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West Michigan’s Entertainment Guide for 25 years

Music / Movies / Art / Beer / Beards

Âť May 2013

Always Free!

Romeo and Juliet The Moth Mainstage The Dillinger Escape Plan

The

Food Issue

Featuring Recipes, Trends and More


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What’s Inside

May 2013 | Volume 25, Issue 5

45

The Food Issue

SCENE:

13 Random Notes 16 Q&A with Tami VandenBerg 18 Beer 20 Free Market 22 All Ages 23 Eclectic

SOUNDS: 25 26 28 30

Sink’s Spins On Tour: The Dillinger Escape Plan On Tour: The People’s Temple On Tour: New Found Glory

SIGHTS: 33 34 36 38 39 40 42

Visual Arts: Kalamazoo Art Hop Dance: Romeo and Juliet Comedy: Erik Griffin Indie Film Movie Previews Lit Life: The Moth Mainstage Style Notes

The Food issue: 46 48 50 52 56 58 59 60 61

Gluten Free Food Incubators Q&A with Kristen Kish Make This! Farmers Markets Eat Like a Minion The Next Best Thing Cooking Classes Food After Midnight

DINING:

63 Restaurant Listings 64 Taste This: Two Beards Deli

64

Two Beards deli

56

Farmers markets

SCHEDULE:

71 Daily Event Listings and Best Bets


Letter from the Editor

E

W est M ichig a n ’ s E nterta inment G uide

v e ry t i m e o u r Fo o d I s s u e c o m e s aro u n d, I realize how pathetic I am when it comes to what I eat. I mean, I could eat pancakes and waffles for eternity if I didn’t have people to intervene every three weeks.

Here’s the problem, though (aside from my breakfast food addiction): I have no excuse. It’s so easy to eat incredible, diverse food in West Michigan. And many times, dining locally fits into my budget. In fact, each year we put out our Food Issue, I always find new chefs, restaurants and dishes that make me say, ‘This is in little ol’ West Michigan?’ Plus, it’s always really cool to see passionate people on our humble side of the state whose goal is to give their customers the best. For example, just look at the people in the food service industry that are retooling their menus for gluten-free diners. Going gluten-free is now easier for those with celiac disease, gluten intolerances or people who want the health benefits. It’s also tastier too, with higher-quality products reaching the market. Locally sourced food is another passion we have here – especially with the Downtown Market opening this month. With Monsanto all over the news, it’s nice to know we have a group of people dedicated to supporting local agriculture and downright good food.

Editorial Publisher Brian Edwards / brian@revuewm.com Managing Editor Lindsay Patton-Carson / lindsay@revuewm.com Design Creative Director Kim Kibby / kim@revuewm.com Design Kim Kibby, Kristi Kortman, Kellie Zaplitny Contributing Writers Kyle Austin Allison Parker Missy Black Emma Kat Richardson Jayson Bussa Matt Simpson Siegel Ben Darcie Jane Simons Steven de Polo John Sinkevics Alexandra Fluegel Josh Spanninga Audria Larsen Anya Zentmeyer Nick Manes Contributing photographers Katy Batdorff, Joe Boomgaard, Steven de Polo, Richard Deming, Stephanie Harding Listings schedule@revuewm.com

So for this month, it’s my goal to put down the syrup and put my taste buds to work. Eat on,

Find us online! Website: revuewm.com Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm

Lindsay Patton-Carson, Managing Editor / lindsay@revuewm.com

Revue is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. 65 Monroe Center, Ste. 5, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182

Advertising index 8th St. Grille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 ACLU of West Michigan. . . . . . . 31 Amway Hotel Corporation . . . . . 51 Barfly Ventures / GRBC. . . . . . . 43 Barfly Ventures / Stella’s. . . . . . 21 Bell’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 70 Billy’s Lounge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 BOB’s Brewery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Brewery Vivant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Buttermilk Jamboree. . . . . . . . . 28 Cascade Optical . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Celebration Cinema. . . . . . . . . . 39 Circle Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Delta Plex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Dog Story Theater . . . . . . . . . . . 23

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Doorganics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Dowagiac Dogwood Fine. . . . . . 78 Downtown Battle Creek. . . . . . . 75 Dr. Grins // Gilmore. . . . . . . . . . 36 Elite Health Plc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Erb Thai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 FedCom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Festival of the Arts. . . . . . . . . . . 17 Firekeepers Casino . . . . . . . . . . 11 Founders Brewery . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Fulton St. Farmers Market. . . . . 60 The Gilmore Collection. . . . . . . . 62 GR Ballet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 GR Downtown Alliance. . . . . . . . 31 GR Public Library. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Revue Minions Lauren Longo Carly Plank Kari Norton Audrey Sochor Diana Nowak Sales / 616.608.6170 / sales@revuewm.com Molly Rizor / molly@revuewm.com

GR Public Museum . . . . . . . . . . 17 Grand Woods Lounge. . . . . . . . . 79 Growco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 The Intersection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Kzoo State Theatre. . . . . . . . . . . 70 Millennium Restaurant Group / Martell’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Millennium Restaurant Group / Wine Loft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 The Orbit Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Palazzolo’s Gelato . . . . . . . . . . . 44 The Pyramid Scheme. . . . . . . . . . 5 Reserve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 REVUE Meet Your Scene. . . . . . . 47 River City Improv. . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Saugatuck Brewing Company. . 19 Saugatuck Center for the Arts. . 32 Schmohz Brewery. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Schuler Books. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Score. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Seven Steps Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Sight Optical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort. . 3 Vitale’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Well House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 West Michigan Symphony. . . . . 31 West Side Beer / Budweiser. . 8, 80 Wharton Center For The Arts. . . 35

©2013, Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part granted only by written permission of the publisher in accordance with our legal statement, fools.

On the cover: Mathew Green, executive chef of Reserve, shot by Katy Batdorff.

»

See The Food Issue on page 45


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Random Notes

She & Him’s Volume 3 debuts May 7.

Local Music ///

Nashville folk duo Channing and Quinn on an eclectic night of performances with something for everyone, children included. Tickets are $20 or $17 for CMC members … On May 31, REVUE will be down in Kalamazoo live at the Old Dog Tavern for a show dubbed “Meet Your Scene.” We’ll be featuring Flashing Blue Lights, which calls both Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo home, in addition to music producer, creator and all-around talented dude Gordon van Gent and his band. Other area acts will hit the stage in the beer garden. Show kicks off at 7:30 p.m. and $5 gets you in.

On Tour ///

On May 11, Michael McDermott touches down in Spring Lake at Seven Steps Up Event & Banquet Center (116 S. Jackson St.), offering an inventive blend of honest

lyrics, driving roots rock and country influences in an intimate setting. Tickets start at $18 for the 8 p.m. show.

National CD Releases ///

Before attaining commercial success with the Dixie Chicks, Grammy winner Natalie Maines was a rocker at heart. She returns to those roots on her May 7 solo debut Mother, which also features songs written by rock virtuosos including Ben Harper, Eddie Vedder and Roger Waters ... Ashley Monroe has been busy lately. After releasing a solo album in March, her country-pop band Pistol Annies, which includes Miranda Lambert and Angaleena Presley, has its sophomore album, Annie Up, due out on May 7 ... She & Him, the adorable songwriting collaboration between quirky girl Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward, continues with Volume 3 on

May 7 ... Unlikely rap-collaboration-turnedindie-rock success Vampire Weekend will release its third album, Modern Vampires of the City, on May 7 ... Other noteworthy releases include 30 Seconds to Mars (May 21), Daft Punk (May 21), John Fogerty (May 28) and The Stranglers (May 28).

Beer ///

Grand Rapids Brewing Company nabbed four medals during the World Beer Competition hosted by tastings.com this past Feburary. The brewery’s biggest winner was the Rosalynn Bliss Blonde, which took the gold medal in the fruit beer category. Judges enjoyed the frothy mango and peach flavors with the almond biscotti, green tea and strawberry finish. Other winners include Continued on page 14 8

REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

Scene Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

Ann Arbor’s Saturday Looks Good to Me, frequent visitors to our west side of the state, releases its album One Kiss Ends it All on May 21. The album continues in the vein of glossy, undulating guitar pop the group is known for ... If you haven’t yet absorbed the soulful fusion of R&B, blues and classic rock offered by Blue Molly, take advantage of a free show 8-11 p.m. on May 18 at One Trick Pony (136 E. Fulton). Lead singer Molly Bouwsma Schultz is capable of a wide range of musical styles, showcasing powerful and smoky vocals backed by seasoned musicians … Jack of all trades musician Brian Vander Ark, with his wife Lux Land, will be part of a special show at Wealthy Street Theatre (1130 Wealthy St. SE) on May 31 at 8 p.m. They will be accompanied by members of The Verve Pipe and

Gordon van Gent will be playing at REVUE’s “Meet Your Scene” event May 31 at Old Dog Tavern in Kalamazoo.

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Random Notes silver-medalists Fishladder IPA and Senator Lyon Stout, and the bronze-earning John Ball Brown … If you’re a lady craft beer lover, Saugatuck Brewing Company’s “Celebration of Women and Craft Beer” might be just the event for you. On May 5 from 2-5 p.m., professional women brewers bottle up their brews for purchase and donate all proceeds to Sylvia’s House. The free event will also have information on homebrewing and cooking with “beergredients,” as well as tastings … Shortly following the announcement to distribute to Texas, Founders Brewing Co. (235 Grandville Ave. SW) has announced plans to flood the Sunshine State with year-round brews and select seasonal beers, including Dirty Bastard, Centennial IPA and Breakfast Stout, both on draft and in bottles. Brown Distributing will market the label across Florida so young craft beer enthusiasts and retirees alike can be introduced to brews Michigan has been enjoying since 1997 … BarFly Ventures broke ground on its new endeavor last month, a new neighborhood hangout called HopCat - East Lansing. Don’t worry, HopCat - Grand Rapids, we’ll still love you even though your new counterpart has 100 craft beers on tap (the largest draft selection in the state) and an extensive food menu. The new tavern opens late this summer; try to contain your excitement until then. The unusual groundbreaking included planting Michigan-sourced hop bines in hop barrels so they grow safely throughout construction and reflect BarFly’s sustainable business philosophy.

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

FESTIVALS ///

Artist applications for the 2013 Festival of the Arts are available until May 4. Artists of all ages compete for dozens of cash prizes, ranging from $100-$500. This year the festival’s Regional Arts Exhibition will be held at the Urban Institute of Contemporary Arts, which marks the first time the UICA will host the event in its 44-year history. The exhibit opens May 31 and run through Aug. 18. Regional Art Awards will be presented June 8 at 7 p.m. All festival events are free to the public. The competition is open to all artists living in Ottawa, Muskegon, Kent, Ionia, Allegan, Barry, Montcalm and Newaygo counties. Artists are allowed three entries, with entry fees ranging from $25-$50. For more information or to get an application, visit festivalgr.org … On May 10 and 11, get ready to laugh at the 5th Annual Kalamazoo Improv Festival. The event takes place at Farmers Alley Theatre (221 Farmers Alley) and festivities kick off

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One Minute for One Million for Grand Rapids will pay tribute to the million people who identify as LGBT May 3 at noon in Rosa Parks Circle. PHOTO: SETH THOMPSON with a Happy Hour show on Friday. The laughs continue through Saturday night and include a comedy jam where everyone is welcome to watch or participate, live music by Fishlips and improv workshops. Tickets to individual shows are $10, workshops are $15 and a festival pass is $25.

COMMUNITY ///

One Minute for One Million for Grand Rapids pays tribute to the million people who identify as LGBT in West Michigan by forming human art in Rosa Parks Circle. The event takes place on May 3 at noon

while the air raid siren goes off for approximately one minute. Volunteers will gather hundreds of participants in red shirts into the shape of a heart and an equal sign, or the Until Love is Equal logo. Until Love is Equal was created in 2011 in response to the Holland City Council’s refusal to consider an anti-discrimination ordinance that would prevent members of the LGBT community from being fired or evicted based on their sexual orientation. Currently, this discrimination is legal.

DANCE ///

Trip the Light: Mythical, performed by Dance in the Annex, combines the grace and power of dance with the energy of live, local bands. The event takes place May 11 at Wealthy Theatre. The event is inspired in part by Artistic Director Amy Wilson’s fascination with mythological goddesses, and centers around six dance solos choreographed by the dancers and performed to local band Paucity. Other bands include The Fauxgrass Quartet, Hugo Claudin and Friends, and Frank Booth.

ART ///

Trip the Light: Mythical, May 11 at Wealthy Theatre. Photo: SETH THOMPSON

After not painting for two years, Mic Carlson will host an open house show at his gallery in the Waters Building (161 Ottawa N.W., Suite 100) on May 9 from 4-7 p.m. to showcase his new reverse glass paintings. For the past several years, Carlson dedicated his life to creating bronze sculptures and memorials for Grand Rapids and recently revealed a

seven-foot bronze statue of Madonna of the Streets as the centerpiece for the Rosary Garden (659 Bridge St.). Carlson has also been working on the Michigan Fallen Memorial, which will be four bronze sculptures and a wall of more than 250 names of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11. Out of all his work, his largest project just may be the construction of Saint Francis Sculpture Garden for Prayer and Meditation at Marywood Academy (2025 E. Fulton St.). Over the past six years, he has put in three bronze sculptures of Saint Francis, 12 prayer and reflection benches, and pathways through the five acres of woods. This spring, two or three more statues will be added to the garden. n

Random Notes is compiled by Revue staff and minions including Jayson Bussa, Lauren Longo, Kari Norton, Lindsay Patton-Carson, Carly Plank and Audrey Sochor. For more music, art and entertainment news, including breaking concert announcements and giveaways, “Like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/ revuewm) or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/ revuewm.

Important Dates Ad Reservation Deadline: May 17 Editorial Deadline: May 5 Delivery: May 28


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/// Q&A

Top of the Pyramid

Questions for Tami VandenBerg, co-owner of The Pyramid Scheme and The Meanwhile

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

Y

ou recently celebrated The Pyramid Scheme’s two-year anniversary with Dead Prez, which performed in the past. Why did you choose this act for your anniversary?

Dead Prez is one that we went out on a limb to bring in because they’re pretty controversial. We’ve had enormous success with hip hop, but we had to have another conversation when we opened because a lot of insurance companies will try to jack up their rates when you do hip hop. So I just said, ‘Well, if they try to charge us more, I’ll fight it.’ It sounds like discrimination to me.

You brought them in anyway. What was the response? We didn’t know how they would do. They sold 419 out of 420 tickets, and I couldn’t even believe it. I was hoping for 200.

What was the difficult part of growing the business? Our first year, we had a lot of shows that lost a lot of money.

“I think we provide that necessary sortof underground niche that every city should have. It’s a little bastion of creativity … I don’t think there’s a venue in this town that caters to artists of all kinds.”

You’ve put on a lot of really successful hip hop shows over the past two years. What do you think it is about hip hop that sells? I think relationships are huge. Part of it is I’m new to the hip hop world … I love the rawness and authenticity to it. It’s just a genre that lends itself to our size venue because we’re

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doing a lot of underground acts that don’t necessarily fill The Intersection, but have very broad appeal. You can bring in people who love hip hop and people who love activism (to our shows).

Surprising ones? We lost a lot of money on our T-Rex Fest.

Do you think you’ll do another festival, but tweak it based on your learning experiences from T-Rex Fest? Good question. I love festivals so much, but we are not going to do one this year. We have not completely ruled out doing a festival in the future, but we need to do some major changes.

You mentioned a lot of shows lost money within the first year. Was there a lot of dependence on bar sales during that time?

Yes, and that’s why we opened the front bar. We designed the business that way because Jeff (Tami’s brother and fellow co-owner) had done a lot of booking and I’ve done a fair amount, and it’s hard to make money on shows … so to have that cushion of the front bar — that was probably our best move.

It seems like you and Jeff knew what your venue wanted to be in the beginning. We did know what we wanted to be, but I think we’ve evolved into something a little different than what we originally thought. We said we wouldn’t do DJs, but now we have the Bottom 40 guys, and they throw the best party ever. We’ve also done a lot more different genres. We originally thought we were going to be indie, maybe a little metal, but now we’re doing folk … The same people aren’t going to come to a show multiple times a week, so we have to broaden.

Now that The Pyramid Scheme hit its stride, what have the past few months been like for you? Fortunately, the business has gotten to the point where I can pay people to do everything I was doing … There are certainly some things I do myself, but the vast majority of the work, we pay people to do.

What do you think The Pyramid Scheme adds to the downtown Grand Rapids scene? I think we provide that necessary sort-of underground niche that every city should have. It’s a little bastion of creativity … it’s offering a lot of exposure to a lot of the artists in this city and I don’t think there’s a venue in this town that caters to artists of all kinds. n Interview conducted, condensed and edited by Lindsay PattonCarson. Photo: Joe Boomgaard.


Scene Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

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/// Beer

by Ben Darcie | ben@revuewm.com

Photo: Ben Darcie

Brewery Spotlight:

Founders Brewing Company

F

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

o u n d e rs’ g rowth an d c u r r e n t s u c c e s s began in 2007 on Grand Rapids’ Monroe Avenue in Grand Rapids, nearly 10 years after Dave Engbers and Mike Stevens opened the brewery in the Brassworks Building. “The momentum behind the brand had already picked up,” Stevens said. “We knew we needed a facility that we could produce a lot more product out of.” Engbers and Stevens began scouting Grand Rapids for a new location for their growing brand. After searching, they settled on an abandoned Truck Depot on the corner of Grandville

and Cherry, a location that included surrounding land, perfect for future expansion. “Our number one priority in moving here was to keep that feel, that culture, that soul that we had developed in the Brassworks space,” Stevens said. Founders claimed its new home in late 2007 with the intention to grow, but at the time, Engbers and Stevens didn’t know by how much. “We did our soft opening, and we didn’t open to investors or to VIPs,” Engbers said. “We opened to our mug club members. We thought it was important to open our doors first to those who had been supporting us for years. It took seven minutes to fill the taproom.”

Beer News Oddside Ales in Grand Haven recently announced that it is entering the beer distribution market with bottles. The World Expo of Beer, Michigan’s largest international beer sampling event, happens May 17-18 in Frankenmuth. More than 99 of Michigan’s finest microbrews, ciders, meads and brats are featured at Michigan Beer & Brat Festival in Thompsonville on May 25.

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The taproom features a long wood bar and large open windows that allow light to flow into the room, while large bay windows allow you to watch the brewers at work on the old 35 bbl brewhouse or peek into the old cellar space. West Michigan is very familiar with the taproom’s standard line: pale ale, Centennial IPA, porter, and Red’s Rye, but even this lineup has changed with the company. Red’s Rye and All Day IPA are now seasonal bottle releases to preserve freshness, and it was also announced that Rubeaus will return late summer for the first time since 2008. The brewery also introduced the Backstage Series, a

special bottling of rare taproom offerings to hit the distribution market. “Part of our responsibilities as brewers is to continue to create new flavor profiles and beers, find some new and exciting flavors,” Engbers said. “When you find one that people really gravitate to, the Backstage Series allows us to take those beers to a much larger audience.” To meet the demand for their product, Founders had to start growing a little sooner than planned. “The original idea was that we could stay in the original footprint for five years without modifying the building,” Engbers said. “And we didn’t make it a year and a half.” In the first year, Founders doubled its production and has continued to grow every year since. The first expansion included a new walk-in cooler, expanding cellar space and installing a brand new 85 bbl brewhouse. As of right now, Founders is in the second phase of expansion, a $26 million project that will increase production to 320,000 bbls a year, construct a two-story office complex, expand the taproom (along with a second bar) and the company store, and increase cellar space in the brewery with the installation of a fleet of 600 bbl fermenters. The expansion also includes a beer garden out front and a beer school inside. For two friends who began homebrewing together, the journey to their massive success has been a long and winding road. “Probably the most humbling day was when we opened here,” Engbers said. “Mike and I were standing on the stage before we opened the doors, and I remember saying, ‘Will we ever fill it?’ We were both worried because it was so big, and Mike starts laughing and says, ‘We damn well better.’” n

Founders Brewing Company 235 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids (616) 776-1195, foundersbrewing.com

Beer of the Month

Short’s Anniversary Ale

H

ere’s a little kick to your spring: A 10% ABV blood orange wheat wine from Short’s. This beer pours hazy deep orange-red with an off-white head that is full of orange, grapefruit and citrus hops. The flavor rides on a big, malty backbone that’s full of wheat tangibles and full of bright citrus flavors, peppercorn and coriander while remaining well-balanced. The mouth-feel is a bit thick with a very mischievously hidden alcohol presence, and finishes slightly bitter. A great ripe beer to usher in your summer.


Scene Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

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Steven de polo’s

Free Market

New and exciting things happening in the businesses and nonprofits in West Michigan.

Freebies The West Michigan Environmental Action Council wants to help make your

shack less drafty. They have already helped a couple thousand homeowners save hundreds of dollars in energy costs per year. Call for a low-cost energy assessment at (616) 451-3051. Superieur Brand Clothing

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

is a new company hustling Michiganthemed t-shirts for your sunken hipster chests. Kendall grad Todd Truman, who spent years in the rag trade, offers vintage takes on beloved spots like Pine Knob, Thunderbird Raceway and Lee’s Chop Suey. Mostly men’s styles with women’s shirts in the near future. Look for them locally at Landsharks in Saugatuck, Book Nook in Montague and Fitzgerald’s in Grand Rapids. The Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce recently launched Netwalking for busy professionals every Monday and Wednesday at the Lakes Mall at 7:30 a.m. and at L.C. Walker Arena at noon. Ask Tru-Fit Comfort Shoe Store for a 10 percent discount for your new kicks.

