together.” As they spend the evening reuniting, perhaps there will be many stars above, but the shine will be brightest in the eyes of old friends. n

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å CALENDAR OF EVENTS

35801

MAGAZINE.com June/July 2016 Down Home: Contemporary Southern Masters Through June 11 Huntsville Museum of Art The Huntsville Museum of Art is sharing treasures from its permanent collection in a new exhibition, open through June 11. The exhibit features a selection of more than 20 prints, photographs, and sculptures created with the enduring traditions of this region in mind. For more information, visit www. hsvmuseum.org or call 256-535-4350.

Huntsville Photographic Society: 2016 Members’ Showcase Through August 21 Huntsville Museum of Art This exhibition is an annual juried selection of 50 outstanding photographs by members of the Huntsville Photographic Society. HPS was founded in 1964 to promote the art and science of photography in Huntsville and the surrounding areas through informative programs, member contests, and special events. For more information, visit www.hsvmuseum.org or call 256-535-4350.

Whimsical and Woolly Wood Through Sept. 10, 10am - 5pm Burritt on the Mountain The Whimsical Woods are back with more whimsy than ever! By popular demand, Burritt on the Mountain has brought our first original, educational, summer game back and added a colorful twist. Once again, the Historic Park features stories from 19th century children’s literature. For a lively touch we’ve added yarn bombing, a popular world-wide craze where unexpected items are covered in decorative yarn. Go to www.burrittonthemountain.com for more information.

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35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

Acoustic Squared Every Thursday in June, 5 - 8 pm Downtown Square Two acoustic artists on opposite sides of the Square will provide the soundtrack to your summer as you enjoy the weather, historic buildings, restaurants, and shopping Downtown.

Concerts in the Park Every Monday, June 6 - August 8, 6:30pm Big Spring Park Arts Huntsville and the City of Huntsville’s Department of Parks and Recreation present the 2016 Concerts in the Park season. The Concerts, which will be held for ten weeks every Monday evening, begin June 6 and conclude August 8. The series showcases a mix of musical genres from rock and roll, pop and top 40 to swing, country, bluegrass, Celtic, and jazz. The Concerts take place in downtown Huntsville on the Huntsville Museum of Art outdoor stage in Big Spring International Park from 6:30 - 8:00 p.m. The series is free to the public. Concertgoers should bring their own seating and leashed pets are welcome. Go to www.artshuntsville.org for more information.

BRIC Summer Bash Wednesday, June 8, 11am - 1pm The BRIC - 3360 L & N Drive The BRIC Summer Bash is for teens ages 13-18 (or going into grades 7-12). Enjoy water activities such as water balloons, water guns, food trucks, and overall fun in the sun! Go to www.thebric.info for more information.

Friday Night Art Walk 2nd Friday in June, July & August, 5 - 8pm Downtown Square Enjoy more than 40 artists with a huge variety of creative wares, live music, and a local nonprofit tent. Artists interested in participating can email info@downtownhuntsville.org www.35801magazine.com


Summer Movies in the Park

Hamacon 7

Friday, June 10 & Friday, July 8 at sunset Big Spring Park Join us under the stars at Historic Huntsville Foundation’s Summer Movies in the Park. HHF will be offering three family-friendly movies on the Big Screen in Big Spring Park East at sundown on the second Friday of June, July and August. Local food vendors will provide delicious treats and fun activities will be available for kids of all ages!

Friday, June 17 - Sunday, June 19 Von Braun Center South Hall Cost: $45 for 3 day pass HAMACON 7 is the Rocket City’s anime convention. Join us for 3 days of family-friendly entertainment. Our convention features voice over and industry guests, contests, gaming and cosplay as well as a vendors room and artist alley. For information about registration and events check out www.hama-con.com.

Grotto Lights Saturday, June 11, 6 - 9 pm Big Spring Park East Come enjoy Thomas Wynn & The Believers and Walker Lukens Music. Food trucks will be there, feel free to bring a picnic, chairs, blanket, drinks, etc. Grotto Lights falls during open entertainment district hours. All bands have played South by Southwest or Bonnaroo.

