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EVENTS & SHOWS The Wharf Rat Rally

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David Mann - Chopper Festival

FEATURED BIKES Lucky Bastard

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22 The Big Chief 60 Spirit on Wheels 80 Neptune’s Storm

ON THE ROAD A Journey on the Silk Road

INTERNATIONAL Rock a Cry Baby

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COLUMNS New Generation

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52 Her Say 44 Our Readers 92 Old School

Editorial

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Coming Soon

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66

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Chief Editor : Pascal Richard Editor : Geneviève Fréchette Writers :  Dan Lim, Sam Pileggi, Samuel Guertin, Pascal Richard, Catherine David, Becky Goebel, Charles-Édouard Carrier, Audrey Huot-Arsenault Translation : Kathy Blais Special Collaborators : Martin Provencher, Denis Lévesque, Eric Marshall, Mélanie Charlebois, Claude Roberge, Benoit Roberge, Josh Allison Photographers : Dan Lim, Suzie Gauthier, Samuel Guertin, Martin Piché, Becky Goebel, Laval Gagnon, Eric Marshall, Benoit Roberge, Audrey Huot-Arsenault Model : Lucky Bastard : Kawennase Mccomber Midnight Boner : Marcella Graphic Design : Suzie Gauthier, Revolution Motorcycle Magazine Proofreader : Nicole Duchesne, Lorie Richard Prepress :  Photographique MF Inc. Printing :  Imprimeries Transcontinental Distribution :   Messageries Dynamiques (French) Coast to Coast (English) ISSN 1913-0082 Copyright 2007 Bibliothèque Nationale du Québec Bibliothèque Nationale du Canada Registration number Post Publication : 41471522 Advertising Consultant :  Pascal Richard : 514 726-5742 Web Site : Suzie Gauthier Social Media : Pascal Richard Revolution Motorcycle Magazine is published 4 times a year. All rights reserved. Reproduction in total or in part of any article, photo or advertisement is forbidden without prior written permission from the Publisher of Revolution Motorcycle Magazine. Our office is located at 1302 Garden Ave. Mascouche (Quebec) J7L 0A4 Tel. : 514 726-5742 Fax : 450 477-9814 email :

revolutioncustom@hotmail.com Printed in Canada

www.

revolutionmotorcyclemag .com


Editorial BY pascal richard

Before looking ahead to the new year that is underway,

to keep us around in the summer surrounding ourselves

here is a small summary of the 2018 season.

with motorcycles, spending time with friends and nourish-

This past summer, the weather was one of the best we have had in a long time. Motorcycle enthusiasts enjoyed the summer across Canada. RMM travelled from one

ing exchanges. As for planning the upcoming articles, I can tell you that they are going to be great, there will be lots to read about. I am already excited at the idea of

ocean to the other still feeling that we live in a magnifi-

revealing all the places we will be visiting and we will likely

cent country. The bikers are all amazing and spirited, while

be in your part of the country this summer.

the motorcycle events had mother nature on their side; attendance was there to prove it.

In the beginning of this new year, I would like to thank our readers who follow us year after year as well as for

I would like to thank our team who pounded the pavement, travelling the roads across and outside our continent to create the coolest stories and who unfortunately had no other choice but to have fun and have a few beers‌ what a boring job ! The end of 2018 brought some nice surprises as the Harley-Davidson and Indian Motorcycle dealers presented new motorcycles and 2019 seems to be on course for more news.

your positive comments regarding the magazine, our advertisers because without you our magazine would not be what it is, and finally, the wonderful RMM team in the four corners of Canada and the United States who prepare these wonderful articles. May this year be marvellous and may the road bring pleasure.

January is a month that is synonymous with motorcycle shows and planning for 2019. The shows are worth visiting

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Let the Revolution continue !!!!


FEATURED BIKE Text : Sam Pileggi — Photos : Suzie Gauthier

A decade brings on a ton of changes in one’s lifetime : new jobs, new relationships, good times and bad times. Often, we don’t even see ten years go by because we get so caught up in the everyday grind. Finding the time to dedicate towards working on our passions many times get put aside because life gets in the way, so I tip my hat to Luc for sticking with it and completing an awesome one-off custom that will turn heads for decades to come. Luc Charbonneau, a talented Harley-Davidson technician, had an idea for his next build, which was to design and fabricate a motorcycle that would not only put his talents to the test but also appeal to the younger new age riders. The baggers and choppers that appeal to most of us older bikers are sometimes lost on the next generation who look for a sportier speedoriented model. So about 10 years ago Luc decided that he wanted to use his newly acquired 124’’ S&S motor on a different type of build. Something that not only would help him get his rocks off on the road but also attract attention from the newbie riders that long for a super cool V-Twin that doesn’t look like their grandpa’s old Panhead.

Mission accomplished ! Most ground-up builds don’t happen overnight as you see on TV; they take time and patience, especially for guys that have a real job. So “A Decade in the Making” is no word of a lie. Just ask Luc. The project started when Big Joe D. from Montreal Chopper gave Luc a 124” S&S motor. Luc worked for Joe at the time, and that motor was the primary component that got Luc’s wheels spinning about what his next custom build would be. Inspired by builders like Roland Sands, who were putting out modified Harleys that had that KTM styling helped Luc figure out the path that he was going to pursue with this build. Luc’s first contact was Fausto from Moto X, and they designed and built a chassis that was high up off the ground in a sports style configuration with an extended swing arm. Luc spec’d out the frame knowing that he did not want to use a rear fender, so they designed a figure 8 rear tail section that ended in a point to showcase the bike’s rear end. After the frame was close enough to what Luc envisioned, he took the chassis to Showtime Cycles where he also moonlighted as a mechanic and worked with Spencer and Eric to complete the overall look of the build. This is where they decided to incorporate the oil tank into the tail section of the frame, so that groovy figure-8 rear fender now served the dual purpose of fender and oil tank.

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Spencer also offered up a prototype gas tank that he had designed for a special Carol Shelby project, which he had worked on years earlier, and figured that the tank would suit this build perfectly, and Luc agreed. And this is where life gets in the way of progress because the project got put on hold for a few years since people do have to work for a living and Luc was starting a new job as a technician at Vision Harley-Davidson in Repentigny, Quebec. So once the ball got rolling again, Luc took the paintwork to Fitto for a custom paint job. Knowing that he did not want anything too over the top, he explained that he really wanted his birth year on the tank, and as for the rest to keep the focus simple, clean and green. While the paint was in progress, Luc went to see an old friend, Sylvain Genest, who banged out a nice aluminum seat pan and configured a sharp exhaust that fit the design plans perfectly along with a ton of other one-off custom parts for this build. A set of stock HD mid controls were machined/modified to work with the design, and a custom dip stick was fabricated at the same time because, hey, it’s pretty important to know what your oil level is after all. By this time the project had moved yet again, only this time it found its way to a bike lift in the Vision Harley-Davidson

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Service Garage. Needless to say, that when customers came into the shop to speak with their mechanic and saw this project sitting on the lift, they knew this was nothing the motor company put out and it started many a conversation. Working on finalizing the project at the dealership stretched on for another two years, and I can attest that going into work every day and seeing your baby sitting on the lift and not having the time to work on it must have made Luc crazy. But isn’t it always the same old story, the mechanic’s bike is always the bike in need of repairs because after all, a mechanic spends all his time fixing everyone else’s motorcycles and ignoring his own ? Like all projects this build came full circle in the completion stages, ending up at Highroller Kustoms in Kahnawake a shop owned/partnered by Eric English & Peter Thomas (same Eric that Luc worked with at Showtime Cycles and Montreal Choppers). Eric was there from the beginning of the project and helped Luc finalize the build at his newly opened custom bike shop. This is where Luc did all his own wiring even though he had contracted someone else to do it, he finally got tired of waiting (NO SHIT !!!) and decided that enough was enough and he was going to get this build completed, so that’s exactly what he did.


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OWNER CITY

L. C. Beloeil, QC

AccessoirIes

GENERAL Manufacturing Year / Make Model Assembly Time

Sly and Fausto 2010 Unique Luc Charbonneau A life time

ENGINE Year Model Builder Ignition Displacement Lower end Balancing Pistons Heads Cam Lifters Carb Pipes

Pre-1999 Evo S&S S&S 124 ci S&S S&S S&S S&S S&S S&S Super G Custom/Sly

Transmission Type Shifting

6 speed RSD Foot

painting Painter Airbrush Color / type Special

Yannick Lavoie None Green House of Color Fitto Airbrush

FRAME 2010 MotoXcycle Unique 33 degrees — Softail

Year Builder Type Rake Stretch Shocks

PhotographeR

SPECIFICATIONS Bars Handlebar Controls Headlight Tail light Speedo Dash Pegs Electrics Gas Tank Oil Tank Oil System Primary Seat Front Fender Rear Fender Mirrors Grips

CCI Magura Alloy Art Alloy Art Motogadget What’s that ? Custom/Sly Luc Charbonneau Spencer Racine In the tail S&S Evil Engineering Custom Aucune/Brace None Joker Joker

forkS Type Size Builder

SJP Real big SJP

WHEELS FRONT Size Wheel Tire Brake

21” Xtreme Machine Avon 130 PM

REAR Size Wheel Tire Brake

OTHER

18” Xtreme Machine Avon 240 PM Model : Kawennase Mccomber

I would like to thank everyone who helped : Highroller Kustom, Spencer Racine, Sly and Fausto, Vision Harley-Davidson and Fitto.

Suzie Gauthier

The last question I had was where did the name Lucky Bastard come from ? Well, we have all heard the old saying that green motorcycles are unlucky. Luc knew all along this was going to be a green bike so to contradict the old saying he called his latest build the “Lucky Bastard”. With everything that this project went through, with all the miles it did from shop to shop (before any miles were put on the bike) with all the help and parts that Luc’s buddies offered him through the years, I ask you, who do you think is “The Lucky Bastard ?” I can tell you one thing : I’m ready to wait another decade to see what Luc builds next. Keep them coming, Luc !!!

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Text and photos : Audrey Huot-Arsenault

Early last spring, I was invited to go to Digby, Nova Scotia to attend the 14th edition of the Wharf Rat Rally. I had been riding a motorcycle for only two seasons and did not have the long-distance experience so for this loop of almost 1,500 km, I asked my brother to accompany me on the adventure. I admit that I was hesitant not knowing what to expect, about the possibility of bad weather, and my lack of experience made me nervous. At the same time, since my brother spent his summers riding, I couldn’t ask for anyone better to coach me. What big brother would not be there to protect his little sister ? When I asked him, he immediately said yes. I had just found my perfect partner.

