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revelstoke

FREE! Summer 2011

arts eats outdoors alive

Inside: - Epic mountain biking rides - Revelstoke patio guide - B.C. Interior Forestry Museum - The skinny on where to take a dip - Painter Keishia Treber - Revelstoke Art Walk - Summer events listings Revelstoke Farmers’ Market The Saturday Revelstoke Farmers’ Market in Grizzly Plaza is a must for anyone visiting for the weekend. It is the weekly social highlight for many Revelstoke residents and is very popular with visitors. It’s open Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the summer and early fall.

Aaron Orlando/ Revelstoke View

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Entertainment VISIT THE B.C INTERIOR FORESTRY MUSEUM By Aaron Orlando

Looking for an slice of authentic Revelstoke culture and history? Into burly, dangerous machines? Want to learn about an industry’s ongoing transformation? Don’t miss the B.C. Interior Forestry Museum.

Above left: B.C. Interior Forestry Museum staff: Anna Minten, operations manager; Brian Sumner, chair of the B.C. Interior Forestry Museum and Lachlan Gonzales, museum assistant (watch those fingers, Lachlan! Photos by Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke View That chainsaw still runs!) Above right: Step inside an authentic forest fire lookout tower and try your hand at charting smoke and calling it into the fire patrol.

There are few more in touch with the booms and busts of the economy than loggers. Local forest operations slowed dramatically following the U.S. housing collapse a few years back. At the same time, Revelstoke’s B.C. Interior Forestry Museum was dealt a similar blow when provincial gaming funding drastically impacted their operating budget. But like resilient loggers, the museum has picked itself up and redoubled its efforts to move forward. “We’re not taking a victim stance, we’re taking a survivor stance,” says museum chairperson Brian Sumner.

“Which is the tradition of logging ... The loggers always manage to come through, and that’s really the approach we’re taking. You get your down cycles, and then you go for it when you get your up cycles.” The 10-year-old museum is undergoing a transformation. Over the summer, they’re rearranging the massive logging machines in their parking lot into a new configuration designed to attract more visitors inside. They’re also repositioning themselves with lots of new community outreach events.

They’ve also added a new First Foresters exhibit that highlights the role of First Nations forestry history. The museum is well appointed with a gift shop, educational displays that tell the rich history of logging in the region and displays on forest ecology and management. Sumner says the museum tells the story of modern forestry practices, something visitors now actively seek out. “They’re looking to connect with the environment,” he says. The museum is full of fascinating logging equipment. They have one of the earliest known snowmobiles and

a vast collection of antique chainsaws, many of which still work. Each of the machines is a visceral reminder that logging is a rough and tough job where danger lurks behind every decision. If find myself holding my limbs a little closer to my body as I take in the displays, subconsciously fearing one of the fearsome giant antique chainsaws might roar to life with a belch of blue smoke. Museum operations manager Anna Minten says visitors often comment that the museum is a ‘real’ experience, providing them with a connection to the people who helped

build Revelstoke. “It adds to the history of Revelstoke,” she says. “Someone this morning, the first thing he said when he came in was, ‘This town ain’t no Whistler. There is a lot of history here,’” Minten says. “Being able to hold onto that and share that with the community and people from around the world is great.” The museum is located on Highway 23 North, a few kilometres north of Revelstoke, just before the Revelstoke Dam. You can’t miss the sign.

This summer in Revelstoke TO AUGUST 5 MUSE by Keishia Treber at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre. Also features Figuratively Speaking by Paula Cravens and Bowls of Life by Darlene Swan. Opens July 8 at 6 p.m.

Includes interpretive walks, new exhibits, a barbecue and activities for the whole family. At Rogers Pass. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Entrance to the park is free.

RAILWAY DAYS At the Revelstoke Railway

SEPTEMBER 11

Museum. For more information visit www.railwaydays.com.

MOUNT REVELSTOKE STEAMER 26km hill climb up the Meadows in the Sky Parkway in Mt. Revelstoke National Park.

JULY 17

MIDSUMMER AFFORDABLE ART FAIR

JULY 9

STURGIS NORTH Motorcycle rally and BBQ

SEPTEMBER 15-16 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR in Revelstoke. At the Roxy The-

JULY 8

AUGUST 12

TO

SEPTEMBER 2

TIMBER DAY Featuring a variety of logging

at Glacier House Resort.

sports and other activities. At Centennial Park.

JULY 23-24

All works priced less than $300. At the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre. Opens Aug. 12 at 6 p.m.

JULY 10

BEACH VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT

AUGUST 12

atre. Hosted by the Friends of Mount Revelstoke and Glacier.

Hosted by the Last Drop. For more information or to register, contact Cyril Tomlinson at 250837-2121.

EVENING WITH THE STARS Witness the

SEPTEMBER 24-35

JULY 29-AUGUST 1

AUGUST 14-15

GLACIER CHALLENGE 24th annual slo-

CELEBRATE THE SUMMIT in Mount Rev-

pitch tournament. At Centennial Park and other locations around town.

elstoke National Park.