Family Fun Festival & Expo Saturday, June 11, 10am - 5pm Von Braun Center South Hall The event offers free admission to the community. The event is designed to entertain all ages from toddlers to preteens to adults. Upon entering the Festival you will find a variety of free activities, interactive games, crafting classes, inflatables, a carousel, face painting, door prizes and giveaways, a tumbling track, a performing arts stage with dancing and drumline performances, a musical petting zoo and a garden area. Go to www.familyfunfesthsv.com for more information.

Ty Gracey Singer/Songwriter Saturday, June 11, 7 - 9 pm The BRIC - 3360 L & N Drive Admission is FREE for all teens in grades 7-12. Ty is a recent graduate of Huntsville High School.

Dining With Friends Saturday, June 11, 7 - 10pm Huntsville Depot, Museum, & Roundhouse Thrive Alabama is hosting Disco Dining with Friends Event. Party-goers will put on their bell bottoms and boogie shoes. Cost to attend is $50, and tickets can be purchased at www.diningwithfriends.org. It will feature decadent desserts, savory appetizers, live music from DiscOasis, and a silent auction. www.35801magazine.com

Downtown Street Food Gathering 3rd Friday of every month through October, 5 - 9pm Downtown Square These FREE Street Food Gatherings take place the 3rd Friday of every month until October. Check with us on Facebook for details, www.facebook.com/downtownhsv/ Theatre Huntsville presents

Rumors by Neil Simon

Friday, July 15 - Saturday, July 23 Von Braun Center Playhouse At a large, tastefully appointed Sneden’s Landing townhouse, the Deputy Mayor of New York has just shot himself. Though only a flesh wound, four couples are about to experience a severe attack of farce. Gathering for their tenth wedding anniversary, the host lies bleeding in the other room and his wife is nowhere in sight. As the confusions and miscommunications mount, the evening spins off into classic farcical hilarity. Go to www.yourseatiswaiting.org for more information and showtimes.

Cirque du Soleil - Ovo Wednesday, July 27 - Sunday, July 31 Von Braun Center Cirque du Soleil returns to Huntsville with OVO, its newest touring show in arenas. The production will be presented at the Von Braun Center from July 27 to July 31 for 7 performances only, as part of a global tour in arenas around North America. Go to www.vonbrauncenter.com for more information and show times.

Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to share with us and our readers? Go to 35801magazine.com and let us know about it. 35801magazine.com comes out bi-monthly on each even numbered month. 35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS

Another Huntsville

Success Story

Flint River Armory by Donald Christian | Photos: Donald Christian

I

L-R: Tony Fabiszak, John Heikkinen, Charley Groves

f you happen to stop by a nondescript duplex at 706 Rison Avenue, in the heart of the old Mill District, (the owners of Flint River Armory hope you will) you might be surprised by what you find. I sat down with three of the owners, Charley Groves, John Heikkinen, and Tony Fabiszak, to learn more about the latest in a long line of Huntsville high-tech success stories. If you have lived in Huntsville long, you must have heard the now legendary stories of how companies like Intergraph, once known as M & S Computing,

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35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

began in a garage, bringing the founders both fame and fortune twenty-five years later. No matter how many times we hear how important Redstone Arsenal and the vast network of research and development projects out there are, it helps to get the story straight from the horse’s mouth. It was with Huntsville’s rich history of technological creativity in mind that I approached the story of Flint River Armory. The three owners previously mentioned and Mike Lemley share backgrounds working for government contractors on www.35801magazine.com