Superieur Brand Clothing

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G

rand Rapids Coffee Roasters (1111 Godfrey Ave. SW ) is known for its Saturday Experience. In business since 2007, the micro-roaster encourages customers to visit the fifth-floor roastery Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can learn about the roasting process, try the coffee and sit and chat with fellow java-heads, while the shop custom roasts your order. Many will pre-order the coffee on Thursday or Friday and come in Saturday to pick it up and have a free cup. Roasters such as Erin Durfey take first timers through the roasting process: how a coffee bean goes from being the pit of a cherry to your kitchen; how decaf coffee becomes decaffeinated; and debunk many coffee myths such as a dark-roasted coffee actually has less caffeine than a lighter-roasted coffee. On select Saturdays, customers can sample the java brewed in a variety of ways: Bunn Brewed, Chemex Drip and French Press or a shot of espresso pulled on the Faema Espresso Machine. Saturday customers receive special discounts for two pounds of freshly roasted Select Single Origin coffees, starting at $21.50.

Across Division Avenue you will find Chasing Vanity Salon and Spa (150 Wealthy St. SE), which has its grand opening this month. Owner Elisabeth Bartrom opened her upscale beauty parlor in the new Tapestry Square development that the Inner City Christian Federation built across from Mary Free Bed. Elisabeth trained under a Redken instructor in Grand Rapids then sought fame and fortune in Las Vegas.

count) from around the world, as well as wine and crackers and other delicacies, in the River City. Heather has been busy from day one, educating current and future cheese lovers. “You can never know enough about cheese,” she said. When you walk in, you will immediately be offered a tasty morsel to sample. And then another and another. Our Miss Lourdie was mad for ivory cubes of Canadian Cheddar. Lovers of stinky cheese will grab a funky chunk of Epoisses Berthaut, which is so malodorous that it is banned from hotels and taxis in Paris. Other delicacies include the rich and creamy Fromager d’Affinois and the mildly ruminant Potato Chip Goat Gouda. Stop by often to try new and exciting cheeses, my pets.

Grand Rapids Coffee Roasters Photo: Heather Rowan

in the exclusive Mandarin Oriental Spa. Her next step was to come back home to provide West Michigan with trend-setting styles and superior customer service. Chasing Vanity offers traditional salon and day spa services, along with specialty treatments such as eyelash enhancements and hair extensions. “We want to be that onestop destination for all your beauty needs,” she said.

Elisabeth Bartrom She thrived, helping to open the Aria Salon in the Aria Casino and worked

The Cheese Lady hit Midtown Grand Rapids (315 Fuller NE). Heather Zinn was a customer of the original Cheese Lady in Muskegon. Now she offers 119 cheeses (at last

Sweet Kreations For You (95 West Michigan Ave.) is a new custom bakery in downtown Battle Creek, near the Kellogg Company headquarters, the Hart-Dole-Inouye Federal Center and downtown schools. “Having been born and raised in Battle Creek, we are looking forward to being on the front end of ‘our’ downtown revitalization,” said Owner Tracy Summers-Miller. She began baking for her daughter’s open house party and caught the cupcake bug. Her hobby soon became serious when demand grew beyond friends and family. She took advantage of Michigan’s “Cottage Law,” which allows bakeries to be run as home businesses. The next logical step was to open her own shop. Sweet Kreations For You’s new shop is homey with antique couches and chairs and renovated hardwood floors. Initial offerings include cupcakes, cakes, cookies and more. Tracy noted, “If you can dream it, we’ll Kreate it.” n


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3Mother’s Day Outdoor Adventure

Fruitport Old Fashioned Days Pomona Park Park & Third, Fruitport May 22-27 Free! fruitportlions.com

Get outside and take part in a good, old-fashioned celebration with Fruitport Old Fashioned Days. Taking place in Pamona Park, overlooking Spring Lake, this annual festival hosts a carnival midway, car show, motorcycle run, community market, horseshoe tournament, fireworks, parade, 5K/10K run and the very popular Ox Roast. “We’ve got many free activities,” said Jim Kauppila, secretary of the Lion’s Club and co-chair of the Ox Roast. Look for a wild animal petting zoo and free music in the evenings. “We’re the oldest festival in West Michigan,” Kauppila said, adding that the festival is “the only non-beer-tent-related festival in Muskegon County.” Don’t forget to visit the Ox Roast for a beef or pork sandwich with a “special cabbage sauce that we get rid of by the gallons.” Time to school the youngins’ in the delicacies of fair food!

/// All Ages

Fresh Air Fun Nicer weather means less time indoors and as a fellow parent once told me, “It’s a good time to blow the stink off them.” Get the kids outside enjoying sunshine and fresh air and away from the couch and video games. May is the time to get moving. Ever try mother/daughter yoga? We can tell you where to go. Festivals with art, food, culture and activities are sprouting up every weekend. The dress code is grass stains, windblown hair and muddy shoes. It’ll look good on you. By Missy Black

Mother’s Day Outdoor Adventure

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

Ramona Park 8600 S. Sprinkle Rd., Portage May 11, noon to 4 p.m. Free! portagemi.gov, (269) 329-4522

This day for families to honor mom and celebrate Mother’s Day features fishing, kayaking and mother/daughter partner yoga. It’s the perfect way to kill two birds with one stone: get outside and enjoy the nice weather at Ramona Park and have some specialized, one-on-one time with mom. We wanted to “reach out to the female audience and engage them more in fishing and boating activities,” says Tricia Keala, recreation program manager with the city of Portage. Gifting mom is easy, as every mom brings home a gift of handcrafted earrings made from fishing lure. “Everything we’re offering that day is really going to reach out to all audiences—mothers, children, any skill level.” It’s worth noting that the outdoor activities keep coming the following Saturday with a Family Fishing Fair also at Ramona Park. Enjoy more fishing and kayaking in a festival-type setting with 100 fishing rods given out to kids.

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Arts In Ada Festival Downtown Ada May 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free! adaarts.org

Join everyone under the oaks on picturesque, tree-lined Bronson Street for art, music and dance in Ada. Around 60 to 70 visual artists participate in the realm of fine art, crafts, prints and photography. Families will love to look at all the creations, as well as take in highlights from performing arts groups and musicians. “Some of the onstage acts are quite a delight to watch,” said Bob Kraai, event coordinator. “We’ve got unique vendors, food booths with some ethnic-type foods and a caricature artist, which is novel.” Kids will love the live entertainment, face painting and crafts all in the very scenic setting between Ada Drive and the historic Covered Bridge of Ada. Held in rain or shine, this festival has loads of charm (which is never lost on parents).

Ambrose T-Shirt Printing4

Ambrose T-Shirt Printing

Ambrose Corner of 9th and River, Holland May 4, noon-4 p.m.; May 8-10, noon-7 p.m.; May 11, noon-4 p.m. $20/printing experience and shirt tuliptime.com, phone, (800) 822-2770 Make your own swag by picking your favorite t-shirt from the first-ever Tulip Time t-shirt design contest and printing it yourself. Ambrose, the collaborative design and screen-printing studio, has teamed up with Tulip Time in Holland for a design contest that leads up to t-shirt making fun. Both adults and kids get a behindthe-scenes lesson on how clothing is made. Pick a color, design and then the Ambrose team shows you how to print it. “You pull the squeegee and that’s it!,” said Ambrose Director Jenna Weiler. “You have your very own Tulip Time t-shirt that you created.” The very hands-on event allows you to “two minutes later, wear the shirt” and ask questions of the process during the printmaking demonstration. Creating something useful that you can wear will be a big source of pride for small children and a cool quirk for teens. It’s a “great way for local families to get involved with Tulip Time. We want to celebrate our community by putting a modern spin on Holland’s rich traditions.” Walking away from an event with gear you made (and wear) gets high scores any day. n


/// Eclectic

May Eclectic Events

T

his month is about all about pomp, and some circumstance, with a larger than life Renaissance experience, the posturing and preening of a mustache masquerade, the distant, Voyeuristic gaze into a bygone America and the triumphant blast of color from soaring kites. By Audria Larsen

Mustache Masquerade

The Intersection, Grand Rapids May 10, 6 p.m. $10 advance, $12 day of show 21+ sectionlive.com, (616) 451-8232

Brown Bag Film: Edward Hopper

Muskegon Museum of Art May 9, 12:15 p.m. Free! muskegonartmuseum.org, (231) 720-2570

Mayfaire Renaissance Festival

Marshall, Michigan May 18-19, 25-27 10 a.m- 6 p.m. $3.50-$40 mayfaireren.com, (269) 382-6120

Renaissance festivals are more than a whimsical jaunt into the world of bygone days; they’re a way of life. And on festival grounds, you can immerse yourself among knaves, jesters, boisterous broads and lithe pixies. Being cajoled into buying whole pickles by lewd men and gnawing on shanks of meat directly off the bone are par for the course. Personal role-play is part of the allure, along with live entertainment like performances

by fire dancers and feats by aerialists. Not to mention real knights, in real armor battling for glory. Other notables like Knotty Bits Sideshow, a duo based out of Grand Rapids, are certain to bring a wow factor with stunts like glass walking and snake charming. Go for a day, or enjoy the whole weekend. Camping is available and the event is family friendly.

25th Annual Great Lakes Kite Festival

Grand Haven State Park Beach May 17-19, event times at 10 and 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Free! mackite.com, (866) 428-2335

Flying isn’t just for the birds and kites aren’t just for kids. “The reason that people want to fly a kite is because everyone wants to fly,” said Steve Negen, owner of MAC Kite and host of the annual Great Lakes Kite Festival. The festival, which is celebrating 25 years this month, began as a small competition and now features three days of colorful flight. Each day is filled with performances and demonstrations featuring curiosities like kite ballet, which is choreographed to music. “Visualize ice skaters in the sky,” Negen said. Participate in manufacturer test fields, giving prototype kites a test fly. Shop at the world’s largest kite store (MACkite) and simply gaze in awe at the aerial beasts the size of a school bus. “[For] the really big kites, what they do is anchor them with a stand … One year, one of the guys brought a giant spinning [kite] and we tied it to a pickup truck and it was pulling the pickup truck in the sand.” n

Scene Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

Riding the wave of hirsute glee, the first annual Mustache Masquerade is debuting at The Intersection’s recently refabbed front room, now called The Stache. More than a night to strut your facial stuff, the event features mustachethemed games and the requisite competition, all to the backdrop of a variety of local bands. The be-whiskered masquerade is presented by the local non-profit, Making Smiles For Hope. “They seem like genuinely good people and wanted to do something a little different,” said Scott Hammontree, general manager and talent buyer at The Intersection. The competition requests a $5 registration donation and all proceeds go towards cheering up children with life threatening illnesses.

While he wasn’t the one that famously rode a chopper across the country, the artist Edward Hopper created distinctly American works of art that are just as iconic as Ben Hopper’s cinematic toking. Part of the Muskegon Museum of Arts’ Brown Bag Film series, this documentary, narrated by the inimitable Steve Martin, explores the life and mystery of Edward Hooper and his renowned paintings. Always free, attendees are encouraged to bring a lunch and enjoy complimentary cookies and coffee at the afternoon viewing.

Great Lakes Kite Festival

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/// Sink’s Spins on Music

ON THE MUSICAL RADAR May boasts at least a half-dozen first-time musical events, several with an unusual twist to give spring 2013 added zip. Here’s a peek at the uncommon lineup: West Michigan’s Music Legends at We Do Care Charity Extravaganza, noon-8:30 p.m. May 5, free, Knights of Columbus Hall in Wyoming – Starring 17 acts from Grand Rapids’ past – from The Eschelons to The Trace to Mona and Kristi Sallie – this benefit for We Do Care (aiding children with cancer) pays tribute to some of the area’s most historically important artists. Organized partly by Kim Rush of the West Michigan Music Hysterical Society website, the show reflects “the earliest days of rock ’n’ roll,” garage-rock, jazz, soul, gospel, classic rock and blues. Bimini Brothers 30th Anniversary Show, 8 p.m. May 11, $10 advance, $12 day of, The Intersection in Grand Rapids – Incredible as it seems, Dennie Middleton and Nick Lewis have put in three decades as the Bimini Brothers parody rock band: Middleton estimates that since 6th grade in Sparta, the duo has played their “stupid songs” 4,000 times. “Hell, we’ve been at this as long as WLAV and AC/DC,” he said. Active Commute Week Celebration, 4:30 p.m. May 17, free, Rosa Parks Circle in Grand Rapids – Organized by the Greater Grand Rapids Bicycle Coalition (and coinciding with National Bike to Work Day and the Grand Rapids Film Festival), this concert features singer-songwriter Ralston Bowles, rock’s The Mines and the debut of the bluesy Jim Shaneberger Band, plus screening of the film, Bicycle Dreams. World Fiddle Day, 2 p.m. May 18, free, Riverside Park in Grand Rapids – Bows will be sawing and strings bending. Launched by musician Caoimhin Mac in Ireland last year,

The B-Sides For the generation raised on early rock, the B-sides of treasured 45s by The Beatles, Kinks, Zombies and even obscure acts like The Clique were thrills unlike any others. Grand Rapids’ appropriately named band the B-Sides deftly revive that flush of excitement. Its two- and three-minute originals recall the twangy guitar pop, sweet hooks and delicious harmonies of the ’60s (“Let Her Go,” “Mary Had a Baby,” “I’ll Be There”), while adding a smidgen of modern garage rock. The B-Sides – Tommy Schichtel, Pete Curry, Christopher Schichtel and David Stanton – have roots in (and share sonic textures with) local retro bands The Concussions and The Fuzzrites. But like the slightly edgy, psychedelic B-sides of old, it all sounds like nothing else on 2013’s musical landscape.

Bona-Who? Pig Roast and Music Festival, noon-midnight May 18, free, Cedar Springs – Year four of this event designed to give young musicians a platform for performing has grown to feature nine youth and adult bands and a pig roast. Just bring blankets, chairs, beverages. Consumption of alcohol by minors strictly prohibited. Honor by August playing the Seven Steps Up Courtyard Concert, 2:30 p.m. May 19, $10-$15 ($25-$40 VIP), Seven Steps Up in downtown Spring Lake – This first-ever outdoor concert hosted by Seven Steps Up’s listening room features Washington D.C. modern rock’s Honor by August and Grand Rapids prog-bluegrass’ Fauxgrass Quartet, raising funds for The Little Red House adult care services agency. Organizer Gary Hanks says the courtyard holds 2,000 people, with local food and beer available on site. Greg Nagy playing at Tip Top Deluxe, May 31; $5. Finish the month by whooping it up in a live recording of Michigan blues guitarist Greg Nagy and band playing two shows on May 31. Come and your cheers could forever be enshrined on CD. n

Music critic and entertainment writer John Sinkevics comments on the local and national music scene at localspins.com (Spins on Music), spotlighting artists at 10 a.m. Wednesdays on Local Spins Live at News Talk 1340 AM.

The Formal Introduction of Flashing Blue Lights From the opening guitar lines and rich vocals of “I Can’t Breathe,” it’s clear Grand Rapids’ Flashing Blue Lights is up to something delightfully rootsy and mighty good on this debut recorded at River City Studios. As songwriter/ rhythm guitarist/bassist/co-producer Jason Roy puts it, the band inspired by Neil Young, The Beatles, Ryan Adams and Noel Gallagher set out to make a cohesive, layered album with straightforward lyrics, not just a “willy-nilly” collection of tunes. Roy, his brother/singer Tim Roy, lead guitarist Jordan Stricklen, drummer Luke Rockhold and co-producer Austin Ruhstorfer did that and more in an album that adroitly spans American and British influences, and rock, folk and country, too.

REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

Scene | Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

Local CD Releases

Honor by August: May 19 at Seven Steps Up in Spring Lake

Remus fiddler Bruce Bauman pulled this Grand Rapids version together with Garry Zack, Jean Neal and Bruce Ling. Musicians representing “all skill levels” can drop in and jam the afternoon away. Violins, violas, cellos, upright basses and other stringed instruments are welcome; no wind instruments or drums.

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/// On Tour

The Dillinger Escape Plan Cultivates Chaos | by Josh Spanninga

Schedule | Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

T

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LADIES LITERARY CLUB 61 SHELDON BLVD SE

MAY 4 MAY 18 CALVIN’S GEZON AUDITORIUM 3201 BURTON ST SE

JUNE 22 JULY 20 ALL SHOWS 7:33 PM RIVERCITYIMPROV.COM

he Dillinger Escape Plan has pretty much become synonymous with the mathcore genre, though the members readily admit they never set out to become figureheads of the genre. Still, it only makes sense they have a proven formula for writing songs. “We take it from such an inception where it’s a quarter of the speed, it’s like a quarter as intense,” said Frotnman Greg Puciato. “And then we start speeding it up, and then we’re like ‘OK, let’s add this little hiccup here,’ and “Oh, that little hiccup should happen once, May 17. As for the tour, fans can expect the and then let’s make it happen three times the band to translate the ferocity of its recorded next time.’ But it’s all very methodical.” songs to a live performance, sometimes to This results in a heartfelt and vicious the detriment of the members mess of a song, with layers themselves. of screams, breakdowns and The Dillinger “If you eat a lot of Ibuabsurd time signature changes Escape Plan profen on tour it keeps the — but somehow, it works. wsg Royal Thunder and swelling down,” Puciato said “When you listen to this The Faceless about the intense strain his stuff it sounds insane, and The Intersection, Grand Rapids vocal chords endure while the process of recording it is May 5, 7 p.m. performing. equally as insane,” Puciato said. $16 advance, $18 day of show Me m b e r s a l s o h a v e Th e s e l f - p r o c l a i m e d sectionlive.com, (616) 451-8232 endured bloody gashes and perfectionists employed such broken bones from relentlessly methods while recording their latest album One of Us is the Killer, and they thrashing around onstage in such close proximity to each other. All this intensity, however, admit it could get stressful at times. “I think (guitarist) Ben and I both quit can be drawn back to a longstanding appreciafive times each during the making of it,” tion for hardcore music. “When I saw and heard the type of energy Puciato said. that came from more hardcore type stuff I was Luckily, the band finished recording intact, and has already taken to the road to addicted,” Puciato said. “And I don’t think it’s promote the new album, which is due out ever really left my bloodstream since.” n

“When you listen to this stuff it sounds insane, and the process of recording it is equally as insane … I think (guitarist) Ben and I both quit five times each during the making of [the album].”


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/// on tour

The People’s Temple Gets Jack White’s Attention by Doing Its Own Thing | by Dwayne Hoover

I

Schedule | Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

n 2007, two sets of brothers out of Perry, Mich. got together and decided to make some music. But they weren’t reaching for the polished, over-processed sound that saturates the airwaves today. Instead, these four embraced the raw, unrefined style of 1960s garage rock, with some psychedelia thrown in for good measure, and formed The People’s Temple. Given their focus, it’s no wonder they found themselves on the radar of Third Man Records, Jack White’s independent record label out of Nashville. So in July 2012, the band — which Third Man Records calls one of “the most intriguing and rawkus bands currently blowing up the rock-n-roll underground” — traveled to Tennessee to record a live single. “We drove all night to get down there,” said Lead Guitarist Alex Szegedy. “It was really fun, and it was actually our first The People’s Temple live recording we’ve ever done. We got to listen to it right after wsg The Amoebas, recording. It was very interesting.” Kastanza, Cardboard That live single, which included the songs “Never More” Swords and “Miles Away,” was released under the Third Man label on The Pyramid Scheme, Grand Rapids 7-inch vinyl in February. Add that to the band’s already impresMay 3, 8 p.m. sive discography, which includes three EPs and two full-length $8 advance, $10 day of show albums, as well as a consistent touring schedule, and it’s safe pyramidschemebar.com, to say these guys keep busy. (616) 272-3758 “Right now we’re just trying to go out and spread our name around,” Szegedy said. “We have a whole other bunch of May dates …We’ll be sticking around the Midwest and the deep south, take a month off, then go out to the west coast in July.” Yet even with that kind of schedule, the band is looking at more recording. “We’re going to be putting out another single in July,” Szegedy said. “I don’t know about a third album yet. We have a lot of material, just nothing specific in the works right now. What we do have is not necessarily very good, or at least what I consider very good … We’ll see, you never know.  Right now we’re just trying to keep playing shows and keep going.” n

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DR EW NE LS ON

MAY 4 - 8:00PM

TYLAN

CD RELEASE PARTY!

MAY 5 - 7:00PM

&

MI CH AE L MC DE RM OT T

MAY 11 - 8:00PM

LIZ LON GLE Y

MAY 24 - 8:00PM

STEPH EN KELLO GG

W/OPENER MILOW

ALBUM RELEASE TOUR

JUN 1 - 8:00PM

116 S Jackson St. Spring Lake, MI 49456 (616) 678-3618 www.pindropconcerts.com

Scene | Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

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/// On Tour

Relive Pop-Punk’s Glory Days | by Dwayne Hoover

I

Schedule | Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

t’s di fficult to just slap an all-encompassing genre on a band, as many pull from a variety of influences to shape their sound. But to not acknowledge New Found Glory as a pop-punk group is to ignore their influence on the genre’s rise to mainstream popularity. The simultaneous success of the genre and band saw two gold New Found Glory records for NFG at the beginning wsg Cartel, Living of the 21st century. So, in 2012, the With Lions guys set out on tour to celebrate the The Intersection, Grand 10th anniversary of the second of Rapids those two albums, Sticks and Stones. May 21, 6:30 p.m. “That record was one of our $19.99 advance, $23 day biggest,” said Jordan Pundik, lead of show, All ages vocalist for NFG. “A lot of people sectionlive.com, (616) grew up on that record, and even 451-8232 we grew up on that record. Heck, we were still in our early 20s.” And it was Sticks and Stones that made an impact on the pop-punk scene and bands to come. “[Sticks and Stones] has been cited by other bands as an influence on them, and so I think that we decided to do that record

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because it was like, 10 years for just one record is kind of a big deal,” Pundik said. “There are a lot of bands in our genre that come and go, but our longevity is because of successes like that.” May actually begins the second leg of NFG’s Sticks and Stones Anniversary Tour. The first, according to Pundik, was an absolute riot. “We did it all in small clubs,” Pundik said. “The biggest capacity was maybe 1100. A lot of the venues didn’t have any barriers, so there were a lot of kids on stage.” Even with its current touring schedule, the band has its sights set on some more recording, including an upcoming live album. “We’re going to [record] two shows in Anaheim, two super small venues,” Pundik said. “We’re just going to do two different sets and see how it goes. We’re trying to mix it up and put three new studio songs on the live record.” And after that? “Our plan is to probably, hopefully, do a new record after the New Year.” “That’s really what our focus is on,” said Pundik. “I’m super excited, and our fans are excited about it. We always try to keep our fans involved, like they’re a part of everything.” n


Scene | Sounds | Sights | Dining | Schedule

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CALLING ALL FILMMAKERS

SAUGATUCK SHORTS FILM COMPETITION

SUBMISSIONS ACCEPTED

MAY 1 - AUGUST 31

The rst annual Saugatuck Shorts event will be held on October 12 and will feature short lms (ve minutes or less) that have a tie to Michigan. Three prizes will be awarded at the screening: $500 for the high school & under student category, $1,000 for the adult category, and $1,000 for “audience favorite”. Filmmakers of all ages are encouraged to enter; visit our website for more details: www.sc4a.org.

