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WEST MICHIGAN’S ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR 29 YEARS

FREE! MAY 2017

» NOVEMBER 2017

MUSIC / ARTS / DINING / BEER / FREE!

SWEET VS. SAVORY WHERE TO SATISFY YOUR NEED FOR PIE Also Inside: Things We’re Thankful For, Founders KBS Vertical Taste-off, A Perfect Circle and more


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18+

13+

NOVEMBER 1 COLIN HAY w/ Brian Vander Ark

18+

NOVEMBER 4 REGINA SPEKTOR

NOVEMBER 5 THE USED w/ Glassjaw

NOVEMBER 9 AARON LEWIS & BLACKBERRY SMOKE w/ Alex Williams

NOVEMBER 11 NEEDTOBREATHE

18+

NOVEMBER 12 KARI JOBE w/ Cody Carnes

NOVEMBER 13 ODESZA w/ Sofi Tukker, Louis Futon

NOVEMBER 15 HOLLYWOOD UNDEAD w/ Butcher Babies, Demrick

NOVEMBER 17 MAGIC MEN LIVE!

NOVEMBER 18 DESCENDENTS w/ Mustard Plug, Frank Iero

18+

DECEMBER 1 THE PRINCE EXPERIENCE

JANUARY 10 BLACK LABEL SOCIETY

w/ Corrosion of Conformity, Eyehategod

18+

DECEMBER 9 DAMIEN ESCOBAR

DECEMBER 11 CHEVELLE 10 Years, AEGES

JANUARY 18

BLACK VEIL BRIDES & ASKING ALEXANDRIA w/ Crown The Empire

JANUARY 19 THE DAN BAND

DECEMBER 17 DUSTIN LYNCH

w/ Ryan Hurd, Mitchell Tenpenny

JANUARY 26 KATHLEEN MADIGAN Boxed Wine & Bigfoot

DECEMBER 22 WHO’S BAD

JANUARY 27 JIM NORTON

18+

JANUARY 28 BØRNS

FEBRUARY 2 BLUES TRAVELER

FEBRUARY 5 NF

FEBRUARY 16 CHIPPENDALES

11 OTTAWA AVE NW • DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS • 20MONROELIVE.COM

10 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

MARCH 18 WALK OFF THE EARTH


WHAT’S INSIDE

November 2017 | Volume 29, Issue 11

SCENE 14

What’s Going On this Month

18

Biz Beat: Business Happenings

SOUNDS

54

21

On Tour: The Descendents

22

On Tour: A Perfect Circle

24

On Tour: Chris Robinson Brotherhood

26

Local: Bigfoot Buffalo

28

Festival: Kalamashoegazer

REVUE ARTS: 1A

Visual arts, classical and jazz music, theater, arts event previews and more. (See the center of this issue)

SPECIAL SECTION: HOLIDAYS 32

Things We're Thankful For

38

Local Gift Guide

40

Pies: Sweet vs. Savory

SIGHTS: 43

Style Notes: Thanksgiving Survival Kit

44

Comedy: Inaccurate & Innapropriate

46

Comedy: Josh Blue

48

Eclectic: Brain Candy Live

DINING & DRINKING: LOCAL COMEDY: INACCURATE & INAPPROPRIATE

44

LOCAL GIFT GUIDE

38

51

Restaurant Guide

54

Beer: Founders KBS Vertical Tasting

59

Last Call: Rockwell/Republic


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR “WHAT ARE YOU THANKFUL FOR?” It’s a question we should all be asking ourselves right now. As the state of the world becomes more tiresome and social media shines a spotlight on woes, we need to bring our thoughts back to what’s nice in life. Here’s my own short list: dogs, cats, bourbon, orchards, blueberry tea, board games, friends, soft pretzels, and cool swords. Wow, that felt good! On a more local level, we know the threat of snow looms ever closer as the temperature drops every day, which means this is the time of year we all consider moving away. But let’s be honest, you’re not going to do that, so instead let’s take a quick minute to think about why you stay and what you’d miss if you left. That’s exactly what we’ve done with this month’s Things We’re Thankful For section, in which our writers — along with some local public figures — dish on what they dig about West Michigan. Of course, this issue is also packed full of our usual arts and entertainment coverage, including interviews with nationally touring bands like A Perfect Circle and The Descendents,

along with a look at Brain Candy Live!, a special show combining the mental superpowers of MythBusters’ Adam Savage and YouTube’s Michael Stevens. We also rounded up more than a dozen of the region’s best spots to get pie, and personally tasted five years of KBS for the greater good. And don’t miss Revue Arts, where we interviewed former Grand Rapids Symphony conductor David Lockington and twin piano masters Christina & Michelle Naughton. That’s not to mention comedian Josh Blue, local music fest Kalamashoegazer and the classic musical An American in Paris all coming to town. The point is, we’ve got a lot to look forward to in West Michigan, both in this month and many more to come. Whatever else happens, try to be thankful for that.

’Til next time,

W E S T M I C H I G A N ’ S E N T E RTA I N M E N T G U I D E

EDITORIAL Publisher Brian Edwards Associate Publisher Rich Tupica / rich@revueholding.com Editor Joe Boomgaard / joe@revuewm.com Managing Editor Josh Veal / josh@revuewm.com Copy Editor Claire Boomgaard DESIGN Creative Director Kim Kibby / kim@revuewm.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Missy Black Kelly Brown Dana Casadei Dwayne Hoover Nick Macksood Marla R. Miller Eric Mitts

Samara Napolitan Troy Reimink Jane Simons Elma Talundzic Dylan Tarr Kara Toay Kayla Tucker

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Phil Artz, Katy Batdorff ADVERTISING / 616.608.6170 / sales@revuewm.com Kelli Belanger / kelli@revuewm.com Joe Langlois / joelanglois@revuewm.com DIGITAL EDITORS Kim Kibby, Josh Veal

FIND US ONLINE! Josh Veal, Managing Editor Website: revuewm.com Twitter: twitter.com/revuewm Facebook: facebook.com/revuewm Instagram: instagram.com/revuewm

UPCOMING IS SUE S DECEMBER: Holiday Entertainment

JANUARY: 30th Anniversary

There’s never a shortage of holiday-themed events in West Michigan. We wade through them all and give you our top picks for what’s worth your time and hard-earned money.

We take a look back on 30 years of Revue, how it began and how it's changed since. We'll also help you out with that New Year's resolution as we dive into fitness in West Michigan.

TO ADVERTISE: Call (616) 608-6170 or email sales@revuewm.com. Space reservation is the 13th of the month before publication.

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REVUE is published monthly by Revue Holding Company. 65 Monroe Center, Ste. 5, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 Office: 616.608.6170 / Fax: 616.608.6182 ©2017, Revue Holding Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part granted only by written permission of the publisher in accordance with our legal statement, fools.

ON THE COVER: Nantucket Baking Co. pumpkin pie and Grand Traverse Pie Co. quiche, photographed by Phil Artz, styled by Kim Kibby. See page 40.


REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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/// BEST BETS

WHAT’S GOING ON THIS MONTH | Compiled by Revue Staff

Through 11/5 Wicked

Broadway Grand Rapids 122 Lyon St. NW, Grand Rapids $49+ broadwaygrandrapids.com, (616) 235-6285 Making its Grand Rapids premiere, the Broadway phenomenon Wicked takes a look at the Land of Oz through the eyes of someone way more interesting than Dorothy.

11/3 Periphery & Animals

As Leaders

The Intersection 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 3, 6 p.m., $25+ sectionlive.com, (616) 451-8232

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

If you’re looking for modern metal bands that have changed the game musically, Periphery and Animals As Leaders are both a great place to start, and they’re co-headlining this show at The Intersection. Periphery is a progressive metal band known for its distinctive highgain, distorted, low-pitch guitars (similar to Meshuggah). Meanwhile, Animals as Leaders focuses on the instruments, being

a rare metal band with no vocals. As such, the band has set the bar high for what metal can be.

Lamp Light Music Festival

Eastown Nov. 3-5, $35 lamplightmusicfestival.com

For years now, Lamp Light has been a shining example of how to host a house show in Grand Rapids. In fact, the festival takes place in three houses on one street in the city’s Eastown neighborhood. More than 30 regional bands of all genres come together for this intimate event, including bands like Gifts or Creatures, an indie-folk/Americana band who just moved from Lansing to Kalamazoo and recently released an album, Fair Mitten (New Songs of the Historic Great Lakes Basin). A weekend ticket also gets you access to special events, including a Storytelling Hour with The Moth’s Patti Wheeler and creative industry workshops with Creative Many Michigan.

Plan B: Planned Parenthood Benefit Show

The Pyramid Scheme 68 Commerce Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 3, 7 p.m., $8 pyramidschemebar.com

Lamp Light Music Festival, Nov. 3-5. (Pictured: Gifts or Creatures) With Planned Parenthood (and all health care) under fire from lawmakers on every level, it’s important to help fund the organization, which provides important, affordable health services such as cancer screenings, pap tests, pelvic exams, birth control and much more. For the second time, Pyramid Scheme is hosting a benefit show featuring local female-fronted bands, including FLUSHED, Lipstick Jodi, Tonia Bug, Emma Loo and Under The Pink.

11/4 Kalamazoo Craft Beer Festival 2017

Wings Event Center 3600 Vanrick Dr., Kalamazoo Nov. 4, 1-6 p.m., $45-95 facebook.com/kalamazoocraftbeerfestival

Lipstick Jodi at Plan B: Planned Parenthood Benefit Show at The Pyramid Scheme,Nov. 3

14 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

Kalamazoo’s fourth annual beer festival features craft breweries from Michigan and across the country. The day includes beer tasting, specialty tappings, cornhole, the infamous keg curling and more. Last year had dozens of breweries, each bringing a handful (or two or three) of their finest brews. General admission tickets get you a fancy souvenir sample glass and 15 tasting tokens.

and you can enter a raffle. The market’s management, The Vendor Exchange, hopes to make this a monthly event, with a SantaCon taking place in December.

11/5

All Stouts Day

Indie Flea Grand Rapids

Bell’s Eccentric Cafe 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo Nov. 5, all day bellsbeer.com

This month, the inaugural Indie Flea of Grand Rapids is coming to Wealthy Theatre. Vendors from all over the city will set up shop, selling art, jewelry, vintage goods, aromatherapy, fashion designs, horticulture and more. It’s free to attend,

As the oldest (and the biggest) craft brewery in Michigan, Bell’s Brewery knows its beer inside and out. The Kalamazoo-based brewery has become known for its killer stouts especially, which is why the taproom will fill every one of its taps with the dark, creamy, roasty style for one day this month. Head in for some specialty brews, along with specialty tours all weekend.

Wealthy Theatre 1130 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids Nov. 4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.


/// BEST BETS

11/8 Tom Petty Tribute

Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill 760 Butterworth St. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 8, 7 p.m., $5 In memory of Tom Petty, eight local bands will come together at the Tip Top Deluxe and pay tribute to the masterful American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. Tickets are cheap (as are drinks), and bands include Bigfoot Buffalo, Hazy Past, Devin and The Dead Frets and more.

11/9 Lewis Black

Kalamazoo State Theatre 404 S. Burdick St., Kalamazoo Nov. 9, 7 p.m., $39.50-$65 kazoostate.com, (269) 345-6500

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE

Over the decades, Lewis Black has become known as the “king of rants,” going off on anyone or anything that gets on his nerves. It only makes sense then that his latest tour would be called Rant, White & Blue. Expect plenty of yelling, sarcasm, profanity and hand-flailing as Black goes off on current events, social media, politics and just about everything else someone can get mad about. If you need to familiarize yourself with Black beforehand, just check out any of the 24 specials he’s released to date.

11/10 My Friend Dahmer

drink and food you could hope for will be there. Admission tickets include a glass and access to seminars. After that, drink tickets are 50 cents each.