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EVENT

The Beginning of the Journey The morning of our departure, the weather was not on our side : rain and thunderstorms. We planned to leave for New Brunswick by riding for as long as we could until the rain made us stop. I told myself that if we left early we would probably avoid the worst of the bad weather ! But that was not the case. At Montmagny, we hit a wall of rain. Unbelievable ! I could not see anything. We stop for gas. I was so discouraged. I didn’t want to show it but my brother knows me so well and could see that I am starting to panic. Fortunately, I am accompanied by a real biker who has seen it all. He is always smiling, he cheers me up and since he is so sure of himself, he gives me the confidence I need. I feel the adrenaline rising and we pursue our route to Edmundston. We are cold and tired so we need to stop. It rained so much that I literally felt as if I had been through the washing machine. Our Doc Martens boots are filled to the top much like glasses of water. Happy to find the warmth of the motel, we decide to order a delicious pizza and enjoy some well-deserved rest.

The next day, we hit the road again for a second day of 400 km to Saint John. Our equipment is dry, we had a good night’s sleep, we are ready to ride and the weather is perfect. We choose to take the TransCanada Highway and then route 7, a straight course that crosses through forests, but there are many amazing small roads to discover if you leave the highway.

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Saint John, founded in 1785, is the oldest town in Canada and its architecture resembles that of Old Québec. We stop at Canada’s Best Value Inn and apparently, we are not the only bikers to spend the night. Upon arrival, there are already several motorcycles in the parking lot. Our motors are still running as some people approach us to ask questions about our machines, asking where we are from and if we are headed to Digby. We are indeed ! We are all there to wait for the ferry that will take us to Digby at 8 am the next day.

Arriving in Nova Scotia, we go directly to our hotel, the Annapolis Basin Conference Center in Cornwallis, 15 minutes from downtown Digby where the event is being held. Despite a large sign at the entrance indicating “Welcome Bikers”, it seems strange, there are several white buildings that appear uninhabited and a large tank on the grounds. We wonder if we are at the right place… The Annapolis Basin is an old military base and an army training centre. The main building is much more welcoming and we meet 4 really nice guys, veterans who trained here when they were in the army. They have come to remember the good old days and they have many incredible stories to tell. These guys are like are old foxes !

Crossing the Bay of Fundy takes about 2 hours. It seems that in bad weather, the water can become quite rough so they recommend taking the time to tie your motorcycle to avoid an accident. But today, the weather is perfect.

At Annapolis Basin, the view is magnificent. We are by the ocean above an immense beach where each night, we have the chance to steal glimpses of the sunsets, with their unimaginable colours, way beyond the horizon.

From Saint John to Digby

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The Wharf Rat Rally Since the end of July 2005, the Wharf Rat Rally has provided a family environment to reunite all types of bikers and their motorcycles, regardless of the model. A typical motorcycle weekend : builders, leather crafters, painters, accessories, games of skill, music shows, skill performances, and motorcycle stunts. The ambiance in Digby seems so relaxed, without the ocean and the energy of the Maritimes. This event is growing every year. So much so that a study was conducted by Nova Scotia to measure the economic

benefits of the Rally on this small municipality of about 2,000 inhabitants. Last year, the Wharf Rat Rally attracted 21,870 visitors to the Digby area and generated benefits of 4.9 million dollars for the Nova Scotia economy, money that would not have been spent there if not for the Rally. This is why Nova Scotia supports the event and continues to promote it to attract more riding enthusiasts from Quebec, Ontario, Labrador and the neighbouring Maritime provinces. The people of the region and the surrounding area are happy to see us arrive and we can feel the passion they have for motorcycles. With landscapes such as these, it is hard not to love the road !

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Saturday is the biggest day for the Wharf Rat Rally. The city is abounding with motorcyclists of all ages. Main street, where the event is held, leads to the port and its fifty or so sailboats. The motors rumble from all around and no one shies away from providing a smoke show. Women arrive on their big bikes and I look quite minuscule with my Triumph Bonneville. We enjoy a nice chat. They are impressed that I made the trip from Quebec on my Triumph with a very small seat and no windshield.

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The day passes and the ambiance is still festive and familial. We meet and have a coffee with Timo, the talented Mad Squirrel leather artist that we met at Roll the Bones in MontrĂŠal. We attend a motorcycle acrobatics show and a strong-arm contest, then end the day with a blues show and fireworks. It is wonderful to see that in this small town, everything revolves around the Wharf Rat Rally and the people are so proud of it. Indeed, nothing much else goes on except for fishing the rest of the year. They put all their effort into the Rally.


The Most Important Thing is to Ride

a motorcycle, you must listen to your body and stop when you feel you need to. I take a room in a small motel.

During this type of event, the people mingle with their friends and talk about motors, but most interesting of all are the road trips you can take around Digby. My brother and I decide to do the Evangeline Trail recommended to us by some veteran friends. It is a magnificent route that runs along the shore through a couple of villages and fishing ports. The ocean breeze is delicious and we make a few stops to admire the view and take some pictures. We take a detour to Yarmouth to visit Cape Fourchu, a small peninsula in the ocean of the Bay of Fundy. The Cape is home to an immense lighthouse perched atop the rocks. It feels like we are at the end of the world.

After a good night’s sleep, my batteries are recharged, I hit the road again for the last 2 hours home.

Upon returning to the hotel, we finish our day with a rock country show with the veterans. It is our last night and already the end of our trip, but it is not over yet, we need to return home.

Dibgy, and Then ? I really feel as though I met a personal challenge on this first long trip. It took this type of road trip to give me the itch and now I have it. I had wanted to ride with my brother for a long time. Honestly, it could not have been any better. Nova Scotia is a must-see for motorcyclists. I feel the need to go back, there are so many places to see : Cabot Trail, Halifax, Peggy’s Cove or even Carter’s Beach. There will be a next time. Thanks to my brother, co-pilot and companion, for supporting me during this adventure. I expect to plan another ride soon. As you say, “Ride or die” !

A Quick Return While having breakfast all together, the four former soldiers offer that we make the return trip with them. My ever-enthusiastic brother smiles as he looks at me and says, “Come on ! Let’s ride with them ! Hey sis, what do you think ?” As I look at him, I have no choice but to agree ! Upon exiting the ferry, the six of us head to Fredericton, well positioned in our ranks. My first experience riding in a group. The others have big Harley-Davidsons, my brother is right in front of me and the last one riding a T-Rex takes up the rear. I felt very confident riding in a group. Then the group separates, we say goodbye and we continue as another thunderstorm forces us to make an extra stop in Rivière-du-Loup. My mentor must leave me and continue on his way to meet other obligations. I am tired. The storm has drained my energy. I have been told that when riding

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FEATURED BIKE

Text and photos : Dan Lim | The Moto Foto

It was quite appropriate that the day of the photo shoot of Adam King’s new build for a client took place on a cold, wet, windy, and dreary fall day. The Harley-Davidson 1943 WLC, Canadian Military edition bike with its off-white and navy blue marineinspired colour theme seemed to suit the ambience of the day perfectly. Adam and I talked at length about where we wanted to shoot this beach racer beauty and decided to take her to the water – naturally. Of course, given the conditions, we were utterly soaked by the rain and waves for our efforts. Admittedly, I wished several times during the photo shoot that I had brought my rain gear, but in the end, it was totally worth every cold and soaking minute. We trailered the bike, and off we went to a great little spot Adam knew of on the edge of Lake Huron. By the time we got there the drizzle had come, the winds had picked up, the temperature had dropped, and the waters were filled with white cap waves rushing towards shore, beating violently against the breakwall of huge rocks. It really was a day more suited for lake surfing than for doing an outdoor photo shoot, but I knew that lighting and that backdrop were going to make for some stunning shots and I was getting super stoked about the shoot. While driving on route to the location and in the comfort of his truck, I took the opportunity to ask Adam some questions about his philosophy on bike building and what inspired this particular creation.

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DL : Why the anchor emblem, the marine-themed colour scheme for this bike ? AK : My mom, Maggie King. I’ve always wanted to build a bike with this paint job and theme with her in mind. She inspires me, man. So, you could say this is a tribute to her. She is a member of the Motor Maids and as well a lieutenant in the Canadian Navy. If you are not familiar with the Motor Maids, it’s the first women’s motorcycle club in North America. The Canadian Chapter has been around since 1949, and the colour scheme of the Motor Maids is royal blue and silver grey. Since the main component of the bike is a Canadian Military issue bike, I thought this would be the perfect choice to do the marine-theme with the navy blue and off-white colour paint job and the anchor emblem. My client left it to me, creatively, for the final look of the bike as they usually do. So, I’m really happy with the way it turned out. DL : True to form of an Adam King – Blackhorse Cycle build, your creations look like bikes that have been untouched for years. It’s as if father time has had its way with the bike. Like a gem one would stumble onto in an old abandoned barn find. I know that is your style, tell us a little bit about that ? Why do you gravitate to that, creatively ? AK : That’s true. That’s just my thing. I specialize in building Harleys that look old, vintage-like bikes that reflect that period in the late thirties to fifties. I want to incorporate that look into the final build, so the motorcycle looks as if it could

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tell a story. The machines may seem like an old barn find, but they are pristine inside where the internals are new and tuned to run like a new motorcycle. My styling cues tend towards the drag racer, beach racer, stripped down, cut down looks cause that’s just what I like. What people don’t realize is the extent I go through with the aging, patina, and weathering process of the bike in the right places so as to look real – like it has been literally sitting in a barn for 50 years. Even my paint job is hand-painted brushed paint. It’s funny; I always get a kick out of people’s expressions as I see their imagination run wild when they look at my bikes, totally unknowing that it has been built out of bits and parts (some custom fabricated of course), although these parts are always era-specific and authentic. Man, that’s where my craft is : combining old and new into one. It takes a lot of efforts and expertise to make it look and run just right. DL : I know you’re also known for fabricating your own parts. Can you give me an example ? AK : Yeah, for sure. About three years ago I got the idea of building a rear leg to repair all these busted chopper springers I kept buying up, with the intent to restore them to original specs. It worked out so well, and the response has been excellent. Since then I have started production on most of the components needed to restore the complete Harley front end. Rear legs, front legs, three-piece brake stay, fender tabs, chevrons with plans for a lot more to come. Stay tuned.