L-R: Tony Fabiszak being helped by Charley Groves

various projects at Redstone Arsenal, and like many before them time they found their way to Bryant Bank, which embraced their had a dream of designing, manufacturing, and taking to market a dream from the outset. With a few key investors, they have now superior product. Charley shared how their first real discussions worked their way through the expected regulatory obstacles. came to pass over a round of beers, complete with sketches on bar They admit today that the goal they set four years ago to napkins. But unlike so many Huntsville design, develop, and manufacture a success stories that led to the design of home defense weapon in .45 ACP caliber, computers, software, or missile guidance based on new and superior technology, systems, theirs came from a shared interest was much more time-consuming and and desire to design and manufacture expensive than they ever imagined. (essentially from scratch) a home defense Through all the ups and downs firearm for a more discriminating, quality and all the time and money invested and design-conscious consumer. This in their venture, the product is now shared desire led to the development polished, refined, and ready for market. of the CSA45 firearm. As a long time They are beginning to see their dreams outdoorsman, I can say that the CSA45 come true as pre-orders for the CSA45 has the feel, fit, and finish of a precisionfirearm in .45 ACP caliber are exceeding made, high-quality product. I predict Flint present production capacity. Charley River Armory is a company that we will and the guys tell me they hope to ramp be hearing more about in the months and up production to about 100 units per years to come. month to meet expected demand and Charley, John, and Tony shared have plans to offer their Huntsville, stories about the many lessons they Alabama, designed CSA45 in .45 ACP learned during the four long years they caliber at select local retailers in the spent designing, making prototypes, near future. trouble shooting, redesigning, and now The guys at Flint River Armory manufacturing, what they describe as a hope folks will drop by to see them at home defense weapon built on a familiartheir “corporate offices” in that Mill L-R: Dennis Denson, Tony Fabiszak, Charley Groves looking, but technologically advanced District duplex on Rison Avenue so that platform. Although there were all the expected stories of how they can tell you all about their pride and joy, their plans for in the beginning banks, governmental agencies, and commercial exciting new products, finishes, and accessories. They’ll put you landlords wouldn’t give them the time of day, they also shared on their pre-order list, and if you ask nicely, I bet Charley (a encouraging anecdotes of how they managed to develop retired Naval Aviator) will even tell you a few war stories. If you important relationships with vendors, suppliers, and other want to know more about Flint River Armory check out the web businesses along the way. As they say, perseverance pays off. In site at http://flintriverarmory.com. n www.35801magazine.com

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www.35801magazine.com


å HABIT FORMING

Following an Old Adage:

It is More Blessed to Give Than to Receive by Donald Christian|Photo: Donald Christian

Alisha Daniels “When I first volunteered with Habitat, I was between jobs and did manual labor with the construction crew.”

W

hen I met Alisha Daniels in the conference room at the administrative offices of Habitat for Humanity of Madison County (HFHMC), I was shocked. How could this young woman, wife, and mother of small children manage to work as a Habitat volunteer for 12 years? “When I first volunteered with Habitat, I was between jobs and did manual labor with the construction crew,” Alisha recalls. Over the years, the nature of her service has evolved, but her deep desire to help others has remained constant. Alisha presently serves as president of the board of directors for HFHMC, having experienced nearly every aspect of the process including laborer, part of the group responsible for interviewing and selecting families, and a member of the board of directors assisting with fundraising projects, approving homeowners, and land acquisition. “The most fulfilling part of my service as a volunteer has been watching as a family moves

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from the application process through construction, and finally to a dedication ceremony that is often the first experience of home ownership for the family,” she says. As stated in the HFHMC literature, “Habitat for Humanity of Madison County is an ecumenical, grassroots, Christian housing ministry that seeks to eliminate poverty housing from our community and make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action.” Clearly, Alisha and the hundreds of Habitat volunteers follow the old adage “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” Alisha is quick to point out that, “Volunteering is often the best gift to give another.” As the mother of young children herself, she takes great satisfaction in seeing families thriving in their new homes and their children being provided with a safe, healthy place to live. If you are interested in volunteering, making a donation, or learning more about Habitat for Humanity of Madison County, please check out the web site, call, or stop by the office. n

Habitat for Humanity of Madison County 400 Pratt Ave. NW Huntsville, AL 35801 (256) 533-2282 www.habitatmadisonco.org

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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www.35801magazine.com

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å A PERFECT MATCH

A Local Family’s Story:

How a Service Dog Changed Their Lives by Donald Christian | Photos: Donald Christian