SCA FARMER’S MARKET

MAY 24 - OCTOBER 4

Schedule | Dining | Sights Sounds | Scene

FRIDAYS 8AM-2PM

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EXHIBITION OPENING

LAND & SKY: FRANK DUDLEY & THE PAGEANTRY OF CONSERVATION

MAY 30

6-8PM FREE ADMISSION

Stop by the SCA for in-season produce, owers, fresh baked goods, artisan products, and more. Sponsored by: Hilliard Lyons of Holland, Huntington Bank, Lighthouse Title + Insurance

Featuring paintings by noted Chicago artist Frank Dudley (on loan from the Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso, Indiana) this exhibition reveals how art – from paintings and photographs to music and theatrical presentations – played a central role in our nation’s rst dune preservation movement in Northwest Indiana. Open through August 9. Sponsored by: Warner Norcross & Judd, Penny & Jamie Ladd, Janice & David Varney / Century Restoration, Tracey Shafroth & Michael Elam

TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 269.857.2399 OR WWW.SC4A.ORG


Visual Art

by Alexandra Fluegel

Hop Into Art

D

McCann said the art hops began with iscove ri ng an area’s only three or four stops but over the years have artful offerings can blossomed into one of the main draws of the be challenging, whether you’re downtown area. a first-time visitor or a longtime “The idea is to come into downtown resident. Questions of where to Kalamazoo, park your car, grab a brochure, and go and what to see abound, but hop from place to place,” she said. there’s one type of event that can easily help Brochures are available at any of the stops provide some answers: a gallery hop. and help visitors navigate where they will go and Gallery hops are community events put what to expect. McCann said the hops are great together through partnerships between area opportunities for people businesses, artists and to try out new places and organizations with the create an entire evening of aim to create an evening activities, including dinner of culture, commerce and and live music. entertainment. One of the Participating artists longest-running gallery open their studios, allowhops is Kalamazoo’s Art ing the community to not Hop, which is celebrating only see and discuss the its sixteenth year. Held work, but also get a sense the first Friday of each of where they create their month, Art Hop brings pieces. McCann said this droves of people into the month’s hop features a downtown area to experihandful of artists that ence what it has to offer. haven’t participated before, Four times a year, and the range of mediums Art Hop expands to inwill include unique offerclude more galleries and ings such as bonsai art and more businesses, and the glass blowing. second of these expanded Kalamazoo Art Hop “We try and have evenings take place this Downtown Kalamazoo, May 5, 5 p.m. Free! something that will appeal month. 53 stops are kalamazooarts.org to everyone,” she said. included on the May 5th For additional fun, event that will run from Art Hop hosts the free Chalk It Up, which will 5-9 p.m. throughout downtown Kalamazoo. turn Kalamazoo Mall into a giant chalk mural. “Our May event is one of the largest,” Reservations are not required, but they are said Beth McCann, deputy director of the encouraged for any groups that want to create Kalamazoo Area Arts Council, which coorditheir art in specific areas. Judges will select first nates the art hops. “We include more of the and second place winners and will award $100 downtown community, the merchants, restauand $50 prizes. n rants, salons, all kinds of folks.”

Other Art Events Annual Student Exhibition Week

Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids Opening Reception May 7, 4-7 p.m. May 8-10, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; May 11, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free! kcad.edu, (800) 676-2787

There’s nothing quite like a child’s imagination, the fruits of which can often be seen clinging to the refrigerators of proud parents. Now there’s an opportunity to check out some of what Grand Rapids’ youngest artists have been creating throughout the past year, and you can expect much more than finger paintings. The annual spring exhibition highlights the talents of students from 75 K-12 Grand Rapids Public Schools, an eclectic mix of more than 350 works ranging in medium.

Kendall College is home to a wellspring of talented, up-andcoming artists, and this exhibition is one of the few opportunities the community has to see the students’ cutting-edge creations. This year’s show takes place inside the Old Federal Building, giving the work one of the most beautiful and historical backdrops in Grand Rapids. Undergraduate work and graduate work is on display and ranges from oil painting to fashion design, and during the opening reception, many of the artists will be on hand to discuss their work.

Live Painting: Justin Kellner

LaFontsee Gallery, Grand Rapids May 11, 12-3pm Free! lafontsee.us, (616) 451-9820

Award-winning artist and Kendall College alumnus Justin Kellner’s paintings will be on display through May 24, and for one afternoon he will be in the gallery creating a new piece. Kellner’s current body of work contains mixed-media acrylic painting that focuses on the negative impact humankind has on various natural ecosystems, specifically the sulfide mining in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. This exhibition is Kellner’s first solo show.

REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

Scene | Sounds | Sights Diing | Schedule

GRPS City Wide Art Show

UICA, Grand Rapids May 12-19 Free for exhibiting students and their families uica.org, (616) 454-7000

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by Allison Parker

Dance

Other Performing Arts Events La Traviata

Opera Grand Rapids DeVos Performance Hall, Grand Rapids May 3 & 4, 7:30 p.m. $21-$98, students 50 percent off opreagr.com, (616) 451-2741

Verdi’s La Traviata closes Opera Grand Rapids’ season with a spellbinding spectacle of drama, passion and grit. Introduced to many audiences in the film Pretty Woman, La Traviata is the second most performed opera in the world and features an iconic soprano role. The plot centers on the unlikely romance between high society courtesan Violetta and provincial bourgeoisie Alfredo. Ultimately, the course of true love does not run smoothly, as the blossoming relationship is inevitably plagued by scandal and tragedy. English subtitles and a preshow lecture from opera experts help audiences savor the performance to the fullest.

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

Kalamazoo Civic Theatre May 3, 4, 9-12, 17-19; show times at 2, 7:30 and 8 p.m. $12-23, kazoocivic.com, (269) 343-1313 A smirking Broadway favorite with plenty of charm and wit, How to Succeed tells the story of an ordinary man’s rise to greatness. The story begins when window washer J. Pierrepont Finch finds an instructional guide for climbing the cooperate ladder. Excitement escalates and outrageous satire abounds as the guide leads Finch to defeat rivals, find love and gain an executive position. When Finch’s company faces disaster, however, he must suddenly rely on his own ingenuity and streetsmarts to come out on top.

Schedule | Dining | Sights Sounds | Scene

Anything Goes

Broadway Grand Rapids DeVos Performance Hall, Grand Rapids May 14-19; show times at 1, 2, 6:30, 7:30 and 8 p.m., $32 & up broadwaygrandrapids.com, (616) 235-6285 Featuring unforgettable numbers such as “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “You’re the Top” and “Anything Goes,” this Cole Porter classic typifies the dazzle, hilarity and heart of vintage Broadway. The cheeky storyline sets sail when a gangster, a debutante, a nightclub singer and a businessman climb aboard an American ship bound for England. Before long, romance buds and mayhem breaks loose as the passengers throw social norms overboard and fall for each other in unexpected ways.

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GR Ballet Presents Passionate Romeo and Juliet Update

F

rom th e icon ic ‘wh e re fore art th o u’ to the dagger’s final plunge, William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet delivers enthralling moments that continue to captivate audiences worldwide. This classic tale of forbidden passion returns once again with Grand Rapids Ballet’s season finale, Romeo & Juliet. Selling out at its world premiere in 2011, the show has earned international recognition and is the company’s most requested work. While Shakespeare’s storyline and Sergei Prokofiev’s traditional score provide a familiar backdrop, Mario Radacovsky’s new choreography infuses the ballet with vibrant energy and an updated, modern feel. Dance elements are athletic and novel, blending classical and contemporary movement in stunning, imaginative ways. For Radacovsky, it is particularity important that the choreography expresses authentic emotion that resonates with real-life experiences. “With this Romeo & Juliet, I would like to tell a tale of passion, love and hate — many aspects of our lives and emotions,” Radacovsky said. “I hope to convey to the audience how this classic story is relevant to all of us. We have all had our Juliets or Romeos, and struggled with barriers. I believe this ballet can be a truly unique experience for all of us — dancers, directors and

Romeo & Juliet Grand Rapids Ballet Peter Martin Wege Theatre, Grand Rapids May 10-12, 17-19; show times at 2 and 7:30 p.m. $30-40, grballet.com, (616) 454-4771

audience — as we explore with such honesty the passion, love and tragedy of Romeo & Juliet.” Sets and costumes are smoothly incorporated into this vision, transforming the emotions of a familiar tale into urgent feelings audiences can connect with. Background projections are rich with sentimental symbolism, while shrouds of fog and splashes of light flood scenes with meaning. Outfits contribute to the immediacy of the ballet, as well as highlight dancers’ expression and provide a current edge. “Grand Rapids Ballet’s Romeo & Juliet is a contemporary take on a classic tale,” Artistic Director Patricia Barker said. “Some details are stripped, but [Radacovsky] has also taken Shakespeare’s tragic love story and made it accessible to all ages with dramatic lighting, modern costuming and stunning dance.” The ballet also tugs at heartstrings by relating all of the characters’ inner turmoil to love — a core aspect of human existence. The result is a textured, in-depth exploration of one of the most universal human experiences. “Shakespeare took the strongest, most basic emotion of human life and created an entire play around it — love. Young love, passionate love, hate love and tragic love,” Radacovsky said. “Love is the centerpiece for all other feelings that come into play. It is my hope, with this Romeo & Juliet, that I give you an incredible experience of the many facets of love.” n


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by Josh Spanninga

Comedy

Erik Griffin’s Comedy Melting Pot

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rik Griffin is a first-generation American, born to a mother from Central America and a father of European descent. Because of his genes, Griffin is what he refers to as “very racially ambiguous,” a trait that has proven valuable in his comedy. “I think it disarms people,” Griffin said. “It lets me say some really outlandish things. Then they can’t put me in a box of things I can or cannot say.” By taking advantage of his mixed cultural background, he honed his comedy into an edgy, funny routine where nothing is off-limits, and no race or demographic is safe, as he’s an equal-opportunity wisecracker. Due to his attention to diversity and race, he gained recognition from fellow like-minded comics, most notably Ahmed Ahmed, who asked Griffin to appear in the film Just Like Us, a documentary about comedians bridging the gap between America and the Middle East. Soon after this, Griffin auditioned for Comedy Central’s “Workaholics” and landed the iconic role of Montez Walker, a serious coworker with the tendency to divulge a little too much unsolicited information about his personal life. Griffin embraced the role. “It was the perfect part for me,” he said. “I feel like there is a little bit of Montez inside of me, and he’s just blaring to come out all the time, so I love that part.” “Workaholics” was recently renewed for two more seasons, and Griffin couldn’t be happier. “I just like being a part of something that people legitimately love.” Griffin has also been receiving a little taste of rockstar treatment lately – he was recently signed to SideOneDummy records and released his first comedy album. The label generally releases albums from punk and indie bands, but co-owner Joe Sib expressed an interest in signing Griffin, and once they met he knew it was a great Erik Griffin opportunity. Dr. Grins, Grand Rapids “He’s trying to be a comic himself now,” May 23-25, Show times Griffin said. “He understands the scene. He at 8,9 and 10:30 p.m. understands how it works.” $10-$15 While recording the album, Griffin realthebob.com, (616) ized he needed to fine-tune his routine to 356-2000 better fit an audio-only format.

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“It’s just my perception of the world around me. You’re either going to agree or disagree, but in that process you’ll laugh.”

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“I’m such a physical comic, so it was hard to really narrow it down to jokes that can be heard and not seen,” he said. The result is a full 52-minute set of Griffin’s crass humor, with topics ranging from airport security to gay Santas. All of this is delivered in a manner that hardly seems rehearsed, which can be attributed to his approach to stand-up. “I’m always adding to it and expanding on it,” Griffin said. “So a one-minute bit turns into a 10-minute bit, and that’s just how I operate.” Right now Griffin is touring non-stop, and he looks forward to bringing his brand of comedy to Grand Rapids. “It’s just my perception of the world around me,” he said. “You’re either going to agree or disagree, but in that process you’ll laugh.” n


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by Anya Zentmeyer

film

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etween the Jewish Film Festival of Grand Rapids and the return of the Grand Rapids Film Festival, West Michigan filmgoers might have more fun watching films in Grand Rapids than they’ve had all year.

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ARTISTIC AVENUES Local filmmakers Michael Martin and Jeremy Nickerbocker are teaming up with the Avenue for the Arts along Grand Rapids’ South Division Avenue to co-produce a series of three online promotional videos that aim to break down barriers not only stylistically, but in the local art community. “There are a lot of people that have become active in the Grand Rapids art community but are unaware of where these things are happening and unsure of how to approach it,” Martin said. “So we want to show people this unique world of Avenue for the Arts’ thriving and tucked away community in a media format that’s simple and engaging to the average person.” Martin and Nickerbocker wanted to make the short-film series into its own project, combining elements of stylistic experimentation, humor and darkness to tell the story “of this underground world,” Martin said, with a point to “make what is underground accessible and seen in a way that it’s approachable to an average person.” They’ll release the videos in May, with episodes that feature interviews with local artists along the South Division strip on their own creative and general philosophies, and about the community at large – their understanding of how people function together and how people see their artistic selves as part of a larger whole. “This is definitely a project in our own passion to create something – you know, take a medium that we’re familiar with, like short-format TV, and to experiment with it in a way that helps benefit the community at large,” Martin said.

MOVIE MARATHONS The 15th Annual Jewish Film Festival of Grand Rapids brings a whole host of cultural-growth opportunities beginning May 5-9, screening six films for West Michiganders at Celebration! Cinema North – all designed to bring community members together in thoughtful discussion. “(The festival’s mission) is not only to show films inside the community, but to bring it to everybody,” said Sari Cohen,

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Reb Roberts, owner of Sanctuary Folk Art on 140 S. Division, recounts what Avenue for the Arts looked like when it opened up shop 14 years ago. His interview will be part of the promotional series’ first episode, themed “Site Owners and Avenue for the Arts’ Past. Photo: Michael Martin programming director for the Jewish Film Festival of Grand Rapids. The festival is part of the larger Year of Interfaith Understanding, an initiative hosted by a partnership between Grand Valley State University’s Kaufman Interfaith Institute, the Grand Rapids Press, WGVU Public Media and the Grand Rapids Mayor’s office to “cultivate community interest and engagement of all faith traditions in West Michigan.” Case in point, the German drama Kadish for a Friend, a coming-of-age story about a Muslim teen that explores the deep ethnic and religious divisions between Jews and Arabs that will screen on May 6, wherein Cohen said “the interfaith equation” is pretty clear. It’s Cohen’s twelfth year as the festival’s programming director – something that started as a volunteer position and blossomed into a long-term passion project. “Getting the people there and getting the theater that we have is unbelievable, it’s really rewarding,” Cohen said. “…I have a list of people that request me to send information to them, people that we have never reached before.” Admission is $6 per film, but Cohen said Flex Pass tickets for eight admissions are available for $36 until May 1.

NEW AND IMPROVED The Grand Rapids Film Festival also returns this month – bigger and badder after its yearlong hiatus as it absorbs the

Michigan Film Festival to screen films throughout downtown Grand Rapids May 15-19. “The (Michigan) film festival was really known for its community initiative, really involving locals,” said Jennifer Shaneberger, director of GRFF. “The Grand Rapids Film Festival’s focus has always been wonderful independent films, and that really comes to life with the university involvement.” Kendall College of Art and Design is one of three festival “hubs” that also includes $5 indie film screenings at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts and Grand Valley State University’s Loosemore Auditorium, which plays a fitting host for the festival’s student submissions. This year, the GRFF hosts a free educational production workshop, which gives festivalgoers the opportunity to see the production process from the ground up, at KCAD throughout the entire week. “Basically, what we want to learn about is how to make film, how to make them better and how everyone else is doing it,” Shaneberger said. “It’s a comprehensive workshop that pulls together all different aspects of production.” From script writing, to story-boarding, to filming and editing, the workshop will produce what Shaneberger called three “tangible, three-minute shorts,” and it’s 100 percent free for the public to come and participate. n


The Great Gatsby

Movie///pREVIEWS by Diana Nowak Opening May 3

Iron man 3 Desperately in need of a break after teaming up with The Avengers, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) vows to spend more time at home with Pepper (Gwyneth Paltrow) and without his helmet. His plan goes awry when he is attacked by a new villain named The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley). When his life’s work is destroyed and the love of his life is threatened, Stark must piece his life back together and defeat Mandarin.

Opening May 10

The Great Gatsby

Opening May 17

Star Trek into Darkness In the second installation of the 2009 reboot, J.J. Abrams promises to pack in even more high-octane thrills aboard Captain James T. Kirk’s USS Enterprise. After being called home, Kirk’s vessel encounters a seemingly

Opening May 24

Epic From the creators of Rio and Ice Age comes the story of Mary Katherine (Amanda Seyfried), a young girl who sets out to find her father (Jason Sudekis) after he disappears in the woods. While searching through the forest, she stumbles upon a strange group of warriors called the Leafmen. Desperate to bring her family back together, she agrees to help the mythological clan fight a battle against the evil forces taking over their gardens.

Hangover 3 In the third and final film directed by Todd Phillips, t h e Wo l f p a ck members (Ed Helms, Bradley Co o p e r, Z a ch Galifianakis, Justin Bartha) are reunited in a place they never expected to set foot again: Las Vegas. With new cast members (John Goodman, Melissa McCarthy) and without a bachelor party to celebrate, the boys somehow find themselves in the middle of yet another hilarious situation. n

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Director Baz Luhrmann (Romeo + Juliet) brings to life F. Scott Fitzgerald’s world of glitzy gowns and gin-soaked jazz through the eyes of Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire), a would-be writer in New York City. After leaving the Midwest for the city, Carraway is captivated by a world unbeknownst to him, including the mysterious Jay Gatsby (Leonardo Dicaprio), Daisy Buchanan (Carey Mulligan) and many other interesting people during the city’s famous Roaring Twenties.

invincible force that both destroyed Earth’s defenses and attacked Starfleet. With the help of his crew, Kirk must track down this evasive force and settle the score once and for all.

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by Kyle Austin

Lit Life

Other Literary Events Grand Rapids Writer’s Exchange

Barnes and Noble – Woodland Mall Thursdays, 7 p.m. grwriters.org, (616) 940-0820 If you’re a budding writer who’s been slaving away at the computer in solitude, perhaps it’s time to get out of the house and into a writer’s group. The Grand Rapids Writer’s Exchange provides a community of support and self-improvement for writers of all skill levels, and new members are free to join in at any time.

Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him Grand Rapids Public Library May 1, 7 p.m. grpl.org, (616) 988-5400

Hear Captain Luis Carlos Montalván, a 17-year veteran of the U.S. Army, discuss his book, Until Tuesday, at this free event. The book, which chronicles both Montalván’s service and his postservice rehabilitation, explores the trauma and experiences of veterans and people with disabilities, as well as the healing power of animal/human relationships. Montalván’s service dog, Tuesday, will be on-hand as well.

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Singing Man: Seven Sacred Directions

Black River Books 330 Kalamazoo St., South Haven May 25, 1 p.m. blackriverbooks.net, (269) 637-7374 Singing Man, Michael Toahty, is a man of mixed Native American descent. His father was half-Pawnee and half-Kiowa, while his mother was full-blooded Southern Arapaho. Living in the 21st century with ties to ancient Native American culture has inspired Toahty to share his unique blend of Native American teachings and modern struggles through his writing. At this free event, he will share some of the spirit contained in his book, Seven Sacred Directions: A Native American Message of Transformation.

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Keeping the Flame:

The Moth Brings Storytelling Into the 21st Century

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10 minutes each to captivate the audience with a true, personal and llow me to blow the collective mind compelling tale. of Generation Y with a history lesson. Shocking as it may “The time limit forces [the storyteller] to sit down and really seem, humans did in fact once communicate without the think about exactly what it is they’re trying to communicate,” Cino aid of digital technology and social media. Mocked for their lack of speed and efficiency, relics like the letter, the said. “What information does the audience need to understand how telegram and the fax have been effectively phased out, but important this experience was to you?” Mainstage events allow time prior to the performance for acclaimed non-profit organization The Moth, there The Moth is one antiquated form of communication that deserves for the audience to have a few drinks, mingle and prepare Mainstage themselves for a truly immersive experience. Sold-out preservation: the ancient art of storytelling. Kalamazoo State Theatre Founded in 1997 by poet and novelist George Dawes performances everywhere, including two in Michigan May 22, 7:30 p.m. Green, The Moth began as a series of small gatherings last year, are proof of the communicative power of Tickets start at $30 storytelling. in New York City where Green and others would meet kazoostate.com, “Hopefully, people will encounter the opportunity up to swap true stories. The organization has grown (269) 345-6500 tremendously over time, hosting main-stage events and to be a part of a community, to sit back and think about open mic-style story slams in a number of major cities, what it really means to connect,” Cino said. Spend an hour on The Moth’s website and you’ll including Ann Arbor and Detroit. A strong media presence features regular podcasts, as well as The Moth Radio Hour, a find recordings of live stories about anything and everything, such as a wedding toast gone horribly awry, a stabbing at the hands of Latin Peabody-winning program that is broadcast on more than 200 radio stations nationwide. Kings gang members or the raw experiences of an embedded wartime “Our storytelling is very much the art of the raconteur,” said journalist. But it’s not the surface details that resonate with the audience most, but rather the pain, joy, regret, conflict, death, discovery and Maggie Cino, The Moth’s senior producer. “What we are fundamenrebirth that arise when the everyday and the extraordinary collide. tally interested in is the person and the passion behind the story.” Through a story hotline (1-877-799-6684), story slam performances “[The stories] are all fundamentally about things that have been and word-of-mouth recommendations, The Moth’s producers entergoing on since people were able to talk to each other,” Cino said. “Putting a frame around that in this chaotic and information-rich tain every story pitch they receive. Chosen storytellers range from famous names in the arts, sciences and pop culture to everyday men culture is something that people have really been responding to.” n and women. Each mainstage event revolves around a chosen theme (on May 22 it will be “Between Worlds”), and gives five storytellers


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missy black’s

STYLe NOTeS

It’s game on with a Candy Land runway show and a side of old-money accessories.