DL : Amazing. So customers can purchase these from you for their own build ? AK : Yes, sir. DL : Well, I love the looks of your bikes. Always have. Want to tell me a bit about your aging process to give it that Adam King look ? AK : NOPE. That’s my secret (laughs out loud) and what sets me apart. DL : So, because of your penchant to build in this style and genre of bikes, you hooked up with the guys from The Frozen Few in the United States and Japan. Tell me a bit about The Frozen Few and how that came about. AK : I got involved with The Frozen Few about six years ago. They were going to be racing in the middle of winter in “The Sault” (Sault Ste. Marie, ON) and I was invited to participate ‘cause I guess they found out I was building and riding these vintage bikes in Canada. I have never ridden with a group of like-minded people as me who also rode vintage Harley’s, all pre-1947 bikes. So, you could say it was a dream for me when I got the call. I didn’t know what to expect really, and when I got there, I was completely blown away with the amount of work they had put into building the snow track and the property where the race took place – the Old Grist Mill is something right out of time. It was the perfect setting for our weekend trip travelling back into time. Fucking unbelievable, that’s all I can say. An experience I will never forget. There were about 20 of us who were riders, planners, photographers and guys just wanting to help with the weekend race. We became instant friends. No, more like family, actually. This was also the weekend when I busted up my clavicle. The track had this large snow berm that caught my attention. A snow berm is a wall of snow built up in a corner. In this case, it was a very high snow wall. For some reason, I got it into my head that I needed to conquer this beast. After a few passes and as I got comfortable with the track, I got up to the very top lip of the berm until my front wheel broke through the snow and I literally went flying off the back side of the track. Yuup ! That happened. Not only did I break my clavicle but a few broken ribs to go along with it. The crazy Canuck that I am, I still stuck it out for the rest of the weekend with these incredible people who have since bonded to become family. We continue to this day to rip up ice wherever and whenever we get the chance. DL : Wow, what an incredible story ! The fact that you stayed after getting hurt. You are a Crazy Canuck ! Adam, what would you like to see moving forward with this particular genre of the moto community ? AK : Honestly, man, I would love to see more people riding these incredible vintage machines in Canada. It’s for sure more common in the States and Japan. These bikes have history and character, and every one of them has a story to tell, you know ? And maybe we can do events here in Canada that would celebrate the rich history and heritage of these bikes like they do in the United States, parts of Europe and in Japan. I don’t know man… I love these bikes and what they represent. Maybe I’m just an old soul born in the wrong era (laughing). DL : See Adam ? Time travel is possible.

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OWNER CITY

Trevor Bentley Vancouver, BC

AccessoirIes

GENERAL Manufacturing Year / Make Model Assembly Time

Blackhorse Cycle 1943 WLC Blackhorse Cycle 2 months

ENGINE Year Model Builder Ignition Displacement Lower end Balancing Pistons Heads Cam Lifters Carb Pipes

1943 WLC Blackhorse Cycle Magneto 750 Stock — Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson M88 Linkers Harley-Davidson

Transmission Type Shifting

3 speed Tank shift

painting Painter Airbrush Color / type Special

Blackhorse Cycle — Navy blue and white —

FRAME Year Builder Type Rake Stretch Shocks

PhotographeR

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SPECIFICATIONS

Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson Stock Stock None N/A Dan Lim | The Moto Foto

Bars Handlebar Controls Headlight Tail light Speedo Dash Pegs Electrics Gas Tank Oil Tank Oil System Primary Seat Front Fender Rear Fender Mirrors Grips

Custom Blackhorse Cycle Foot Clutch Engine Navy black out light N/A Custom Blackhorse Cycle Floor boards Joe Hunt Harley-Davidson — Dry sump 31 tooth Bate replica N/A N/A N/A Harley-Davidson

forkS Type Size Builder

Spring fork — —

WHEELS FRONT Size Wheel Tire Brake

18” — — —

REAR Size Wheel Tire Brake

OTHER

16” — — — —


Text and photos : Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel

The David Mann Chopper Festival celebrates David Mann, his lifestyle and his taste. Since the year after his death (2004), the “Chopper Fest” has been happening in Ventura, California. It’s a one-day event held on the ocean side, just off the 101 Hwy at the Ventura Fair Grounds, just two hours north of Los Angeles. It was the first time I have been able to attend the event. I’ve always wanted to go, but because it’s only a one-day event, it’s been tough to come all the way down from Canada. This year I’m spending the winter down south with a couple of my bikes and my camper van, so it made for perfect timing. We got our bikes ready and partied a bit at Chatty’s chopper compound in Reseda, just north of LA. The next morning we rode through the burnt-up Malibu hills, through tiny windy roads with big boulders dangerously fallen on the road right after a tight turn. After the crazy fires that took out hundreds of mansions and large luxurious properties, the heavy rain came through and created landslides throughout the entire area. Roads were shut down, cars were burnt up right on the side of the road, and it took over three hours to ride 40 miles down to the coast where the crew was meeting at Neptune’s Net – an iconic biker seafood bar & restaurant in Malibu that has been featured in many movies and TV shows.

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After some shrimp and a beer, we rolled deep along the PCH Highway 1 into Ventura – over 20 of us on choppers cruised into the Vagabond Inn, the hotel that bikers take over every year for one night and one night only. We spent the night annoying other hotel guests, eating tacos and going to the Tiki Bar where the signature drink is the Zombie. What’s in it ? Who knows… What does it do to you ? Literally makes you into a Zombie. After one of those things, you cannot speak English anymore. I’m not sure what language it is we started speaking, but it seemed like we still all understood each other. Things got a bit blurry after that (even though it was only 8 p.m.), but I do slightly remember going to the official Chopper Fest preparty at the Tavern Bar. This bar is so cool. It looks like it’s in an old library or maybe an old haunted mansion; 80 % of the bar is outside, and the other 20 % is indoor, amongst walls full of books with a band playing right in the centre.


The History of David Mann

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Since I was a little kid, I’ve been infatuated with anything Easy Rider : the movie, the magazine and the lifestyle that is choppers. David Mann just comes hand in hand with all that. He was a legendary painter and hangout of the whole Easy Rider/chopper builder crew that influenced us youngsters with the bikes we ride now. Before he passed away just over a year ago, I was a buddy of Tom Fugle, one of the original characters in the David Mann paintings, who first scouted David and brought attention to his paintings. David went on to join Tom’s El Forastero Motorcycle Club, becoming one of the founding members of the Kansas City Charter and from there, their legacy grew like crazy. What did he paint ? He recreated the imagery of the clubs’ parties, rides, their girls, their fantasies and every bike their crew rolled with. He recreated freedom in his strokes. He broke the rules and publicised the badassness that was chopper culture. He repeated over and over the theme of the honour and nobility of the biker, depicting bikers as modern knights or mythic heroes. He showed the tactics of the El Forastero Motorcycle Club in many of his paintings as well – a club whose members have been found guilty of motorcycle theft and meth dealings. David’s art was in a full-page centre spread in every Easy Rider magazine from 1971 up until he died in 2003. Before that, his art was in the first ever chopper magazine created by Ed Roth called Choppers. David’s art is continued to be seen at every motorcycle show, tattooed on bikers’ bodies and painted on tanks around the world. It is still being reproduced in Easy Rider Magazine as well. In 2004, David Mann was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame. Some of his original art is shown at the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee, and Orange County Choppers dedicated a build to him in one of their episodes. One of the original paintings by “Dave” that first caught my attention was the portrait of the Devil Dolls Motorcycle Club, the first all-female outlaw biker club in the United States, with the Golden Gate Bridge as a backdrop behind them. Another one of my favourites was the Holly Wood Run painting that shows a crew of men on choppers flying North on the highway past the Hollywood sign. This is the image that the David Mann Chopper Festival uses as its main promotional photo on its social media and website.

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The crowd is cool. It’s lots of older riders – legit people who know what their fucking talking about. It’s refreshing and really old school feeling. I met some really awesome new people there and also ran into Ian and Carol, a couple from Vancouver who just had a build at my show Loserpalooza. They bought me and my buds beers and the party continued long into the night and into the pizza shop – naturally. The next morning was rough, and throughout the entire night, you could hear burnouts going off, bottles being broken and drunk dudes yelling in the parking lot just steps from my hotel room door. We rode our bikes through the back gate of the show – late as per usual and cured our hangovers quick before I started taking the photos you’re looking at now.

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Instead of being “invited” to display your bike at the show, it’s more of a “Show and Shine” style where you bring what you built, pay $40 and put it in. There are all sorts of bikes in there. The show classes are Chopper, Bobber, Antique, Modern Chopper, Radical Design, Metric, Coolest Paint, Bagger, FXR, Ladies, Best Knucklehead, Best Panhead, Best Shovelhead, Best of Show and the David Mann Memorial Reward. There’s an art exhibit, custom bike builder displays, an entire swap meet, tons of vendors, beer, food and live bands. The whole event was started by David “Huggie” Hansen and sponsored by Harley-Davidson and Russ Brown. In the words of Huggie on their official website : “Chopper Fest is forever dedicated to the design, function and art of the motorcycle through those talented enough to create and those creative enough to appreciate talent.” The festival has become much more than a showcase for futuristic Motorcycle design. Indian Larry died the same year as Dave Mann and I think the whole motorcycle community was hit hard at that time. The love of the artist and the chopper culture in general fuelled the creation of the event.

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Our younger generation of chopper riders and builders was hit hard just days before Chopper Fest when Australian based builder, photographer and all around cool guy Timo Caraco (@ timo_tigerblood) was hit and killed on his bike. I understand the feeling of an entire community being affected by death so I’d like to extend my appreciation to those that organize this event. Events like Chopper Fest bring life back into us and it’s much more than a wild weekend looking at bikes. Gary Royal and his buddy rode their vintage Harley choppers from San Francisco with Timos photo on a flag flapping behind them. Our fallen riding brothers are with us at these shows. Some bike highlights were Canadian Dayten Likness’ Panhead chopper and his Born Free Shovelhead build. There were also a couple of super clean Sportsters, some funky old Indian choppers and some top-notch new FXRs customized to the brim. Chatty rode his shiny “Liberace” Knucklehead up from LA and Blake Raw’s period correct 38’ Knucklehead was there as well. The vendors were cool too : lots of old parts for sale, old prints, leather works, painted tanks, and tons of badass biker shit. Chemical Candy Customs and Oliver Pecker were there from Dallas, Texas with their brand Cheap Thrills and of course, the entire Cycle Zombies crew was there with their booth set up front and centre. They had their bikes lined up, fresh off the boat from the Japan Moon Eyes Show.

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One of my favourite displays at the show was the Dave Mann replica paint job on an old van. The hand-painted work perfectly suited the show and was parked beside two beautiful Panheads, all of which came from the same shop. There was also a survivor chopper on location that was in an original David Mann painting which was on display beside the bike. Details like this in a show like Chopper Fest really bring the show together and are much appreciated !

by money – this one doesn’t feel that way. It’s more accepting, more core and straight to the point. California never sleeps and even in December, there are shows going on, people still riding and people still doing shit. This show really sums up the State of California and makes me excited about being here over these winter months. Thank you to the people who put Chopper Fest on, keep us busy and keep cool shit happening in the chopper culture.