L-R: Peyton, Madison, “Buck”, Terri, and Kevin

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M

ost of us understand how important family pets are to our quality of life, but the Guy family of Huntsville has a unique appreciation for the support and service their dog Buck provides to Madison. Kevin and Terri Guy spent countless hours traveling around the country, visiting clinics, hospitals, and physicians, hoping and praying that someone would provide a diagnosis, or an explanation, as to why their precious daughter Madison suffered from unpredictable seizures that are a constant threat to her health and safety. As we all know, teens can be cruel and Madison had a difficult time during her early school years, often finding it tough to make friends and identify with her peers. During Madison’s 9th grade year, just when the family thought there was no hope, a group known as Service Dogs Alabama crossed their paths and offered them Buck, a LabradorPoodle mix, at zero cost to the family. Buck was specially trained at a Tallahassee, FL prison by women serving time as part of a special rehabilitation program. Since Buck joined the Guy family, Madison has flourished at school, her quality of life has improved dramatically, and her parents, Kevin and Terri Guy, worry less and enjoy life more. The Guys know that Buck is always by her side to alert them if, and when, Madison has a seizure. During our time together, Kevin and Terri smiled with joy as they recalled stories of how Buck runs to their room to wake them in the middle of the night when Madison suffers a seizure in her sleep. There is a sense of relief knowing that Buck provides reliable warnings to those around her when Madison begins to have a seizure, allowing others to provide help and assistance to minimize the risk of injury or harm. Buck is always by Madison’s side. In the hallways at Huntsville High School he has become a familiar and welcome sight (as well as a favorite of some administrators). Buck will proudly walk across the stage with Madison on her graduation night. Words cannot adequately express just how much Buck, a true working service dog, has improved Madison’s quality of life. Service Dogs Alabama has acquired a farm near Montgomery, AL and works closely with a women’s prison in Tallahassee, FL to train service dogs (usually rescued Labrador, or Labrador-mix, rescue puppies) for placement with disabled individuals in need across the state. The truly amazing part of the story is the perfect symbiosis and how all the pieces fit together. Dogs that are otherwise abandoned at shelters are saved and will develop strong bonds with the individuals they are placed to serve. The female prisoners at the Tallahassee prison, many of whom had lost all hope of a normal, productive role in society, now have a renewed sense of purpose in life and statistics show they do not return to a life of crime upon release. Several of the former female prisoners responsible for training service dogs at the prison now work closely with Service Dogs Alabama at their farm near Montgomery. And of course, disabled Alabamians like www.35801magazine.com

Madison Guy and their families who receive a service dog from Service Dogs Alabama (at no cost) find the safety and quality of their lives enriched beyond words. This truly is a Win-Win for everyone involved. Service Dogs Alabama has delivered dozens of working service dogs to families and individuals across the state. These dogs make it possible for individuals with a wide range of disabilities (including seizures, diabetes, and post-traumatic stress disorder) to live more safely and enrich their quality of life in ways that most of us, as every day pet lovers, cannot fully appreciate. Many of you have seen the heartfelt video Madison’s father, Kevin Guy, recorded expressing the family’s thanks for Service Dogs Alabama and asking people to give generously to the wonderful group. As you might imagine, the demand for Service Dogs Alabama exceeds the supply, and anyone who wants to contribute to this wonderful group that makes such a huge contribution to the lives of disabled Alabamians should check out the web site at www.servicedogsalabama.com for more information. I know Madison Guy and her family thank you and if you were at the Von

“Buck” Braun Civic Center on the evening of May 27th for Huntsville High School graduation ceremonies and noticed Buck walking across the stage with Madison Guy, we hope this story helps you understand the important role service dogs play in the lives of disabled persons in Alabama. n Scan the QR code or use the web link to view a video of Kevin Guy speaking about Madison and how service dog Buck has changed her life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Gqu2vzPblI&app=desktop

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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Pints & Pixels

Whistle Stop

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April 9, 2016 | Photos: Donald Christian

April 29, 30 & May 1, 2016 | Photos: Donald Christian

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

www.35801magazine.com


Good Day Kid’s Fest

Hockey for Free

www.35801magazine.com

May 7, 2016 | Photos: Lori Hepfner

Benton H. Wilcoxon Municipal Ice Complex May 14, 2016 | Photos: Lori Hepfner

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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Panoply

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May 6 & 7, 2016 | Photos: Lori Hepfner

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

www.35801magazine.com


www.35801magazine.com

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å IN THE MOOD

Celebrating L J SOUNDS of History with the

by Dianne Burch/dianneburch.com | Photos: Cathy Lamberth, Hans-Edmund Glomme, Lance Cooper