Jeffrey Dahmer is one of America’s most infamous serial killers, having murdered 17 men and boys in the Midwest during the ’80s. But before that, Dahmer was a teenager with some unsettling hobbies and a troubling home-life. My Friend Dahmer is based on a graphic novel by a man who was friends with Dahmer in high-school, and it tells the story of the killer’s life leading up to the first murder.

A Very Merry Market Day

UICA 2 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids Nov. 10-21, $4 members, $8 public uica.org

11/16-18

Grand Rapids International Wine, Beer & Food Festival

DeVos Place 303 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids Nov. 16-18, $15-$40 showspan.com

Every year, thousands of people head to DeVos Place for three days of drinking, eating and more drinking. Now in its 10th year, the festival will fill two event halls with about 600 vendors, ranging from wineries to breweries, distilleries, cideries and restaurants. With that many options, it would be pointless to list any here, but know that just about every purveyor of

11/18

Downtown Market Grand Rapids 435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

The Downtown Market will be filled to the brim with vendors this month, creating the perfect opportunity to find an incredibly unique gift for your loved one. More than 45 artisan gift vendors will set up shop, offering jewelry, art, crafts, pottery, engraving, and much more. When you’re done shopping, head downstairs and check out any one of the Market’s many food vendors.

Trevor Noah

Miller Auditorium 220 Auditorium Dr., Kalamazoo Nov. 18, 8 p.m., $35+ millerauditorium.com

Before Trevor Noah became the host of the Emmy Award-winning The Daily Show, he was a stand-up comedian who found great success in South Africa and then the U.S. Now, he’s back on the road again and coming to Kalamazoo. His stand-up draws on his experience growing up in Johannesburg, along with his observations on race in the world.

Trevor Noah at Miller Auditorium, Nov. 18

11/19 A Drag Queen

Christmas: The Naughty Tour

DeVos Performance Hall 303 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids Nov. 19, 8 p.m., $22.50+ devosper formancehall.com, ( 616 ) 742-6500 Attention divas and supermodels! The stars of RuPaul’s Drag Race are on the road once again, returning to DeVos Performance Hall this month for a holiday spectacular of Christmas songs and drag performances. A Drag Queen Christmas features performances by Latrice Royale, Naomi Smalls, Kim Chi, Sasha Velour, Roxxxy Andrews and more. The night is hosted by Trinity Taylor, a close runnerup on Season 9. Get your tickets now to experience their charisma, nerve and talent up-close.

11/22-25 Barrel Aged Cider Tap

Sietsema offers top-tier hard cider at a great price, and you can carry it around with you as you traverse the orchard. This month, the cidery is kicking the Thanksgiving holiday off with a barrelaged tap takeover, including a signature bourbon barrel-aged cider, along with cider aged in barrels from Founders, Dark Horse and New Holland Brewery.

11/25 Drew Nelson & HWY-2

Seven Steps Up 116 S. Jackson St., Spring Lake Nov. 25, 8 p.m., $25 pindropconcerts.com Drew Nelson is a Michigan-born veteran, storytelling singer-songwriter and multiinstrumentalist. His music draws on his experience as a fly fisherman and world traveler, as he tells the tales of his journey and the lives he’s encountered along the way, mixing Americana and roots-rock with traditional folk sounds.

Takeover

Sietsema Orchards & Cider Mill 8540 2 Mile Rd. NE, Ada Nov. 22-25 sietsemaorchards.com

Kalamazoo Craft Beer Festival at Wings Event Center, Nov. 4

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Sietsema is one of the best orchards around for a few reasons — chicken coop, free corn maze, dogs and absolutely incredible fresh donuts. But above all that,

Find more events in the Revue Arts section and at revuewm.com!


/// news

Bottle Shop & Bar n Downtow

GR’s

eR e B t s e LaRG ion seLect over 800 Beers 20 Drafts Growler Fills Weekly events Free tastings

west Michigan

Happy Hour: M–th, 12–6pm

OPENED:

now taking orders for Beer advent Boxes!

Schedule | Dining | sights | Sounds Scene

order by nov. 10

biz beat

A roundup of openings, closings and other local business news

Dime & Regal moved from its space on Division to 656 Wealthy St. SE in Grand Rapids, giving owner Courtney Jones about 1,000 square feet to work with. Jones works with partner Samantha McIntosh to create jewelry through metalsmithing. The store will also sell other local maker’s products, such as scarves, handbags, candles and prints. Rockford Cheese Shop (49 E. Bridge St. NE, Rockford) has arrived in its namesake town, offering high-end cheeses, charcuterie, olives, jams and just about everything else you’d expect to see on a cheese board. For an idea of the cheeses available (with detailed descriptions), check out rockfordcheeseshop.com Russo’s International Market (241 W. Fulton St., Grand Rapids) is now open in downtown Grand Rapids, having moved into the space previously occupied by Bagger Dave’s. Much like the current location on 29th Street, this Russo’s offers a deli, home essentials and a huge selection of hand-selected wine and beer. This location also has a bar and dine-in eating, featuring a menu of gourmet sandwiches, pizza and salads.

404 IonIa ave. SW (616) 350.9170 grandrapids.craftbeercellar.com

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In Grand Rapids’ Downtown Market, Pho 616 (435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids) set up shop, bringing the Vietnamese noodle soup to downtown. The family-owned joint has a fairly simple menu, with pho bo (beef noodle soup), banh mi, summer rolls and iced coffee. 616 Mitten Market (1186 Walker Ave. NW, Grand Rapids) opened doors on Grand Rapids’ west side, just south of Leonard. The boutique carries a wide variety of locally made products, such as bath and body products, jewelry,

re-purposed furniture and apparel. You’ll also find baby products, including bibs, nursing covers and teething necklaces, handmade by the shop’s owners. On the ever-burgeoning Bridge Street, The Sparrows Coffee Tea & Newsstand (442 Bridge St. NW, Grand Rapids) has moved in with a second location. For years now, the coffee shop has provided Wealthy Street with quality coffee, tea and magazines at its first location. With the new space, Sparrows also is beginning to roast its own beans for the first time.

Russo's International Market's new downtown Grand Rapids store. Courtesy Photos

The Amway Grand Plaza Hotel (187 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids) has completely redone its bar/lounge area along Pearl Street, ditching its classic circle bar and opening the new, modern Rendezvous Lounge. The new concept offers more options, beginning with breakfast (including a buffet) in the morning. Later, Rendezvous makes a shift to appetizers and high-end cocktails, such as the 3 Dots & Dash, with honey, lime, orange, allspice, bitters and New Holland Rum.

Jolly Pumpkin has proposed a move into the former Black Heron location at 428 Bridge St. NW, Grand Rapids. The sour-focused brewery initially had proposed a move into what was once Red Lion, next to Anchor Bar. However, the former home of Black Heron — which closed after a car crashed through its window — would offer a more modern, up-to-date space.

OTHER CHANGES:

CLOSED:

Little Lucy’s Cafe is now just Lucy’s Cafe (1747 Plainfield Ave. NE, Grand Rapids). Why? Well, this isn’t Neverland — everyone has to grow up sometime. Grand Rapids’ Woosah Outfitters is moving from 131 S. Division Ave. to 738 Wealthy St., and launching a large line of new goods along with the move. Woosah offers nature-inspired woodcuts, prints, accessories and clothes. The new space will provide more room, plus a loft for owner Erica Lang to live as close as possible to her work.

The owners of Wealthy at Charles (738 Wealthy St. SE, Grand Rapids) retired last month, closing up shop on Sept. 30. The store was in business for 12 years, selling homemade goods from local artisans, European-style furniture, art, garden decorations and more. n —Compiled by Josh Veal

If you have any closings, openings or other business news for REVUE, e-mail josh@revuewm.com.


REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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Those who know, KNOW. WE HOST GRAMMY® WINNERS. LEGENDS. EMERGING ARTISTS. SINGERSONGWRITERS. FULL BANDS. ROCK. ROOTSAMERICANA. FOLK. BLUEGRASS. Artists and fans say we’re one of the best live music venues in the country. We have a full bar available with craft & domestic beers, fine wines & premium spirits.

Box office 616.930.4755 or visit PinDropConcerts.com

Scan for info and while you’re at it, sign up for our email newsletter!

Seven Steps Up www.sevenstepsup.com

SEVEN STEPS UP

Live Music & Event Venue


/// ON TOUR

The Descendents PHOTO: KEVIN SCANLON

Cutting the Fat

Milo Aukerman talks Wienerschnitzel, passion and four decades of Descendents | by Dylan Tarr

make our way through the world and document our feelings. It sounds kind of corny, but that’s what it’s all about.” After the first EP, the Descendents released a slew of honest albums, the first being Milo Goes to College. Even if you haven’t listened to it, you’ve almost definitely seen the album’s cover: a black and white caricature of a crew-cut, bespectacled Aukerman that drummer and de facto leader of the band, Bill Stevenson, put on the cover to annoy the singer. “Bill said, ‘We’re going to put this caricature of you on the cover,’ and I thought, ‘OK, good luck with that,’” Aukerman recounted with a laugh. Thirty-five years later, Aukerman’s face is synonymous not only with the Descendents, but also with first-wave hardcore as a whole. And while Aukerman’s face might be the most recognizable aspect of the band, he said fans would be remiss if they associated him with the Descendents’ creative direction. “When it comes to the band’s decisionmaking and who’s the leader of the band, I

THE DESCENDENTS 20 Monroe Live 11 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids Nov. 18, 7 p.m., $35, all ages 20monroelive.com, (844) 678-5483

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE

I

N 19 81, A N E W LY F OR M E D PUNK BAND called the Descendents released a frantic, four-and-a-half-minute EP titled Fat. While the pop-music machine of the 1980s was churning out hits like Eye of the Tiger and Hungry Like the Wolf, the Descendents were writing about things real kids could relate to, like grease-ball fast food joints, their jerk of a dad and coffee jitters. The Descendents were the relatable underdogs, and nearly four decades later, they still are. “We’ve always just written about our lives, however mundane they might be,” said Milo Aukerman, singer of the Descendents. “Anything more grandiose than that and I’ve always kind of felt uncomfortable.” As a few California teenagers with the metabolism of laboratory mice, the Descendents wrote about the single most gripping topic on their minds: food.

“It was real funny for us to write songs about Wienerschnitzel and what not,” Aukerman said with a laugh. “It was funny, but it was also very serious to us because we were trying to proclaim our passion for something, and that’s something we felt passionate about.” Fat is a product obviously steeped in the confusion of early adulthood. It reflects the yearning to be taken seriously but, at the same time, is soaked with leftover juvenile attitude. Since then, the Descendents’ passions have matured, shifting from cheeseburgers to a more encompassing narrative. The newest album, 2016’s Hypercaffium Spazzinate, covers everything from prescription pill-popping kids on Limiter to fighting self-destructive habits on Victim of Me. “The common theme in all of it is that this stuff means a lot to us, whether it be a fast food restaurant, a girl or the state of affairs in the world,” Aukerman said. “It’s something that many people can relate to regardless of age, because we’re just trying to

am so far from the leader it’s just laughable,” Aukerman said. “(Bill Stevenson) is the mastermind of the Descendents when all is said and done.” Now in his 50s, the frontman has accomplished far more than most. In addition to the band, Aukerman also holds a Ph.D. in biochemistry, a profession he calls his “ultimate career.” In a story from the punk rock canon, one that’s been told and retold, Aukerman left the band after the aptly named Milo Goes to College to pursue a career in science. “I went into science to be intellectually stimulated, and there were many times when it really failed me in terms of that,” Aukerman said, and he eventually returned to the Descendents. But Aukerman said he and his band never really made it big, which might sound ridiculous coming from a man whose face is so well-known, people tattoo it on themselves. But he’s right — the Descendents isn’t a household name. And for the band, there’s always room to improve, said Aukerman. “Every day it’s like, ‘How can we get better as musicians, and how can we get in touch with our audience better?’ We still want to get better, and we still want to get bigger,” he said. For Aukerman, getting better and bigger means touring like he’s still 20, but also admitting things he might not have in his youth. “I realize that after many years I still need to learn to sing better,” Aukerman said with a laugh. “I just recently made some breakthroughs in terms of singing, and it’s like, wow, it took me 30 years to figure that out? What the hell?” After nearly four decades, seven studio albums, breakups and breakdowns, the Descendents are still trying to play as many shows as they can while keeping their lives together, Aukerman said. When the Descendents come to Grand Rapids, they’ll play like they have something to prove. “No matter what, we’re always an underdog band,” Aukerman said. “The message here is don’t rest on your laurels.”