I go to lots of motorcycle shows all over North America and beyond and it’s safe to say that the Chopper Fest is special compared to them all. It’s a legit show with a cool history, a good reasoning to it and carries a really cool vibe. Lots of shows these days are really blown out and get taken over

To learn more about the David Mann Chopper Fest visit their website : www.chopperfestival.com

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Instagram : @chopperfest


Text and photos : Dan Lim | The Moto Foto

When I first laid eyes on “King Nothing,” I wasn’t sure what to think. This cool-looking timeworn Bobber totally stood out to me amongst a backdrop of so many other usual and typical shiny and colourful custom builds. The way the bright California sun bounced off and around this beauty, you couldn’t help but be drawn to it. This Harley-Davidson 1946 FL Knucklehead was so incredibly and undeniably unique ! While I gazed at this bike – yes, I said gazed – it really did exude such a strong sense of contradiction and evoked a lot of different feelings. I mean, the “King” looked like a bike that is meant to be shiny, like royalty, but on the flip side, it also felt so understated, almost brooding. Partly steampunk, partly Art Deco (in the styling and colouration) and it had a gnarly vintage vibe. It almost looked like an old barn find but yet it felt grand in its stature, quality, detailing and finish. It completely piques your interest in such an unexpected way. When I met the talented builder, Josh Allison, one of the very first things I asked him was how he came about naming the bike “King Nothing.” His answer may or may not surprise you, but it certainly speaks to why this bike has that sense of contradiction.

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“The name comes from the Metallica song, ‘King Nothing.’ When the bike was complete, its styling and character looked worn to me, like an old Knuckle should. Like… a King that was once great, but was no longer. It’s hard to explain, man (laughing). It’s just a feeling I got as the build started to come together.” I found what he said fascinating, how his creative mind works. “I wanted it to have the old antique, patina look that I love. I build out of my head and the bike kinds of builds itself as I go along.” Okay, what ? No sketches ? It’s all in his head ? That’s amazing ! What he said reminded me of something I read about Alfred Hitchcock, the famous British film director. Hitchcock felt that the actual movie making and editing of his (many) films were boring because to him, the whole film was already complete in his head before shooting even began — such a parallel to how Josh works. Josh builds like an artist. He is an artist. It’s all organic in the flow of the build and really, what it comes down to, is how he feels as he’s building his bikes. Does it feel right or look right ? If not, do it again. And again, continually referencing the vision of the motorcycle he has in his mind’s eye. This way of working invariably always take longer but the creative

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process is a process, and sometimes during that process, even mistakes can end up serendipitously tremendous and unique. To build the “King Nothing” Bobber, Josh knew he wanted to create a bike that looked old school with an old gnarly feel that was all handmade and loaded with beautiful detail finishing throughout the bike. Many of the parts are one-off custom pieces with inlays of bronze and copper. Most are created from scratch and fabricated to fit perfectly together, declaring to all who see it, the attention to detail. The bike screams quality, quality, quality, thus giving the “King” its feeling of grandeur. Check out some of these custom pieces in the pictures : front springer cover, brass oil and fuel lines (beautifully shaped to run along the lines of the motor), custom seat, custom exhaust, and custom air cleaner are among some of my favourite parts of the bike. Even the forged kicker pedal has the word “Knuckle” on it. For Josh, the beginning process to his bikes starts with the tank. That’s the centrepiece as it dictates everything for him, creatively. One look at the tank and it’s immediately apparent how much work has gone into it. When you talk to Josh, you can tell he is pretty darn proud of it.

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“It takes a lot of time to make all these parts by hand. The tank, in particular, was really hard to make. I had to build the two sides, then bead roll the outside of the wings into the tank. Then I had to cut out the wings, and with an art roll die, I put the details of the wings into them. Next, I had to plug weld the wings into the tank and weld the two pieces of the tank together. And put a tunnel into it. The two brass gas caps are hand engraved by @jbowerengraving you can find on Instagram. Lastly, I had to make the tank mount fit the outside of the tank and get the copper to fit it with the holes… and let me tell you, what a nightmare,” he laughs. “So a lot of fabrication and design went into this bike for sure. One mistake and I’d have to start the whole process all over. So it was very stressful and challenging, but it was also loads of fun.” No wonder this bike took about eight months to complete and hundreds of hours have painstakingly gone into it. You know what ? It shows. “This was the hardest, yet the most fun bike I have built to date, and what’s even more awesome, is to have built it as an invited builder for ‘Born Free 10’ !“ That’s quite the compliment from Mike Davis and Grant Peterson of the Born Free Show, considering that Josh has only been running Cry Baby Cycles out of his house in Greeley, Colorado for a little over a year. He and his wife, Sarah work together in the shop : he creates and she helps with the daily running and operating of Cry Baby Cycles. By the way, Josh won the Born Free Award which is typically chosen by Mike and Grant every year. He was also the Art & Wheels Basel pick. It looks like he will be Switzerland-bound in May 2019 for that show. I would say this is a great new beginning for Josh doing his own thing from a lifetime of being around bikes and machinery. So, who came up with the name Cry Baby Cycles ? Josh says it was Sarah who came up with the name. They were in Austin, Texas at the Hand Built Show where she bought a vintage motorcycle jacket with an old school patch that said “Cry Baby” on it. The name resonated with them and they both thought it was rather cool for a shop name. So they named it and it stuck. Nothing to do with motorcycles, but it’s unique enough like his bikes. It’s a name that you’ll remember. Once you’ve seen a Cry Baby Build, you’ll know it’s unmistakably Josh’s creation. Keep on rocking those creations in your head, Josh. We can’t wait to see what else you have in store !

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HER SAY

BY Catherine David

Text : Catherine David Photos : Mélanie Charlebois collection

That afternoon, Mélanie swapped the jogging suit that she wore as a physical education teacher for her T-shirt and Speed Trix cap. Leaving for our interview, she left the school as the children watched with wondering eyes : “Mrs Charlebois, are you wearing a cap ?” Although the children followed the teacher’s adventures on the Chopper Québec show on Historia, her metamorphosis always surprises them. I recognize her immediately as she arrives at the café : the same look, the same energy and the same sparkling blue eyes that we have seen on television. She is without a doubt an authentic woman. She orders hot chocolate because coffee, “is added energy that I don’t need,” she confides laughing. I fell immediately under her charm.

The Origins of Speed Trix The Speed Trix motorcycle creation and transformation workshop was founded more than twenty years ago. “I saw guys parading through our place asking my boyfriend for help. So, one day I told him, that is enough, we need to open a shop !” And that is what they did with her boyfriend, Stephan Le Breton, in charge of mechanics, his brother Mike in charge of body work and Mélanie would be responsible for management. Together, they create works of art for the road. The team is extremely talented and complete each other perfectly. With the number of trophies displayed in their garage in Saint-André-d’Argenteuil, there is no doubt that they know what they are doing. “We are a family business and we want people to feel at home. The curious are welcome, customers can follow the evolution of their 2-wheelers at any time, no bullshit here ! I won’t sell you something you don’t need. I will make sure you get the most for your money,” states Mélanie. We can see that

she is invested. But isn’t this a full-time job ? “It is ! After school, I hurry over to the garage to manage the place, answer the telephone and customers, and sometimes brainstorm with the guys on a newly arrived motorcycle… With two kids, 13 and 16, my days are quite full !” Many would be at the end of their rope but not her. She thrives on these projects and loves all aspects of her life. Teaching is the ideal job for the type of company she manages. “Winter is a little quieter at the shop and during the summer vacation I can be there fulltime. There is a cross on the calendar and the guys are anxious for me to arrive full-time in June. The school administrators are very accommodating. I share my schedule with them in advance so they know when I will be taking an afternoon off, here and there, for a motorcycle competition in the United States for example.” When she returns to school on the Monday morning, everyone is excited to see the prize that the shop won over the weekend. The children love to measure themselves beside the trophies that are always higher.

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From Garage to TV

Working Among Men

In the spring of 2018, Speed Trix opened the doors of its workshop to all of Quebec with the broadcasting of Chopper Québec on the specialized channel, Historia. During the ten thirty-minute episodes, we discovered the fascinating world of modified motorcycles and chopper enthusiasts. Although the program, produced by Sylvain Roy, featured Speed Trix, Mélanie considered it was important to present other builders and display the work of other artists of the area, such as Fitto for example, a world-renowned painter. “There are excellent artists, artisans and motorcycle builders in Quebec. The province is very well represented at the North American competitions and has won many prizes. I found it important for the program to reflect the talent found here. We have no reason to envy the Americans,” she says with conviction. But how did Mélanie become the subject of this program ? “I had no idea that there would be so much about me in the show. They gave me a microphone in the morning and took it back at night. I didn’t know what scenario the producer had in mind. Besides the interviews, the rest was just part of an ordinary day. Nothing was staged. I wanted it to reflect our reality but it couldn’t disrupt our work at the shop. They wanted me to act as a bridge between the different builders. A little feminine energy in a male-dominated world makes the conversation easier and more fluid.”

What is it like working with men ? “I feel right at home. I think I have more masculine than feminine energy myself,” she says laughing. “I am very efficient in this universe. I must admit that I had to forge a place for myself. We all know what that is like. I came a long way. Over the past twenty years, the mentality has changed and in the beginning, there weren’t very many of us. Even today, there are customers who are surprised to see me wrenching in the garage.”

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Actually, since 2010, the motorcycle industry has seen an impressive increase of women on motorcycles. Today, women dare to ride two-wheelers and represent 15 % of Quebec’s motorcyclists. At Speed Trix, 40 % of the clientele are female. Seeing my stunned reaction to this surprising number, Mélanie explains, “Most customers arrive in couples. The man will request modifications to his motorcycle and when his wife sees this, she often decides to customize her own as well. However, one quarter of the feminine clientele comes alone. The most common requests are for modifications regarding safety, then maintenance followed by esthetics.” With school, the workshop, television projects and family, we wonder if Mélanie has time to ride. “Working at Speed Trix does limit my travels but I have a chance to take different motorcycles on road tests or to break them in, I ride to events and competitions. I can’t complain.” This pretty forty-year-old emanates an aura of freshness and happiness. Driven by a vital, out of the ordinary force, Mélanie lives, takes action and gets things done, comfortably settled on her X. We say that the joy of living is a contagious emotion so stop by and see Mélanie at Speed Trix to become infected.


Text : Charles-Édouard Carrier — Photos : Audrey Huot-Arsenault

He has kept a page of two-wheel history alive. Generous with his time, this imposing guy loses track of time when talking about motorcycles. With his big, bright eyes, an encyclopedic knowledge of mechanics, a tumultuous life marked by experiences, the restorer and collector, Claude Roberge opens the doors to his museum.