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our hot Saturday night is here thanks to Runway for Charity. Formerly known as the Design 1 Fashion Event, the fashion show’s new incarnation brings A.K. Rikk’s, Design 1 Salon Spa, Aura Cosmetics, The Matthew Agency and V isbeen Associates together for a sweet show rooted in Candy Land lore and wonder. Held May 11 at the A.K. Rikk’s location and event space, this indoor/ outdoor runway show is colorful, creative and out of this world according to Paige Cheever at Design 1 Salon Spa. “Anything candy you can think of will be there. There will be fun aspects of the rich, deep chocolates and the Candy Land look with the ice queen.” The entertainment factor comes in the form of detailed hair and makeup, things you wouldn’t wear every day and spring clothing fashions from gowns to casual wear. Sound frivolous and fun? It is and it’s not, as all proceeds from the event benefit the Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital. Looking good, doing good. You got this. Skip over to the Facebook page for specific details.

Runway for Charity

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I like my fashions with a side of sweet treats and tea. If you feel the same, followers of all things vintage should hit up Grand Rapids Public Museum for a Fashion & Tea program featuring vintage clothing, shoes and refreshments. Learn about Victorian and Edwardian era fashions, vintage clothing, customs and culture. Get a close-up look at all the “layers under gowns and the modesty in some of the fashion,” said Kate Moore, director of marketing and public relations. Talk to an educator, get some period clothing 101 and enjoy “the whole social aspect—shopping is a social thing, looking at the fashions, the tea, that’s very social as well.” The museum’s fantastic clothing collection can be viewed May 16 and 17 as well as June 6-8. Head to grmuseum.org for more information. Nothing says old money like initialed jewelry. If you don’t have the money to back you up, go faux with an Art Deco piece found at Spring Sweet in Holland. The store is very Paris flea market meets chic boutique with clothing and a fresh flower market to top it off. Available to order in any initial, the vintage brass chain bracelet has a large initial engraving, rhinestones for a little glitz and is from the Top Shelf jewelry line. “I think it’s a fun way to personalize,” Owner Spring Sweet (who shares her name with her store) said. “There are so many variations on monograms and initials. This is made to look like an old piece.” Sweet thinks the accessory should be worn with jeans, and a white button-down shirt with the sleeves rolled up or even a simple white t-shirt to let the piece get the attention it deserves. Pick one up for $45. Fashion designer Nicole Miller has two pieces of style advice for you: Don’t leave the house without looking in the rearview mirror (that goes for clothing and hair) and other than black hair, you should never wear clothes that match your hair color. More of her style solutions can be found at Studio K Clothing Company in Holland. The store is a big fan of everything Nicole Miller and has selections from her spring season. Fashion as an art form comes alive with dresses with “stunning fabric,” according to Owner Kimberly Petroelje. Imagine garments in reverse brocade with soft colors that

Fashion & Tea are fun and flirty with an edge to them. One item in particular is a gilded brocade frock with an illusion top in silk that’s gorgeous and perfect for weddings or special occasions. Think embroidered beading, bare backs and modern florals—where the florals are cut and overlapping with black mixed in among a soft pastel. “My store is contemporary and we like some of the classic looks,” Petroelje said. “Nicole Miller does that well.” Suiting crossover customers such as a 28 year old to a more mature age, the store also features some of the designer’s shirts in silk fabrics and florals to pair with denim or skinny jeans. In Bloom: An Evening of Spring Fashion with Lee & Birch hits Division’s Harris Building on May 18 at 7 p.m. The event includes a fashion show, pop-up store and shopping soiree with a few male models thrown in for good measure. (Or a teaser for new things to come?) Models Spring Sweet look dapper thanks to Cheeky Strut’s hair and makeup mojo and “ladies can shop looks right off and a coveted swag bag with loot from Cheeky the runway and get style inspiration for the new Strut. Stalk the Lee & Birch Facebook page for all season,” says Communications Coordinator Blair the juicy details.n Badge. Guests receive discount codes for the night


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FARM TO DOOR WE DELIVER! Local and Organic Produce, Meat & Specialty Goods. $10 off your ďƒžrst delivery! Use coupon code "REVUE"

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www.doorganicsgr.com

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/// Special Feature

The

Food Issue

We all have to eat, so we might as well enjoy what’s on our plate and all that comes along with it. In our third annual Food Issue, we take a look at the recent gluten-free rise and how restaurants accommodate it. We also check in on some local farmers market updates, talk to a “Top Chef” and take a look at the food incubators that help entrepreneurs get their ideas out of the kitchen and into the market. As a bonus for our readers, we asked local chefs to provide some of their recipes that you can recreate at home. Dinner parties will never be the same again. // by Revue Staff and Minions

Make This: Fried Pork Chop, prepared by Chef Mathew Green at Reserve. Recipe on page 52! Photo: Katy Batdorff

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Food Issue

Get the Gluten Out! More local restaurants are going gluten-free / By Li ndsay Patton-Carson

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Little “GF” logos are showing up on local restaurant menus — and they don’t mean food for your girlfriend. That’s because more and more local restaurants are retooling their menus to accommodate those with gluten and wheat intolerances, which vary. While all come with bummer side effects, celiac disease is most life-threatening of the group.

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“The problem with celiac disease is if you continue to ingest the wheat, you can be at an increased risk for certain kinds of cancers in the stomach lining and the G.I. tract,” said Karyn Gell, a doctor at Grand Rapids Allergy, which specializes in asthma and allergy care. That’s not all. In addition to cancer risks, people with celiac disease suffer from some of the most unglamorous side effects possible: diarrhea, bloating, gas, constipation, depression, fatigue and that dreaded hangover feeling, says one person who went gluten-free a year and a half ago. More than ever, businesses in the food industry recognize the pain and discomfort those with intolerances face and adjust menus accordingly. “We’re very respectful of other people’s allergies,” said Ted Watson, general manager at Brick Road Pizza in Grand Rapids, which offers nearly every menu item in a gluten-free option. “They come here trusting that we’re not going to make people sick.”

“Your body is a machine. If you put cheap gas in it, you might have problems with it.” —Aaron Smith, executive chef, Epic Bistro

Not everyone who chooses to go gluten free has celiac disease, however. Many have gluten intolerances, which are not as serious as celiac, but still result in those nasty side effects. “If somebody has celiac disease or is really allergic, those people call days in advance,” said Josef Huber, corporate executive chef at Amway Hotel Corporation. “They take a stand and they’re worried about it.” Within the past two years, the diet has grown not only locally, but on national levels. Just last year, the gluten-free diet came in at No. 2 on Time magazine’s top 10 list of food trends. That same year, Miley Cyrus endorsed the diet on Twitter and in 2010, after going on the diet, tennis star Novak Djokovic won five Grand Slam titles. Such celebrity endorsements lead to more interest in the diet and more tweaks to recipes and menu items. Now it’s even common to see a gluten-free aisle at grocery stores. “It’s getting better and better,” said Christina KlunderMeuser, co-owner of Grand Central Market in Grand Rapids. “When we were looking into gluten-free options two years ago, the products were not that awesome.” GCM stocks its shelves with gluten-free products such as beer, pasta and snacks, and also uses gluten-free meats from Dietz & Watson and breads from Gordon Foods, a large supplier to area businesses. “There has been incremental interest in gluten-free products for the past six years and more so in the past two years as consumers have become more aware of gluten,” said Andy Maier, spokesperson for Gordon Food Service. And yes, even though gluten is found in wheat, the protein can sneak into a lot of meat items — mostly processed products. “Processed meats have to be shelf-stable, so gluten is included as a stabilizing agent,” said Cheryl Powell, co-owner of GCM, who says Dietz & Watson’s meats are all natural, which make them gluten-free.


Gluten-free selections at Martell’s include Chicken Marsala and Pan-Seared Atlantic Salmon.

Photos: Joe Boomgaard

What the hell is gluten? So, you’ve heard the term. It’s on restaurant menus. It’s in grocery aisles. But what the hell does it mean? Well, first of all, wheat and gluten are not the same thing. Gluten is a protein complex found in wheat, as well as barley and rye. Basically, it’s what helps baked products rise and gives them a chewy texture. Gluten is a sneaky little bastard, though, and is not limited to just wheat-based products. It’s also an ingredient in soy sauce, processed meats, root beer (!?), salad dressings, Twizzlers and more, making reading labels especially important for those on gluten-free diets.

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Since gluten can hide in certain foods such as meat, soy and teriyaki sauces and hard candies, reading labels and talking to restaurants about their menus is important, Doctor Gell says. “That’s a problem with eating out — you don’t have a label to read. And our motto here is every label must be read before that food goes in your mouth,” Gell said. “If it doesn’t have a label, then you’re taking a chance.” Luckily for those with gluten intolerance, there are local businesses that educate their staff on customer dietary needs. “We provide explanations and options for our service and kitchen staffs,” said Matthew Burian, president and partner at The Millennium Restaurant Group in Kalamazoo. “Another key point in our education is that ‘gluten-free’ and ‘celiac’ [are] not the same thing.” Martell’s, one of Millennium’s 10 restaurants and catering businesses, went as far as to create separate menus for lunch, dinner and beverages. “Rather than strictly treating an ailment, diners now seem to be selecting gluten free as a means to greater fitness and health,” Burian said. Aaron Smith, who is executive chef at Millennium’s Epic Bistro, learned about the health benefits from his dietician sisterin-law, who is on the gluten-free diet, along with the rest of her family. He says the diet not only boosts energy, but people that go gluten-free are more aware of what they’re putting in their bodies. “Your body is a machine. If you put cheap gas in it, you might have problems with it,” he said.

At Amway, Huber makes sure to have gluten-free options ready for diners, but says the recent rise in dietary needs has made catering for large-scale banquets a little more difficult. “Over the last 15 or 20 years, when I did banquets, we maybe had one out of 100 requests, now we have 10-15 percent special meals.” But that’s only until it’s time for dessert. “A lot of people out there are ‘I’m gluten-free until it comes to dessert.’ People can eat cake all day long,” Huber said. “You know how many gluten-free cakes I make? Zero.” n

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Food Issue

Incubators Help Businesses Get into the Market / By Jane S imons

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For local would-be food entrepreneurs, incubators offer a chance to get their ideas out of the kitchen and into the market. These incubators, which are typically called food and/or kitchen incubators, got their start in Michigan in 2005 when Ron Steiner, Regional Entrepreneurship Educator with Michigan State University Extension, opened the Starting Block, a kitchen incubator in Hart. Steiner, executive director of the Starting Block, said there are now five similar operations in the southwest Michigan area which have opened within the past two to three years. “One of my initiatives for MSU Extension was to be the champion of a regional kitchen incubator,” Steiner said. “I was part of a group which felt that strategically the need for kitchen incubators was there to generate a new environment focusing on specialty food products.” Those specialty foods Steiner references are made primarily for shelf sale or wholesale and include items such as baked goods, jellies and jams and pickled products. In addition to being licensed to produce these food products, the Starting Block also is a meat processing facility. Steiner said the meat processing is regulated and licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture and the specialty food production is regulated and licensed by the Michigan Department of Agriculture. At 11,000 square feet, Steiner’s facility is among the larger food/kitchen incubators. Though incubators vary in size, they operate in pretty much the same way. Clients pay an hourly rate, which may start at $27.50 and decrease from there depending on the amount of commercial

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kitchen space they rent. This fee most often includes kitchen utensils and pots and pans, although the selection varies from incubator to incubator. Janet Tlapek, president and owner of Facility Kitchens in Lowell, said she doesn’t provide much in the way of cooking gear because every client is working on something different. “They tend to bring their own utensils,” Tlapek said. “I have pots and pans here, but many of them like to use their own, particularly if they’re cooking with heavy garlic.”

“The greatest thing that incubators do is give people time to develop a track record and a business plan so that by the time they go to a bank to get financing, they’re no longer a start-up.” —Ron Steiner, The Starting Block Kitchen Incubator

Chef Michael McKay at Facility Kitchen in Lowell. McKay is opening a new restaurant and lounge, McKay’s/Prohibition, in downtown Grand Rapids. Photo: Stephanie Harding

Unlike Steiner, who brought plenty of food experience to his facility, Tlapek is neither a cook nor a foodie. She is a professional accountant who saw an opportunity to provide a service and make money. “It appealed to me so much because you can begin a business and outsource the whole facility,” she said. “As an accountant, that made overwhelming sense.” In 2010, one year after researching the incubator concept, Tlapek decided to renovate an existing building, which now houses her 3,000-square-foot facility. Her hourly rates start at $27.50. She said individuals who want to start a food business will do much better if they don’t spend their own money to build a facility and focus instead on marketing and sales and packaging and distribution. Kelly Lecoy, owner of Uptown Kitchen, an 800-square-foot incubator in Grand Rapids that opened in February 2012, said by providing kitchen equipment and space to work in, clients are saving anywhere between $20,000 and $100,000.

“We’re providing business and kitchen resources, marketing and social media, and helping them through licensing,” Lecoy said. “We don’t want to be a place where businesses are constantly starting and failing.” In addition to offering kitchen space, Tlapek also accepts deliveries, as well as store equipment and ingredients. She has three people who perform work for her, but aren’t directly employed by her, which keeps costs low. “The greatest thing that incubators do is give people time to develop a track record and a business plan so that by the time they go to a bank to get financing, they’re no longer a start-up,” Steiner said. “We want them to launch their business and make all their mistakes at an incubator.” Since the Starting Block opened, 17 clients have graduated and gone on to own their own licensed kitchen facility or have turned production of their food products over to a co-packer so they can handle the business end of their enterprise. A co-pack-


Food Incubator Success Stories / By Carly Plank These businesses took advantage of local incubators to get their products out to the masses. The Canning Diva Incubator: Facility Kitchens (Lowell) Diane Devereaux’s canning business has been featured on WZZM 13 and specializes in capturing the flavors and freshness of fresh seasonal produce in salsas, jams, soups and many other recipes. CG Catering Incubator: Facility Kitchens (Lowell) A professional-grade catering company owned by Chef Chris Gribble, CG Catering has served at events all over the state and is known for stylish, high quality dishes.

Art Azevedo of Art’s Hot Salsa at Uptown Kitchen. Photo: Jonathan Stoner

er refers to a facility that has equipment to produce high volumes of product. Steiner said he has established a threeyear timeframe for a client to graduate, but says most of them graduate in far less time. He said his incubator can accommodate up to three or four clients at the same time if they’re doing a different product. The Starting Block is open 24/7 and has a client base of around 30, some of whom only come in once a month. John Coram, owner of Johnny Secreto Foods, spent about one year perfecting his pasta sauces, barbeque sauces and spice mixes at Facility Kitchens before launching

Deliciosity Incubator: Uptown Kitchen (Grand Rapids) Jeremy Kuhn started Deliciosity, which specializes in raw and vegan desserts, after deciding to cut animal products out of his diet. The healthy, sweet treats can be found at Bartertown in Grand Rapids. Dough Chicks Incubator: Can-Do Kitchen (Kalamazoo) Mother and daughter team Denise and Kara Steeley use Can-Do to produce all-natural cookies, granola and truffles distributed to stores in Battle Creek, Kalamazoo and Portage. Good Life Granola Incubator: The Starting Block Kitchen (Hart) Holland’s Good Life Granola began in Starting Block’s kitchens and is now sold in Meijer and

the product line in May 2012. Not long after that he began using a co-packer to produce the sauces, although he still mixes his spice blends at Tlapek’s facility. Tlapek said by the time people come to her, they are already commercializing their product. “The people I see are working on everything from catering, where they cook and take the food and immediately serve it, to barbequing or cooking inside,” Tlapek said. “They also package food for wholesale and retail sales or they could be making fresh salsa, pizzas for freezing, jams and jellies and spices. “Because we are a licensed vendor, we serve as a place where hot dog stand owners can come in and change out their old water or re-stock their cart.” Lecoy said the local food movement is all about how the local food economy affects the overall economy. “You’re voting with dollars and the choices you make every time you put something in your mouth,” Lecoy said. “Food affects our health. Through these businesses, we are working toward a healthy livelihood.” n

other grocery stores along the lakeshore. In 2011, it was featured on “The Today Show.” Making Thyme Kitchen Incubator: Uptown Kitchen (Grand Rapids) The Grand Rapids (966 Cherry St. SE) retailer offers fresh or frozen entrees made from scratch from local goods for a home cooked meal regardless of your time crunch. Delivery is an added bonus. Pit Stop Catering Incubator: Facility Kitchens (Lowell) Pit Stop specializes in foods that could be found at a summer barbeque, including salmon, salads, mac ‘n’ cheese and meat smoked over Michigan cherry pits for extra flavor.

Rita Girl’s Bakery Incubator: Kitchen Sinc (Grand Rapids) Taking advantage of 24-hour availability and retail space inside MoDiv, Rita Tornga founded her bakery in 2010, selling cookies and cupcakes and filling a niche in downtown Grand Rapids. Secreto Foods Incubator: Family Kitchens (Lowell) John Coram used Family Kitchens food incubator to create and distribute his line of pasta and barbecue sauces, which were recently picked up by Meijer.

Secreto Foods Uses Food Incubator to Launch Business

S

ecreto Foods produces and distributes a line of pasta and barbeque sauces and four different spice blends sold at grocery stores and farmers markets. Owner John Coram’s pasta sauce was recently chosen for inclusion in Meijer supermarkets “Made in Michigan” product lineup and got off the ground thanks to Family Kitchens incubator in Lowell. “We introduced the product line one year ago this May. It’s been an incredible adventure,” said Coram, who got his start at the Facility Kitchens food incubator in Lowell. Coram, who formerly worked in marketing and sales for Valley City Signs, said he did not have the capital necessary to start a business when he decided in 2011 to try his hand at mass producing the sauces and spice mixes. “A licensed kitchen is the foundation for a company like mine,” Coram said. “A lot of people want to get started, but they don’t understand the large time and money investment it takes before you can get a product going.” His wife encouraged him to think about starting his own business after watching him give away the sauces and spice mixes as birthday and holiday gifts. As the popularity of the product line increased, Coram had the happy dilemma of finding a way to mass produce the sauces. He still blends the spice mixtures at Facility Kitchens. “It took a lot of hard work to get to this point,” he said. “I can’t say enough about the importance of having access to Facility Kitchens.”

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Kish’s Kitchen

“Top Chef Seattle” winner and Kentwood native Kristen Kish was recently promoted to chef de cuisine for Menton in Boston, a five-diamond and five-star property of Relais & Châteaux. She chats with REVUE about chicken tenders, Olga’s Kitchen, and refuses to stick it to someone in her past.

After winning “Top Chef Seattle,” do you have any advice for cooks and chefs?

always pick it up for a treat as a kid, growing up when they didn’t cook. Although ... one of the things I kind of crave, at Olga’s Kitchen at the mall, is the orange cream shake drink and the chicken wraps. Amazing. (laughs) I like simple food. Now, my favorite meal when I come home is my mother’s cooking.

When it comes to cooking, I don’t follow recipes. It’s very hard for me to write them. If you mess something up, it’s just food. It’s going to taste good. If you put good ingredients together, it doesn’t really matter how you cook them if you season what it is you are making. Cooking is fun. It’s not supposed to be an intimidating thing. Ideally, it’s enjoyable. A goal as a chef is to inspire and make people do it at home in their own kitchen.

What wouldn’t you eat growing up? Raw tomatoes, cooked mushrooms — the smells alone would make me sick and I would hide in my room — sour cream and English muffins. As an adult, I love those things. As an adult, two things in particular are salmon or lamb.

Is there a food or ingredient you can’t live without?

What do you do on your days off?

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I cannot live without chicken fingers. I eat them often. They’re kind of my guilty pleasure, even though I don’t feel guilty about eating them. I eat crappy, crappy chicken fingers. I would never serve them. It’s my personal dinner. When it comes to ingredients, I love farmers markets. When I don’t have access to one, I become a little sad, almost. I really look forward to walking through farmers markets and getting beautiful, fresh ingredients. And my go-to secret ingredient is sherry vinegar. It kind of goes into everything I do.

It’s well known that your favorite dessert is a macaron. What is the best filling? I don’t think there is any bad filling for them. My personal preference is for anything tart, whether it is a lemon curd or a really tart berry jam. Or, completely opposite of that is peanut butter. You can put peanut butter on anything.

Growing up in West Michigan, what were the restaurants you loved? The 44th Street Bistro. It changed a few times. I always used to get chicken tenders and broccoli cheese soup. They served warm white bread and my parents would

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There’s never a day where there is nothing. There’s always a few hours of work, but I do like to run and clear my head. I also meet and catch up with my friends. We don’t really get to sit down and chat like we used to. And, going out to eat.

Is there anyone in West Michigan you’d like to stick it to?