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/// ON TOUR

COMING ’ROUND AGAIN

A Perfect Circle returns to Grand Rapids for first time in more than a decade | by Eric Mitts

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

R

IGHT FROM THE BEGINNING, A PERFECT CIRCLE N E V E R F I T the shape of a conventional rock band. It’s no surprise then that the group has defied regular touring and recording cycles over its nearly 20-year history. Often described by critics as an art-rock inspired alt-metal supergroup, A Perfect Circle melds the powerful, haunting vocals of Tool frontman Maynard James Keenan with the soaring, searing guitar work of cosongwriter/producer Billy Howerdel. The duo famously first originated when Howerdel played Keenan some of the songs he had written after spending years working as a guitar tech for bands like Tool, The Smashing Pumpkins, Nine Inch Nails and others. Impressed, Keenan said he could hear himself singing on the tracks, and the project came to life in 1999. “I’m not gonna lie. I am pretty pragmatic and shy when it comes to things. But when we went into this, I thought we had something special,” Howerdel said of the band’s beginnings. At the time, Howerdel was a ProTools engineer on the long-delayed Guns N’ Roses album Chinese Democracy. But the feedback he kept getting from friends and peers in the music industry gave him the confidence he needed to step away from that high-profile gig and venture out with his own music. “I had saved up all of my money at the time and put it into APC,” Howerdel said. “I had toured for many years, and worked at home, and saved over $100,000, and I put it all into this band. So if it failed, I was going to be screwed. I definitely was shooting for the stars.” The effort paid off in 2000 with A Perfect Circle’s debut LP Mer De Noms, which launched at No. 4 on the Billboard Albums chart, becoming the highest-charting debut for a rock band ever. Then APC returned with its second LP, 2003’s Thirteenth Step, which charted even higher at No. 2.

22 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

The band quickly followed up with eMOTIVe, a politically charged covers LP released on Election Day in 2004, before going on hiatus in January 2005. At that time, Keenan returned to work with Tool, while Howerdel released his own album as Ashes Divide. APC has since reunited, first in 2011 for a series of sold-out concerts and major festival appearances all over the world, and again at the beginning of this year in anticipation of a now long-awaited fourth LP. “I don’t mean to get too fuzzy and heavy about it, but I got into music because the music I listened to meant so much to me,” Howerdel said of APC’s ongoing legacy and dedicated fanbase. “I’ve got to pinch myself sometimes when I hear people recounting stories of how (APC) was the soundtrack to moments of their life. Especially when it brings positive change to them.”

When Revue got ahold of Howerdel last month, he had just finished work on the latest batch of mixes for the new album, which has a tentative release of some time in 2018. He said the band is “full steam on a roll” with the new LP. Going back as far as 2008, this project has been slow going due to the logistical and creative difficulties of Keenan and Howerdel living in different states and working on different projects. Still, they’ve shared songs and demos online over the years and have used their recent live performances as fuel for the fire of their new material. The band played two new songs — Feathers and Hourglass — on its spring tour earlier this year. “I’m shocked sometimes how quickly he’ll respond to something I put up,” Howerdel said. “There was one (song) that went up two weeks ago and I think within 48 hours or less there was a finished song. And

A Perfect Circle

PHOTO: TIM CADIENTE

A PERFECT CIRCLE

wsg. The Beta Machine The Deltaplex, 2500 Turner Ave., Grand Rapids Nov. 22, 6:30 p.m., $45-$325 deltaplex.com, (616) 364-9000

he hadn’t heard it before. These aren’t that simple of arrangements, so he’s unique like that. He’s a talented dude.” Shortly after talking with Revue, the band cryptically teased The Doomed online, hinting at its first new material since 2013. “On the spring tour, I started working on the record, and I’m bringing another studio on the road this time, so I’m going to be busy,” Howerdel said. “I wake up in the morning and get right in the studio in the dressing room, and try and capitalize on that kind of energy.” In addition to harnessing the concert energy, Howerdel said the current political climate once again is having quite the impact on new material. “(Maynard) said it very well on the last tour. To paraphrase him, it was something like, ‘Our job as artists is to be emotive creatures, and we’re here to interpret and report,’” Howerdel said. “But it’s our interpretation. It’s our report, and it’s completely subjective. “For me, I would say most people could agree that things are more chaotic than ever, and more unsettled, and more uncertain than I’ve ever experienced in my life, and I’ve lived through the cold war. It takes a toll on everybody. There was a time, especially in early winter, where I wasn’t really working. … And so I think we all need a balance. People have to pay attention — they have to stay involved, but they have to keep a balance. You have to unplug for a moment and be healthy enough to make informed and wise choices.”


GET RE A DY TO SEE STA RS

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Must be 21 or older. Tickets based on availability. Schedule subject to change.

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

23


/// ON TOUR

Chris Robinson Brotherhood PHOTO: JAY BLAKESBERG

Life in the Present

Chris Robinson and his Brotherhood create one day at a time

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

| by Dwayne Hoover

F

OR M E R BL ACK CROW E S SINGER CHRIS ROBINSON HAD, NOT SECRETLY, been in a problematic relationship with the band that made him famous for some time. In the final couple of years leading up to the group’s disbanding, he began collecting some songs and formulating ideas for what his next steps in the musical world might bring. He thought back to the very beginning, on what shaped his love for music and performing from the start. It all went back to his time as a purely local musician, playing for the love of music alone. “My infinite wisdom came up with, in a sense, walking away from everything that has made me successful in music,” Robinson

24 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

said. “The second part of that idea as I looked around — because I had attempted said exodus in an early project that didn’t work — was like, ‘How do I make this work without being too simple about it?’” What he landed on was putting together a California-based band, a collection of local musicians who could easily practice together and perform throughout the area, from a logistical standpoint. “I get together a group of guys,” Robinson said. “We all live in the same town. We can rehearse here, and we can get it together. Then my idea was for all of us to jump in a van, just us, and do nine weeks of residencies and work out this new batch of tunes I was working on and see if we become a band.” That nine weeks saw almost 14,000 miles bouncing from city to city in California, the band rapidly making a name for itself. But

what the group was unwilling to do was follow any sort of conventional path on its journey to playing the music the members truly felt and believed in. Ditching the traditional path of making a demo to striking a record deal and going on tour has opened their door to creative freedom. “A real working rock band lives tour to tour,” Robinson said. “Part of the freedom (is) from not having some business jerk from some label come in and say, ‘Hey, I don’t like that bridge.’ It’s like, ‘Who asked you? I don’t like your shoes. You still picked them out and bought them.’ If you’re going to have investors, you have to listen to them. Our only investment is our love of music.” That freedom really shines in The Chris Robinson Brotherhood’s fourth and latest studio album, Barefoot In the Head, a record that was almost completely written and recorded in just two weeks. “In the Barefoot record, the main difference would be that no one had heard any of the compositions before we got there,” Robinson said. “I had a couple of pieces and we had jammed the first chorus at sound check. But we truly wrote, arranged and recorded 11 new songs in 14 days, and that includes a song that wasn’t on the record. I think the idea of being in the present helps this band on our level communicate.” Robinson acknowledged the world as increasingly materialistic and precarious. As

such, what holds the band and its music together, and potentially even humanity itself, is the group’s ability to do just that — live in the present, with something that means more than typical societal expectations. “Timothy Leary was an egomaniac even after 10,000 acid trips, but what he said in a cliche time bubble is, ‘Tune in, turn on and drop out,’” Robinson said. “Well, you can do that now without having to leave everything behind and move to a hippie commune in Colorado. ... You can turn off your TV, and you can at least try to recognize the corporate trance machine of status and wealth. You can remove yourself from the fear-driven propaganda. You can do that with the food you eat and the music and the corporations. “I’m no prophet and I’m no weather man, but I’m imagining when times become more anxiety-filled and you feel the fear and hatred tangibly, you’re going to want to really have a good relationship with something soulful, or something more meaningful.”

THE CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD The Intersection 133 Grandville Ave. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 12, 7 p.m. $20 adv / $25 dos sectionlive.com, (616) 451-8232


REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

25


/// LOCAL MUSIC

“We’ve all been playing in various bands since we were in high school, but I’d say for me, Bigfoot Buffalo is the first band I’ve been in where it feels like that allfor-one, one-for-all vibe.”

Evolution of the Bigfoot Buffalo

‘Psychedelic-roots-rock’ band grows into whole new animal with second LP

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

| by Eric Mitts

U

NDERGOING SOME T HING OF A MUSICA L TRANSFORMATION, Bigfoot Buffalo has changed with the cycles of the moon. Having rotating members in and out of its lineup from 2014 to 2016, the Grand Rapids band emerged from the cold last winter with a roaring new sound that it has now captured on its second studio LP, The Sun Is The Moon. The album is the band’s follow-up to its 2015 self-titled, Jammie Award-nominated, mostly acoustic debut. “We started as an acoustic band,” said vocalist/guitarist Kyle Brown. “Acoustic guitar, mandolin, fiddle and eventually upright bass. Now we’re two guitars — almost exclusively electric — drums, keys and electric

26 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

bass. The instrumentation has evolved and the sound with it. It’s like in the ’50s and ’60s when bands started out as jug or skiffle groups and over time grew into rock ‘n’ roll groups. I guess we kind of did that, just much faster.” When Bigfoot Buffalo first formed — with Brown on guitar and vocals, Michael Prokopchuk (formerly of The Waxies) on fiddle and Evan Breithart on mandolin — the young singer-songwriter found himself listening to a ton of bluegrass, country, folk and old tyme music. He took influence from legends like Del McCoury, Sam Bush, Brownie Mcghee & Sonny Terry, Ledbelly, Townes Van Zandt and others. But over the last few years, he’s gotten into more rock bands like The Allman Brothers Band, Pink Floyd, The Who, Drive By Truckers and Moe. During that same time, Bigfoot Buffalo began to grow into its own as well, with a

solid lineup made up of Michael Serota on bass, Charlie Merkel on drums and Landon Knoppers on keys. Most recent addition Luke Smits joined the band earlier this year on guitar. “We’ve all been playing in various bands since we were in high school, but I’d say for me, Bigfoot Buffalo is the first band I’ve been in where it feels like that all-for-one, one-forall vibe,” Brown said. Previously, he’s played drums for Nicholas James & the Bandwagon and fronted the band Into The West. “We all hang out together in our free time, even after being together on the road on such a regular basis — we’re all just good friends playing music.” Averaging around 50 shows per year, the band will continue to expand its roaming area following the release of The Sun Is The Moon, with ventures planned for Wisconsin and elsewhere in the coming year. But the

band’s familiar stomping grounds here in West Michigan have really helped Bigfoot Buffalo develop into what it is now. Calling its new sound “psychedelicroots-rock,” Bigfoot Buffalo melds together country, blues, funk, prog and psychedelic rock on The Sun Is The Moon, creating an album that seamlessly flows and transitions from one tune to the next. Recorded at Centennial Sound with The Crane Wives’ Ben Zito, the new LP was mastered by Ian Gorman at La Luna recording in Kalamazoo. In addition, the four-member horn section from Muskegon funk-rock band Flexadecibel backed Bigfoot Buffalo on four songs off the album, and also will perform for the album’s release show on Nov. 3 at Tip Top Deluxe. “I think the best part of this scene is people are open to a lot of different types of music, which has made our evolution that much easier,” Brown said. “I’m sure people prefer different genres and different eras in our band’s existence. But for the most part, people have been just as interested in our newfound psychedelic rock direction as they were in our early old tyme and folk stuff. I think the festival scene in Michigan helps that a lot. There’s a whole bunch of different genres represented and the folks aren’t afraid to genre hop all over the place.”