Beginning on a BSA None of his entourage rode a motorcycle. So where did this passion come from ? “I lived on a rural country road about 3 kilometers from the village. I remember a man who would pass by riding a BSA, the one with a chrome tank. I could hear him coming from far away. Each time, I would go out on the porch and wave to him. After passing by many times, he stopped and offered to take me for a ride. I think that was when I caught the bug. We rode to the end of the road and he brought me back home. From that moment, I knew that there would be motorcycles in my future. This man changed my life,” recounts the collector. A year later, at 12 years old, he bought his first motorcycle with his own hard-earned money. “I worked cutting hay for a farmer. It is with that money that I bought a Honda Mini Trail

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Z50.” Later came several motocross bikes to get cross the fields around the house and, at 17, he acquired a Triumph chopper. He describes this Tiger 650 as his first real motorcycle.

Love Stories…or not When walking the land belonging to Claude Roberge, from the workshop to the garage and passing by the 53-foot trailer where he stores his parts, we can quickly see the importance motorcycles play in this collector’s life who has estimated having owned between 40 and 45 motorcycles until now. At the time of our visit, he had a little less than thirty, having just concluded the sales of a Triumph 1915, an Indian motocross and a Honda Scrambler CL350 1968. “My motorcycles are love stories. If I have no more love for a motorcycle, I sell it.”


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Claude Roberge expected to have as much pleasure restoring a motorcycle as riding it. Once the work is done, the ultimate step is the road test. That is where he falls in love… or not. “I put a lot of energy into the Honda that I just sold. I spent an entire winter restoring it, a total of 150 hours. When I rode it, it was not what I expected, so I sold it. But I had worked hard to restore it, undressing it from one end to the other. It is really a matter of interest if I keep a motorcycle or not.” He admits that he has never been a salesman : today it is because of his age and health that he has been gradually selling certain items of his collection. “Recently, I got an offer for my NSU, a guy offered me $3,500, but whatever the offer, it is not for sale. I know that I will restore it and take it on the road one day.” Among his greatest projects, the restoration of a 1959 Panhead left the deepest impression. “It was my first real restoration, 20 years ago. I had a log book to register each step. In total, I spent 230 hours on this motorcycle.” And like any collector, he searches for the rare gems. He hopes to add three models to his roadmap : “I would like to find a 45-inch cube original to restore. Then a WLA. And finally, a Servi-car.”

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Harley-Davidson, Past and Present Claude Roberge makes no secret that his heart lies with Harley-Davidson. With the exception of to his son, he has not sold any of this American brand motorcycle. “I have been riding them for a long time. I can completely disassemble and reassemble one with my eyes closed. The mechanics are simple. When you ride it correctly, it is reliable and I know how to maintain them.” However, he is skeptical as to the future of the brand. He knows that the brand is attempting to attract a new clientele with its old-school inspired models. “They are doing wonderful things, but they are complicated to work on… For my old motorcycles, up until the 1990s, my tool box to take on the road needed a pair of pliers, a roll of tape, a few tie-wraps, a little bit of wire, a screwdriver, and a 1/2 x 9/16 wrench. You had everything you needed. I often sanded the points by the side of the road with a match carton or a nail file. Today, that is not be possible. The new machines are all electronic and so complicated that you cannot fix anything yourself.”


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1915, From the Garage to the Theatre The masterpiece of Claude Roberge’s collection is the exceptional 1915 Harley-Davidson, which was seen on the big screen last year in the film “The Little Girl who was too Fond of Matches”. The comedian who was to ride the motorcycle needed two days of training in order to control the 100-year-old prop. “We needed to teach him everything, the gas on the right, the starter on the left, the clutch at the foot, the shifter on the tank. It is a very particular bike. We needed more than 2 hours just to get him used to the friction point,” calculates Claude Roberge.

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Of course, he is most proud of seeing his motorcycle used in such a context, but at the same time, he admits that this adventure of two days of training and five days of filming was very stressful. “I was the only one permitted to move the motorcycle and I always had to be on the set. Sometimes, we re-taped the scenes up to 15 times. The motorcycle overheated once, so we needed to interrupt filming. The technicians brought large fans to cool the motor and to continue without wasting too much time. I felt a twinge in my heart to see another person driving my motorcycle.” All that being said, if it was to be redone, I would not hesitate to relive the experience.


The Internet – Before and After

An adventure, as Always

For many enthusiasts, regardless of the subject, the web has become a major turning point in the way we develop a network. However, technology has not had a great influence on Claude Roberge and his work methods. “For motorcycles and parts, it is more by word of mouth. We are 200 members in the Association de moto ancienne du Québec (AMAQ). Everyone receives the list of members and the type of motorcycle they have. Often, when you are looking for a part, you know who to ask. I love the swapmeets, this is where we find treasures. You can even find motorcycle parts at car swap-meets. I prefer this over the Internet since there is more human contact. It is important and you don’t have this on the Web. For auctions such as eBay, there are many that sell at unreasonably high prices, it makes no sense. This has become a market solely to make money and not to share a passion.”

The motorcycle world has changed between the 1970s and today. Claude Roberge’s lifestyle has changed as well. But one thing has remained the same : adventure, an element that is slowly disappearing with the new technologies : “Before, when you saw a cloud to the right, you turned left. When you saw a cloud to the left, you turned right. Today, people watch the weather three days before leaving and depend on a GPS. This is not how to ride a motorcycle. It should be an adventure; it is leaving and not knowing when you will arrive.” He loved long trips, crossing Canada and the United States, taking a road trip to New Brunswick with his Knuckle 47, but today he does not hide the fact that the older he gets the shorter the trips. “Now, my girlfriend and I will leave in the morning, and return by the evening but at least once every summer, we organize a week-long ride.

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Supporting our Successors

Of the 200 members of the AMAQ, there are about twenty young people. “I know some who are as passionate as me. They buy beautiful motorcycles and restore them. They come here to rummage through my stuff, ask for advice and for parts.” They are happy to see that there will be successors for old motorcycles but they would love for there to be more of them. “It seems as though there are fewer and fewer people who want to get their hands dirty.”

Claude Roberge wants only one thing : to keep his passion alive, his passion for old motorcycles, for the restoration and for the road. Neither his age, nor his health will stop him. “I kept my 1939 sidecar. So, if my legs become weaker, I will install it on my 1959 Panhead to continue riding for as long as possible. Several of our members are over 70 years old. It is also my goal to ride for many more years to come. You cannot live for the moment any better than when you are on a motorcycle. The past is behind you and what lies ahead has not yet arrived. All you have is now, the present, at the helm of your bike. Regardless of the brand, regardless of your age, if I meet you, I will wave.”

The “Association des motos anciennes du Québec” (AMAQ) Claude Roberge has been president of the AMAQ for 5 years. This association was founded in 2004 and has a mission to promote and facilitate contact for those who are passionate about restoring and collecting old motorcycles. “In this field, we are all pretty much loners, we each work alone. When we started this group in 2004, there were 5 of us, including my girlfriend Nancy Meunier who is in charge of our magazine,” remembers the president. “It was to help us to transmit and share our passion with people.” Today, with 200 members from Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick, some do not have motorcycles but they are devoted to the old motorcycle cult. The AMAQ publishes four magazines per year in addition to organizing several activities. The old motorcycle exhibit of Hérouxville is the organization’s most significant event. It attracts between 1,000 and 1,200 visitors. “Exhibits, swap-meets, restaurants, cottages, camping. So many beautiful people, so many wonderful encounters, so many beautiful motorcycles”, summarizes Claude Roberge.

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Text and photos : Samuel Guertin

For those who do not know me, my name is Samuel Guertin and I am the owner of a custom motorcycle workshop called Clockwork Motorcycles. I am, above all, passionate about vintage motorcycles, design, fabrication and also history and heritage. I normally work on older motorcycles, but when the owner of an Indian Motorcycle dealer (Mathias Sport) gives you a call asking you if you want to modify a 2018 Chief, it is hard not to accept the challenge. Having completed several projects for Mathias Sport, I knew that he had complete trust in me and would give me carte blanche so, in my mind, I had already agreed. Once the motorcycle arrived in my workshop, I spent several minutes just sitting in front of it, staring at it and letting my ideas take form. I believe that in order for a custom project to succeed, it is not only a matter of assembling a lot of cool parts together. It is more than that. It requires a main thrust, a flow of ideas. And you cannot do just anything with a Chief Classic, that is if you want to stay with the limits of good taste. Before launching the project, I devoured 3 or 4 books on the history of the Indian, from its creation in 1901 until its end in 1953. I found a gold mine of inspiration. I also realized that the actual brand, since it was purchased in 2011, also lived up to its duty of being greatly inspired by the rich heritage of this great American brand. Following my research, I decided to draw inspiration from the Chief of the 1940s and to push the already vintage look of the Chief a little further. After getting rid of everything useless on the motorcycle, I was ready to attack the project. In order to give the front a look of a 1940s Indian, I decided to place a conventional round headlamp in the original enclosure. I reshaped and modified the rear section of the enclosure and also closed the hole left behind by the original enclosure (that hides some connectors and wiring) using a thick leather panel that I created myself.

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On the old Chief models, what appears to be a second light above the main headlamp is in fact a large horn ! To recreate the look, while adding a more functional side, I installed an auxiliary light perched completely above. For the handlebars, I put the original “risers” hidden under the enclosure aside exposing a completely different setup. In keeping with the vintage style, I installed the bars that I handmade with a set of dog-bone style risers. To add to the fully accessorized look often seen on American motorcycles of those years, I extended the front fender with a leather guard adorned with rivets, also handmade. Then, there was the matter of the seat. I knew that I wanted something classic from the 1940s, so what better than an old Chum-me seat ! As the name indicates, it was the preferred seat to have a friend ride along (I imagine that people were much slimmer in those days, haha). Since an original model in good shape is rather rare, maybe even impossible to find, I turned to the master of restoration for old Indians, Kiwi Indian in California. He made a perfect reproduction for me. I then fabricated the system to install it on the 2018, by keeping the same high, advanced position as on the old models. Kiwi Indian is also responsible for creating the magnificent rear bags, once again, a more than perfect reproduction of a model formerly available. To push the idea even further, I was not satisfied with the original exhaust system. Still faithful to the 1940s, I decided to create an old-style 2 in 1, in the classic Indian shape followed by a cigar-style muffler that literally came from a friend’s old Panhead ! As for the air intake, I found that the smaller round model, an option offered by Indian, was perfect for the look I wanted.