“I cannot live without chicken fingers. I eat them often. They’re kind of my guilty pleasure, even though I don’t feel guilty about eating them. I eat crappy, crappy chicken fingers.”

I had a teacher in high school that I told I wanted to be in finance and business, that sort of thing, and he basically told me, not in as many words, that I couldn’t do it because I wouldn’t be good at it. But now, that threw me in the direction I am in now. I can’t really be mad. I will say thank you to him. No grudges though. (Laughs.) n Interview conducted and condensed by Matt Simpson Siegel. Edited by Lindsay Patton-Carson. Photo: Mercure Photography


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Entrée

Make This!

Local Chefs share their recipes

Deep Fried Pork Chop with Crispy Polenta, Tempura Apples, Wilted Young Greens By Mathew Green, executive chef, Reserve 4 pork chops, one inch thick at least Salt Lard 6 ounces dry polenta 24 ounces chicken stock 4 ounces milk 2 ounces butter 2 ounces grated parmesan 1 teaspoon salt 2 apples 2 ounces cornstarch 2 ounces soda water 2 teaspoon baking powder Baby kale and baby mustard greens Balsamic vinegar Extra virgin olive oil First, take the pork chops and sprinkle generously on both sides with salt. You can do this up to a day ahead. Meanwhile, bring the chicken stock, milk, butter, and teaspoon of salt to a boil. Whisk continuously while you sprinkle in the dry polenta. Continue to stir as the polenta thickens. Reduce heat and stir often. Cook for 30-45 minutes. Add grated cheese and add more salt to taste. Grease up a 9x13ish baking dish and pour in the polenta. Cool completely in the refrigerator.   Get out the largest pot you own, something that the pork chops will fit into all together, fill one third of the way to the top with lard and heat to 350ºF. Turn the heat up all the way and carefully put the pork chops in. Fry for 8-12 minutes, but be sure to check the internal temperature with a meat thermometer. The FDA recommends 145ºF. Mix the cornstarch, soda water and baking powder. Slice the apples and coat in the tempura batter. Fry until lightly browned and crispy. While still warm, toss the tempura apples in a bowl with the baby greens, oil and vinegar. Cut the polenta cake into your favorite shape, squares, rectangles, circles, triangles. Deep fry until lightly browned and crispy.   Serve the pork chops with the fried polenta and topped with the apples and wilted greens. Add a little bit more vinegar and oil over the whole thing. Photo: Katy Batdorff

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Vegetarian

Omnivore

Photo: Katy Batdorff

Fresh Rolls

Beef Tips on Toast

By Lisa Her, owner and head chef, Erb Thai

By Adam Watts, executive chef, Grand Rapids Brewing Co.

Ingredients: Dried Rice Paper Lettuce Carrots Green Onions Cucumbers Rice Noodles Cilantro (Note: All veggies should be cut into strips.)

Serves: Four

Need Sauce? You can buy sweet chili sauce at your local grocery store. Helpful Hints Try it with broccoli, bell peppers, beansprouts or any of your favorite veggies.

4 ea slices of brewers grain bread or any crusty European-style loaf cut into 3/4” size slices Season your beef with salt and pepper. Start with a large non-stick sauté pan over medium heat and add oil and tips. Sauté until color forms on all sides and remove from pan onto a side plate. Next, add mushrooms, shallot and garlic and sweat until slight color forms. Deglaze with your favorite brown ale or dry red wine. Reduce the liquid by half and add beef stock, heavy cream and thyme. Simmer until the sauce starts to thicken (3-5 minutes). Toast bread under a broiler until golden brown. Cut bread into bite-sized pieces and start to assemble the dish. Place beef tips back into the sauce and cook to desired temperature. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Spoon out the sauce over the toast points. Wipe out the sauté pan and place back on the stove over medium heat. Add butter and cook eggs to desired style. Serve with a serrated steak knife.

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Fresh Roll Directions 1. Dip the rice paper in warm water. Do not submerge the rice paper in water too long or else the paper will lose shape and strength. 2. Place the rice noodles and strips of veggies onto the wet rice paper about 1/4 from the bottom. 3. Roll the bottom part of the rice paper up and over the rice noodles and veggies. 4. Gently roll the up the gathered rice noodles and veggies with the rice paper. Be sure to pull and tuck the rice noodles and veggies back while you are rolling them up. This technique will help your fresh roll keep its log shape. 5. Once your roll is half way up the rice paper, flip the right and left sides of the rice paper over the roll. 6. Continue rolling up the roll to the top of the rice paper. Remember to continue pulling and tucking the veggies back while you are rolling. 7. The rice paper will self-adhere, keeping all the rice noodles and veggies inside.

1 lb. beef top round, tenderloin or loin, sliced into 1” cubes 2 T canola oil 1 pint crimini mushrooms, stems removed and quartered 1 tsp. shallot, fine chopped 1 tsp. garlic, chopped 1 tsp. thyme, picked leaves 2 T brown ale [GRBC’s John Ball Brown] 1/2 C beef stock 1/2 C heavy cream 2 T butter 4 ea whole eggs TT salt TT black pepper

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Hors d’oeuvre

Blue Cheese Stuffed Dates

By Jamie & Jeremy Paquin, MIA + GRACE Date Filling 8 oz. cream cheese 1 cup Gorgonzola or other mild blue cheese, crumbled 1-2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1-2 tablespoons honey 2 cloves of roasted garlic, mashed into a paste with olive oil 1-2 teaspoons black pepper Kosher salt (to taste) For garnish: balsamic reduction (recipe follows) honey candied walnuts (recipe follows) Combine cheeses, vinegar, honey and garlic in a bowl. With a hand mixer, combine until mixture is creamy. Season the cheese mixture with black pepper, granulated garlic and kosher salt, and mix well. Store filling in an airtight container under refrigeration. Can be prepared up to one week in advance. Balsamic Reduction 1 cup balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons honey Pour balsamic vinegar into a small sauce pan. Bring vinegar to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer gently until reduced to Âź cup. Stir in the honey. Cool to room temperature. Store the reduction in an airtight container under refrigeration. Allow it to come to room temperature before using.

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Candied Walnuts 2 cups walnuts, toasted (at 325 degrees for 7-10 minutes) 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup water Place sugar and water in a sauce pan. Stir over medium high heat until boiling vigorously. Continue cooking until sugar is amber in color and thick. Working quickly, with a wooden spoon, pour melted sugar over walnuts and stir until completely coated. Stir the walnuts occasionally until completely cool to help break them apart. Store candied walnuts in an airtight container up to one week. Halve and seed medjool dates, fill the crevice with the cheese mixture. Top with a candied walnut and then drizzle with balsamic reduction and honey.

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Photo: Jay Bolt, Revel


GLUTEN-FREE

Vegetarian

Photo: Katy Batdorff

Lemon Corn Muffins with Berry Icing By Matthew Russell, Bartertown

Wet ingredients: 3/4 cup sugar 2 cup soy milk 2 tsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. lemon extract 1/4 cup canola oil 1/4 cup non hydrogenated shortening (softened) 1 1/2 tbsp. lemon or orange zest

By Denise Miller, executive chef, Fuel Vegetarian 1 cup butter 1 cup white onion, finely chopped 1/2 cup celery, finely chopped 1 cup shallots finely chopped 2 teaspoons garlic, minced 2 tablespoons flour 1 cup whole tomatoes 2 cups vegetable stock 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon black pepper ¼ teaspoon of cayenne 1 1/2 cups crumbled tofu In a large saucepan, melt butter and sauté onion, celery and shallots until tender. Add garlic and cook one minute more. Stir in flour and stir constantly until golden brown. Add tomatoes and brown. Blend in stock and simmer 10 minutes. Add salt, pepper, cayenne and tofu; cook slowly 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with dirty rice.

Mix dry and wet separately in bowls, then combine in one bowl. Bake in lined cupcake pans for about 18-20 minutes at 350 degrees or until the tops have domed and started to brown. Remove from oven and cool completely before decorating. Makes a dozen muffins.

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Dry ingredients: 1 1/2 cups GF flour mix (Russell recommends Bob’s Red Mill) 1/2 cup yellow corn meal 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum 1/4 tsp. salt

Vegetarian Etouffe

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Food Issue

The market last summer Photos: Richard Deming

Fulton Street Farmers Market Renovations Almost Complete / By Audrey Soc hor

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A

This year, the market added a new managlthough the Fulton Street Farmers er’s office and wheelchair-accessible restrooms. Market experienced unforeseen Fulton Street But the biggest project is a year-round building, problems during renovations, the Farmers Market which will house about eight vendors. The build1147 E. Fulton St. final phase of construction will be Grand Rapids, ing’s green roof is a work in progress. complete by the May 4 opening day. (616) 454-4118, With most of the renovations complete, Contamination in the soil caused delays and fultonstreetmarket.org Helms-Maletic said the response from both made it necessary to extend the campaign for customers and venders has been hugely positive. capital before moving ahead. The entire project Open Tues., Wed., Fri., “Patrons appreciate the wider aisles and cost more than $3 million from start to finish. Sat., 8 a.m.–3 p.m., beginning Saturday, the ability to stay — mostly, depending on the “Thanks to many generous funders and to May 4 wind — dry while they shop,” she said. “Vendors several new donors, we completed the campaign are spending less time setting up and taking in November 2012 and were able to re-start down tarps each day, and many have reported construction in January,” said Christine Helmsincreased customer traffic, which benefits their business.” Maletic, project development manager. Parking has been a concern for some patrons, but urban Since renovations started, the farmers market installed a areas provide limited opportunities for expansion. Changes to new underground storm water management system and built parking have helped, but Helms-Maletic encourages the use a shed with overhead sheltering and lighting, in addition to of alternative transportation. new stalls with upgraded electrical and water access. Or customers could use the Market’s Wednesday hours “We also rearranged the parking area to encourage between 4-7:30 p.m. smoother traffic flow, repaired the pavement, added new trees “Many favorite vendors are still there, but the jostling and landscaping, installed extra bike racks and created a new, enhanced bus stop,” Helms-Maletic said. crowds are not,” Helms-Maleic said. n

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Food Stamps Make Farmers Markets More Accessible About 1.8 million people in Michigan receive benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program. Since 2007, farmers markets have been collaborating with SNAP, when the Michigan Food Policy Council and Michigan Farmers Market Association began increasing the number of markets capable of accepting electronic benefits like Bridge Cards. Since 2010, people with SNAP benefits can get twice as much local produce with the Double Up Food Bucks program. Customers use their bridge card at one of 40 participating markets (including the 100-Mile Market and Fulton Street, Holland and Muskegon farmers markets) and get an equal amount of tokens or electronic credit back to use on more Michigan-grown fruits and vegetables. Over the next several years, the program will expand to include more of the nearly 80 farmers markets that accept Bridge Cards. —Lauren Longo


So Close We Can Taste It:

Downtown Market Opens Outdoor Market This Month / By Steve n de Polo

The Grand Rapids Downtown Market has been busy over the past several months, securing vendors and completing construction on the $30 million culinary cathedral. Set to open its outdoor seasonal market May 4 and its indoor market in July, the 138,000-square-foot, year-round market recently announced the first of 24 vendors that will occupy the indoor food hall.

100-Mile Market 507 Harrison St., Kalamazoo May-Oct., Wed. 3-7 p.m. (269) 342-5686

GVSU Farmers Market Allendale Campus, Parking Lot H June 5-Sept. 25, Wed. 10 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Ada Village Farmers Market 7239 Thornapple River Dr., Ada June-Sept., Tues. 12-6 p.m. (616) 676-9191

Holland Municipal Farmers Market (Eighth Street Farmers Market) 150 W 8th St., Holland May-Nov., Wed. & Sat. 8 a.m.–4 p.m. (616) 355-1138

Battle Creek Farmers Market Festival Market Square, Battle Creek May-Oct., Wed. & Sat. 9 a.m.–1 p.m. (269) 968-3448 Byron Farmers Market 84th Street and Byron Center Avenue (616) 878-6029 June-TBA, Tues. & Fri. 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Caledonia Farmers Market 9942 Cherry Valley Ave. May-Oct., Sat. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (269) 838-5264

Lowell Area Farmers Market 2111 W. Main St. Mid-June to mid-Sept., Thurs. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. (616) 897-9186 Moelker Orchards & Farm Market 0-9265 Kenowa Ave., Grand Rapids July-Oct., Mon. thru Sat. 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Nov.-Feb., 8 a.m.–5:30 p.m. (616) 453-2585

Centerpointe Mall Farmers Market 3665 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids May-Oct., Fri. 12-6 p.m. (616) 949-2550

Muskegon Farmers Market 700 Yuba St., Muskegon May-Nov., Tues., Thurs. & Sat. 6 a.m. –3 p.m. Dec., Sat. 7 a.m.–3 p.m. (231) 722-3251

Fulton Street Farmers Market 1145 E. Fulton St., Grand Rapids Open year-round, but regular hours are May-December Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 8 a.m.–3 pm. (616) 454-4118

Muskegon Heights Farmers Market 2724 Peck, Muskegon Heights Memorial weekend–Aug. Fri. and Sat. 7 a.m.–7 p.m. (231) 724-3100

Grand Haven Farmer’s Market Chinook Pier, Grand Haven June-Oct., Wed. & Sat. 8 a.m.–2 p.m. (616) 842-4910 Grandville Farmers Market 4055 Maple St., Grandville June-Oct., Tues. 8 a.m.–1 p.m. (616) 531-3030

New Horizons Farmers Market 2660 Breton Road at Woodmeadow June-Oct., Wed. 2-7 p.m. (616) 889-4922 Plainfield Township Farmers Market 4411 Plainfield Ave. NE June-Oct., Tues. and Thurs. 2-7 p.m. (616) 364-8466 Rockford Farmers Market South Squire St., Rockford June-Oct., Sat. 8 a.m.–1 p.m. (616) 866-1537 Saugatuck Center for the Arts (SCA) Farmers Market 400 Culver St., Saugatuck May-Oct., Fri. 8 a.m.–2 p.m. (269) 857-2399 South East Area Farmers Market 334 Burton St. SE June-Oct., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. (616) 632-7272 YMCA Farmers Market 475 Lake Michigan Dr., Grand Rapids June-Sept., Thurs. 3-7p.m. (616) 430-0511

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by Shelby Kibler, formerly of Zingerman’s baking Typical of the artisanal businesses recruited to school in Ann Arbor. the market are Simpatico Coffee and Love’s Ice There will also be fresh produce, meats, Cream. Simpatico has been roasting fair-trade seafood, dairy, baked goods, flowers, wines and beans from the Oaxaca region of Mexico for locally brewed beer sold by the two dozen indoor 18 months, which it sells to local coffee shops, vendors, as well as from the covered 58-stall restaurants and specialty stores from its Holland outdoor farmers market. production facility. Owner Alex Fink is excited to The investors envision the market to be a offer a second retail location in downtown Grand destination for local food innovation, education Rapids. and experimentation. In addition to food sales, “We want to make coffee a fun experience, there will also be two restaurants, a kitchen incushow people where the beans come from, how bator/certified commercial kitchen, coffee is roasted and just how fresh kids kitchen, wholesale produce coffee can be,” Fink said. distribution center and office space. Chris McKeller looks forward Downtown Market Look up and you will see a to opening Love’s Ice Cream in the Grand Rapids 6,000-square-foot rooftop greenmarket. The local entrepreneur and 435 Ionia SW house. The greenhouse is the founder of Grand Rapids Cooking (616) 805-5308, downtownmarketgr.com building’s signature design eleSchool will serve hand-crafted ice ment, as it supports educational cream made from local organic Outdoor Market opening programming that show school grass-grazed dairy as well as gourday: Saturday, May 4 children how real food is grown met non-dairy frozen desserts. and cooked. There are also work“I am a bit obsessed with Hours: shops and gardening classes held ingredients and the market will Tuesday: 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Thursday: 4–7 p.m. there. The country’s first LEEDallow me to share my whole food Saturday: 8: a.m.–1 p.m. rated public market also promotes perspective around organic, local sustainability through innovative and quality with others like me,” uses of energy, lighting, water and McKeller said. advanced composting and recycling programs. Spread over 3.4 acres, the mammoth facilPlanners expect the facility to lead to the ity provides space for small, independent food creation of 1,270 jobs, offer start-up opportunibusinesses that focus on Michigan-grown-andties for budding entrepreneurs and potentially produced foods. Such vendors include Aperitivo, provide $775 million in economic impact over a a wine and cheese-tasting shop, which is owned 10-year period. Sounds tasty indeed. n by Art of the Table’s Amy Ruis and managed by the business’ “cheesemonger,” Kate Leeder, as well as Field & Fire, an artisan bakery owned

West MI Farmers Markets

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Food Issue

Eat Like a Minion We gave our current and former minions $20 to try a new restaurant and tell us about their experience. Here are the results, as told to us by the minions.

London Grill

CVLT PIZZA

Carly Plank, current minion

Elijah Brumback, former minion

On the creepily deserted streets of Kalamazoo on a Sunday evening, a truly authentic British pub complete with Indian menu options and beverages from across the Atlantic was the most hopping place in town. While the free appetizer of papadum and sweet tomato chutney and the salty, cheesy stacked naan I ordered were filling and surprisingly flavorful, I remained stateside with a California white zinfandel.

Other than the killer adornments (haha, get it?), the place is pretty bare bones — clearly it’s all about the pizza. I am all about the pizza too. Let me break it down. We’re talking vegan/vegetarian mixology. For those who are of the persuasion that meat is the best and only delivery vehicle, it’s time to break those shackles and stuff your pie hole with the sweet, savory and often unexpected pleasures of CVLT’s toppings.

214 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo

10 Jefferson St. SE, Grand Rapids

Crust 54

Wally’s Bar & Grill

Kelli Gilmore, former minion

Meaghan Minkus, former minion

Crust 54 is a tasty, local pizza joint in Holland. The environment was casual with a seat-yourself and order-at-the-counter policy. We ordered a large thin-crust Chicago style barbecue chicken pizza that was more than enough for two people. The sauce was just the right amount of spicy and sweet but more toppings would have made it even better.

Wally’s down-to-earth, small-town atmosphere is complemented nicely by its better-than-your-grandma’s Yankee Pot Roast, served with grilled onions, Swiss cheese and a caper-mayo sauce (Capers! Fancy!) on an onion bun. With a side of onion rings and washed down with a Guinness, the whole meal comes out to $19.39 with tip and tax.

54 E. 8th St., Holland; (616) 394-3002

128 Hoffman St., Saugatuck

Curragh

New Holland Brewery

Kari Norton, current minion

Lauren Longo, current minion

Eating at Curragh was like eating a home-cooked meal from my grandma in Ireland – if she lived in Ireland, that is. I like to celebrate my McNaughton heritage, and this pub actually made me feel like I was there. The shepherd’s pie was amazing and I would eat there every day if I could.

The Dixie Luau is not I-don’t-know-what-to-eat-let’s-just-getpizza, pizza. Nor is it just Hawaiian. I usually prefer thick, chewy crust, but this thin-crusted pizza was not too crunchy and covered in prosciutto, bacon, pineapple and five different cheeses (I ordered mine sans banana peppers). I demolished and loved it anyway.

75 E. 8th St., Holland

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66 E 8th St., Holland

Bostwick Lake Inn Kyle Austin, former minion At Bostwick, I expected the flavorful menu options and casually classy atmosphere typical of other Gilmore joints, and I was not disappointed. The portions were large, but my dish (prime rib and pasta with succulent sautéed veggies) was so delicious that I welcomed the leftovers. The cozy ambiance of the place nurtured our table’s conversation, which kept coming back to the food. Now that’s full-circle excellence. 8521 Belding Rd. NE, Rockford

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Old Burdick’s Bar and Grille Audrey Sochor, current minion Walking into Burdick’s, it took me a moment to realize it’s an upscale sports bar. The first hint came from glancing around at all the photos of top athletes and TVs displaying games, minus the “in your face” feel. The food is deliciously classic Americana, including a rich and creamy mac and cheese topped with baconwrapped shrimp. 100 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo


The Next Best Thing We present three former food fixtures with cult followings whose flavors are gone, but not forgotten. We attempt the impossible with the next best thing. / By Matt Simpson Siegel RIP Mr. Fables, 1963-2000 Survived by The Filling Station West Michigan was once dotted with Mr. Fables, renowned for its onion rings and Mr. Fabulous Burger, the olive burger of olive burgers. It closed its final door in 2000. Although Yesterdog Owner Bill Lewis (and former Fables worker) owns the trademark, there are not any definite plans for the future. Former Fables competitor and Mr. Burger off-shoot The Filling Station offers up its own Mr. Fabulous and many diehards swear by it. Sit in the cafeteria-style dining room and let your taste buds take you back. The Filling Station, 4750 Alpine Ave. NW, Comstock Park; (616) 784-6706

RIP Little Mexico, 1968-2008 & 2010-2013 Survived by El Granjero Besieged by a fire in 2008 from which it never fully recovered after reopening in 2010, Little Mexico finally passed out of this world in March. Finding a west-side Mexican eatery that serves up the best American comfort food, one automatically assumes Maggie’s Kitchen, however, Maggie’s isn’t open into dining hours, of which Little Mexico was a premier destination during its heyday. Enter El Granjero Mexican Grill. Open ‘til 9 for the dining crowd, you’ll find a more casual experience with the flavors you miss in the familiar form of fajitas, tacos, burritos, tortas

El Granjero

Photo: Steven de Polo

and more. Be sure to check out the one and only “El Molcajete” for a massive plate of steak, chicken, grilled cactus, chorizo and cheeses. El Granjero Mexican Grill, 950 Bridge St. NW, Grand Rapids; (616) 458-5595

RIP Schnitzelbank, 1934-2006 Survived by AlpenRose Restaurant A staple of German cuisine for more than 70 years, the Schnitzelbank shuttered its doors in 2006. Unfortunately, yet luckily, there is one restaurant open that captures bits of the ‘bank’s magic in Holland. Austrian Chef Helmutt Klett provides the only real German deals at AlpenRose Restaurant. Although not exclusively German, AlpenRose has the best schnitzel, sauerkraut and sauerbraten around. For some real treats, try the Tafelspitz, a thin-sliced NY strip in a horseradish cream sauce, or the Pork Provencal in its herb-roasted pork tenderloin glory. For the beer swilling, brat chomping Bavarian in all of us, the Bratwurst Plate hosts two beef and pork white brats with house-made sauerkraut and beer mustard. AlpenRose Restaurant, 4 E. 8th St., Holland; (616) 393-2111, alpenroserestaurant.com n

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Food Issue

Cooking Classes / By Revue Minions

Amore Trattoria Italiana 5080 Alpine Ave. NW, Comstock Park Amore hosts free Italian cooking classes the second Saturday of the month. Previous classes included soups, risotto and Italian desserts, while chefs-in-training can look forward to a pizza class in May and Respecting the Lasagna in June.