BIGFOOT BUFFALO

The Sun Is The Moon LP Release Show wsg. Flexadecibel, Conrad Shock Tip Top Deluxe Bar & Grill 760 Butterworth St. SW, Grand Rapids Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $5 bigfootbuffalo.com, (616) 272-3910


11/2

Kevin Jones Band 11/4

Electric Tunas 11/9

Denny Middleton Duo 11/11

Rawhide Johnson Band 11/16

Kathy Lamar Quartet 11/18

Natchez Trace 11/30

T U E - W E D 1 1 AM - 1 0 PM T H U R - F R I 1 1 AM - 1 1 PM S A T 5 PM- 1 1 PM & S U N 1 1 AM- 4 PM

Juke Joint Hand Me Downs

SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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/// FESTIVAL At The B.O.B. Grand Rapids, MI 616.356.2000 thebob.com

ZEMAN KEVIN BbOer 2-4 Novem

Tambourina

DON FRIES

November EN 9-11

Looking Up, Down & All Around Kalamashoegazer brings together shoegaze fans from all over | by Eric Mitts

T

JOSH BLUE

SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS | SCENE

November 16-18

DAV

NovemberE D2Y4ER&

25

S DAN CUMMeIcN. 2 Nov. 30 - D

28 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

H E R E’S NOT H I NG QU I T E LIKE KALAMASHOEGAZER. The festival feels like a celebration in more ways than one — an honoring of its host city’s diverse yet devoted music scene, and of the beloved cult subgenres of shoegaze, twee and dreampop first popularized by such iconic bands as My Bloody Valentine, Ride and Slowdive in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Led by the radiant passion and infectious enthusiasm of co-founder/curator April Zimont (vocalist of Kzoo bands glowfriends, Vida Eterna and Tambourina), Kalamashoegazer has steadily built upon itself much like the music it celebrates, culminating in a yearly crescendo of crashing guitars and pure auditory bliss. “I think this genre attracts people that want to feel something,” Zimont said. “Whether it be extremely loud music that assaults their senses, or something more ethereal, melodic, melancholy and beautiful. My attempt each year is to kind of pay homage to the genre, re-imagining it through these shoegaze-influenced bands that are all over the spectrum of what we think shoegaze and dreampop is, and was, but are also their own thing entirely.”

Like almost no other fest of its kind, K alamashoegazer has drawn in avid fans and devoted bands from all around Michigan, the Midwest and even across the country. Now more than a decade in, this year’s lineup features Zimont’s latest band, Tambourina, which will make one of its firstever live appearances. Fellow Kalamazoo band Crash City Saints also will return to the stage, roaring into the festival following this fall’s release of the high-volume LP, Are You Free? Chicago band Airiel is headlining the night with its own distinctive sound, just days after releasing its second full-length album. Meanwhile, Whimsical, another Chicago band, is reuniting with all of its original members for the first time in 13 years, just to perform at Kalamashoegazer. A longtime favorite, Milwaukee’s Brief Candles, will return to the festival as well. And New York ’s Dead Leaf Echo and Orations, along with the Grand Rapidsbased Houseplants are all making their Kalamashoegazer debuts this year. Even esteemed scene supporter Greg Wilson from DKFM shoegaze radio out in Los Angeles will fly into Kalamazoo to be a part of the festival. “In the UK, back in the early ’90s when the British press first dubbed these bands ‘shoegaze,’ they also referred to them and all

their fans as the scene that celebrates itself and I gotta say, it is exactly that,” Zimont said. “There’s a lot of excitement built into the whole event, with the bands all being very supportive of one another, which is something you don’t always see. A lot of people I’ve talked to who have come out to the fest for the first time were surprised at how inviting this whole scene is.” This year, Kalamashoegazer is taking over Bell’s Eccentric Café for the first time ever. Previously the fest has taken place at such revered Kzoo venues as Kraftbrau Brewery, The Strutt, Old Dog Tavern and Louie’s Trophy House. “Bell’s Eccentric Cafe is such a fantastic venue for live music, the sound is incredible, and it is definitely the ideal venue for this event,” Zimont said. “I think Kalamashoegazer will likely be out of the ordinary for regular Bell’s patrons, but I expect we’ll gain some new interest, as I think the lineup is fairly accessible this year. Still, if you haven’t been before, I’d highly recommend earplugs.”

KALAMASHOEGAZER 11

Bell’s Eccentric Café 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo Nov. 4, 4:30 p.m., $15 bellsbeer.com, (269) 382-233


SCENE | SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE

29

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |


OPEN

One HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4-7PM cityflatshotel.com / 616 608 1725

Lashes · Brows · Makeup (616)-427-5394 217 Grandville Ave SW Suite 102, Grand Rapids info@sirenandproper.com sirenandproper.com

30 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017


SIMON & GARFUNKEL SEPTEMBER 19, 1981 Photo credit: Paul Mobley

LIVE in Central Park

Starring Lee Lessack & Johnny Rodgers

NOV. 17 @ 8 p.m.

NOV. 18 @ 8 p.m.

NOV. 25 @ 8 p.m.

NOV. 29 @ 7:30 p.m.

NOW ON SALE! For more information visit us online at millerauditorium.com or call (269) 387-2300 | (800) 228-9858



Tuesday, November 7 7:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE We will discuss what you need to start streaming television and save money.

Modern Lettering for Beginners Learn the art of hand lettering! In this beginner class, Jamie Johnson from 6.25 Paper Studio will guide you through lettering basics, proportions, and a few different font styles. You will spend time practicing and trying out your new skills. Space is limited.

GR

An entertaining, engaging, and hands-on experience with one of the most important cultural icons in history: the guitar.

ART HOP FRIDAY NIGHTS

Saturday, November 11 1:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE

Speak Up

GUITAR: THE INSTRUMENT THAT ROCKED THE WORLD EXHIBIT THRU JANUARY 7, 2018

Gentrification and

Our City

Monday, November 13 7:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE Join us for an enlightening discussion on gentrification, our city, and the ways forward.

A MUSICAL INTERLUDE IN THE LIBRARY

Live entertainment, visual art, and music light. The best date night in downtown Kalamazoo. VISUAL EXPERIENCES| 5PM |FREE LIVE MUSIC EXPERIENCES | 6PM | FREE MUSIC LIGHT SHOWS | 6:30 & 8PM | $3 NOVEMBER 3 Mechele Peters & ‘Til the Cowboys Come Home (Americana old school) Josh Gipson’s “Precision Productions”(art) DECEMBER 1 Kalamazoo Mandolin and Guitar Orchestra (holiday classics) Denise Miller’s “Reclaiming Humanness: An Historical Broadside Journey of Black Women as Reluctant Heroes 1781 - present(art) The Museum is open until 9 p.m. on Art Hop Friday Nights ; doors close at 8 p.m.

KARISA WILSON Thursday, November 16 7:00 pm Main Library 111 Library St NE

FREE GENERAL ADMISSION Monday–Saturday 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Art Hop Fridays 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Sunday + Holidays 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and Easter

269.373.7990 | 800.772.3370 kalamazoomuseum.org

EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 111 LIBRARY ST NE 616.988.5400 WWW.GRPL.ORG

The Kalamazoo Valley Museum is operated by Kalamazoo Valley Community College and is governed by its Board of Trustees


Saturday, March 17, 2018 12–2 pm at the Judi K. Jolliffe Theatre 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, Suite 205

A Fe e - O n l y We a l t h M a n a g e m e n t G r o u p

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

ENTRIES DUE BY 5 PM: Friday, January 26, 2018

kpl.gov/teenfilmfest


FALL CONCERT SERIES

UT

DO JEFF SOLDANIELS WITH THE BEN DANIELS BAND November 5 | 4:00PM $36 Advance | $39 Day of Show

One of America’s most accomplished jazz families

BRUBECK BROTHERS QUARTET November 17 | 8:00PM $36 Advance $39 Day of Show "The Brubeck Brothers Quartet brings a new spirit to straight-ahead jazz." - Boston Globe

TICKETS AT SC4A.ORG OR 269.857.2399 SPONSORED BY HILLIARD LYONS | Stephen Kiss


: FRIDAY • DECEMBER 15 • 7:30 PM

Frauenthal Theater • 425 W Western Ave • Muskegon

Scott Speck conductor Cathie Ryan Irish music vocalist WMS Children’s Choir Beth Slimko, director

west michigan symphony SCOTT SPECK | MUSIC DIRECTOR

Irish vocalist Cathie Ryan and her band present a program that reflects her Celtic roots in a wide array of holiday works. Ring in the holidays with Ryan, the West Michigan Symphony orchestra, and the WMS Children’s Choir as they bring traditional and Irish-themed music of the season to West Michigan. westmichigansymphony.org • 231.726.3231 $22-$54 • Student tickets $10

Cathie Ryan and her band follow a Friday evening holiday concert with the WMS with an evening of Irish folk music. Join Cathie as she warms up West Michigan with heartfelt lyrics, beloved ballads and traditional tunes of the Emerald Isle.

theblockwestmichigan.org • 231.726.3231 $25-$35 • Student tickets $10


St. Cecilia Music Center PRESENTS

IT’S JUST SO GOOD

MUSIC LIVES HERE

NOVEMBER JAZZ 24 Ransom Ave NE Grand Rapids

CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE

NOVEMBER 16, 2017

Four-time Grammy-winning jazz bassist appears with his trio, Tip City

BRAD MEHLDAU TRIO

CHAMBERJAZZFOLK SCMC-ONLINE.ORG 616.459.2224

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

“The most influential jazz pianist of the last 20 years� - New York Times

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SINGER | SONGWRITER | ACTOR | GRAMMY WINNER

The Artists’ Forum presents

Saturday, December 9 2 pm and 7 pm

Sunday, December 10 2 pm

with the

Chenery Auditorium Kalamazoo Michigan

Featuring Guest Professional Dancers from

Cincinnati Ballet & Grand Rapids Ballet Kalamazoo Children’s Chorus Reserved seats available for $15 to $22 Miller Auditorium Box Office (269.387.2300) or online at balletartsensemble.org. Group Rates: Special ticket rates available for groups of 20 or more. Fresh flower bouquets by Schafer’s Flowers available at the door while supplies last.

Funded in part by the Irving S. Gilmore and Harold & Grace Upjohn Foundations.

Special Guest TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2017 7:30 P.M. | $15 DOORS OPEN AT 6:45 DALE B. LAKE AUDITORIUM TEXAS TOWNSHIP CAMPUS

www.kvcc.edu/artistsforum


FA R A ND AWAY THE

BEST MUSIC A L OF T HE Y E A R !

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BR OA DWAY.C OM’ S AU DIE NC E C HOIC E AWA R D F OR BES T M U S I C A L

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MSU’s Wharton Center ON SALE NOW! WHARTONCENTER.COM • 1-800-WHARTON East L ansing engagement welcomed by Foster, Swift, Collins & Smith, P.C.; Jackson National Life Insur ance Company; and Portnoy and Tu, DDS, PC.


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THRILLING, SPECTACULAR & UNFORGETTABLE

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BROADWAYGRANDRAPIDS.COM • 1-800-745-3000 • TICKETMASTER.COM Grand Rapids engagement is welcomed by Amway Hotel Corporation; BISSELL, Inc.; Herman Miller; Mercy Health Saint Mary’s; The Sharpe Collection; and Warner Norcross & Judd LLP.


REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Things We’re Thankful For REVUE’S TEAM EXPRESSES OUR GRATITUDE FOR WEST MICHIGAN

Unless you take some time to reflect, you might not know what you’ve got until it’s gone. So just think: What would you miss if you moved away

Heritage Hill

from West Michigan? That’s the question we here at Revue asked ourselves this month. Whether it be people, places or events, we all have something we love about West Michigan — otherwise, we likely wouldn’t live here. For some people, it’s the brewery where they discovered truly great beer. For others, it’s a festival full of great music and kind people. For someone else, it’s that special lake or park where they go to clear their head. The point is, there’s a lot to love around here, so much so that we brought on some community figures to act as guest writers and give their own thanks. Whether or not you’re thankful for the same things as us, take some time this month to really think about what you’re blessed to have around you. Then, maybe take a little more time to let those people or places know how you feel.