T

Above: Huntsville’s In the Mood Big Swing Band. Photo: Lance Cooper. Inset: Huntsville Concert Band. Photo: Cathy Lamberth

here is nothing that says “Americana” more vividly than a traditional family gathering to celebrate our nation’s independence on the Fourth of July! The best way to capture that air of nostalgia happens in the heart of downtown Huntsville at Big Spring Park with the July 4th celebration at Concerts in the Park, presented by Arts Huntsville and Parks and Recreation. Load up the car, the kids, even the dog. Pack the picnic basket with your favorite foods, your checkered tablecloth, and don’t forget some comfortable lawn chairs. Then settle in and get ready to be transported to the days of simple living accompanied by sensational sounds. The evening will start off at 6:30pm with invigorating music courtesy of the Huntsville Concert Band. Count on hearing many Independence Day favorites such as Stars and Stripes Forever and other familiar marches and tunes. Be ready to join voices with the crowd in a sing-along patriotic medley. This nonprofit, community band is well-known across North Alabama and has been the accompaniment to many festive events throughout their 53-year history. Expect spontaneous dancing to break out after a brief set change as the stage comes alive with Huntsville’s In the Mood Big Swing Band. Feet will be moving when the notes start ringing out with the ever-stylish sounds of this band’s signature song, In the Mood. The city’s newest and highly popular, high-caliber jazz and swing orchestra will fill the night with the big-band sounds of Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, and Ella Fitzgerald. The air in the park will burst with the excitement and the explosion of beautiful sounds. In the music of the night, you’ll www.35801magazine.com

hear the laughter of families and the serene rippling of the Big Spring. It’s appropriate to celebrate our country’s history with the timeless music these impressive groups will perform. Community bands have been a time-honored tradition throughout U.S. history, and tradition forms the long-standing membership of both bands. Each group has multi-generational family members; some members even enjoy playing in both groups whenever schedules allow. Combine one of Huntsville’s oldest musical traditions with one of the newest, and it is sure to be a family outing to remember. q Final Notes q Arts Huntsville has lined up some great food vendors for those who prefer to completely relax. Look forward to I Love Bacon, Bad News BBQ, Rollin’ Lobstah, Piper & Leaf, Maggie Moo’s, Honeypie Bakery, and more. Visit www.ArtsHuntsville.org for full details and all event policies. Leashed pets are welcomed and general parking policies apply. Find interesting facts about Huntsville Concert Band and Huntsville’s In the Mood; visit their web sites: www.HuntsvilleBand.org and www.HsvInTheMood.org. n

Huntsville Concert Band. Photo: Hans-Edmund Glomme

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å NATURAL HEALING

Impacting Bones and Impacting Lives by Dianne Burch/dianneburch.com | Photos: Mandi Cook

Seated: Donna Livingston, client. Standing: Ashlee Dew, OsteoStrong Center manager.

I

t is hard to imagine that doing something for less than 10 minutes, one time per week could make any significant difference with anything, especially quality of life. However, clients of OsteoStrong in Huntsville are anxious to share their stories. They are firm believers in the results they have experienced first-hand. Donna Livingston is convinced enough to drive three hours each way once a week for a ten-minute session. Yes, three hours!

Eight years ago, at age 52, she was diagnosed with osteoporosis and was told she had ‘severe risk for fractures.’ It changed her life dramatically; and after maintaining a strict protocol of medications, proper exercise, and a high quality diet, her case continued to decline rather than improve. Due to extreme side effects from medication and lack of progress, she decided to look for alternative therapies. She first learned about OsteoStrong through people in online support groups and decided to check it out. Donna began as a skeptic, unable to take the two flights of stairs on her first visit. She conquered them easily by her third session. Others have their own impressive stories to share and not just for osteoporosis; for pain relief, better balance, even healthy, young athletes report improved strength training. Owner Josh Fandrich says, “Anyone suffering from degenerative disc, joint pain, classifications of fibromyalgia, type 2 diabetes, kyphosis, even MS, or loss of functional strength and balance due to neurological muscular diseases should consider OsteoStrong as an alternative to their health care needs.” The brochure states it best. “OsteoStrong is a true paradigm shift in the way people can achieve stronger bones, increase strength and improve balance at just about any age. It is not a gym, diet, pharmaceutical or health supplement. The program uses a very specialized, technician-monitored system designed to trigger an individual’s own natural adaptive responses to grow new, healthy tissue without soreness and without the sweat associated with working out in a gym.” Center Manager, Ashlee Dew began her experience with OsteoStrong as a client. She has a background in Sports Medicine and first came to OsteoStrong for pain relief from a chronic back issue. Ashlee was so impressed with the system, her results, and the results of others, she invested in the company and became co-owner of the Huntsville office. This location opened four years ago and was the first in Alabama. A second has since opened in Fairhope, and there are plans for a Madison location in the near future. When asked, “Who is this for?” Ashlee answers with a very sincere smile and says genuinely: “Anyone who wants to improve the quality of their life! That’s what we do here and that’s why I love it!” n