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For the final touch : the paint. Not easy to make a decision when it comes to the paint. This is often the deciding factor, if a project is a success or a flop. I was still looking for inspiration from the past. A little history lesson : E. Paul Dupont (yes, Dupont as in Dupont Automotive Paint) had a massive investment in the Indian company to save it from any effects of the great depression and he was the company president for many years. Since the company, formerly named Dupont Motor, specialized in the chemistry of painting, it helped Indian take advantage of the immense colour palette and revolutionized the look of their motorcycles that were otherwise available in 2 or 3 other uniform colours, for reasons of functionality and cost (for example, black paint dried faster). With the arrival of Dupont, customers could now choose from many 2-tone models (24 colours !) and also choose almost infinite colour possibilities as an option. In short, what I wanted to say, is there was no lack of inspiration when I looked at the colours of the older models. It was while leafing through a book that I found a Chief painted for the California police near the end of the 1940s. The perfect matching between the black and the off-white, with a touch of gold in the logo, was exactly what I wanted for my project. Subtle, classic and fancy. I therefore entrusted my project to the art master, Jean-Philippe Huet, who would be in charge of my California Highway Patrol paint job. Very happy with the result, I rode the motorcycle for a good part of the summer, attending several gatherings and shows, attracting curious onlookers. The connoisseurs congratulated me for my tribute to the old models while some of the less knowledgeable in the field even believed that the motorcycle was right out of the 1940s. This motorcycle was indeed an experience in itself. It had the shape and look of an old model, while adding modern performance and reliability. An amazing challenge realized. This challenge even went as far as pushing the collaboration between Clockwork and Mathias Sport to another level, the creation of the Mathias Custom department, a workshop dedicated to the modification of Indian motorcycles directly in the Mathias showroom. You can expect that I will find new Indians in the near future. Oh and by the way, the Chief that you see in these pages, well, I unfortunately had to return it to the dealer, but fortunately, there will be a lucky one among you since it is available for sale.

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Text and photos : Benoit Roberge

We looked out of the corner of our eye into the rear-view mirror to see the sun setting slowly, descending peacefully between the treeless steppes of the arid hillside. To the EAST, as it does every day. We must advance in our travels, time is passing and we have an ultimatum to arrive in China. But for the moment, we needed to find a place to camp for the night before it got dark. We left the main road to explore the back country searching for a place to setup camp, far from civilization and sheltered from the wind. Deep cracks and ruts waltzed from left to right for many kilometers, leaving the rumbling of the engines to slip away into the vastness of the landscapes. We avoided being found, only a few thin camels wandering throughout the clumps of dried shrubs witnessed our passing. Suddenly, the road abruptly stopped before a cliff. We shut off our motors and let the dust slowly settle. The view before us was from another world, infinite, covered with hills of black and white layers, as far as the eye could see. This environment is hostile toward life, an area far from people but where we feel peaceful in our element. It is like being in a dream, but in reality, we are standing at the edge of a lost canyon, on the land of the empire of the fallen Soviet Union, in Kazakhstan. A month earlier, we were in Athens, where Mathieu, Simon and I began our expedition. For close to a year, our lives centred around this project to reach this day where our wheels finally touched the European soil. All three of us, for some time now, had a desire to embark on an expedition that would allow us to go beyond our limits, far off the beaten track. From the possible itineraries, we chose the one that would bring us the closest to the ultimate adventure, across unknown country, which most of the Western population doesn’t even know exists. A mythical passage laid out thousands of years ago, crossing deserts to the highest roads on the planet. The goal : to cross central Asia by following the old silk road on 3 KLR 650s.

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Preparation required an incalculable number of hours of research, reading and meetings on Skype. Mathieu is from Quebec but, for a couple of years now, has been living in British Columbia, the heart of our beautiful Canadian mountains. We met 10 years ago in Costa Rica, on the Caribbean coast. He had a beer bottle broken over his head by a Tika when he refused to let him remove my plate while I was away from the table. Well, that is a whole other adventure, but we stayed in touch and I was really happy that he joined us. As for Simon, he joined the project early on in the adventure. The idea of assembling a team seemed impossible in the beginning. The list contained many criteria to be checked off, whether it was relating to money, family, work, travel experience or other commitments. We succeeded but that was only the beginning of the project, the prefeasibility phase that would tell us whether it was possible and what it would imply. When choosing a rarely used itinerary, there was also the complexity of clearing the path. From sending our motorcycles by plane to choosing the best customs points, once on site, there was lots to do. The shaky political relations between certain countries for which coexistence is a constant battle were a constant threat to the execution of the project. In the case of a sudden closure of a border, circumvention options were often impossible because of the conflict zones. As the days passed, the adventure that we were planning was becoming more of a reality… up until one morning in the beginning of August. I took my famous, spotlessly clean KLR650 out of the garage. It was chosen

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especially for this trip and was loaded like a mule. Direction : Pierre Elliott Trudeau airport ! The time had come to launch this expedition from the shadows of the Acropolis in Greece. Mathieu joined us in Athens. Simon and I had arrived a couple of days earlier. We needed to clear our motorcycles through customs, take care of some final technicalities for our visas and… let the good times roll ! We started training, with the wind in our faces, the music in our ears and an intense feeling of freedom. We would spend the next 3 months as vagrants exploring unique places using the best transportation there is. The Cape of the Peloponnese is a peninsula of the continental territory of Greece, with its mountains, winding roads and abrupt cliffs. We followed the Mediterranean coast, from town to town, covering a couple hundred kilometers each day. We camped under the stars on a foundation of rock of an unfinished house nestled in the mountains with a breathtaking view of the bay. We explored sites that marked the history of the world, in the shadow of immense marble columns erected thousands of years earlier. Really ! What a start to our road trip ! It was also in Greece that our paths, chosen simply by a gut feeling, led us to rarely-used dirt roads, between 2-way points, far off the beaten track. We tested the limits of our motorcycles. We explored everywhere, finding paths to the summits of bare mountains, admiring the views or simply to find the best site to pitch our tent. The adventure was only beginning.


We decided to follow the ocean for a long as we could, since we knew that we could not for the remainder of the trip into the heart of the Asian continent. The coast led us to our first land border, the Turkish limits, where a clearly visible military presence reminded us that we were entering a country where peace is not taken for granted. Shortly after, we crossed the Bosporus strait, the point where the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea meet. The bridge is located in the heart of Istanbul, the only city in the world that sits on 2 continents, a symbolic point and entry to the Middle East, in Western Asia. The cultural difference with Greece was striking. We spent a few days visiting the city, wandering through the markets that sold all types of spices and strange vegetables, surrounded by buildings of another era.

We were accustomed to travelling long distances every day and stopping for too long soon became monotonous. Although the stops along our way often contained amazing attractions, the road always seemed to be calling. We can spend good times exploring on foot and resting, but we feel most at home behind the handlebars, seeing the landscapes rush endlessly by. Each moment brings a new place and new scents. Stopping on the roadside to taste the mixed nuts offered by a peasant, crossing paths with a camel, seeing an eagle diving to catch its prey, high-fiving a child who runs toward us with his hand already extended‌ Istanbul would probably deserve that we stay another couple of days, but it was time to get back on the road, where the adventure is.

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Then, we navigated across the mysterious Cappadocia, in Central Anatolia, a region where the hills have eroded over the years, pierced like swiss cheese. The troglodyte people who have lived here for the past two millennia created an underground kingdom, a strategic location to hide from their enemies with many kilometers of tunnels throughout the underground cities. The fairy chimneys, as they are called, form high towers covered by strange-looking caps. Our dual-purpose motorcycles allowed us to leave the main road to explore the back country in search of a hidden cave to spend the night, away from the sites developed specifically for tourists. We finally found one perfectly perched on the face of a cliff, well located, difficult for scorpions to access and that provided a breathtaking view of the valley.

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Our chosen itinerary to the Georgian border, analysing the map and selecting the most inspiring terrain, led us across a surprisingly lush mountain chain. A trap for humidity coming off the Black Sea forming permanent clouds, clinging to the summits, this was where we experienced our only episode of rain during the trip. We saw small town churches littering the streets and the people were very friendly. We were pleasantly surprised by Turkey, among other things by the quality of the roads, something we rarely saw‌ until our return to Canada. Georgia, the first country we visited of the former USSR, welcomed us with jugs of homemade vodka, an accordion and a harmonica. We experienced a hard first wake up in this


country trapped south of the Russian border, beneath the Caucasus mountain chain. We again chose the route according to the intriguing mountainous terrain in the center of the country, although the GPS proposed a large detour to the north to avoid this region. A mountain road, with a few patches of asphalt here and there, combined with a road washed out by the flow of a poorly drained stream. Welcome to Georgia ! Dehydrated, we stopped at a small store to buy something to drink. The lady appeared surprised to see us, she probably did not welcome many strangers. I pointed to her counter filled with plastic bottles and asked her how much one cost. She took one of the bottles, removed the cap and gave it to me with a look of disbelief. I had been waiting for this moment for many kilometres and took a big sip. Wouahahhhh !! More vodka !!! It was going to be a hard day.

of the following countries until we crossed the border from Pakistan to India; they were accustomed to welcoming tourists. The people were curious to know where we came from and visibly happy that we rode all this way to discover their corner of the world. The language barrier often limited conversations to a few mimes, or we exchanged a few words using the voice application of Google translate.

As we went deeper into the country, the more the people acknowledged us as we went by. We had already seen a difference when we left Greece, but we had just reached a whole new level. With our studded motorcycles loaded with cases and bags, we could not pass through unnoticed. The only motorcycles that we met were equipped with side cars, directly out of the Soviet era. We quickly passed through the region where every person who saw us, with rare exceptions, would turn and look at us, surprised. It was the same for all

We tried to have our arrival in Baku, the Capital city, coincide with the departure of the boat that would take us across the Caspian Sea. This was the only way we could get to the other side. As Canadians, we were not allowed to enter Iran, to the south, (a guide is required for all Americans, English and Canadians in Iran as a result of the longstanding diplomatic quarrels, but entering with a personal vehicle is strictly forbidden), and Russia required applying for another visa that would bring both delays and headaches.

The Azerbaijan border was announced on a large roadside sign displaying “Azerbaijan border, good luck” written in large characters followed by a burned-out car frame on the bridge linking the two countries crossing “No man’s land”. The message could not be any clearer. The country’s authorities are known for being strict, a sharp contrast with the friendliness of its inhabitants. Many of the country’s youth move away to work in the United Arab Emirates and never return.