32 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

The Sparrows Coffee Tea & Newstand


The Meanwhile Bar

Festival of the Arts

White Pine Trail

Cannonsburg Ski Hill Intimacy

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

33


SPECIAL FEATURE

Brewery Vivant

Horrocks Market

Wheatland Music Festival

34 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017


The Great Lakes

Vault of Midnight

Oasis Hot Tub Gardens

Kale’s Korner Bar

Asylum Lake Preserve

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

35


SPECIAL FEATURE

GRATEFUL LOCALS What West Michiganders love about home

Rosalynn Bliss Tami VandenBerg

Grand Rapids Mayor

Well House Executive Director and Meanwhile Bar/The Pyramid Scheme Co-owner

Erica Lang

Woosah Outfitters

36 | REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017

April Zimont

Kalamashoegazer and Tambourina


ALL YOUR THANKSGIVING NEEDS DOWNTOWNMARKETGR.COM

SCENE SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

37


SHOPPING

GIFT GUIDE RIGHT THIS WAY, GENTLEMEN

Coppercraft Distillery’s single barrel bourbon whiskey is made by hand in Holland, Mich. using local ingredients, $69.99 at Coppercraft Distillery in Holland.

38

This relief print was pulled directly from a stump that the artist, Erica Lang, found while hiking in Saugatuck, $32 at Woosah Outfitters in Grand Rapids.

(TOP) Perfect for stockings, a dozen toothpicks made with Kentucky straight bourbon are subtle at first and build complexity when warmed in the mouth, $8 at Frances Jaye in Holland.

Follow the short stories of nine men striving to understand what it means to be alive in David Szalay’s All That Man Is, $16 at Bookbug in Kalamazoo.

Make a list and check it twice with this thumbs up notepad that’ll keep you organized, $8.95 at Rebel in Grand Rapids.


We’ve had enough of cheapskates and re-gifters. When it comes to presents, do the right thing and buy gifts that are a genuine fit for your friends and family. If you think it can’t be done, we’ve given you a headstart with a few recommended picks from local retailers. BY MISSY BLACK

FOR THE "DIES

White and pale pink druzy agate pendant necklace on brass chain with natural jasper and jade accents from Domestic Archaeology, $48 at Lolë in Grand Rapids.

(TOP) Tobacco Rose perfume oil is a blend of warm, rich amber with soft floral made of 100-percent organic blends of beneficial, skin-loving oils, $17 at fox-naturals.com.

(TOP) This 15-oz. ceramic mug with a ceramic lid and stainless-steel infuser is designed to steep fresh tea at home, $24.95 at Spice Merchants inside the Downtown Market in Grand Rapids.

Whimsical, oversized serving “Mac Attack” dish and “Cheesy Goodness” serving spoon set by Mud Pie, $38 for the set at Haven Creek Flowers & Finds in Rockford.

Consider researching Jane Rocca’s Cocktail: 200 Fabulous Drinks for all the holiday and NYE parties, $15.99 at The Brass Anchor Co. in Saugatuck.

39


SPECIAL FEATURE

SWEET VS. SAVORY

Where to satisfy your need for pie


F

or Thanksgiving, you could make your own pies, but to save time (or save face, if your crust game is lacking), leave it to the pros. Whether you're looking for the perfect dessert for a get-together or craving something hot and hearty, we’ve got you covered. Pro tip: If you need a whole pie, call ahead to check availability and pre-order to get it before the holiday rush. COMPILED BY KIM KIBBY / PHOTOS BY PHIL ARTZ

SWEET + SAVORY Sweetie-licious*

as seasonal options (currently including pumpkin and pecan). Nantucket also offers quiche (single serving quiche is always available, but order ahead for a full-size quiche).

This award-winning pie maker offers many rotating sweet and savory selections in the Downtown Market. (Sweet pies: $4.50/slice, $10.99/Cutie Pie, $24.99/whole pie. Quiche: $6.50/ slice, $24.99/whole.)

615 Lyon St. NE, Grand Rapids (616) 350-9292 nantucketbakingco.com

435 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids (616) 259-7005, sweetie-licious. com (online store temporarily unavailable)

Sugar Momma's creates a variety of sweet pies and cheesecakes, as well as quiche with a "build your own" option. (Sweet pies: $10.99-$16.99. Quiche: slice: $3.75, whole: $13.99.)

Grand Traverse Pie Co.*

Chef Mario Batali says “I don’ t think I’ve ever had as good a pie as Grand Traverse Pie Company’s Cherry Crumb Pie… It’s a religious experience.” Sounds like a solid recommendation to us! In addition to a wide selection of sweet pies, savory options include quiche, pot pies and pasties. Available in stores or shipped via phone/web orders (quiche available in stores only). 3224 28th St. SE , Kentwood (plus locations in Portage and Norton Shores) gtpie.com, (616) 977-7600

Sugar Momma’s Bakery & Café*

SWEET Crane’s Pie Pantry/ Crane's In the City*

Crane’s fruit pies are handmade from recipes passed down and perfected by Lue “Meme” Crane. Wash down the pie with Crane’s cider or wine, and top it off with Palazzolo’s French vanilla gelato. If you can't decide on a flavor, try a pie flight! 6054 124th Ave. (M-89), Fennville (269) 561-2297, cranespiepantry.com Crane’s In the City 11 E. 8th St., Holland (616) 796.2489, cranesinthecity.com

6504 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids (616) 957-2122, sugarmommaspastries.com

HopCat

For November, HopCat’s dessert feature is a slice of scratch-made frozen spiced pumpkin pie with stout-glazed pecans and whipped cream. 25 Ionia Ave. SW, Grand Rapids and 300 E. Water St., Kalamazoo (616) 451-4677 (GR), (269) 210-0075 (Kzoo), hopcat.com

Maisy’s Pie Company*

A very small family-run bakery, Maisy's Pie Company makes truly special creations. Specialty items include caramel pecan pumpkin ($26), traditional pecan ($18) and pumpkin ($16). Order by phone or web. (616) 889-0112, maisyspiecompany.com

Food Dance

Noco Provisions

Food Dance offers a daily deep-dish quiche with mixed greens and citrus vinaigrette ($11) and a seasonal sweet pie (filling changes with the season) in a flaky 5” pastry crust with vanilla ice cream ($10).

Fresh for the fall menu, this new eatery will feature Dutch apple pie with local apples from Sietsema’s Orchard, served with vanilla bean ice cream. ($7 for a generous slice.)

401 E. Michigan Ave. #100, Kalamazoo (269) 382-1888, fooddance.net

Rykse’s Restaurant & Bakery*

A Kalamazoo favorite, Rykse's bakes dreamy, creamy pies including peanut butter, french silk, coconut cream, banana cream, strawberry cream and samoa.

Nantucket Baking Company*

The counterpart to Martha's Vineyard and Lion Street Café always has fruit pies and cheesecakes in stock as well

5924 Stadium Dr., Kalamazoo (269) 372-3838, rykses.com (Continued)

KEY: * = OFFERS WHOLE PIES

Grand Traverse Pie Company’s  Cherry Crumb Pie


PIES, CONTINUED

Grand Rapids Cheesecake Co.*

SEPTEMBER 6 - DIRTY DANCING - GREEN ZEBRA SEPTEMBER 13 - CLUE - PORTER SEPTEMBER 20 - THE USUAL SUSPECTS - DIRTY BASTARD SEPTEMBER 27 - FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH - REDANKULOUS OCTOBER 4 - THE BREAKFAST CLUB - BREAKFAST STOUT OCTOBER 11 - THE FIFTH ELEMENT - ALL DAY IPA OCTOBER 18 - FIELD OF DREAMS - HARVEST ALE OCTOBER 25 - THE SHINING - RED’S RYE IPA NOVEMBER 1 - THE CABIN IN THE WOODS - BACKWOODS BASTARD NOVEMBER 8 - PITCH PERFECT - RUBAEUS

Bonus: seasonal vegetables and bread. ($14.99)

Believe it or not, there's still some debate about whether cheesecake is technically a pie. Instead of arguing, we recommend simply eating the pie (or custard tart, if you insist) and being happy. Grand Rapids Cheesecake Company has every flavor you can imagine, made from local ingredients.

Matchbox Diner & Drinks

Matchbox offers a sizeable chicken pot pie, with chicken, carrots, peas and parsnips in a puff pastry, served in a skillet. ($10.99)

2255 Alpine Ave. NW, Grand Rapids (616) 447-9045, grcheesecake.com

1345 Lake Dr. SE, Grand Rapids (616) 774-8641, matchboxdiner.com

Rise*

If you have special dietary needs, Rise can help. All pies are gluten-free, vegan and soyfree. Flavors include dutch apple, pumpkin. blueberry and strawberry rhubarb (Rise also makes cheesecakes and tarts). Custom order by website or phone. ($40) (616) 283-5226, risegrandrapids.com

SAVORY

Anna’s House

Love quiche but not the gluten? Anna’s House offers a quinoa-crusted sausage quiche — classic quiche baked on a crust of quinoa with caramelized onion and sage breakfast sausage, thyme, spinach and arugula. Topped with melted swiss, lemon arugula salad and feta. ($11.75) Multiple locations annashouseus.com

Nonna’s The Trattoria

Nonna’s crafts a French-style quiche, served with choice of side salad or fresh fruit cup ($10.50, ingredients change daily). 584 Ada Dr. SE, Ada (616) 920-7028, eatwithnonna.com

The Curragh

73 E. 8th St., Holland (616) 393-6340, curraghholland.com

This Irish-themed pub serves a rustic Cottage Pie: chicken, peas, carrots and onions in herb sauce, topped with mashed potatoes and baked until golden brown.

Bakewell Co.*

Bakewell Co. creates handmade quiche, pot pies and tarts in an array of delectable flavors, such as: sausage, cheddar and chive; goat cheese with spinach and roasted red pepper; and brandy cream chicken with bacon and shallots. Sounds delicious, no? Available in select markets during fall and winter, and online ordering is available. 2725 E. Milham Ave., Portage (269) 459-8030, thebakewellco. wordpress.com

SEPTEMBER 6 - NOVEMBER 8, 8PM FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO: celebrationcinema.com/foundersfilms

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Chicken Pot Pie at Matchbox Diner & Drinks


STYLE NOTES

by Missy Black

Thanksgiving Survival Kit A

S THE HOLIDAY SEASON APPROACHES, YOU’LL HAVE TO SUMMON all your Zen vibes to handle so much family time. Get comfortable and be ready to fend off intrusive inquiries into your personal life, along with any political jabs. And to ensure you’re able to bring all your wardrobe needs, make sure you have the Adventurer Overnight bag. “I wanted something I could fold down flat when not in use and something funky — that’s what my whole business and brand is built around,” said Amber Adams-Fall, designer at WoollyMammothDesign out of Kalamazoo. “I looked up what the measurements were for commercial airlines and my bag is exactly as big as the box in the check-in lines.” The bag features adjustable shoulder straps (great for running to catch a flight in time) and custom orders are a cinch. Adams-Fall has made a bag out of a client’s old army blanket that belonged to their grandfather. She’s even using super popular Rifle Paper Co. fabrics. “The fabric is produced by a company called Cotton + Steel, a female-owned company with all female designers.” Perfect for weekend jaunts and the Thanksgiving holiday, the bag “will hold a disturbing amount of stuff,” said Adams-Fall, who notes that the bag is so accommodating, it can hold up to two standard size pillows. But make sure to pack the essentials, such as a sleep mask, which Adams-Fall also makes. “I’m a big fan of sleep masks. They’re great for plane and car rides or when you’re hungover from the biggest bar night of the year. A sleep mask is where it’s at.” The Adventurer Overnight bag ranges from $125 to $150 and can be found in the WoollyMammothDesign shop on Etsy. The small business also has creations in Pink Lemonade Boutique in Grand Rapids as well as Book Bug and Tromblay Salon, both in Kalamazoo.