Bartertown and Tree Huggers 947 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids Every Sunday night at 6 p.m., Bartertown’s Matthew Russel joins Tree Huggers to demonstrate vegan cooking recipes. Classes focus on spring cooking, gluten-free recipes and how to make Kombucha, a beverage made from fermented sweetened tea. Demonstrations are free and always include samples.

Bekins Cooking School 6275 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids and 735 Washington Ave., Grand Haven Bekins, a home appliance and electronics company, began offering cooking classes in 2008 to encourage customers to get the most out of the store’s appliances. Now with locations in Grand Haven and Grand Rapids, Bekins Cooking School offers several classes each month taught by profes-

sional chefs for around $50 per person. Nearly 10 classes are offered this month between both locations.Topics to choose from include sushi rolls, fresh pasta and ravioli, Spanish paella and more.

San Chez 38 W. Fulton, Grand Rapids The unique thing about San Chez: the tapas bistro offers classes for adults and kids. Throughout May, there are four classes offered for adults and four offered for teenagers between the ages of 13 and 16. Adults learn how to make traditional Spanish favorites, while teens master breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert. The classes are on Mondays and Tuesdays from 5-7 p.m. at $25 per person.

Spartan Culinary Classroom 3960 44th St. SW, Grandville The D&W Fresh Market Culinary Classroom offers multiple classes each month for $40 per person. Learn basic grilling skills or how to make that dish you love from your favorite restaurant. For those interested in food from different cultures, this month features a Mexican cuisine class in time for Cinco de Mayo, as well as a Lebanese class. Start Mother’s Day weekend with their Date Night Out class on May 10, which includes a wine pairing dinner. n

Schedule Dining Sights | Sounds | Scene

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OOPENING MAY 4 Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 8:00am - 3:00pm www.fultonstreetmarket.org fulton

1147 Fulton Street


FOOD AFTER MIDNIGHT Not all of us are on the same eating schedule. Here are some of the best joints in town for you night owls. The Elbow Room This Grand Rapids joint serves bar staples like burgers, wet burritos, BLTs and more until 2 a.m. every day. Foosball and a jukebox are an added bonus. 501 Fuller Ave. NE, Grand Rapids

Gino’s Pizza This family owned and operated pizza place has more than 40 years under its belt. Gino’s is closed Mondays, but you can get your late-night fix Tuesday and Sunday until 2 a.m., or 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. 1556 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids

Georgio’s Pizza This gourmet pizza joint takes the classic Italian dish to a whole new level. Grab the usual toppings or if you’re feeling adventurous, try options like Mac “N” Cheese, Hamburger, Taco and many more. Open until 3 a.m. Wednesday through Saturday. 15 Ionia, Suite 140, Grand Rapids

The Grand Coney This diner is open 24 hours and the perfect after-bar spot. Grease your stomach with classic coneys, four-egg omelettes, burgers and fries, country-fried steak and more. 809 Michigan St. NE, Grand Rapids

HopCat HopCat is open until 2 a.m. every day, with a special late-night menu until close. The minions recommend combining crack fries

and all three taco varieties. 25 Ionia SW, Grand Rapids

Johnny B’z Dogs and More Get your fair share of dogs, burgers and sandwiches until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Vegetarian and vegan options are offered as well. 638 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids

Marro’s Restaurant Pizza by the slice served until 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Gluten-free options also available. 147 Water St., Saugatuck

Mr. Kozak’s Gyros This Grand Haven restaurant brings traditional Greek gyros and Chicago-style food to West Michigan and stays open until 2:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. 38 Washington Ave., Grand Haven

Stella’s Lounge The vegetarian/vegan friendly lounge’s kitchen stays open until 1 a.m. every night. 53 Commerce Ave. SW, Grand Rapids

Yesterdog The legendary Eastown joint stays open until 2:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday. When you just need some food for a couple bucks and don’t care about keeping it neat, then get your hands on a Yesterdog, Ultradog or Killerdog. 1505 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids

Z’s Bar & Restaurant Nestled in the heart of the hotel district, the kitchen stays open until 2 a.m. on weekdays and Saturdays and 1 a.m. on Sundays. 168 Louis Campau, Grand Rapids n Compiled by Revue Minions

Scene | Sounds | Sights Dining Schedule REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

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Dining Restaurant listings arranged by region

Angel’s Thai Café 136 Monroe Center NW. 616-454-9801 THAI. This downtown restaurant makes your order fresh, fast, and hot. You can order your entree with your choice of meat and spice level, or create your own. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Thai Steak and Yum Talay.

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BarterTown Diner 6 Jefferson St. SE. 616-233-3219 VEGAN. This workerowned-and-operated restaurant offers a variety of tasty healthy dishes fresh and hand-picked right from local family farms. Want a certain recipe or cooking lessons? Events and programs are BarterTown’s way of getting the community involved. So don’t be surprised if one day there’s Greek and Mediterranean cuisine and the next it’s all about pizza. SERVING: Breakfast (Saturday & Sunday), Lunch, Dinner. OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Locally based vegan meals.

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Bentham’s Riverfront Restaurant 187 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-774-2000 AMERICAN. Enjoy great breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert options while looking out at the Grand River. Bentham’s now offers a lunch buffet with choices of salads, breads, soups and roast beef and poultry carved to order — not to mention stir-fry stations with fresh vegetables, meats or seafood and unique sauces. Casual attire. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 days, closes at 2 p.m. GO THERE FOR: Lunch buffet.

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Big O Café 80 Ottawa NW. 616-451-1887 ITALIAN. The downtown (and downstairs) restaurant has a reliable menu featuring pizza, pasta, and sandwiches that are Italian and Cuban influenced. A great spot for lunch or a quick glass of wine and plate of pasta before a downtown event. SERVING: Lunch

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openings and closings, editorial space, budgets, deadlines, acts of God, congressional hearings and, of course, visits and meals at restaurants throughout the region. The listings are not intended to be reviews of West Michigan restaurants, although we will inject some opinions into the listings based on experiences or the personal preferences of staff. Our intention is to expand and sharpen the content every month to make it the region’s most user-friendly and accurate dining guide. To submit or correct information

Cuisine is a hot spot for those who like to add a little flavor to their lives. With a lunch buffet served every weekday, this restaurant provides its eaters with an array of traditional Indian cuisine. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Naan, Butter Chicken.

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The Bistro 11 Monroe Avenue NW (at Courtyard Marriott). 616-242-6000 AMERICAN. Serving American food bistro-style, whether it’s grab-and-go or guests dining in for breakfast, lunch or dinner. The Bistro offers fresh seasonal options, serves Starbucks beverages and has a full-service bar. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Sandwiches.

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Bistro Bella Vita 44 Grandville Ave. SW. 616-222-4600 ITALIAN. One of Grand Rapids’ best dining experiences, featuring Mediterraneaninspired country cuisine, a swanky yet comfortable downtown atmopshere and personable service. BBV’s culinary team creates authentic, housemade recipes made with locally grown produce, fresh seafood and rotisserie roasted meats. Specialty gluten-free menu, and can prepare custom dishes for lactose intolerant, vegetarian, and vegan diets. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mediterranean Country Cuisine and Martinis.

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Blue Water Grill 5180 Northland Dr. 616-363-5900 SEAFOOD. One of Grand Rapids’ most inspired restaurants in terms of overall ambiance, with Frank Lloyd Wright-style architecture, a stunningly massive fireplace, and some of the best water views in West Michigan. The food is similarly inspired, drawing from Italian, Mediterranean and classic American influences. All the traditional favorites are accounted for with a wide variety of wood-fired pizzas, seafood, steaks, chops, salads, and sandwiches. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Grass Fed Beef.

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Bobarino’s 20 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-356-2000 ITALIAN. A melting pot of food, live entertainment and fun. Live music Tuesday through Saturday, including rock, jazz, retro, country, rockabilly and more. Large game room with video games, billiards and shuffleboard. Menu includes vast array of wood-fired pizzas, plus burgers, entrées and classic appetizers. Lunch buffet with pizza, pasta, and salad for $6.45. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Wood-fired pizzas.

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Bombay Cuisine 1420 Lake Dr. SE 616-456-7055 INDIAN. Offering savory and subtly spiced dishes from northern India, Bombay

Brandywine 1345 Lake Dr./2844 East Beltline NE 616-774-8641/616363-1723 AMERICAN. Both locations do brisk business at breakfast, especially on Sundays, but also offer a solid lunch and dinner menu featuring sandwiches, pasta, Mexican favorites and the legendary beehive potatoes. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Breakfast.

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Bulls Head Tavern 188 Monroe NW. 616-454-3580 AMERICAN. Downtown eatery is a great spot for business lunch or casual pre-show dinner, with a wide-ranging menu that includes salads, burgers, pasta, seafood and steaks. Specialties include the ostrich burger, sashimi tuna and smoked Gouda chicken pasta. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday. GO THERE FOR: The Ostrich Burger.

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Charley’s Crab 63 Market SW. 616-459-2500 SEAFOOD. A staple on the finedining scene in Grand Rapids. Fresh seafood, a world-class Sunday brunch and a comfortable, upscale atmosphere for drinks and dining. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The Sunday brunch buffet.

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Cherie Inn 969 Cherry SE. 616-458-0588 BREAKFAST. The East Hills restaurant is one of the area’s most-loved breakfast and lunch spots. A neighborhood staple for more than 60 years, the eatery offers a cozy, café-style setting complete with French flags, weathered brick walls, pressed tin ceiling, and intimate tables. Breakfast is the true star, with a variety of regular dishes like eggs Florentine and blueberry pancakes, as well as specials like red-flannel hash and almond joy pancakes. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: T W Th F Sa Sn. GO THERE FOR: Eggs Florentine.

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The Corner Bar 31 N. Main St. 616-866-9866 AMERICAN. The downtown Rockford tavern serves a solid menu of burgers, burritos, salads and sandwiches, but it is best known for hot dogs — serving almost 1,000 per day. Its hot-dog-eating challenge has been conquered by more than a few, but it raises the question: Why would you want to consume Corner Bar dogs in a hurry rather than savor each bite? SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Hot dogs.

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Cornucopia 187 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-774-2000 DELI. A refreshing option for on-the-go, or casual, lighter fare. Enjoy deli options such as homemade soups, salads, Panini sandwiches and freshly brewed gourmet coffee. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Sandwiches.

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Cygnus 27 187 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-776-6425 ECLECTIC. Enjoy the skyline as you dine atop the Glass Tower. Indulge in a variety of globally infused dishes at this AAA Four-Diamond restaurant. Casual attire; no jacket required. Private dining also available. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Seasonal Sunday Brunch.

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Erb Thai 950 Wealthy St. SE #1A. (616) 356-2573 THAI. Food rooted in traditional Thai cuisine, but also made to accommodate health conscious and special diets. Not too strong, not too weak, like harmony and melody. Marketing representative Molly Rizor was a Thai virgin when she went and is now glad Erb Thai was her first experience. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays. GO THERE FOR: Peanut Curry Noodles.

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Founders Brewing Company 235 Grandville SW. 616-776-1195 BREWPUB. A beer-lover’s paradise with a national reputation for flavorful, awardwinning beers. Likewise, the brewpub’s menu consists mainly of flavorful handcrafted deli sandwiches that can stand up and complement the beers (or vice versa). SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Award-winning beer, handcrafted sandwiches.

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Garden Court Lounge 187 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-774-2000 LOUNGE. An excellent choice for a quick drink with friends or when you desire relaxing with your favorite drink. The Garden Court Lounge offers a fine array of beer, wine, cocktails and liqueurs. SERVING: Drinks OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Specialty cocktails.

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Gilly’s 20 Monroe NW. 616-356-2000 SEAFOOD. Gilly’s may not be the biggest name on the seafood block, but it takes

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Scene | Sounds | Sights Dining Schedule

Big Bob’s Pizza 661 Croswell Dr. 616-233-0123 ITALIAN. Located in Gaslight Village in East Grand Rapids (across from Jersey Junction), Big Bob’s is a cozy restaurant that serves up specialty pizzas, pastas, burritos, sandwiches and salads. Sit out on the deck and enjoy Happy Hour from 4-6 p.m. and 9p.m.-close seven days a week. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 Days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza and beer (is there a better combination?).

restaurants. Our magazine listings will constantly change and grow in scope based on

in a dining listing, please send an e-mail to editor@revuewm.com.

Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Dead Head Vegetarian Pizza, Cuban dinners on Friday nights.

Grand Rapids

REVUE’S dining listings are compiled by staff and minions. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of restaurants in the region; for our full list, visit revuewm.com/

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by Matt Simpson Siegel

Taste This

Dining second place to no one in regards to quality, freshness and inspiration. A vast array of exotic fish is line-caught, flown in and prepared fresh daily. Every facet of Gilly’s speaks to impeccable attention to detail. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Fresh seafood at a great price.

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GP Sports 187 Monroe Ave. NW. 616-776-6495 SPORTS BAR. Three large screens, more than 30 HD flat screens, pool tables, video games, outdoor patio seating, pizza, signature burgers and more. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays. GO THERE FOR: Score Big Burgers.

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G.R.P.D. (Grand Rapids Pizza and Delivery) 340 State St. SE. 616-454-9204 ITALIAN. The current GR location opened in 2004 as the first established pizzeria in the Heritage Hill district. A common meeting spot for local folks, business professionals and college students, a place where one could gather for a quick meal or a reflective lunch. It offers both hand-tossed pizza and Chicago-style stuffed pizza, as well as pasta, sandwiches, salads, and wings. Online ordering, too. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

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Grand Rapids Brewing Company 1 Ionia Ave SW. 616-458-7000 BREWPUB. Good for the environment and your palate, GRBC is Michigan’s first certified organic brewery and features a menu stocked with locally grown ingredients. With a diverse selection of beers on tap inspired by historical Grand Rapids figures and a hearty array of burgers, melts and handcranked sausages, this place represents the best of the Grand Rapids Brewing Company’s 120-year legacy. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Organic beer and locally sourced food.

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Grand Woods Lounge 77 Grandville Ave SW. 616-451-4300 AMERICAN. The restaurant’s interior exudes a warm, casual ambiance reminiscent of the great eateries of the Pacific Northwest; the outdoor porch features two outdoor bars and a fireplace. Menu stocked with affordable appetizers great for sharing, plus salads, sandwiches, and entrées. Lots of domestics and microbrews, plus an array of martinis including the “Woodstini,” a tasty mix of Stoli Orange Vodka, mandarin oranges and raspberries. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Cocktails.

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Graydon’s Crossing 1223 Plainfield NE. 616-726-8260 TAVERN. An authentic take on the English Pub, with a huge selection of beers on tap and a menu that includes classic English dishes like Fish & Chips, Shepherd’s Pie and Irish Stew, as well as Indian specialties like Tandoori Chicken and Tikka Masala. A great casual atmosphere for drinking and dining. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer and authentic pub food.

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The Green Well 924 Cherry SE. 616-808-3566 Eclectic. REVUE’s “Free Market” columnist Steven de Polo writes, “Green Well is the best restaurant in GR.” The East Hills gastropub serves up an ever-changing menu featuring local

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Left: The Zappa. Above: Co-owner Chris Sommerfeldt. Photos: Katy Batdorff

Restaurant of the Month:

Two Beards Deli

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pen seven days a week from 7a.m. until 10 p.m., the younger bearded brother of the Cherry Deli and cousin to the recently closed 4th Street Deli serves up several dozen of the city’s exquisitely stuffed sandwiches and decadent salads. As for options, you can’t have too many more to choose from without causing irreparable brain damage and memory loss. The menu is split up into the sandwiches’ major stuffings, featuring turkey, ham, roast beef, corned beef and pastrami, chicken, sausage, vegetarian, vegan and salad wraps, all of which are named after bearded icons. For poultry picks, don’t pass up The Zappa, a wheat panini packed with pulled barbecue turkey, muenster cheese, red onion, pickle shreds and a tangy medley of barbecue mayo and Dijon mustard. The Yosemite Sam satiates the most rootin’ and tootiniest spicy appetites with jalapenos and sriracha sour cream, watercress, jalapeno jack cheese, tomato and red onions laid out over juicy roast beef on a fresh-made jalapeno sub bun. For

Cheap Eats: The Crow’s Nest If it’s 3 a.m. and you’ve got hunger pangs and little cash, this locally owned and affordable café (nothing costs more than $9) stays open 24 hours a day on the weekends. Ever-changing daily specials (posted conveniently on their Facebook) like The Lumberjack omelet, stuffed with bacon, pulled-pork, cheddar cheese and sautéed onions. Top it off with house barbecue sauce. For something sweeter, order the coconut French toast, a rotating special that is drizzled in chocolate syrup with raspberry coulis. It’s not just eggs and toast over here, the smoked turkey sandwich will put that store brand, pre-sliced deli meat nonsense in your lunchbox to shame. On toasted bread with red bell peppers, cucumbers, lettuce, herb aioli and smoked turkey (obviously), this is just one of many burgers and sandwiches to choose from, which run $6-$8.50. 816 S. Westnedge, Kalamazoo; (269) 978-0490

vegans, Charles Darwin sits in an avocado spread black bean salsa bâtard baguette, contemplating Cajun-seasoned tofu, cucumber, red pepper, grilled squash and zucchini. I implore the eating of Ewoks as well — a hot, grilled Polish sausage, red skin potatoes, caramelized onions and horseradish. Simply put: it’s pretty damn awesome and I couldn’t receive a straight answer on the sausage’s composition. Not to be overlooked, breakfast is served until 11a.m. and offers 12 of the best breakfast sandwiches in town. Served on English muffin bread or croissants, these will start your day or fill an early lunch perfectly. For the hungriest, Teddy Roosevelt is a fat helping of ham, turkey, sausage, chicken, kielbasa and bacon with Swiss and cheddar cheeses ... and tomatoes, onions, green peppers, and parsley because why not? n 38 Commerce Ave. SW, Grand Rapids, (616) 719-3802, twobeardsdeli.com

Downtown Market Outdoor Farmers Market Opening, May 4 If you haven’t heard about the $30 million project nestled in the crook of US 131 and Wealthy Street on Ionia Avenue, you can go back to your dumpster. On Saturday, May 4, the force descends upon Grand Rapids in the form of fresh fruits, vegetables and meats and more by the hands of local farms at the grand opening of Downtown Market. Grab your tote bags and head in early as the best cuts and picks will be gone before long. The proposed hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Grand opening of the indoor market will be later this summer. Downtown Market, 435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids; (616)805-5308, downtownmarketgr.com


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Dining ingredients, and a wide array of local craft brews and wines. The green refers also to the LEED© certified building and management’s commitment to a small carbon footprint. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Baked local goat cheese, Michigan maple whiskey chicken over risotto.

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The Holiday Bar 801 5th St. NW, Grand Rapids. 616-456-9058 AMERICAN. For 107 years, The Holiday Bar has been serving its loyal customers great beer and food, with 12 specialty beers of tap and its homemade “Porter” Pulled Pork sandwiches. Fully stocked with pool tables and nine HD flat screens, this dive is the perfect spot for cheap beer and good times.. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Cheap beer.

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Harmony Brewing Company 1551 Lake Dr. SE (616) 233-0063 BREWPUB. The newest addition to the Grand Rapids brewpub scene features five craft-brewed beers in addition to signature root beer for the kiddos. Harmony’s real specialty, however, is a take-out combo that features one of its gourmet wood-fire pizzas and a growler of beer. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza and brews.

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HopCat 25 Ionia SW. 616-451-4677 TAVERN. Rated the 3rd best beer bar on the planet by Beer Advcoate, HopCat’s spin on its food is thus: “It’s the food your Mom would feed you, if your Mom loved beer.” That’s specifically true for HopCat’s beerbar cheese, cheese ale soup and porter braised beef, but mom would also love the Hippie wrap (it’s vegetarian), the crack fries (not real crack), and Killer Mac and Cheese. Because what mom doesn’t like mac and cheese? SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Widest variety of beers, crack fries.

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J Bar 20 Monroe NW. 616-356-2000 STEAKS. Grass-fed beef selections and an ample variety of seafood, chops and house specialties. Extensive wine cellar and tastefully upscale ambiance that’s comfortable rather than stuffy. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Choice-cut prime rib, 10-oz. Filet, 14-oz. Top Sirloin.

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JD Reardon’s Bar & Grill 940 Monroe Ave NW. (616) 454-8590 AMERICAN. Neighborhood pub offers 15 Michigan beers on tap and more bottled, along with a full menu of handmade appetizers, pizzas, salads, sandwiches and 16 half-pound burgers. Nightly drink specials and karaoke on Tuesday night. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Burgers.

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a la Mexicana (scrambled eggs with onions and jalapenos).

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Sn. GO THERE FOR: Tex-Mex.

Marie Catrib’s 1001 Lake Dr. 616-454-4020 ECLECTIC. The East Hills eatery has one of the most hard-to-categorize menus in West Michigan, but this line from its website begins to do it justice: “a twist of Lebanese, a hint of Yooper and yen for unique pastries.” Everything is made from scratch with local ingredients, and there are plenty of vegetarian and vegan options. Get there early for lunch, as there is almost always a wait. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Salads, soups and sandwiches.