OsteoStrong 1015 Airport Rd., Suite 201 • Huntsville, AL 35802 (256) 489-0084 • www.OsteoStrong.me www.35801magazine.com

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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å GROWING FORWARD

Greene Street Market

Bringing Community Back to Downtown Huntsville

T

by Donald Christian|Photos: Donald Christian

he Greene Street Market at Nativity might well be the impetus that sparked an era of exciting growth in downtown Huntsville. The Reverend Elenor Lucius Anderson, III (known to most as Andy or Father Andy) served at the Cathedral of St. Philip that founded Peachtree Road Farmer’s Market in Atlanta before his appointment as Rector of the Church of the Nativity Episcopal in Huntsville. It was the Peachtree Road Farmer’s Market that formed his vision and served as the model for what Huntsville has come to know and love as Greene Street Market at Nativity. For any who aren’t familiar with the Church of the Nativity, it’s a beautiful and recently restored, National Register of Historic Places, 19th century Gothic, Episcopal church on the corner of Greene and Eustis streets in the heart of downtown Huntsville. The church has been in the same location since 1843, is part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, and welcomes anyone seeking a faith family. Now in its sixth year and run entirely by volunteers, many of whom are parishioners at Nativity, the Greene Street Market at Nativity has grown from 8 vendors the first year, to 75 vendors today. This year the market has expanded to include local artists, artisans, and prepared food vendors on Eustis Street. I sat down with Marilyn Evans, the manager of the Greene Street Market, on the benches beneath the shade of the dogwood trees on the grounds of the Church of Nativity, to learn more about the market, its history, goals, and positive economic impact on our community. Marilyn shared that Greene Street Market’s primary goal is to improve the quality of life for people

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35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

in our community by providing a market place for locally grown produce and food. She pointed out that the market’s tremendous growth and success couldn’t have happened without the cooperation of Mayor Tommy Battle and the City of Huntsville. Although its success might have come as a surprise to some it seems to have tapped into the national local food movement and is carefully managed by a local board that oversees the growing number of vendors and revenue. Each year the Greene Street Market contributes almost all of its substantial revenue to the Church of Nativity Episcopal and First Presbyterian Church, both of which distribute those funds to community outreach programs that help disadvantaged children and adults here in our community. Marilyn couldn’t stop talking about how the market serves as an incubator for fledgling small business owners, the sense of community it creates, the hard working volunteers who give so generously of their time and talents, how the market participates in co-ordination with the North Alabama Food Bank to help recipients of the Alabama Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (S.N.A.P.) purchase fresh produce at half price, and how revenue www.35801magazine.com


Although offerings change with the season, you can expect to find fresh, locally-farmed chicken and eggs, grass-fed beef, local onions, greens, potatoes, squash, tomatoes, strawberries, peaches, blackberries, and a wide assortment of fresh breads, cheeses, relishes, and preserves. You will see a diverse crowd, young and old from across the community, and live performances by local musicians. Thursday nights downtown this summer are a great time to get out and enjoy the Greene Street Market, Maypril Music on the Square, or any of the other exciting events offered in Downtown Huntsville. So load up the children, your dog and leash, and head downtown to enjoy one of the many community events offered while the weather is nice and the days are long. Don’t forget to bring a market bag, plan to arrive early if you want the best selection of produce, and stay awhile to enjoy an evening meal before heading over to see more live music on the square, or filling your growler with a locally made craft beer. n You can find more information about Greene Street Market, The Church of the Nativity Episcopal, and downtown Huntsville summer events online at: www.greenestreetmarket.com • www.nativity.dioala.org www.downtownhuntsville.org

generated by the market is distributed by the Church of the Nativity and First Presbyterian Church to fund a wide variety of community outreach programs. The Greene Street Market kicks off the summer season annually on the first Thursday in May and closes out its season on the last Thursday in October. Summer hours are Thursdays from 4-8pm through August; 4-7pm during September; 3-6pm throughout the month of October. The Market Store (also manned by an entirely volunteer staff) is located at 208 Eustis, and is open M-F 10am-2pm, Th 4pm-8pm, and on Sunday mornings 9:30am-12 noon.