Overnight bag from WoollyMammothDesign

Part clothing, part blanket — ponchos are the ultimate in comfort and come in a multitude of colors at Karla’s Place in Holland, $28.

Curl up with some tea and make the couch your throne. The official cozy shirt comes in black, rose and vanilla hues at Dear Prudence in Grand Rapids, $58.

CAT Footwear’s signature comfort cushion insole means you travel with ease. Inspired by menswear and with an eye-catching color block design at For the Love of Shoes in Saugatuck, $119.95.

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To accommodate all the food, you’ll want these 100-percent cotton Bowie pa nt s w it h st udded a n k les f rom Philanthropy at Adored Boutique in Grand Rapids, $119.

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by Kayla Tucker

COMEDY

LOGGED IN AND LAUGHING Comedy duo takes on the internet stage

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T

WO GRAND RAPIDS WOMEN HAVE COME TOGETHER TO CREATE A comedic duo thriving off not stand-up or skits, but the power of the internet. With a show primarily hosted on Facebook, local standup comics Kaira Williams and Megan Elaine have gathered a sort of cult following. The show varies each time in length and content, but it always promises banter between the two personalities. “We have a chemistry,” Williams said. “People just kept telling us, ‘Oh my god, I could just watch you guys talk to each other forever,’ and we were like ‘Hmm, we should do something.’ Originally we were going to call it ‘The Generation Gap,’ because there’s a decade between us.” So in December of last year, Williams, 32, and Elaine, 22, uploaded their first video. At that point, they still hadn’t decided on a name, so they just turned the camera on and started spitting out ideas until they decided on one: Inaccurate & Inappropriate (or I&I). “Because she’s the one who’s inappropriate mostly, and I’m very inaccurate with everything that I say,” Elaine said. Topics on the show vary widely, from games that Elaine likes to play to just talking about what’s going on in their lives. Both women in their own stand-up use self-deprecating humor, and viewers can see that seep into the show. “We just talk about whatever,” Williams said. “Sometimes we have no clue and just sit in front of the camera and start talking to each other.” The two met through Funny Girls, an all-female comedy collective in Grand Rapids. Their show gained some momentum a few months ago when they snagged a surprise live interview with Donnie Wahlberg, one of the members of boy band New Kids On The Block, of which Williams is a big fan. For those who didn’t see the locally viral video, Williams and Elaine were outside a concert venue for the band, and as Wahlberg happened to be walking in, Elaine stopped him and starting asking questions. The video garnered more than 165,000 views. After that,

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they saw an increase in followers just in their own Facebook circles, as well as a surge of NKOTB fans. “We have super fans, and they are people we don’t know in real life,” Williams said. “They are New Kids on the Block fans, who are now super fans of I&I who just think we’re very funny. I love that, it’s amazing.” However, Elaine said she did make some changes once they saw an increase in viewers. “My biggest thing now is I’ve always been so open in all of our videos,” Elaine said. “(Now), people I don’t know watch these too. So now I try to take that into account when I talk about things online. That is the biggest change, I think.” To the duo’s satisfaction, fans have started to approach them in public. “I was at Dave and Busters and a bartender said, ‘I don’t want to be weird, but I watch Inn and Inn.’” Williams said. “I’m like, ‘That’s not weird, tell me that all day.’” Williams and Elaine work on having new videos up each Friday for the show, but it really depends on the week, they said, because they both work full-time jobs.

“The way we make our money obviously has to come first because we have to pay rent and then Funny Girls and Inaccurate & Inappropriate,” Elaine said. But if they miss a Friday upload, viewers can expect a funny Facebook post or short video in the meantime. The pair recently had their first live show at Creston Brewery, and they were surprised at how well it went. “I said right before we started the show, ‘This show is only going to be as good as the audience that comes out,’ and the audience that came out to that show was everything that I could ever dream of,” Elaine said. “I felt like crying that night.” The show was an hour long, with Williams and Elaine bantering back and forth for a while, and then they each did their own stand-up. “It was nice to see other people at our show and how much — I think in the past like year or two — how much the comedy community in Grand Rapids has just packed in toward each other and really been supporting every aspect of it, which is something I never saw two years ago,” Elaine said. “I was about to move away

to go to Chicago two years ago because of that, and now I’m like, ‘This is insane.’” Because of that support, Williams and Elaine make an effort to support other local comedians in turn. “As female comedians in Grand Rapids, as people that are part of the all-female comedy collective, and as people that are a part of Inaccurate & Inappropriate collectively, we plan to go to shows for local artists all the time,” Elaine said. “It’s important for us to support other people.” “If we don’t show up, then why (would) we expect people to show up to ours?” Williams said. For the future of I&I, both Williams and Elaine agreed they just want to give the viewers what they want. “I just hope it can lead to us doing more of what we love, and what we love is making people laugh, making people feel comfortable with their own skin, making sure that people know they’re not the only ones that think this certain way, because I think that we say a lot of things that people don’t say,” Elaine said.

Inaccurate & Inappropriate


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by Eric Mitts

COMEDY

(Not) Feeling Blue

Despite today’s world, Josh Blue brings the laughs

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H

E A D I N G I N TO LA ST YEAR’S PRE S I D E NTIAL E LECTION, comedian Josh Blue took things as seriously as any stand-up comedian could — he ran for office. Joining up on the independent ticket of fellow comic Ron White as his vice presidential nominee, Blue said their platform included a nationwide legalization of marijuana and better treatment for veterans and the disabled. “We probably should have stuck with that,” Blue said. “I think we would’ve won.” Now, unlike some comedians who have gladly made bank from the chaos surrounding President Trump’s first 10 months in office, Blue hasn’t found much to laugh about since his own campaign with White fell short. “Unfortunately, (some) people say you should just be excited about all the material,” Blue said about being a comedian in the age of Trump. “But there’s nothing f***ing funny about it, man. And the thing is, (Trump’s) people aren’t the kind of people who take jokes well. He doesn’t take jokes well. He said they should shut down Saturday Night Live because they made fun of him. And they’ve been doing that for decades, making fun of the president. I’m afraid of getting shot if I say the wrong thing.” But he’s not backing down from the challenge. In fact, he’s never backed down from any challenge – and he’s faced many.

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Josh Blue For those who don’t know Blue, the 38-year-old comic has Cerebral Palsy, a lifelong movement disorder that starts during childhood. He’s addressed his disability head-on throughout his comedy career with a self-deprecating style discussing how he lives with it, as well as the reactions of others to it. He’s helped put people with disabilities into the national spotlight with his numerous TV appearances, and has raised awareness for those who all too often go unnoticed in mainstream media. Just don’t call him inspirational. “I just feel like it takes away from your real accomplishments,” Blue said of the dreaded word. “Like, people say, ‘He’s inspirational,’ when I do a mundane action, just because I’m disabled. People say it’s so inspirational what you do, and I go, ‘Well, I don’t do (comedy) because of my disability. I do it because it’s what I want to f***ing do.’ People mean well and that’s the hard part, because people think they’re being so nice and generous, when really what they’re saying is: ‘If I was you, I would’ve killed myself.’” In 2006, Blue won the fourth season of NBC’s reality series Last Comic Standing. The national TV attention widened his audience

with it, and it’s a good-hearted and helped pave the way for his attempt at being real with it. four comedy albums, 2008’s JOSH BLUE “It’s kind of funny, because Good Josh, Bad Arm, 2012’s Dr. Grins at The B.O.B. 20 Monroe Ave. NW, I’m thinking, ‘Did I write this? Hooligan Stew, 2013’s Sticky Grand Rapids Did they steal all my material? Change, and last year’s Delete. Nov. 16-18, $10-$20 Or was it universal enough that “When I started getting thebob.com/ this really is shit that happens to successful, it took me probably drgrinscomedy, (616) disabled people?’” almost six years to become com356-2000 Currently residing in Denver fortable and think about (being and happily continuing to celthought of as inspirational) in ebrate that state’s legalization of a way that I can deal with it, marijuana, Blue is working on sitcom ideas because I’m up there to be funny and be a of his own while exploring woodworking, comic,” Blue said. “That’s my first priority. painting and raising his two children. But if you take something else from it, I’m Just don’t assume his love for weed not going out of my way to inspire you. I’m comes from a purely medicinal standpoint. just doing what I want to do. But if you are “The thing I always say when people inspired, that’s great. There’s more going on ask me if (marijuana) makes me feel better, I in our society than just comedy that a lot tell them ‘No, it doesn’t — I just like getting of times people need to see success to know high,’” Blue said. “The thing of it is that it’s something’s possible.” not that it makes me feel better, it just makes Blue said he’s happy to see the recent me forget that there’s anything wrong.” success of the ABC sitcom Speechless, which In 2017, here’s hoping unique comedy also uses humor to discuss the difficulties of like his can help us all do the same for a growing up with Cerebral Palsy. moment. “They approached me and told me about it,” Blue said of the show. “It’s a really good show. It’s not delicate about disabilities. A lot of times, people have been afraid to be real


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by Josh Veal

ECLECTIC

SWEET, SWEET SCIENCE

Brain Candy Live! provides a king-sized treat of knowledge and fun

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ichael Stevens and Adam Savage are both known for being two of the greatest public educators around. Stevens teaches tens of millions with his YouTube channel, Vsauce, where he explains science, philosophy, illusions and much more. Meanwhile, Savage has risen to near household-name fame with MythBusters, a show full of science, special effects and skepticism. Brain Candy Live! brings the duo’s knowledge and passions together to create a live show unlike any other, and it’s coming to Miller Auditorium this month.

We talked with Stevens about what to expect, why learning is important and what exactly “brain candy” means.

What made you want to go live in the first place? There’s so many things that just don’t come across or aren’t explained well unless you’re physically there, and you can actually hear and see and smell the thing. Plus, live is a lot more personal and authentic — it’s not scripted, and it’s not edited. It feels a lot more like a conversation, and you can see sides of us that you wouldn’t see in a more meticulously edited video.

What does ‘brain candy’ mean to you? Brain Candy is when you learn something, anything, and all of a sudden, you just go, ‘Whoa! Oh my gosh, of course!’ It’s nutritious — it’s something that you’ve learned — but it’s

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Adam Savage and Michael Stevens

delicious as well. It’s brain food, but you want to share it and everyone wants it and they want more of it.

like, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa! This is new to them. They haven’t even seen this yet. Just wait until you guys get to see this.’

How did you go about designing the show?

Do you have plans for the next show after this?

We talked for a long time about what kinds of things you would want to do on a stage, where things can be bigger and we can travel with props. We worked with a director, Michael Weber, who was fantastic … and it emerged that air was going to be the right theme for this first version. Air is very cool. You can do cool science with it, and it’s free and it surrounds us at all times. We really want the audience to leave having learned a lot, but also having gathered new skills so they can do what we did onstage at home — they’ll still be surrounded by air when they get home. There’s no artifice or mystery behind it. You can see how it was built and what it’s made of.

How has the show changed since you started this spring? The show keeps improving every time we do it. We’ve had time to add some new things on the same theme and perfect and update, even as new science comes, in particular new things we’ve learned about dinosaurs. We’ve actually had to change the script now that we know more about — is gasoline really made out of dinosaurs? As it turns out, pretty much no! It’s such a bummer, right? We’re updating that, and some of the science we do with vacuums because we’ve got new props which are bigger and cooler.

What’s your favorite part of the show? I would say it’s the meet and greets after the show. You really get to hear their reactions right after the show, and you also get to meet them and hear their stories and get a sense of who they are. Especially when you’re doing YouTube videos or a television show, you don’t see the audience. … I also love right before I come on stage. Just hearing the excitement in the audience is really cool, because I’ve done this show 40-some times, but every new city means an audience that hasn’t seen it. And when I hear them applaud and the music starts, I’m

We’re already talking about the next theme. A couple ideas are math without numbers, that could be really cool, but then also electricity. We’d love to be able to do electricity in some way. Adam knows more about it than I do, but I want to dive in and learn it well enough to explain it and get our mutual curiosity super contagious. It would be safe, but it would look super dangerous.