STOKED TO GET SPANKED Mountain bike race at Mt. MacPherson trails. For more information visit www.skookumcycle.com/get_rev_ el_stoked_race. Register at www.zone4.ca.

JULY 16 CANADA PARKS DAY Celebrate the 125th anniversary of Glacier National Park and the grand re-opening of the Rogers Pass Centre.

AUGUST 11-14

Perseids meteor shower in Mt. Revelstoke National Park.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK CAMPOUT at the Illecillewaet campground, near where Glacier National Park was founded 125 years ago.

SEPTEMBER 10-11 LITTLE BEAR soccer tournament.

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ART WALK By Alex Cooper

59 artists 36 businesses 1 great stroll

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I

n what is quickly becoming a summer tradition in Revelstoke, the third annual Art Walk made its debut on Canada Day for another summer showcasing local artists. The Art Walk features works by 59 artists at 36 participating businesses – the most ever in both counts. “Everybody is really supportive,” said Tina Lindegaard, who has organized the Art Walk since its debut in 2009. There are works in all sorts of medium – painting, pottery, photography, woodworking, stone carving, jewellery and more. Many familiar Revelstoke artists are featured, such as Nicola McGarry, who has a painting at Benoit’s Wine Bar, Keishia Treber, who is featured at

Style Trend, and Rob Buchanan, whose photography is on the wall at Valhalla Pure. As well, there are many new faces taking part; Kim Wiggins, Daniel Poisson and Julie Martel are all featured at La Baguette, while Daniel Anhorn’s paintings adorn the Revelstoke Mountain Resort Presentation Centre. At The Cabin, Blaze Pryde’s skateboard art is on display. Pamphlets showing the participating businesses and artists are available at participating locations. Each spot has a number in the display window, indicating which stop it is on the walk. As well, all art is for sale - just ask the participating business for purchasing assistance. It runs until Sept. 1.

Above: Cairnsmore Crow by Jennifer Hedge is located in Spisani Design jewellery store, alongside work by wood carver Ron Aspeslet and jewellery designer Suzanne Spisani. Below: A photograph by Rob Buchanan is posted on the wall of Valhalla Pure.; Left: Tarnation by Daniel Anhorn is located in the Revelstoke Mountain Resort presentation centre. Alex Cooper/Times Review

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Outdoors

Photo courtesy Keith McNab/Revelstoke Cycling Association

Keith McNab, president of the Revelstoke Cycling Association, rides the Frisby Ridge Trail after its completion in the fall of 2010. In the summer the meadows would be filled with wild flowers.

EPIC RIDES

With the opening of the new Frisby Ridge trail, mountain bikers have one more reason to come ride in Revelstoke. By Alex Cooper

A 22-kilometre cross-country ride through alpine meadows to a cabin by the lake and back. A riveting descent from alpine meadows to Lake Revelstoke 5,000 feet below. A smooth, 13 kilometre climb along an alpine ridge followed by a descent back down. Throw in 40 kilometres of cross-country trails on Mt. Macpherson, a newly rebuilt downhill trail on Boulder Mountain, a wide five-kilometre loop in Mount Revelstoke National Park and several rogue trails and it’s little wonder why Revelstoke is growing as a mountain biking destination. “Quite honestly, I think it’s absolutely amazing,” said Brendan MacIntosh, a former mountain bike racer and owner of Flowt Bikes. “There’s just more variety of trails here so you don’t have the same type of trails to ride over and over again.” Cycling in Revelstoke goes back to the

Play

Toyah

late-19th century. There are photos of a cycling club that existed in 1899 and Eddie Edwards was the top racer. According to Rob Mohr, the long-time former president of the Revelstoke Cycling Association, people started mountain biking on rogue trails around Revelstoke sometime in the late 1980s. It wasn’t until 1998 that Revelstoke got its first official mountain biking trail – Root Canal on Mt. Macpherson, which was built by volunteers from the Revelstoke Cycling Association. “That was our first kick at the cat and you can tell,” said Mohr. “A lot of people like its because its what they call old school. I don’t find it particularly challenging, I just find it annoying.” Up next came Buff Enuff (also built by volunteers), followed by several trails on Mt. Mackenzie (a few of which still exist as rogue trails). Now, the Mt. Macpherson and adjoining Begbie Bluffs area contains

almost 40 kilometres of single track for all riding abilities. The 22 kilometre ride through Keystone-Standard Basin is the epic mountain biking trip in the Revelstoke area. An old mining trail, it was re-built by the forest service and locals started biking it in the late-80s, Mohr said. The ride climbs for about one kilometre through a forest before emerging into stunning alpine meadows that stretch as far as the eye can see. The view encompasses the jagged Selkirks and the Monashee Mountains that dominate the opposite side of Lake Revelstoke, including the piercing pyramid of Frenchman’s Cap. The best time to ride the trail is in August, when the snow has melted, the flowers are in full bloom and the trail is usually dry. You’ll pedal through endless fields of wild flowers, switchback up a ridge and then descend to a cabin on a lake. There, it’s time to turn around and head back.