www.35801magazine.com

35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

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June 2016

CHECK OUT MORE EVENTS (256) 532-5980 • http://hmcpl.org

å AT THE LIBRARY

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35801MAGAZINE.COM • June/July 2016

www.35801magazine.com


å STORY/ADVERTISER INDEX STORIES/OTHER

A Perfect Match: Madison Guy and her Service Dog.................. 30,31 At the Library: June 2016 events...................................................... 44 Busy Bees: Plight of the Honey Bee................................................. 13 Calendar of Events...................................................................... 22,23 Class Reunions: HHS 55 Year Reunion........................................... 21 Growing Forward: Greene Street Market.................................... 42,43 Habit Forming: Alisha Daniels, Habitat for Humanity Volunteer........ 28 In the Mood: Huntsville Concert Band .............................................. 37 In Your Back Yard: The Birdman of Blossomwood...................... 18,19 Meet Your Neighbor: The Little Family............................................ 8,9 Natural Healing: OsteoStrong........................................................... 41 Neighborhood Chalkboard.............................................................. 46 Out & About................................................................................. 32-34 Spotlight on Business: Flint River Armory.................................. 24,25 Student Standout: Maggie Fleishmann............................................ 17

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AFS ............................................................................................................... 36 Ayers Farm Farmers Market........................................................................... 35 Bruegger’s Bagels.......................................................................................... 45 Church Street Wine Shoppe........................................................................... 29 Cleaning for a Reason.................................................................................... 10 C.T. Garvin...................................................................................................... 27 Cymatic Therapy & Dermacycling.................................................................. 20 D1 Sports Training.......................................................................................... 40 Emma’s Tea Room......................................................................................... 39 European Boutique......................................................................................... 20 HAPPI Urgent Care........................................................................................ 38 Hartlex Antique Gallery................................................................................... 16 Health Source of Huntsville............................................................................ 35 Invisible Fence of Huntsville........................................................................... 35 Iron Tribe........................................................................................................ 12 J Whitener Boutique....................................................................................... 12 Jerry Damson Honda...................................................................................... 39 Joe East Heating & Cooling............................................................................ 29 Lee Company................................................................................................... 5 Lowe Mill.................................................................................................... 14,15 Mei Wei............................................................................................................11 Mercedes Benz................................................................................................. 4 Meridian Street Cafe....................................................................................... 45 Old Town Beer Exchange............................................................................... 16 Permanent Makeup Huntsville........................................................................ 39 Ray Pearman Lincoln..................................................................................... 20 Rhodes Consrtruction............................................................Inside Front Cover Small Cakes................................................................................................... 45 Taziki’s............................................................................................................ 10 Tennessee Valley Fence................................................................................. 29 Townhouse Galleries........................................................................................ 3 UG White..........................................................................................Back Cover University Kia......................................................................... Inside Back Cover Valley Equipment Rental................................................................................ 12 Van Valkenburgh & Wilkinson......................................................................... 26

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Minimum $25 order before discount. Coupon required for discount. One coupon per person, per visit. Not valid with any other offer. Prices do not include sales tax. Valid at participating locations. Expires 7/31/16.

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Neighborhood Chalkboard , Happy Birthday Anais ay and Happy Father’s D e Alan! You guys make lif really easy! Maryanne

Happy 60th to our good friend CT from all your poker buddies!!

‘76 HHS High School ful i Reunion is June t u a nny, ur be e o 18th! Go Big Red! J o r T ghte u a d d gran Happy birthday to u! o y e v ma d Jackie from Bob n a we lo & Gr a p d Gran r fo Congrats to Rory making the freshman Big Birthday Shout Out to basketball team! Jeff, Steve, Jimmy, Love, Grandma and Tim UG Happy Parents Day. H your folks on July 24!! Congrats to Melissa & Steven on your Happy 2 6t beautiful new baby! Alyson! L h birthday ove, mo Love, Mom & Mike m. Happy birthday Leigh! You get better every year! John, Angela, & Kelly

thday r i B y ove, Happ L ! r e nd Alexa er V. h t o dm Gran

Use the Neighborhood Chalkboard to share your personal messages. E-mail info@the35group.com for instructions to post your message in the next issue. Some restrictions apply. Subject to space availability.

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35801 Magazine.com Issue 4 June/July 2016  

35801 Magazine.com Issue 4 June/July 2016  

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