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Mixology 235 Louis St. NW. 616-242-1448 LOUNGE. Casual, upscale service and atmosphere allows guests to relax and enjoy the city views. This type of service allows guests to complete business tasks while still enjoying the accessibility to great food and libations. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Specialty cocktails.

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O’Toole’s 448 Bridge St. 616-742-6095 PUB. This West side pub is equipped with delicious and outrageously topped burgers, as well as an extensive beer selection, and arguably, the best happy hour specials in town. If food is not your passion, this is a prime place to kick off your Sunday Funday with its $3 Absolut Bloody Mary bar. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 Days. GO THERE FOR: Gourmet burgers, Absolut Bloody Mary bar.

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Olive’s Restaurant 2162 Wealthy St. SE. 616-451-8611 ECLECTIC. Gaslight Village mainstay for Easties looking to have a cocktail and casual dinner. The menu is surprisingly broad, with innovative starters (e.g., Napoli fritters, Paella cakes) and diverse entrées like Southern meatloaf, braised short ribs and mobu tofu. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: A broad selection.

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The Pita House 1450 Wealthy SE, 3730 28th Street, 4533 Ivanrest SW (Grandville). 616-454-1171 MEDITERRANEAN. Gyros so big you can club someone with them, the smoothest hummus in town and other Mediterranean fare, including kibbe, kafta and falafel. Additional locations on 28th Street and Kalamazoo SE. Sandwiches are made to order with fresh vegetables and ingredients. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh pita wraps.

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Lumber Baron Bar 187 Monroe Ave. NW. (616) 774-2000 LOUNGE. Settle into the warmth and charm of this historic bar — complete with a fireplace, leather club chairs and a large selection of premium drinks and appetizers. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays and Mondays GO THERE FOR: Scotch or Brandy after a Symphony concert.

Red Jet Cafe 1431 Plainfield Ave. NE. 616-719-5500 ECLECTIC. The funky restaurant in Creston’s old library is the kind of place you’d find in Chicago’s hip neighborhoods, offering non-sequitur menu items that somehow seem to work. Seriously, how many other places in town can you find that serve high-end organic coffees, crepes, wood-fired pizzas and artisan baked goods. Is it a bistro? Is it a coffeehouse? Does it matter? SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Crepes.

Maggie’s Kitchen 636 Bridge St. NW. 616-458-8583 MEXICAN. The storefront restaurant on GR’s west side has quietly built a reputation as one of the best places in town for authentic Mexican food, especially its tacos and breakfast items like huevos

Reds on The River 8 E. Bridge St. 616-863-8181 AMERICAN. This highly acclaimed restaurant in the Rockford area promises no processed foods. Red’s sports a cylindrical fireplace and is known for its incredible views and outdoor

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dining. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays. GO THERE FOR: Steak and Wine. Reserve 201 Monroe Ave. NW (616) 855-9463 ECLECTIC. With 102 wines available by the glass and more than 300 by the bottle, paired with an ever-changing food menu influenced by West Michigan grown foods, Reserve promises diners a unique experience. Cocktails and craft beers add depth to the primarily wine-centered menu. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday GO THERE FOR: Wine and food pairings, charcuterie.

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Rinaldi Pizza and Sub Shop 966 E. Fulton St. 616-458-3737 ITALIAN. The tiny pizza shop at the corner of Fulton and Diamond is publisher Brian Edwards’ favorite spot to stop for a large slice after a late night at the office. “It’s got the four C’s of pizza going for it: chewy, cheesy, crusty and cheap — with a perfect balance of sauce and cheese,” Edwards says. Fold it over, New Yorkstyle, he recommends. SERVING: Lunch, Dinner. OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

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Rockwell-Republic 45 S. Division Ave. 616-551-3563 ECLECTIC. Menu offerings range from sushi to burgers and everything in between. The cocktail menu runs the gamut from classics like the Manhattan to more modern variations and the beer and wine menus are nothing to sneeze at either. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Specialty cocktails, broad menu, lively atmosphere.

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Rose’s On Reeds Lake 550 Lakeside Dr. SE. 616-458-1122 ECLECTIC. The East Grand Rapids landmark is one of those places that has a different feel in each season. In the summertime, it’s a great spot to hang on the decks and have cocktails and light appetizers; when the snow is falling, it’s a warm and cozy spot for a hearty meal and big glass of wine. The menu draws from a multitude of influences including Mediterranean, Italian, and Casual American. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Root Chips.

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Ruth’s Chris Steak House 187 Monroe Avenue NW. 616-776-6426 STEAKHOUSE. Serving only the best steaks, Ruth’s Chris hand-selects its steaks from the top two percent of the country’s beef, which is then broiled to perfection at 1800 degrees. Enjoy the freshest seafood, classic sides and homemade desserts that satisfy any craving. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays. GO THERE FOR: Steak.

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San Chez a Tapas Bistro 38 West Fulton St. 616-774-8272 ECLECTIC. Using available local products, San Chez a Tapas Bistro is a social setting where people can remember the one rule of kindergarten: sharing. Featuring small, delicious dishes, San Chez a Tapas Bistro can satiate your desire for variety. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 Days. GO THERE FOR: Tapas.

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San Chez Cafe 38 West Fulton St. 616-774-8272 ECLECTIC. This comfy venue allows customers to “walk on sunshine” with its windowed-out structure. A hidden secret for breakfast in downtown Grand Rapids, San Chez Cafe promises a great start to any day. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 Days. GO THERE FOR: Sandwiches.

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Six.One.Six. 235 Louis St. NW. 616-242-1448 ECLECTIC. Marketinspired menus, sweeping views and progressive rhythms combine to create a memorable dining experience. The dishes tempt taste buds and is the perfect spot for foodies. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 Days GO THERE FOR: Variety and being seen.

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Stella’s Lounge 53 Commerce Ave. 616-356-2700 TAVERN. The Chicagostyle whiskey bar has more than 200 varieties of distilled spirits, old-school video games, a superexcellent jukebox stocked with rock and punk classics, and a menu filled with vegetarian and vegan bar food — and stuffed burgers. Did we mention you can sip cans of PBR, Blatz and other classic beers, as well as sangria, out of a mason jar? REVUE’s British ex-pat David Smith calls Stella’s his favorite bar in the world. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Vegetarian and vegan bar food.

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The Score 5301 Northland Dr. NE. 616-301-0600 SPORTS BAR. Multifaceted restaurant and sports bar has a lot to offer, including expansive menu with discount options, happy hour specials, countless big screen and projection TVs broadcasting big games and pay-per-view UFC matches, outdoor beach volleyball and live music in the summertime … the list goes on. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Sports bar atmosphere.

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Tavern on the Square 100 Ionia Ave. SW. 616-456-7673 ECLECTIC. The re-fashioned former Irish pub still has that neighborhood feel, and offers up a unique menu with salads, antipasto, appetizers, a pub burger, and an array of unique “Yankee Tapas” like Fish Tacos, Loaded Carnival Fries and the ultimate West Side tapas: Pierogies. A hodgepodge to be sure, but fun. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: PBJ Tuna.

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Vitale’s Restaurants Various Grand Rapids locations. vitalespizza.com ITALIAN. The Vitale family has served West Michigan for more than 40 years. Each of the five locations in the Greater Grand Rapids area offer traditional Italian family recipes and award-winning pizza, but provide their own unique dining experience. Whether you go there to watch the big game, enjoy a brew or dine on authentic Italian dishes, these locations have something for everyone. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days GO THERE FOR: Pizza and Italian dishes.

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The Winchester 648 Wealthy St. SE. 616-451-4969 ECLECTIC. Upscale Wealthy Street bar and restaurant feels like it was plucked from Chicago’s Bucktown or Logan Square neighborhoods. A comfortable spot to drink or dine, with an always evolving menu featuring shared plates, salads and inventive sandwiches. The Cuban Reuben, originally created as something of a joke, remains a (very tasty) staple item. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: DIY Bloody Mary Bar Special, Yucca Fries.

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Dining Wolfgang’s Restaurant 1530 Wealthy St. SE. 616-454-5776 BREAKFAST. The bustling Eastown breakfast spot is home to some of the heartiest breakfast dishes and funniest menu descriptions. Courteous staff never fails to offer a cup of coffee to go after we’ve finished breakfast. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Breakfast all day.

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Lakeshore

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84 East 84 East 8th St., Holland. 616-396-8484 ITALIAN. While we categorize it as “Italian,” that’s a bit limiting for this downtown Holland spot, which specializes in creating inventive pasta dishes. Housed in an old industrial building, 84 East is a favorite splurge spot among REVUE’s Hope College minions. 84 East also serves up designer pizzas and a few non-pasta house specialties like Pork Marsala and Mahi Mahi. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sunday GO THERE FOR: Baked Spaghetti Pie, Tuxedo Chicken Pasta.

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Bil-Mar Restaurant 1223 S. Harbor St., Holland. 616-842-5920 AMERICAN. A destination restaurant for locals and tourists for more than 60 years. Dazzling sunsets and an All-American menu featuring fresh seafood and hand-cut steaks. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Lake perch, lobster strudel, prime rib.

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Blue House Bistro 220 W. 8th Street, Holland. 616-355-1994 AMERICAN. Chef-owned boutique bistro located in downtown Holland, with an extensive menu featuring small plates, sandwiches, soups, salads, pizza, desserts, dine-in, take-out, delivery catering, beer and wine to-go. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN: Tu–Sun. GO THERE FOR: Seafood gumbo, Saturday and Sunday brunch.

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CityVu Bistro 61 East 7th Street, Holland. 616-796-2114 AMERICAN. Located atop CityFlats Hotel in downtown Holland, CityVu Bistro offers unique breakfast creations, an array of flatbread dinners, and small plates. Full bar with extensive wine list and great views of Holland. Hours of operation change with the seasons. SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Flatbreads.

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Everyday People Cafe 11 Center St., Douglas. 269-857-4240 AMERICAN. REVUE Publisher Brian Edwards calls Everyday People Café his favorite restaurant along the lakeshore. The atmosphere is casual and upbeat, the staff knows its stuff about wine and

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wine, food and service. Try one of 12 unique brews that are served in the pub and bottled and distributed throughout the Midwest. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer in a family friendly pub environment.

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Fricano’s Pizza Tavern 1400 Fulton Ave., Grand Haven. 616-842-8640 ITALIAN. Claims to be the first pizzeria in Michigan, but customers care less about its longevity than the amazingly crispy thin crust and simple ingredients atop its much-lauded pies. Four other locations around West MI, including Comstock Park, Muskegon, Holland and Kalamazoo. SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

Vitale’s of Zeeland 59 W. Washington St. (616) 772-5900 ITALIAN. This family owned restaurant specializes in Italian dining, but also has a full menu including Mexican and American specialties. Family friendly atmosphere with newly remodeled dining, and an expanded sports bar with big screen TVs. Happy hour specials, live music every Saturday and has been voted Best Pizza seven years in a row by the Grand Rapids Press. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

Kirby House 2 Washington, Grand Haven. 616-846-3299 AMERICAN. The Grill Room doesn’t pretend to be anything other than what it is — a chop house and grill. Atmosphere is warm with Tuscan tones, atmospheric lighting, classically cool music and leather booths. The menu focuses on steaks and chops and makes no apologies. The steaks are prime USDA choice, the seafood selection immaculate, and the wine and beverage list is top shelf. Relaxed and unpretentious atmosphere. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Nightlife.

Kalamazoo/Battle Creek

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8th Street Grille 20 W. 8th St., Holland. 616-392-5888 AMERICAN. This eclectic grille located in the heart of Holland offers a mix of draft and bottled craft beers and a variety of pub classics and new, American beer-inspired dishes. Enjoy happy hour from 3-6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9-10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, which includes delicious half-off appetizers and $1 off drafts. SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: 28 taps of craft beer, hometown atmosphere.

Schedule Dining Sights | Sounds | Scene

food, and the seasonal menu is filled with meticulously prepared, eclectic comfort food like Butternut Squash Risotto, Braised Lamb Shank and Ahi Tuna. A great wine list and tremendous desserts. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Gorgonzola Pork Chop, Greek Salad with Grandma Gigi’s Dressing (Edwards).

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Mia & Grace 1133 3rd St., Muskegon. 231-725-9500 AMERICAN. Calls itself a bakery and bistro, but that’s too limiting to describe the creativity of Mia & Grace’s menu. The farm-to-table eatery in downtown Muskegon is casual and comfortable and serves lots of one-of-a-kind items like the Pork Belly Reuben or the Duck PB&J (duck confit, carmelized onions, cashew-peanut butter, green pepper jelly, anadama bread). SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Salads, Soups, Creme Brulee.

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New Holland Brewing Company 66 E. 8th St., Holland. 616-355-6422 BREWPUB. One of West MI’s premier microbreweries serves up better than average pub grub, including the Tarheel barbecue Pulled Pork, Grilled Portobello and The Treehugger, which is billed as “a vegetarian sandwich utopia.” SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mad Hatter IPA, Dragon’s Milk.

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Phil’s Bar & Grille 215 Butler St., Saugatuck. 269-857-1555 AMERICAN. This cozy (some would say “small”) bar and grille in downtown Saugatuck is one of those unassuming spots you might easily overlook, though locals in Saugatuck will tell you about their love affair with Phil’s. Eclectic menu is all over the place, but in a good way, and the staff is super-friendly. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Mushroom Fries.

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Salt of the Earth 114 East Main St., Fennville. 269-561-7258 AMERICAN. Salt of the Earth is a farm-to-table-inspired restaurant, bar, and bakery located in the heart of SW Michigan farm country in Fennville. Focuses on fresh, seasonal, and local ingredients whenever possible. Also serves up live music on weekends. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: House made rustic cuisine.

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Saugatuck Brewing Company 2948 Blue Star Highway. 269-857-7222 BREWPUB. Enjoy a traditional Irish-style pub that features quality beer,

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factory.” Lots of unique choices, for breakfast (gingerbread pancakes), lunch (crab cake sandwich) and dinner (beer roasted chicken). SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh Local Foods.

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Old Burdicks Bar & Grill 100 W. Michigan Ave. (269) 226-3192 AMERICAN. Old Burdick’s Bar & Grill features tasty sandwiches, burgers, salads and entrees, as well as a great selection of cocktails, wines and beers. SERVING: Lunch Dinner. OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The Old Burdick Burger.

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Olde Peninsula 200 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo 269-343-2739 BREWPUB. Downtown brewpub serves up the expected (e.g., steaks, ribs), the authentic (e.g., London Broil) and some pleasant surprises (e.g., extensive vegetarian offerings, Italian food). Offers a range of beers brewed on the premises and served on tap, plus a full bar. Check out the seasonal porters on tap right now, including the Vanilla Porter (5.5% ABV) and Stout Chocula (5.25% ABV). SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer-B-Que Ribs, London Broil.

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Arcadia Brewing Co. 103 Michigan Ave., Battle Creek. 269-963-9520 BREWPUB. You’ll find some of the usual suspects on the Battle Creek brewpub’s menu, including wood-fired pizzas and some of the best barbecue in the region. But you’ll also find some delightful surprises — Osso Bucco in a brewpub?! — on the menu, courtesy of award-winning Chef Sean Kelly. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Handcrafted ales and barbecue.

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Bell’s Eccentric Cafe 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave. 269-382-2332 BREWPUB. Eccentric Café’s regular menu of appetizers, sandwiches, sides and salads — plus the daily soups and specials — exists for a simple and important purpose: to complement the Kalamazoo microbrewery’s award-winning beers. Eat up while you drink up. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The Beer.

Martell’s 3501 Greenleaf Blvd., Kalamazoo. 269-375-2105 AMERICAN. Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood that overlooks Willow Lake, Martell’s offers casual ambiance and an expansive menu with steaks, prime rib and other comfort food entrées like Italian style meatloaf and pork shank. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days (Sundaysdinner only) GO THERE FOR: Quiet casual ambiance.

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Union Cabaret & Grille 125 S. Burdick St., Kalamazoo. 269-384-6756 AMERICAN. A partnership with Western Michigan University, Union features eclectic food and cocktails, plus live jazz music performed by WMU faculty and students. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Fries, Bloody Maries with infused vodkas. n

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Bravo! 5402 Portage Rd., Kalamazoo 269-344-7700 ITALIAN. Much-lauded restaurant has earned its stripes over past 23 years as one of the region’s best dining experiences, including a 3-star rating in the 2010 Forbes Travel Guide (formerly the Mobil Travel Guide). The Tuscan-inspired cuisine is spectacular, the atmosphere comfortable and intimate, and the service first-rate. Also brews its own beer in small batches for pairings with menu offerings. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. (Closed Sat. lunch) GO THERE FOR: A great dining experience.

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Fieldstone Grille 3970 W. Centre St., Portage. 269-321-8480 AMERICAN. Lodge-retreat atmosphere overlooking the Moors Golf Club natural wetlands. The “field-to-plate” menu features burgers, pizzas, steaks and some eclectic items like quail. Try the FSG chips, a combination of potato, beet and sweet potato chips. SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Blue Burger, Almond Crusted Walleye, FSG Chips.

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Food Dance 401 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo. 269-382-1888 AMERICAN. An eclectic American menu that reflects ownership’s fixation on “finding honest-to-goodness fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs that come from the farm, not the

For our full list of restaurants, visit revuewm.com/ restaurants. To submit or correct information in a dining listing, please send an e-mail to editor@ revuewm.com.


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Schedule Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene


The Schedule Get Scheduled! E-mail your info to schedule@revuewm.com or add your events into our calendar at revuewm.com.

wednesday

5.01

Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Grand Rapids Public Library Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar Speed Dating The Intersection Ben Rector wsg Alpha Rev Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection Kalamazoo Nature Center Yoga in the Glen Vista, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve

Ghostface Killah: The Pyramid Scheme, May 1

Lemonjello’s Coffee Open Mic Night MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Miller Auditorium Wicked Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for

Snory Fellers, Book Discussion: The Greater Journey by David McCullough Old Dog Tavern Patricia Pettinga and Steven Lee Pesch The Pyramid Scheme Ghostface Killah: Twelve Reasons to Die Tour wsg Adrian Younges’ Venice Dawn, The Black Opera Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing The Union Cabaret & Grille, Kalamazoo Jazz Mix Night UICA Limit(less)

thursday

5.02

Art of the Table In-Store Wine Tasting Barnes and Noble, Woodland Mall Grand Rapids Writers’ Exchange Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Fruition

Papa Pete’s Latin Salsa Night The Pyramid Scheme Jake Miller, D-Pryde Rockford Brewing Co. The JetBeats UICA Limit(less) Wealthy Theatre Yoga for Mind, Body and Soul, Dancing From Within For Women

friday

5.03

Bobarinos Sprague Brothers Covenant Fine Arts Center, Calvin College SAO Film: Lincoln Czar’s 505 Ifficial Reggae Band DeVos Performance Hall La Traviata Dog Story Theater Four Wounded Women Dr. Grins Josh Sneed Frauenthal Center The Music Man presented by Muskegon Civic Theatre Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar She Said Howmet Playhouse Dragon Wagon The Intersection Mega ‘80s John Ball Zoo Zoofari - Kid’s Night Out The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Time Stands Still, How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel

Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal The Livery Nora Jane Struthers & the Party Line Louie’s Trophy House Grill M. Sord, Dumbelievers, The Wrap MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Miller Auditorium Wicked Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Free Silver and Tilford Sellers Peter Martin Wege Theatre Grand Rapids Ballet: Peter Pan Planet Rock Prospect Hill The Pyramid Scheme The People’s Temple, Kastanza, Cardboard Swords River City Saloon Classic Fix Rosa Parks Circle One Minute for One Million Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grille Scott Holt UICA Limit(less)

saturday

5.04

All Ears Theatre Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Speckled Band Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Big Brew Day Billy’s Lounge Jimmie Stagger

Best Bet: Indie

MGMT REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

Scene | Sounds | Sights | Dining Schedule

If psychedelic rock began and ended with the ‘60s, don’t tell the members of MGMT. As one of America’s favorite breakout bands of the last few years, the band has been managing (get it? Because MGMT means manage… never mind) to carry on the flag of neo-psychedelia MGMT well into the 21st century. Its success is so Calvin College, spectacular that even now, just reading the Grand Rapids band’s name in print, immediately stirs the May 6, 8 p.m., darkly toned opening chords of “Time to $35 Pretend” in my head. It’s hard to imagine calvin.edu/ a more fitting group to inherit the crown boxoffice/tickets, of introspective mood rock, and indeed, (616)526-6282 MGMT wears it proudly. But while we haven’t heard much in the way of recordings from the group recently, a new album release is tentatively planned for June; and in the meantime, there’s always the live shows to tide you over. And what a way to be sated until the summertime. Reported by Emma Kat Richardson

Crush Spotlight Singer Series: Tony Reynolds Duo The DAAC Solo Exhibition: Jenn Schaub Dog Story Theater Four Wounded Women Dogwood Center for the Performing Arts “A Place at the Table” Documentary Film at the Dogwood Center Dr. Grins Josh Sneed Founders Brewing Company Scott Lucas and the Married Men Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts The Music Man presented by Muskegon Civic Theatre Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gaspard Gallery “Conditions” exhibit by Jeff Kraus Grand Rapids Public Library Reading the Great Lakes Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Miller Auditorium Wicked Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers One Trick Pony Grill & Taproom Thursday Night Acoustic Stew

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Schedule Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