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The problem was that the boat made the crossing about once every two weeks, with a variable schedule, depending greatly on the weather conditions that can be very difficult. It was hard to find information on the Internet about this and the testimonials of people having spent weeks camping in the parking lot near the dock made us expect the worst. Finally, the boat left a couple of days after our arrival, not without hassles, but at least we were on our way. We had reached another milestone in our itinerary. After many hours anchored in a bay, sheltered from a storm that raged at sea, we passed near Neft Dasları. This impressive city of 2000 inhabitants, constructed on the sea on oil rig foundations poured onto the seabed, contains 300 km of roads built on pillars between the oil extraction installations, for the most part, in ruin. We finally arrived ashore on the other side of the sea, anxious to continue our journey after being immobilized for so long. From here, we could only go forward. Aktau, a Kazakhstan city built in the middle of nowhere, ended up being much nicer than we thought. We took advantage of this time to gather supplies and necessities that would help us to reach the next supply point, much further south in Uzbekistan. We would need enough gas to cross the entire desert region to the Aral Sea, and hope to find replenishment once we reach civilization, in this country where the majority of the vehicles operate on propane. A stranger biker arriving from the opposite direction provided us with a little information about what to expect further on. Me : How is the road in the Pamirs in Tajikistan ? Biker : The road ? ! Hahaha ! There is no road ! After spending several days zigzagging through the chaos of completely battered roads across the Uzbek desert, guessing at the best paths to take through the craters became natural and we kept our rhythm in a sort of trance. Herds of camels wandering in the middle of nowhere watched us pass by with a look of nonchalance. We had finally reached Samarkand, the legendary city that welcomed the caravanserai for centuries during the silk era. The Registan, in

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the heart of the city, is comprised of 3 imposing structures, standing face to face, that could definitely find a place on the list of the wonders of the world. A magical place that you could spend hours looking at, contemplating the details and imagining the gatherings that took place with the venders, their camels and their carioles. The vast dry expanses abruptly ended as we arrived in Tajikistan and entered a region of rugged mountains recalling images that we saw in the west, landmarks of the Taliban. A 5-km long, suffocatingly, narrow tunnel with monstrous potholes, no lights and no ventilation, crossed the mountain chain leading to the capital, Dushanbe. We met some old trucks going backwards up the hill, the diesel motors roaring in first speed, leaving a thick, black cloud of dirt suspended in the air behind them. In this tunnel, sounds resonated in all directions against the filthy concrete walls. It was impossible to keep our tinted visors lowered since it was already as dark as night. The heavy, dirty air hit me right in the face and I tried to hold my breath as best I could. My back wheel slipped on the oily road. You had to brake slowly, skidding off the road here would be disastrous. A simple flat tire from a pothole hit the wrong way could be fatal. A glow appeared on the horizon and with faces black with soot, we stopped on the other side to breathe, amazed at what we had just experienced. We now know that the locals call this the tunnel of death because many people died of asphyxiation trying to get through but getting stuck. The people living in this country of rugged terrain are extremely friendly, ready to welcome you for tea on any occasion. However, its border with Afghanistan sometimes lets some radical extremists through who come to recruit young people looking for a purpose in their life. Guards armed with machine guns patrol daily along the road bordering the river dividing the two countries. One week before our departure, an attack claimed by the Islamic state killed four tourists in the south of Dushanbe. The tension was palpable in this small region of the country and we had many concerns.


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One evening, after dark, we were cooking some 10 metres or so from our camp site, beside a river, when we noticed a truck slowly approaching down the road. We could see the silhouettes of people standing on the steps on each side of the truck, visually scanning the sides of the road with their powerful flashlights. We hid behind some huge rocks, turned off our headlamps and observed the scene. The large Soviet-looking vehicle stopped gradually on the dirt road near our camp site with its big round headlights shining ahead. We could hear the old motor clacking in the night, barely masked by the sound of the river that flowed behind us. For many long minutes, the beams of their flashlights scanned our tents and motorcycles, searching for us of course. Still hiding behind the rocks, we couldn’t help but picture the worst scenarios, remembering the tourists that

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were assassinated in the region a few weeks earlier. What did they want from us ? Were we simply unaware that we were camped on someone else’s land ? Were we camped near a poppy plantation ? Did they view us as a threat ? Did they have a deep hatred of Westerners or were they simply curious, ready to invite us for tea ? After a long time, the truck finally left, we stayed hidden near the river, wondering if they left only to better plan their return. Still hidden in silence, we assessed our options while waiting to see what would happen. A short time later, another passerby arrived riding a donkey, trotting slowly as he also scanned the area around our tents and motorcycles with a flashlight. Did we really want to know what he had to say ? We all agreed that the answer was clearly we did not.


After another period of waiting, during which time seemed to stand still, we gave the signal. Go ! We were going to pack up and leave ! With no light, we repacked all our equipment on our motorcycles, started the motors and left, returning to where we came from. We followed our tracks bordering the river, through the soft sand and the large rocks until we reached the dirt road that brought us here. We rode during the night at good speed but not wanting to seem like we were fleeing like thieves. We never did find out what they wanted from us and that is okay. The road bordering Afghanistan was simply superb. Well, the landscape actually since the road itself was in a deplorable state. It would bring us to the heart of the Pamir mountain chain, a true unknown treasure of Central Asia. We were warmly welcomed by these cheerful people who have obviously had a difficult life. The relationship between the inhabitants of this region and the government has not always been easy. The difficult access and the bad reputation of their neighbouring countries undoubtedly contributed to the region being able to conserve its authenticity. The Wahkan corridor is an area of the silk road that was otherwise very busy and was at the time guarded by forts, still visible today, built into the mountains at several strategic points. To appreciate the beauty of this region of the globe, you need to explore. A picture does not do it justice. It is often referred to as the

“most epic road trip on the planet”. During peak hours, herds of sheep are crowded on the road heading to their next pasture. The Pamiris are Muslims. Most of them are part of a moderate division of Islam, called Ismailis, in which women are not veiled and even drink alcohol. On the road to Kyrgyzstan, we came across the high-altitude lake, Karakul, along the Chinese border, a unique place that inspires the imagination. The border between the two countries is located at the highest point of Kyzylart pass, at 4280 metres, the most elevated border crossing on the planet. Our motorcycles equipped with carburetors held up well on these highaltitude dirt roads. It was late in the season and the road snow-covered left only muddy roads to circulate over the pass. Our passage among the Kyrgyz people was quick, only the time to explore the unbelievable beauty of the base of Lenin Peak and the plains. On a lost dirt road between the hills, I met a friendly shepherd near his pasture. Although we could not exchange words, our exchange of smiles, expressions and signs were sufficient to understand each other. He would have loved for me to be able to explain what I was doing there, where I came from and where I was going… He gave me a beautiful, well-tanned sheep’s skin that he cut onsite to the form of my motorcycle seat, ensuring that it was completely covered. He even offered me to park my motorcycle and leave with his horse !

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Our arrival in China marked a new, important milestone in our journey. Our date for arrival at the border was set much earlier with our guide (mandatory) to allow enough time for the issuance of the different permits and the formalities related to the crossing of Xinjiang. The Chinese radically control the indigenous people of the region, the Uyghurs, and it is not something pleasant to witness. We were also systematically controlled and followed; they installed a program in our telephones to track us. Every kitchen knife is registered with the government… a real prison under the open sky. We arrived earlier than expected in Pakistan, during the night, by the highest road in the world. The Karakorum highway crosses the magnificent mountains of the same name, in the northern section of the country. The mountain people who live here are again very friendly, the men proudly wearing the traditional Shalwar kameez, the traditional tunic. Three other “overlanders” on motorcycles joined us to explore this region and its roads perched against the mountain sides. A landslide that we narrowly escaped divided our group in two, until the next day. We also explored the high plateaus of Deosai, just to the north of the conflict zone of Kashmir, which was of extraordinary savage beauty. The road, becoming busier, led us to Islamabad, the clean and orderly capital of the country, built to measure in the 1960s, where my motorcycle

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needed some repairs. (Thanks to Kawasaki Canada for their support and sending the parts express to Pakistan !) It was soon after that when the real chaos on the road began, on the famous GT road, to Lahore. To drive to Pakistan, you need to be alert with all your senses sharp. This road was by far the craziest I have ever taken in my life, filled with big multicoloured trucks, motorcycles with complete families piled atop one another, rickshaws both motorized and with pedals, grandmothers walking with a cane in the opposite direction to traffic, lost dogs, donkeys, camels… all in complete disorder, with suffocating pollution and an infernal cacophony of horns blaring, avoiding potholes. Rules of the road are simply non-existent. It is “karma driving”. Each night, just before the sun sets, Pakistan and India close their fence at the border with a dramatic ceremony. The crossing from one country to another was executed through a fully loaded stadium of Pakistanis on one side, and Indians (and tourists) on the other. On each side, guards wearing their traditional outfit parade from side to side in a surprising show under thunderous applauds with attendees shouting out loud patriotic slogans. The few tourists in the assistance were about the equivalent of all the tourists we had encountered since our arrival in Ex-URSS. As much as achieving this journey seemed to be closer to a dream than reality in the beginning, we ultimately reached the Indian subcontinent,


15 000 km later, without any wound or deadlock. The long hours of planning were useful in the end. Simon ended the expedition in the old city of Kathmandu in Nepal, from where he sent his bike back to Canada by plane. On his side, Mathieu came back to India to store his motorcycle after he went exploring the bottom of Himalayan valleys, up to the limits of the Mustang, with his girlfriend Chloe which came to meet with him in Kathmandu. He plans to return to ride up to Ladakh, this North Indian region we could not reach due to early snow falls this year. On my side, the journey ended in cacophonic Delhi, where the chaotic daily life is in constant buzz though traffic and old temples and slums. Nepal being already checked on my list, I preferred to explore the deeper North India, specifically at the foothills of the Himalayas in the Himachal Pradesh and through the majestic temples of Rajastan. I ended up sending my motorcycle to Canada by boat from this country which has a long maritime coast line.

The isolation of Central Asia in relation to the modern world allowed these people to keep their authenticity, far from mass tourism and occidental influences. We were welcomed by fantastic people who breaks down the stereotypes that are assigned to them by us westerners, globalizing without really thinking about what’s happening in this part of the world. The wild landscapes and historic sites that we have explored are now standing at the top of my “best places seen” list on the planet. This Earth, that I have always seen as gigantic, seems now much smaller to me. A new perspective of this little ball, her people, her resources… This three-month adventure finally allowed us to win our audacious bet that was to ride along the Ancient Silk Road on a motorcycle, not without obstacles and sacrifices, but creating memories that will last forever. That will have been the trip of a lifetime, until a new project shows up in the distance on some other mythical or faraway forgotten roads somewhere in this world.

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Text : Pascal Richard – Photos : Martin Piché

Martin Provencher has been working in the distribution of bodywork products and painting for 30 years, but has been at the helm of HP Concept for about 12 years. HP Concept specializes in motorcycle modifications and painting. We have heard people talking about his workshop more and more over the past few years and his motorcycle creations and new parts are often seen on social media. I met Martin at the last Bikefest in Hawkesbury, Ontario, where I was a judge for the motorcycle contest and I had the chance to evaluate his motorcycle, the one that you can see here on these pages. During this meeting and by discussing the motorcycle industry with him, I understood what HP Concept had become and how the company had evolved. I remember its beginnings, when the workshop first opened, everything was centered around painting.