Who should come see this show? It’s for people who love learning, but actually, I’d like for people to come who think learning is boring and involves homework. That’s a big stereotype that we break down in the show. You don’t have to be some kind of egg-head nerd who’s socially awkward and loves school to love learning. We all do, we can’t help it. Curiosity is part of our DNA. When you learn to appreciate the pleasure of finding things out, you become a better person and a better citizen. It’s good for the world.

Without giving too much away, what can people expect from the show? There are explosions. There are ping-pong balls that fly out into the audience. There’s a lot of wind being blown, diaper bags, competitions between audience members, a lot of chances to come up onstage. There’s interpretive dance showing how molecules vibrate and what causes pressure. There’s boiling water and a lot of smoke. It’s kind of a cool look at theater and how special effects are done and the physics behind why they work. It’s just really energetic. I lost weight this spring, just because I do a lot of dancing. If you’re a big fan of us, you’re going to be really surprised, and if you’ve never heard of us before, you’re going to have a lot of fun and want to come back when we come through your city again.


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Restaurant listings arranged by region

GRAND RAPIDS Angel’s Thai Café 136 Monroe Center NW. 616-454-9801 THAI. This downtown restaurant makes your order fresh, fast, and hot. You can order your entree with your choice of meat and spice level, or create your own. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Thai Steak and Yum Talay. Anna’s House Multiple locations BREAKFAST/LUNCH. Anna’s House recently went through a dramatic makeover, going from an already-beloved breakfast hot spot and neighborhood staple to an ever-growing concept with five locations across West Michigan. Why all the success? The menu is unique, but accessible. The interior design is refreshing, and the service is great. » SERVING: Breakfast, Lunch OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Inventive breakfast specials. Bistro Bella Vita 44 Grandville Ave. SW. 616-222-4600 ITALIAN. One of Grand Rapids’ best dining experiences, featuring Mediterranean-inspired country cuisine, a swanky yet comfortable downtown atmopshere and personable service. BBV’s culinary team creates authentic, housemade recipes made with locally grown produce, fresh seafood and rotisserie roasted meats. Specialty gluten-free menu, and can prepare custom dishes for lactose intolerant, vegetarian, and vegan diets. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mediterranean Country Cuisine and Martinis.

Butcher’s Union 438 Bridge St. NW 616-551-1323 AMERICAN. Butcher’s has its fortes — meat and whiskey — but it’s not exactly niche. Expertly-crafted cocktails (made with every kind of spirit) are here at a refreshingly affordable price, along with

a high-end food menu for carnivores and vegheads alike. The historic building sets the mood, giving off an “old fancy-bar in London” vibe. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Meat, whiskey, cocktails.

Thai cuisine, but also made to accommodate health conscious and special diets. Not too strong, not too weak, like harmony and melody. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Peanut Curry Noodles.

Brewery Vivant 925 Cherry St. SE. 616-719-1604 FRENCH/BELGIAN. Housed in a refurbished funeral chapel, this brewery won Best Ambiance in Revue’s Best of the West with its stained glass windows and European beer hall setup. Along with farmhouse style beers, the LEED-certified BV is known for its French-Belgian cuisine, from duck nachos to roasted bone marrow. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The Burger (2nd place Best of the West).

Founders Brewing Company 235 Grandville SW. 616-776-1195 BREWPUB. A beerlover’s paradise with a national reputation for flavorful, award-winning beers. Likewise, the brewpub’s menu consists mainly of flavorful handcrafted deli sandwiches that can stand up and complement the beers (or vice versa). » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Award-winning beer, handcrafted sandwiches.

Chapbook Café 2660 28th St. SE, Grand Rapids. 616-942-0595. CAFE. Take a break from browsing the shelves at Schuler Books with a homemade selection of soups, sandwiches and quiches. Soups are prepared in-house daily and served with fresh baked bread to accompany a small-but-elegant sandwich menu. Try a quiche or traditional Italian Panini grilled on fresh ciabatta bread, or for a quick bite, grab a bagel or scone from the dessert case. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days GO THERE FOR: Homemade soups and sandwiches CitySen Lounge 83 Monroe Center St. NW. 616-608-1720 AMERICAN. CitySen Lounge, located in the heart of downtown Grand Rapids, is a bar with a big-city feel, offering exciting options for lunch, dinner and breakfast on the weekends. The focus is on fresh ingredients and a full bar with local brews, wine and creative cocktails. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner (Breakfast on weekends). OPEN: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Daily happy hour The Cottage Bar 18 Lagrave Ave. SE. 616-454-9088 AMERICAN. The Cottage Bar is the oldest operating restaurant and bar in downtown Grand Rapids. Come in for the Cottage Burger, smothered with green olives, bacon, lettuce, tomato, hickory mayonnaise and Swiss and American cheeses. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sundays GO THERE FOR: The Cottage Burger. Erb Thai 950 Wealthy St. SE #1A. (616) 356-2573. Additional locations at 4160 Lake Michigan Dr. NW, Suite B, and 820 Michigan St. NE. THAI. Food rooted in traditional

G.R.P.D. (Grand Rapids Pizza and Delivery) 340 State St. SE. 616-454-9204 ITALIAN. The current location opened in 2004 as the first established pizzeria in Heritage Hill A common meeting spot for local folks, business professionals and college students, a place where one could gather for a quick meal or a reflective lunch. It offers both hand-tossed pizza and Chicago-style stuffed pizza, as well as pasta, sandwiches, salads, and wings. Online ordering, too. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

root beer for the kiddos. Named one of the top-five brewpub menus in West Michigan by yours truly, Harmony offers 10” rustic wood-fired pizzas and great soups and sandwiches. Check out their new location, Harmony Hall, at 401 Stocking Ave. NW. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza and brews. Lindo Mexico Restaurante Mexicano 1742 28th St. SW. 616-261-2280 MEXICAN. One of the less-discussed Mexican eateries is also one of the most popular, especially on the weekends. The atmosphere? Very communal, occasionally with excellent live music. The food? Full of flavor on the cheap. The service? Always friendly, always helpful. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Unique margaritas made fresh. One Trick Pony 136 E. Fulton. 616-235-7669 AMERICAN. One Trick Pony unveiled a new menu last April with the tagline “Fresh, Local Fare with a Beat.” The restaurant is a part of FarmLink and supports local growers and remains focused on sustainability. Connected to the Cottage Bar, the menu spans pizza, salads, homemade soups, smoked prime rib and more. Pair the food with live music, which OTP features weekly. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Eclectic pizzas.

Grand Woods Lounge 77 Grandville Ave. SW. 616-451-4300 AMERICAN. The restaurant’s interior exudes a warm, casual ambiance reminiscent of the great eateries of the Pacific Northwest; the outdoor porch features two outdoor bars and a fireplace. Menu stocked with affordable appetizers great for sharing, plus salads, sandwiches, and entrées. Lots of domestics and microbrews, plus an array of martinis including the “Woodstini,” a tasty mix of Stoli Orange Vodka, mandarin oranges and raspberries. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Cocktails.

The Pita House 1450 Wealthy SE, 3730 28th Street, 4533 Ivanrest SW (Grandville). 616-454-1171 MEDITERRANEAN. Gyros so big you can club someone with them, the smoothest hummus in town and other Mediterranean fare, including kibbe, kafta and falafel. Additional locations on 28th Street and Kalamazoo SE. Sandwiches are made to order with fresh vegetables and ingredients. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh pita wraps.

Graydon’s Crossing 1223 Plainfield NE. 616-726-8260 TAVERN. An authentic take on the English Pub, with a huge selection of beers on tap and a menu that includes classic English dishes like Fish & Chips, Shepherd’s Pie and Irish Stew, as well as Indian specialties like Tandoori Chicken and Tikka Masala. A great casual atmosphere for drinking and dining. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer and authentic pub food.

Reserve Wine & Food 201 Monroe Ave. NW (616) 855-9463 ECLECTIC. With 102 wines available by the glass and more than 300 by the bottle, paired with an ever-changing food menu influenced by West Michigan grown foods, Reserve promises diners a unique experience. Cocktails and craft beers add depth to the primarily wine-centered menu. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: Closed on Sunday GO THERE FOR: Wine and food pairings, charcuterie, happy hour.

Harmony Brewing Company 1551 Lake Dr. SE (616) 233-0063 BREWPUB. Harmony features 12 craft-brewed beers in addition to signature

Rockwell-Republic 45 S. Division Ave. 616-551-3563 ECLECTIC. Menu offerings range from sushi to burgers and everything in

REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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The B.O.B. 20 Monroe Ave. NW. (616) 356-2000 ECLECTIC. If you’re not sure what kind of dining you want, you can just head into The B.O.B., where you can choose from one of its several venues. Go into Gilly’s, where you can dine on seafood or B.O.B.’s Brewery, the restaurant’s in-house brewery. You can dress down for some pizza at Bobarino’s or dress it up for a steak at Judson’s Steakhouse. For after dinner, take in a show at Dr. Grins or enjoy live music at H.O.M.E. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer and numerous dining options.

REVUE’s dining listings are compiled by staff and minions. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of restaurants in the region. For an expanded list, be on the lookout for new and improved dining changes on our website, revuewm.com. The listings are not intended to be reviews of West Michigan restaurants, although we will inject some opinions into the listings based on staff experiences and personal preferences. To submit or to correct information in a dining listing, e-mail editor@ revuewm.com.

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between. The craft cocktail menu runs the gamut from classics like the Manhattan to more modern concoctions and the beer and wine menus are nicely curated. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Specialty cocktails, broad menu, lively atmosphere. The Sovengard 443 Bridge St. NW 616-214-7207 NEW NORDIC. There’s really nothing like The Sovengard. The menu changes with the seasons, but the quality doesn’t. Expect innovative, beautiful dishes in the Scandinavian tradition. It’s not cheap, but you get what you pay for. The West Side restaurant also boasts an excellent taplist, perfect for sipping in the biergarten. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Something special. Wolfgang’s Restaurant 1530 Wealthy St. SE. 616-454-5776 BREAKFAST. The bustling Eastown breakfast spot is home to some of the heartiest breakfast dishes and funniest menu descriptions. Courteous staff never fails to offer a cup of coffee to go after we’ve finished breakfast. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Breakfast all day.

KALAMAZOO/BATTLE CREEK

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Arcadia Brewing Co. 103 Michigan Ave., Battle Creek. 269-963-9520 BREWPUB. You’ll find some of the usual suspects on the Battle Creek brewpub’s menu, including wood-fired pizzas and some of the best barbecue in the region. But you’ll also find some delightful surprises — Osso Bucco in a brewpub?! — on the menu, courtesy of award-winning Chef Sean Kelly. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Handcrafted ales and barbecue. Central City Taphouse 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall. (269) 492-0100 TAPHOUSE. If Central City doesn’t have the kind of beer you want on tap, you’ll probably find it with the 75+ bottles. OH, you say you’re not a beer drinker? Well, Central City offers 20 wine ‘taps’ and a full bar. If you’re not the drinking type, that’s cool too. There are a number of food options to pick from, including a raw menu, a pizza menu and the all-day menu, which features burgers, soups and entrees. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Diverse beverage selection.

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Fieldstone Grille 3970 W. Centre St., Portage. 269-321-8480 AMERICAN. Lodge-retreat atmosphere overlooking the Moors Golf Club natural wetlands. The “field-to-plate” menu features burgers, pizzas, steaks and some eclectic items like quail. Try the FSG chips, a combination of potato, beet and sweet potato chips. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Blue Burger, Almond Crusted Walleye, FSG Chips. Food Dance 401 E. Michigan Ave. 269-382-1888 AMERICAN. Food Dance is committed to building a thriving and sustainable local food system, supporting artisans who practice craft food processes. It’s about the connection with people and places the food comes from. Offering breakfast, lunch and dinner, private dining space, catering and delivery, while an on-site market offers humanely raised meats, artisan

cheeses, fresh bread and pastries. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Fresh Local Foods.