Schedule Bobarinos CP2 Calder Plaza Big Brew Day Curragh Irish Pub Aidan O’Toole DeVos Performance Hall La Traviata Dog Story Theater Four Wounded Women Dogwood Center for the Performing Arts An Evening with Groucho Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Dr. Grins Josh Sneed FireKeepers Casino KANSAS Founders Brewing Company The Wallace Collective/Chain of Lakes Dual Record Release Show wsg Strawberry Heritage Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts The Music Man presented by Muskegon Civic Theatre Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gilly’s Kentucky Derby Party Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar DJ Dan V Howmet Playhouse 6th Annual White Lake Blues Fest Ionia, Downtown Grand Rapids Cinco De Mayo The Intersection Wayland wsg Devin and the Dead Frets, Sargent Avenue, Coldville, Stickerblister The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Time Stands Still, How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Little River Casino and Resort Laughcatchers Comedy Tour Louie’s Trophy House Grill Frankie Ballard, Dani Jamerson, South Country, The Real Fantastics MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Miller Auditorium Wicked Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Nick Fink’s Murphy’s Law Old Dog Tavern Duffield Caron Project Peter Martin Wege Theatre Peter Pan The Pyramid Scheme GR8BIT LIVE! feat Bit Brigade, Super

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Guitar Bros, Arc Impulse, Playing with Power River City Saloon Classic Fix Seven Steps Up Drew Nelson Tip Top Deluxe An Evening with Tommy Womack UICA Limit(less) Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

sunday

5.05

Celebration Cinema! North Jewish Film Festival Crush Fiesta de la Industria DeVos Performance Hall Grand Rapids Youth Symphony & Classical Orchestra Dog Story Theater Four Wounded Women Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts The Music Man presented by Muskegon Civic Theatre Grand Rapids Public Library Cinco de Mayo Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Intersection The Dillinger Escape Plan wsg The Faceless and Royal Thunder The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sunday Funday: Duct Tape!, Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection Louie’s Trophy House Grill Malaikat Dan Singa, Forget the Times, Brown Company McFadden’s Restaurant and Saloon Live Celtic Music MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Miller Auditorium Wicked Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Seventh Son Blues Jam Peter Martin Wege Theatre Peter Pan The Pyramid Scheme The Soil and the Sun, Healing Power Seven Steps Up Tylan

UICA Limit(less) Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

monday

5.06

Celebration! Cinema North Jewish Film Festival Czar’s 505 Kari Lynch Band DeVos Performance Hall Gordon Lightfoot: 50 Years on the Carefree Highway Tour Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Howmet Playhouse, Whitehall Mindful Mondays Community Wellness Series LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Logan’s Alley Black Out Monday Louie’s Trophy House Grill Arson Party MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski The Pyramid Scheme Heartside’s Got Talent Spoelhof Fieldhouse, Calvin College MGMT wsg Kuroma Stella’s Lounge The Drunken Retort Tip Top Deluxe Motown Mondays

tuesday

5.07

Celebration! Cinema North Jewish Film Festival Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories GVSU Pew Campus, Loosemore Auditorium Then & NOW: Shattering the Glass Rotunda Holland Museum Wichers Gallery 75th Anniversary Exhibit Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Young Artists of Kalamazoo County, Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel

Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, ARTbreak: The Fifth Chakra: Art and Music by Brooke LaRuche Kalamazoo Nature Center Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Loosemore Auditorium, GVSU Pew Campus Then and N.O.W. Fundraiser: Shattering the Glass Rotunda Louie’s Trophy House Grill Comedy Open Mic Night MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Old Dog Tavern Tom Duffield and Open Mic Night with Brandon Mann The Pyramid Scheme Midnight Ghost Train Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing Wealthy Theater Meanwhile Movie: The Dark Crystal

wednesday

5.08

Celebration Cinema North Jewish Film Festival Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival, Volksparade and Streetscrubbing Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Hideout Brewery Otis Blueswell Jr. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Young Artists of Kalamazoo County, Sight

and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Art League Lecture: Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity Kalamazoo Nature Center Yoga in the Glen Vista, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve Kalamazoo State Theater Willie Nelson and Family LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Music Open Mic Night MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Alison Wonderland with David Lloyd and Steven Lee Pesch The Pyramid Scheme Har Mar Superstar The Union Cabaret & Grille Jazz Mix Night

thursday

5.09

Art of the Table In-Store Wine Tasting Barnes and Noble, Woodland Mall Grand Rapids Writers’ Exchange Celebration! Cinema North Jewish Film Festival Crush Spotlight Singer Series: Libby York Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Dr. Grins Rory Scovel Founders Brewing Company Deadstring Brothers wsg The Wildfire

Jamey Johnson: The Intersection, May 9

Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Intersection Jamey Johnson The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Galleries’ Douglas location Reveal/Conceal MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers, Brown Bag Film: Edward Hopper Old Dog Tavern Paul Nelson Band One Trick Pony Grill & Taproom Acoustic Stew Papa Pete’s Latin Salsa Night Rockford Brewing Company Big Boss Blues Saugatuck Center for the Arts Real to Reel: Detropia Wealthy Theatre Yoga for Mind, Body and Soul

friday

5.10

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Lincoln County Process Billy’s Lounge Starfarm Bobarinos Classic Fix Crush Glow 2 DeVos Performance Hall Grand Rapids Symphony Presents Beethoven’s Solemn Mass Dowagiac Middle School Performing Arts Center AwardWinning Author Nicole Krauss Downtown Dowagiac UpFront Art Walk Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival Dr. Grins Rory Scovel Farmers Alley Theatre 5th Annual Kalamazoo Improv Festival Four Winds Casino Tower of Power Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts West Michigan


Best Bet: Comedy “Parks & Recreation” may be on the verge of taking its summer hiatus (though, thank the TV gods, not a permanent hiatus like its big sister, “30 Rock”), but that doesn’t mean its principle stars have withered and died like newscasters without a working teleprompter. Oh no. Instead, Aziz Ansari Aziz Ansari in particular is continuing to nurture his Kalamazoo State Theatre long-time stand-up roots tickling funny May 11, 7 p.m., $35 bones wherever he sees fit. Fortunately for kazoostate.com, (269) us, one of those places that made his cut 345-6500 is the Kalamazoo State Theatre. Hot on the heels of his latest comedy tour, Buried Alive, America’s most famous star whose name rhymes with “sneeze” almost certainly has plans to bury audience members alive under an avalanche of laughter. (Which, if you can believe it, is even more fun than being buried alive under a real avalanche.) Reported by Emma Kat Richardson

Aziz Ansari Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet The Pyramid Scheme Deal’s Gone Bad, Cabildo, The Sleeves

saturday

5.11

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Red Sea Pedestrians Billy’s Lounge The Twin Cats Bobarinos Classic Fix DeVos Performance Hall Grand Rapids Symphony Presents Beethoven’s Solemn Mass Downtown Holland Tulip Time Festival, Tulip Time Muziek Parade Dr. Grins Rory Scovel Farmers Alley Theatre 5th Annual Kalamazoo Improv Festival Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts West Michigan Symphony Orchestra presents The 3 Broadway Divas Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park All Michigan Bonsai Show Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar Matt B The Intersection Bimini Brothers wsg Two Dudes in Flip Flops

The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, The Man Who Came to Dinner Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection Kalamazoo Nature Center Dr. Batts Hiking Challenge Kalamazoo State Theater Aziz Ansari: Buried Alive LaFontsee Galleries Meet the artist - Justin Kellner LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Goodie Boy Flood, DC of Truth Tone Records, Fuse & Ms. Chyna D., Blainiac, Micky Tao, Semi Rich MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Nick Fink’s Harry Lucas and the Lowdown Old Dog Tavern Duffield Caron Project and 4WD The Orbit Room Bullet For My Valentine wsg Stars In Stereo Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet The Pyramid Scheme Midway to Michfest Party feat. Sarah Jean Anderson, Karisa Wilson, Fiona Dickinson, Erin Lenau, Samantha Gretz

Seven Steps Up Event and Banquet Center Michael McDermott The Union Cabaret & Grille Blues Night with BMF Band Water Street Gallery Who’s That? Wealthy Theatre Trip the Light

sunday

5.12

Founders Brewing Company The People’s Champs Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts The Color Purple: The Musical about Love Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park All Michigan Bonsai Show Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Intersection Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, The Man Who Came to Dinner Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection

McFadden’s Restaurant and Saloon Live Celtic Music MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers, Cinema Sunday Film: The Land Old Dog Tavern Old Time Jam and Anders & Kendall Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

monday

5.13

Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Library Michigan Notable Book Author Michael Hodges Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Logan’s Alley Black Out Monday MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Old Dog Tavern Comedy Night with Alec Robbins

Stella’s Lounge The Drunken Retort Tip Top Deluxe Motown Mondays

tuesday

5.14

DeVos Permformance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Gallery Uptown, Grand Haven Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, Art League depARTure: Hot in Cleveland - Treasures of Wade Oval, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Visiting Artist: Sondra Freckelton Watercolor Workshop, ARTbreak: Randy Bronkema: The American Landscape Kalamazoo Nature Center Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Comedy Open Mic Night MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski

REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

Scene | Sounds | Sights | Dining Schedule

Symphony Orchestra presents The 3 Broadway Divas Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar The Legal Immigrants The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, The Man Who Came to Dinner Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Lemonjello’s Klompenfest 2013, The Fever Haze, Small Parks, Little American Champ, Alex & The Brave, and Counselor The Livery Anne Hills Louie’s Trophy House Grill The Missing Generation, The Mittenauts, The Erklings MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Scott Spears and Ben Daniels Band

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Schedule Old Dog Tavern Tom Duffield and Open Mic Night with Brandon Mann Peter Wege Auditorium Meanwhile Movie: Logan’s Run Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show Van Andel Arena Ted Nugent, REO Speedwagon, and Styx: Midwest Rock n’ Roll Express Tour

wednesday

5.15

Celebration! Cinema North Grand Rapids Film Festival DeVos Permformance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Foundry Hall Song Swap Gallery Uptown, Grand Haven Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Great Lakes Commonwealth of Letters Book Launch for Robert

Haight’s New Collection of Poems, Feeding Wild Birds Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, Art League depARTure: Hot in Cleveland - Treasures of Wade Oval, Book Discussion : The Hare with Amber Eyes, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Visiting Artist: Sondra Freckelton Watercolor Workshop Kalamazoo Nature Center Yoga in the Glen Vista, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Lemonjello’s Coffee Haley Dreis and Caleb Caudle MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Steven Lee Pesch The Orbit Room Hollywood Undead wsg Falling In Reverse and American Fangs Rezervoir Lounge Art Battle Riverside Park Grand Rapids Ride of Silence

Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing at Rosa Parks Circle The Union Cabaret & Grille Jazz Mix Night Tip Top Deluxe Igor and Red Elvises, The Moonrays UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show

thursday

5.16

Art of the Table In-Store Wine Tasting Barnes and Noble, Woodland Mall Grand Rapids Writers’ Exchange Celebration! Cinema North Grand Rapids Film Festival Crush Spotlight Singer Series: Kathy Lamar DeVos Permformance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Dr. Grins David Crowe Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition,

Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, Art League depARTure: Hot in Cleveland - Treasures of Wade Oval, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Visiting Artist: Sondra Freckelton Watercolor Workshop LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Andreas Kapsalis & Goran Ivanoic Guitar Duo, Kalamazoo Brass Collective MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers One Trick Pony Acoustic Stew Papa Pete’s Latin Salsa Night The Pyramid Scheme 1969 Tribute Show: A fundraiser for Well House Rockford Brewing Company Roosevelt Diggs

UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show Wealthy Theatre Dancing From Within For Women, Yoga for Mind, Body and Soul

friday

5.17

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Grace Adele and The Grand Band wsg Jen Sygit Bobarinos Litt Up Celebration! Cinema North Grand Rapids Film Festival Central Park Players The Golden Pond Curragh Irish Pub The Moxie Strings DeVos Performance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Dr. Grins David Crowe Forest Hills Fine Arts Center Sheryl Budnik Exhibit Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition,

Best Bet: Americana

Schedule Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

Call me crazy, but I’m beginning to think that Willie Nelson

saturday

is even more indestructible than Cher. He just has that freshly survived-from-the-apocalypse gleam about him, you know? Let’s look at the facts: despite being old enough to receive the early bird discount at Old Country Buffet, the Redheaded Stranger (gray-haired now, but who cares) is still rocking out with the enthusiasm and commitment Willie Nelson of a stoner just getting started on stoKalamazoo State Theatre nerism. Then there’s that whole tax May 8, 7:30 p.m. evasion thing. If the feds can’t even $65-$85 bring a man down, I doubt anything kazoostate.com, as innocuous as “aging” can. And (269) 345-6500 lastly, there’s just the music. Good, old-fashioned, straight-to-the-heart classic country-rock, courtesy of the Willster. Willie wannabes like Kid Rock and Uncle Kracker should be so lucky as to sustain living-legend status. Take a note from one of the greatest unstoppable rockers of all time on how to survive the music biz, and maybe even the end of the world, if my math is correct. Reported by Emma Kat Richardson

74 | REVUEWM.COM | May 2013

Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar Fled Five Howmet Playhouse Ben Bedford in Concert The Intersection Asking Alexandria wsg. Motionless in White The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Visiting Artist: Sondra Freckelton Watercolor Workshop LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal The Livery Toxic Trivia Louie’s Trophy House Grill Double Phelix Showcase MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Real Fantastics The Orbit Room Pop Evil Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet Planet Rock Shallow Side River City Saloon Tetrad Riviera Theatre Super Happy Funtime Burlesque Show Rosa Parks Circle Active Commute Week Celebration Tip Top Deluxe Peter Karp and Sue Foley UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show

5.18

All Ears Theatre The Parade Bar Louie Otis Blueswell Jr. Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Mustard Plug Bobarinos Risque Celebration! Cinema North Grand Rapids Film Festival Central Park Players The Golden Pond DeVos Performance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Dowagiac Middle School Performing Arts Center Arlo Guthrie Dr. Grins David Crowe

Willie Nelson


FireKeepers Casino Martina McBride Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar Armed Forces Party The Intersection Mega ‘80s The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, Robin Hood Kalamazoo County Fair Grounds Kalamazoo Circus Maximus Toy Show Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Kaitlin Rose & Friends, Dave Johnson, The Marci Lynn Quartette, Mike Savina, Gerren Young MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Mexicains Sans Frontieres Jamaican Queens Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Nick Fink’s The Bean Poles Old Dog Tavern Duffield Caron Project, Branden Mann and the Reprimand Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet River City Saloon Tetrad

Rivertown Sports Grand Raggidy Roller Girls VS Lansing Derby Vixens Saugatuck Center for the Arts Stargaze Sigsbee Park, Grand Rapids Eastown Picnic in the Park Tip Top Deluxe Danger Damsels Burlesque UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show Water Street Gallery Who’s That? Wealthy Theatre Pop Scholars

sunday

5.19

Celebration! Cinema North Grand Rapids Film Festival Central Park Players The Golden Pond DeVos Performance Hall Broadway Grand Rapids Presents Anything Goes Frauenthal Center for the Performing Arts Alice in Wonderland with West Michigan Youth Ballet Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection McFadden’s Live Celtic Music

MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Hughie Lee-Smith: Meditations, Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Shutdown Palisades Campaign Peter Martin Wege Theatre Romeo & Juliet Seven Steps Up Courtyard Concerts: A Benefit for the Little Red House featuring Honor By August wsg Fauxgrass Quartet UICA GRPS City Wide Art Show Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

monday

5.20

Bobarino’s West Michigan Jazz Society Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Logan’s Alley Black Out Monday MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski The Pyramid Scheme El Ten Eleven Stella’s Lounge The Drunken Retort Tip Top Deluxe Motown Mondays

tuesday

5.21

Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Library East Grand Rapids Yoga + Breath + Visualization = Contentment Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Gun Lake Casino Hey Marco The Intersection New Found Glory wsg Cartel, Living with Lions The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, ARTbreak: Joshua Haas: Adding Artistic Flair to Bird & Wildlife Photography Kalamazoo Nature Center Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Comedy Open Mic Night MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Old Dog Tavern Tom Duffield and Open Mic Night with Brandon Mann Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile Movie: The Crow

wednesday

5.22

Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Intersection Steel Panther The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection Kalamazoo Nature Center Yoga in the Glen Vista, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve Kalamazoo State Theater The Moth Mainstage LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Mr. Clit and the Pink Cigarettes, The Evil Deuxerz, Dolly Rocker Ragdoll, The Former Tenants MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Alison Wonderland with David Lloyd and Steven Lee Pesch Saugatuck Center for the Arts Edie and Thea: A Very Long Engagement The Union Cabaret & Grille Jazz Mix Night

thursday

5.23

Art of the Table Art of the Table In-Store Wine Tasting Barnes and Noble, Woodland Mall Grand Rapids Writers’ Exchange Crush Spotlight Singer Series: Diana Vandewater Dr. Grins Erik Griffin Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers, Brown Bag Film: Burchfield’s Vision, 85th Regional Exhibition: All-State Edition Old Dog Tavern Steve Busch One Trick Pony Acoustic Stew Papa Pete’s Latin Salsa Night Spectrum Theatre Actors’ Theatre Presents Looking for Normal Wealthy Theatre Yoga for Mind, Body and Soul, Failure-Lab Performance

REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

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Schedule friday

5.24

Schedule Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

Billy’s Lounge In The Red Bobarinos Electrixx Central Park Players The Golden Pond Dr. Grinns Erik Griffin Four Winds Casino Smash Mouth Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar The Fight Scene wsg Whiskey Richards The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood

76 | REVUEWM.COM | May 2013

Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, Art and All That Jazz LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Lemonjello’s Carielle, The Fever Haze, Filmloom, and The Koh Kohs Master Arts Theatre Contents Under Pressure MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Old Dog Tavern Hired Hands, Captain Ivory Riviera Theatre The Moxie Strings Seven Steps Up Liz Longley Spectrum Theatre Actors’ Theatre Presents Looking for Normal

saturday

5.25

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe The Waxies Bobarinos Sweet J Band Central Park Players The Golden Pond Downtown Sparta Pink Dress Run Dr. Grins Erik Griffin Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan, Iris Show Gallery Uptown, Grand Haven Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar Chris Schippers Kzoo Civic Theatre Robin Hood Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel

Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Little River Casino and Resort Gretchen Wilson Louie’s Trophy House Grill Inflatable Best Friend, Invisible Mansion, No Bails, The Arbortion Survivors MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Muskegon Museum of Art Laurie Keller Story Teller: Illustrations for Snory Fellers Nick Fink’s The Lazy Blue Tunas Old Dog Tavern Duffield Caron Project, Real Fantastics The Orbit Room Lookin’ Back: The Bob Seger Tribute Band The Pyramid Scheme Assorted Anonymous, Mad Snipes, Punksuhate, Ed Nino, Suport River City Saloon Hairmania Rockford Brewing Company Faux Grass Quartet

Spectrum Theatre Actors’ Theatre Presents Looking for Normal Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

Round Barn Winery Jammin’ in the Vineyard Water Street Gallery Who’s That?

sunday

monday

5.26

Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan, Iris Show Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, African American Life from the Myrna Colley Lee Collection, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection Louie’s Trophy House Grill Drunkin Spelling Bee, Comedy Show McFadden’s Live Celtic Music

5.27

Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal Logan’s Alley Black Out Monday MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski


REVUEWM.COM | May 2013 |

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Schedule tuesday

5.28

Frederik Meijer Gardens Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gallery Uptown Northern Neighbors Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Sight and Feeling: Photographs by Ansel Adams, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, The Arts of China and Japan: Selections from the Collection, ARTbreak: The Legend of Burning Man Kalamazoo Nature Center Green Drinks, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Old Dog Tavern Green Drinks: Sustainable Discussion, Tom Duffield and Open Mic Night Rosa Parks Circle Swing Dancing Wealthy Theatre Meanwhile Movie: Wet Hot American Summer

wednesday

Schedule Dining | Sights | Sounds | Scene

5.29

78 | REVUEWM.COM | May 2013

Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Great Lakes Commonwealth of Letters Poetry Reading with Hedy Hebra & Glenn Shaheen Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Photographs by Ansel Adams, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection Kalamazoo Nature Center Yoga in the Glen Vista, Birding in the Kleinstuck Preserve LaFontsee Gallery, Douglas Reveal/Conceal MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski

The Union Cabaret & Grille Jazz Mix Night

thursday

5.30

Art of the Table In-Store Wine Tasting Barnes and Noble, Woodland Mall Grand Rapids Writers’ Exchange Bell’s Eccentric Cafe Delilah Dewylde & The Lost Boys Crush Spotlight Singer Series: Deborah Kay The DAAC American Wifi, Kisses for Charity, Midwest Skies Dr. Grins Kevin Bozeman Four Winds Casino Fuel Frederik Meijer Gardens Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Photographs by Ansel Adams, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection LaFontsee Galleries’ Douglas location Reveal/Conceal Louie’s Trophy House Grill Analog Ancestry Dance Party MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski One Trick Pony Acoustic Stew Papa Pete’s Latin Salsa Night Rockford Brewing Company Seth Bernard & May Erlewine Spectrum Theatre Actors’ Theatre Presents Looking for Normal UICA Festival 2013 Regional Arts Exhibition Wealthy Theatre Dancing From Within For Women, Yoga for Mind, Body and Soul

Friday

5.31

Bobarinos Risque Dr. Grins Kevin Bozeman Four Winds Casino Huey Lewis & the News Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park Looking East, Facing West: The World of Zhang Huan Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library Growing Up Grand Grand Rapids Civic Theatre Legally Blonde the Musical and Humane Society of West Michigan Adoption Event Grand Rapids Public Museum Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Storms and Stories The Holiday Bar The Electric Red Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Photographs by Ansel Adams, The Artists of Japan and China: Selections from the Collection, KIA Garage Sale The Landing Lounge, Riverfront Hotel Live Music LaFontsee Galleries’ Douglas location Reveal/Conceal MercuryHead Gallery Kathleen Kalinowski Old Dog Tavern REVUE Magazine Music Showcase River City Saloon Litt Up Spectrum Theatre Actors’ Theatre Presents Looking for Normal UICA Festival 2013 Regional Arts Exhibition Wealthy Theatre Brian Vander Ark n

For more events, check out our calendar at revueWm.com.

Bill Maher: DeVos Performance Hall, June 1


Revue Magazine, May 2013  

REVUE is West Michigan's most comprehensive free entertainment guide covering music, arts, film, dining and family entertainment. Each month...

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