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Today, a large part of his work is devoted to building parts that are sold outside the country and very well-known for their quality. HP Concept creates custom parts for all brands of motorcycles including Indian Motorcycle for which he recently created several esthetic parts to customize the Indian Scout model. Regarding the 2012 Harley-Davidson Bagger that we see on these pages, Martin started the project by acquiring a frame from Rolling Thunder with a 40-degree incline

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specifically designed to receive a 26-inch front wheel from the Renegade Wheels manufacturer. You can see the attention to detail everywhere on this motorcycle, for example, the entirely molded frame with an incorporated spoiler and a splashguard molded around the gas tank. The entire body, the gas tank, and the fender are all creations of HP concept. There are numerous modifications and you can refer to the technical specifications to find out the details. The paint evidently holds no more secrets for the guys of


the workshop, they chose pearl candy orange of House of Kolor with a gloss & matt effect varnish. The mechanical parts were also painted with an electrostatic powder that provides the motorcycle with a really cool look. In the construction of a custom bagger, the paint is a crucial step since there is a large surface to cover and that is what attracts the most attention. This is not the case for the chopper or the bobber, other custom motorcycles, where there is less surface to paint and the visible parts need extra work to stand out.

Martin won first place in the Bagger class at the Bikefest in Hawkesbury and last October, the HP Concept team made the trip to the Daytona Biketoberfest to present its Indian Scout models that were extremely popular with several dealers. Once on site, Martin participated in the Bagger Expo with the motorcycle that you see here and won first place. HP Concept will continue to surprise us and to represent us outside the country with its components and Canadian paint jobs. We will be sure to follow the upcoming projects for you.

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OWNER CITY

Martin Provencher Drummondville, QC

AccessoirIes

GENERAL Manufacturing Year / Make Model Assembly Time

Harley-Davidson 2012 FLH HP Concept 300 hours

ENGINE Year Model Builder Ignition Displacement Lower end Balancing Pistons Heads Cam Lifters Carb Pipes

2012 Harley-Davidson 1684 Harley-Davidson 1684 OEM — OEM OEM OEM OEM OEM Modified Covington

Transmission Type Shifting

Harley-Davidson Harley-Davidson

painting Martin Provencher Painter HP Concept Airbrush Color / type House of Kolor orange pearl kandy Cleared matt and gloss effect Special

FRAME Year Builder Type Rake Stretch Shocks

PhotographeR

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SPECIFICATIONS

2018 Rolling Thunder Bagger 40 degrees — Air front rear Martin Piché

Bars Modified Precision MV Handlebar Controls Stock Harley-Davidson Headlight WPS Tail light HP Concept Speedo Modified Original by HP Concept Dash Harley-Davidson Pegs Kuryakyn Electrics HP Concept Gas Tank HP Concept Oil Tank Harley-Davidson Oil System Harley-Davidson Primary Harley-Davidson Seat Modified Mustang Front Fender HP Concept Rear Fender HP Concept Mirrors Harley-Davidson Grips Harley-Davidson

forkS Type Size Builder

WHEELS FRONT Size Wheel Tire Brake

REAR Size Wheel Tire Brake

OTHER

Air OEM — Renegade 26” Renegade Disc Metzeler HHI Harley-Davidson OEM OEM OEM OEM Licence plate : Molded in Fender


Text : Becky Goebel @actuallyitsaxel – Photos : Eric Marshall

Eric is one of those guys who I feel like I’ve known forever. In Canada there’s not a ton of young people building these oldstyle Harley choppers. Everyone kind of knows each other and follows each other’s projects through social media and on the Internet. Eric lives across the country from me so we talked back and forth for a while before finally meeting up on the other end of North America for Giddy Up Texas. On that trip, I rode on the back of his Shovelhead chopper the whole weekend and all over the Texas Hill country. He brought a couple of his other buddies and their bikes down to Born Free in California that year too. They had a truck and a trailer with 5 choppers and 4 dudes jammed in it that they drove 3,500 km from Winnipeg. I knew right away

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I was going to get along with them. We hopped the border over to Tijuana on our bikes that week and things got wild and have been wild ever since. I’ve been good friends with the Winnipeg crew ever since. They don’t let the fact that they live in the middle of nowhere stop them, that’s for sure. Recently Eric got his hands on this 1953 Harley-Davidson Panhead engine. His builds have always been some of my favourite, so it was fun to watch him put this thing together. He’s also got a wicked eye for photos, primarily with film and vintage cameras. So when Revolution Magazine told me they were going to have him shoot his new build, I knew it was going to be a good-looking article. They asked me to get some information from him about his bike so here you go.


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Who are you ? What’s your age ? Where are you from and where do you live now ? My name is Eric Marshall, I’m 27, and I grew up in Vancouver. I’ve bounced between Toronto, Winnipeg, Australia and Vancouver over the years, and now currently reside in Winnipeg, which I’ve been calling home for the last four years.

What’s your bike ? I have a 53’ Panhead. Well, the heads are 53’ and the cases are Delcron cases. I picked up the motor off a friend in Regina awhile back and sent the motor to @panheads_forever (Jason Parker). From there I put the motor in a chopped-up 53’ wishbone Panhead frame that I ended up rebuilding with a 2-up 3-out 38-degree rake neck with double wishbone down tubes. I ended up getting the front end from a guy in the States for $200. For years, I didn’t know what it was until I was in Texas and realized that a friend had the same one. It turns out it was a 70’s wheel specialities. It’s 100 % chromoly 14-over Springer, and very well made. I could never give it up for sale. I love it. The tank was painted by Michael Geltz, and I got the frame and fender matched by local painter @vonknobkustoms. I’m super happy with the work, as for everything else I made. Most of it is stainless. I made the pipes out of a pool ladder. It saved me some money buying stainless bends. I basically built everything I could other than the front end because I had the bars, frame, pipes, controls, sissy bar and basically everything I could have made. I always have a lending hand from everyone in my shop whether its opinions, criticism, or help when I need something being put together.

What’s the story behind it ? Why did you build it ? I don’t really have a story behind the build to be honest. I wanted a Panhead, found the motor for a good price, and kind of just went from there.

Favourite part of the bike ? My favourite part of the bike is probably the stance. It’s a classic 70’s Denvers Choppers stance – the way a long chopper should look. The second would have to be the part I didn’t do : the paint. I’m very happy with the way it came out. I’d highly recommend getting work done by either of them : @flyingweasel_ @vonknobbkustompaint.

And… Why did you call it the Midnight Boner ? It’s funny and no one would run the name of my last bike…

What’s your plan with it ? The plan for this bike is basically to ride it as much as I can. It seems for the last few years I’ve always ended up building something new over the winter. So now that this bike is done I’m just looking forward to riding it all over.

How long have you been building bikes ? What other bikes have you built ? I’ve been building bikes for maybe six years now. I’ve built a couple different versions of my Cone Shovel and seemingly redone my bike over every winter since then.

What is the Boneyard ? Who’s a part of it and what do you guys do ? The Boneyard is a shop I share with a bunch of my friends in Winnipeg. We’ve basically had the space since we started building bikes, approximately six years ago. We have the full step up right in downtown Winnipeg, it rules and I wouldn’t give it up for anything.

What is the chopper scene like in Winnipeg ? Although Winnipeg gets a lot of flak for being a ghetto city, it homes some of the best people I’ve ever met. The chopper scene is fairly big, and there are a lot of builders coming up with completely diverse bikes, and a lot of laughs and adventures when you’re with the Winnipeg Boneyard crew.

What shows have you showcased this bike in ? I just finished this bike in this spring, so I’ve only had it in one show locally called World of Wheels. I don’t have any other show planned as of now.

What do you do beside build bikes ? Besides keeping busy in the shop, I like to keep busy with my hands. I’ve worked doing carpentry stuff, and am currently working towards my pilots license. I like shooting photos as a hobby and managed to line up some work with that over the years as well.

Do you have plans to build anything else ? I like to keep busy with the bike stuff. I’ve just started building a Springer and I’ll probably build another frame to go with that, and just see what happens from there.

Thanks for taking the time to do cool bike stuff in Canada Eric. If you want to know more about Eric, his builds and his photos, check out his Instagram page : @ericmmarshall

NEW GENERATION

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PHIL POISSON PROPRIÉTAIRE OWNER Certifié peintre-applicateur de revêtement en céramique Certified Ceramic Coating Applicator

438-873-1955 phil@xtremepc.ca xtreme powder coating qc www.xtremepc.ca

XTREME PC 99 rue Industrielle, Delson, QC, J5B 1V9 • 450-635-4000 • info@xtremepc.ca


Text : Denis Lévesque — Photos : Chuck Photographe

It was during 2012 that Hipertech launched its complete line of the V-Twin series oils. As company supervisor for 4 years already, part of the team and I attended exhibits relating to the world of motorcycles. For each exhibit, we would borrow a motorcycle from one of our distributors so we could place it in our booth. Slowly, an idea took shape, that I should build one. I already owned a 2006 Roadking motorcycle and I was quite satisfied until then. It was when I visited the Speedtrix motorcycle workshop, which is one of my distributors in the region, that I started to discuss this project with them. I didn’t want a small motorcycle so choosing a Sportster was out of the question. Since I wanted a motorcycle with a carburetor, I chose a Softail Deuce 1450 from the early 2000s. As soon as I purchased the motorcycle, I took it to Saint-André d’Argenteuil in Quebec and the project began.

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For the paint, I chose antique creamy white, a colour rarely seen in the world of Bobbers. The chrome covering the motor heads was more damaged that I originally thought. The owners of Speedtrix advised me to apply a powder coating all over the motorcycle since it provides an appearance different than that of paint and can be applied to the body as well as to all the parts of the motor. We also decided to replace all the original wheels with spoked wheels and antique-looking tires. To complete this look, a Springer fork and a new gas tank were added. Then, the tattoo artist, Martin Cloutier, put his talents to work to create the company logo on the tank. To give it a vintage look, he proposed creating pin striping of SINCE 1993 that appears on the oil tank, indicating the company’s 25 years in existence. In January 2018, we attended a show in Toronto and won fourth place in the Bobber class. I have been riding the roads of Quebec with my bobber for two summers now. My motorcycle attracts a lot of looks and compliments. I have great pride in sharing my dream and it gives me the chance to talk about my passion for motorcycles and oils.

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REVOLUTION MOTORCYCLE MAGAZINE - English - Issue 48 Spring 2019  

100 pages

REVOLUTION MOTORCYCLE MAGAZINE - English - Issue 48 Spring 2019  

100 pages

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