Old Dog Tavern 402 East Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo. 269-381-5677 AMERICAN. The food at Old Dog Tavern is just about as eclectic as the entertainment offered. The menu has so much on it that it might even bring some harmony between picky and adventurous eaters. » SERVING: Brunch Lunch Dinner. OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: The eclectic menu options. Olde Peninsula 200 E. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo 269-343-2739 BREWPUB. Downtown brewpub serves up the expected (e.g., steaks, ribs), the authentic (e.g., London Broil) and some pleasant surprises (e.g., extensive vegetarian offerings, Italian food). Offers a range of beers brewed on the premises and served on tap, plus a full bar. Check out the seasonal porters on tap right now, including the Vanilla Porter (5.5% ABV) and Stout Chocula (5.25% ABV). » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer-B-Que Ribs, London Broil.

Union Cabaret & Grille 125 S. Burdick St., Kalamazoo. 269-384-6756 AMERICAN. A partnership with WMU, Union features eclectic food and cocktails, plus live jazz music performed by WMU faculty and students. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Closed Sunday. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Fries, Bloody Maries with infused vodkas.

LAKESHORE 8th Street Grille 20 W. 8th St., Holland. 616-392-5888 AMERICAN. This eclectic grille offers a mix of draft and bottled craft beers and a variety of pub classics and new, American beerinspired dishes. Happy hour includes half-off appetizers and $1 off drafts. » SERVING: Lunch, Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: 28 taps of craft beer. CityVu Bistro 61 E 7th Street, Holland. 616-796-2114 AMERICAN. A distinctive rooftop dining experience in downtown Holland with fresh gourmet flatbreads and an array of seasonal entrees. The contemporary-yet-casual atmosphere, full bar and unique menus make it the ideal spot for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. » SERVING: Breakfast Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days GO THERE FOR: Flatbreads. Everyday People Cafe 11 Center St., Douglas. 269-857-4240 AMERICAN. REVUE Publisher Brian Edwards calls Everyday People Café his favorite restaurant along the lakeshore. The atmosphere is casual and upbeat, the staff knows its stuff about wine and food, and the seasonal menu is filled with meticulously prepared, eclectic comfort food like Butternut Squash Risotto, Braised Lamb Shank and Ahi Tuna. A great wine list and tremendous desserts. » SERVING: Brunch (Weekends) Lunch Dinner OPEN: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Gorgonzola Pork Chop, Greek Salad with Grandma Gigi’s Dressing (Edwards).


Introducing

CREPE-MAKING CLASSES Join us for an evening of fun and try the art of crepe making Tuesday and Wednesday evenings at 6:30 PM Get details and register at: BrownButterCrepes.com

BROWN BUTTER CREPERIE & CAFE

616-288- 5038 / 1436 Wealthy Street SE, Grand Rapids

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by Joe Boomgaard, Revue Beer Czar

BEER

TO CELLAR OR NOT? Revue conducts a 5-year vertical blind tasting of Founders KBS

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A

BEVY OF ADAGES EXTOL THE VIRTUES OF PATIENCE. We’re told that good things come to those who wait, that good food takes time, and that wine tastes better with age. Patience, as they say, is a virtue. When it comes to most beers, however, waiting to drink them can produce undesirable results. For example, the closer you drink an IPA to its bottling date, the better your chances of enjoying it as the brewer intended, with its full hop character and desired flavor. Whereas IPAs are the drink of the impatient, many barrelaged stouts have long been considered the beer of choice for people with the resolve to let time work its magic — both at the brewer level and for the end consumer. For many drinkers, the choice to cellar beer comes down to prolonging their enjoyment of a favorite limited-edition bottle, or extending the life cycle of the purchase beyond plunking down more than $20 for a four-pack. And it’s not like you’d want to slam four of these big beers in one sitting, anyway. Luckily, high-ABV, bourbon barrel-aged beers can do well in the cellar, meaning that their flavors can develop over time, mellow out and even improve. At least, that’s what I’ve always told myself as I squirreled away another expensive beer in my basement cellar. But it begs the question of whether Founders KBS 5-year age does these beers any favors, and just as importantly, at what age they begin to vertical blind tasting fall off. To find out, I pulled from my cellar come through. Personally, I like that inRank Vintage ABV Score* a five-year vertical of KBS from Founders your-face coffee — I’ve been really pleased 2017 11.8% 85.5 Brewing Co. spanning the years of 2013 with the 2017 version.” 1 through 2017 and convinced my cohorts In the notes from the blind tasting, 2 2013 11.2% 83 at Revue to conduct a blind tasting. the consensus of tasters noted that 2017 However, the results proved inconcluwas the most coffee-forward of the five 3 2015 11.2% 75 sive in answering any of those questions. vintages, with a heavy presence in the The newest and oldest vintages, nose and a lingering coffee bitterness 4 2014 11.2% 70.5 2017 and 2013, scored the top two spots, in the f lavor. Likewise, the tasters all 5 2016 12.4% 57 respectively, followed by 2015 and 2014. agreed that the oldest beer was the most The 2016 vintage — the one with the highbourbon-forward, likely as the coffee *Scores are an average from four tasters est ABV at 12.4 percent — landed at the had almost entirely fallen off, and had bottom, by a considerable margin. the most roasty and chocolate notes in According to Founders Brewmaster Jeremy Kosmicki, the the flavor. Strangely, the high-test 2016 vintage had the most results prove that the choice to cellaring beer comes down neutral aroma. to personal preference. His personal choice: drink all beer as If anything, the tasting notes showed the mellowing fresh as possible. characteristic of time, as the beer seemed progressively more “As a brewery, by the time we release it, the beer’s already weighted toward bourbon notes than coffee flavors as it aged. spent a year aging in these barrels,” he said. “With this beer in Kosmicki said the recipe for KBS always stays the same, alparticular, as it ages, some of the sharper coffee flavors fall off though year-to-year variations can be attributed to the bourbon and it allows the chocolate and the wood from the barrel to barrels Founders procures to place the beer in for aging. Given

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the volume of barrels needed for its annual batch of KBS, “we take what we can get.” “We get a good supply and we have a line on quality barrels, but every year we’re dealing with different vintages and different distillers,” he said. “We dial in our favorites and age range — how long the whiskey has spent in the wood. If it’s 10-12 years, it has a lot different character than if it’s spent one year with bourbon in it. If it’s had it longer, it tends to impart a deeper, more complex character with a lot of vanilla notes. With younger bourbons, they tend to be more hot and in your face. Some years, we get more of one than another. “It will come out different every year, but it’s still the same beer.” For customers who want to try their hand at cellaring beer, Kosmicki recommends they store it in a cool, dry, dark place, like a basement or a closet. “Beer wants to be cold,” he said. “It degrades a lot faster as it warms up. Even after a month, a beer kept cold stays better than a beer kept warm. If you can keep it on the cooler side, you’ll end up with a better overall experience.”


$100 Lifetime Friars Union Memberships Go to 7monkstap.com for more details

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BEARDS BREWERY

PASSIONATE ABOUT CRAFT

LIMITED RELEASE

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Smooth, Nutty, Caramel Flavors & A Medium Body, With A Hearty Addition Of Oats Balanced Out By Subtle English Varietal Hops.

Look For DEEZ NUTZ On Tap & In Cans! AT SPECIALTY STORES ACROSS WESTERN MICHIGAN

215 LAKE ST. / PETOSKEY, MICHIGAN WWW.BEARDSBREWERY.COM REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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The B.O.B. / 20 Monroe Ave NW / Downtown GR 616.356.2000 / thebobsbrewery.com / #BOBsBrewery

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Fricano’s Pizza Tavern 1400 Fulton Ave., Grand Haven. 616-842-8640 ITALIAN. Claims to be the first pizzeria in Michigan, but customers care less about its longevity than the amazingly crispy thin crust and simple ingredients atop its much-lauded pies. Four other locations around West MI, including Comstock Park, Muskegon, Holland and Kalamazoo. » SERVING: Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Pizza.

Phil’s Bar & Grille 215 Butler St., Saugatuck. 269-857-1555 AMERICAN. This cozy (some would say “small”) bar and grille in downtown Saugatuck is one of those unassuming spots you might easily overlook, though locals in Saugatuck will tell you about their love affair with Phil’s. Eclectic menu is all over the place, but in a good way, and the staff is super-friendly. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: Open 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Portabella Mushroom Fries.

Kirby House 2 Washington, Grand Haven. 616-846-3299 AMERICAN. Formerly a historic hotel, The Kirby House retains its oldworld charm while providing all the pleasantries of new world fare, with a diverse but primarily American-influenced menu. Check out the new island bar with 5 HDTVs and walk to Lake Michigan right after. The Kirby House also hosts The Grill Room and a pizzeria (complete with pool tables) called K2. The lower level has also been renovated to include a wine cellar and a premier nightclub, Dark. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Nightlife.

Salt of the Earth 114 East Main St., Fennville. 269-561-7258 AMERICAN. Salt of the Earth is a farm-to-table-inspired restaurant, bar, and bakery located in the heart of SW Michigan farm country in Fennville. Focuses on fresh, seasonal, and local ingredients whenever possible. Also serves up live music on weekends. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: House made rustic cuisine.

New Holland Brewing Company 66 E. 8th St., Holland. 616-355-6422 BREWPUB. One of West MI’s premier microbreweries serves up better than average pub grub, including savory sandwiches chock full of Michigan ingredients, plus a seasonal entree menu. Also try their artisan spirits. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Mad Hatter IPA, Dragon’s Milk.

Saugatuck Brewing Company 2948 Blue Star Highway. 269-857-7222 BREWPUB. Enjoy a traditional Irish-style pub that features quality beer, wine, food and service. Try one of 12 unique brews that are served in the pub and bottled and distributed throughout the Midwest. » SERVING: Lunch Dinner OPEN ON: 7 days. GO THERE FOR: Beer in a family friendly pub environment.

To submit or to correct information, e-mail editor@revuewm.com.


IF YOU LIKE THIS, YOU’LL LOVE THIS. JOIN THE RYEVOLUTION.

Our Dragon’s Milk beer barrels have been busy creating a new, exceptional dimension in the world of rye whiskey. The Ryevolution has begun.

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Last Call by Nick Macksood / photo by Katy Batdorff

LOVING CUP SAZERAC Rockwell/Republic 45 S. Division Ave., Grand Rapids Devin Vranich, the sly devil behind the bar at Rockwell/ Republic, is the man responsible for this month’s Last Call: the Loving Cup Sazerac. The rye bites you with a quick burn before the chartreuse and citrus mellow out the drink. Even the absinthe makes its presence known, cooling off the rye. It’s a doozy — the Loving Cup weighs in at roughly 2.75 ounces of straight booze, and it’s gorgeous too, the color of a freshly minted penny. What a beautiful buzz!

INGREDIENTS: 2 oz. Bulleit Rye 1/2 oz. Chartreuse 1/4 oz. simple syrup Dash of lemon and Peychaud’s Bitters Eye drop of absinthe, for rinse Lemon rind Rosemary sprig Give rocks glass an absinthe rinse. Pour liquors, syrup and bitters into an iced shaker. Stir vigorously, then strain into rocks glass. Rub lemon rind around rim of glass. Singe rosemary sprig and drop into cocktail.

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SEE HOW IT’S MADE: Check out revuewm.com for an exclusive video tutorial.


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HAPPY HoOn-FUriR 2pm - 6pm M

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY AT THE WOODS! REVUEWM.COM | NOVEMBER 2017 |

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Profile for Revue Magazine

Revue Magazine, November 2017  

REVUE is West Michigan's most comprehensive free monthly entertainment guide covering events, music, arts, beer, dining and more. Visit us a...

Revue Magazine, November 2017  

REVUE is West Michigan's most comprehensive free monthly entertainment guide covering events, music, arts, beer, dining and more. Visit us a...

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