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Above: Cycling through the meadows on the Keystone-Standard Basin trail. Below: Biking the Sex on the Beach trail in the Begbie Bluffs area near Mt. Macpherson.

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One Location. Two Great Choices.

The Martha Creek trail on Sale Mountain is one of the greatest descents you can do on a bike. Accesses at the top of a logging road where BC Hydro built a microwave tower, the trail begins by traversing through alpine meadows before entering the forest, where it goes down and down and down... and then down some more. When Specialized wanted to show off their new mountain bike, this is the trail they took it down. The new Frisby Ridge trail adds to Revelstoke’s list of epic rides. Built last summer, it begins at an elevation of 1,300 metres and travels slowly uphill until after seven kilometres it reaches above the tree line into stunning alpine habitat. The trail peaks at an elevation of 2,000 metres and finishes at a small alpine lake. The reward for all that climbing is a fast, flowing descent back to the car. “We expect these trails to attract a lot of attention and get Revelstoke known as a cycling destination,” said Keith McNab, the current president of

the RCA. The Revelstoke Chamber of Commerce has gone a long way there, publishing a new map this year that highlights all the trails in the area. The RCA’s focus the next three years will be rebuilding and legalizing the rogue trails on Boulder Mountain that were damaged by logging last fall. Work on the only legal trail in the area was recently completed. “It will soon be a fast and flowing thrill to ride with great views across the valley as well,” said McNab. For MacIntosh, the epic rides around here and the network of cross-country trails make it an ideal place to live. “There’s nothing like Sale Mountain and nothing like Keystone anywhere in the province as far as I know,” said MacIntosh. Add Frisby Ridge to the list and it will take a long time to get bored.

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Eats R EVELSTOKE

PATIO GUIDE

It’s summer and it’s time to enjoy dining in the open air. Revelstoke’s wide variety of patio options provide you with lots of choice. Here’s our quick guide to the right spots for you. Our guide focuses on licensed restaurants and pubs, with a couple of other notable patios thrown in for good measure. We provide the name of each establishment and have given each one a nickname we feel best describes the patio’s unique vibe. By Aaron Orlando

MAIN STREET C AFE

ISABELLA’S RISTORANTE

“THE EARLY B IRD ”

“L A FAMIGLIA ”

317 MACKENZIE AVENUE You came, you set up a tent, you slept on the hard ground and now you need something civilized! The picturesque Main Street Cafe patio draws the biggest breakfast crowds in town with its great breakfast food, heritage feel and central location. The Main Street is a great location to catch early morning vibe of Revelstoke on your first morning here. (Not licenced.)

206 MACKENZIE AVENUE This Mackenzie Avenue traditional Italian restaurant’s patio is truly at the very centre of happenings in Revelstoke. No matter what time of day, you’ll be able to take in the comings and goings of all types of residents and visitors alike. Isabella’s is popular with family groups.

BAD PAUL’S ROADHOUSE GRILL “THE HIDEAWAY”

114 MACKENZIE AVENUE This Grizzly Plaza restaurant’s patio is out back and well enclosed, providing a quieter garden-like setting. The restaurant is more upscale than most, but still has reasonable options for families and those on a bit of a budget. Their patio is the best option for those wanting shade, green and a little quieter spot.

WOOLSEY CREEK C AFE

T HE VILLAGE IDIOT

T HE LAST D ROP

“THE ORGANICA ”

“THE D OWNHILLER ”

“T HE NOONER ”

600 SECOND STREET WEST The higher-end Woolsey Creek Cafe celebrates everything organic, homemade and wholesome. Located at the edge of a residential neighbourhood, their patio is ringed with a small, landscaped garden and a lawn with lots of towering leafy trees nearby. Locals who put a premium on eating healthy, natural foods make the Woolsey their fine-dining choice for milestones and special occasions.

306 MACKENZIE AVENUE In the winter, they’ve just come back from boarding or skiing and in the summer, it’s time to reload after a day of mountain biking. The Village Idiot’s raised patio features tons of sun exposure that draws a younger, outdoorsy crowd mixed in with everyone else attracted to Revelstoke’s main street. Check out creative reuses for skis, boards and chairlifts in their patio design.

200 THIRD STREET WEST The Last Drop’s patio is large and enclosed on three sides, giving you lots of privacy for an early afternoon meet-up, mixed in with a little bit of see-and-be-seen. Bask in the sun or sit in the shade in this mellow patio that consistently draws a really mixed crowd. The menu features lots of British pub food options.

THE RIVER CITY PUB

THE ROCKFORD

T HE NOMAD

“THE DOWNTOWNER ”

“THE DESTINATION ”

“T HE DRIVE -IN”

112 FIRST STREET EAST A Revelstoke institution, the River City Pub enjoys solid local patronage and is known for its reasonably-priced, hearty fare. There are patios out front and back, and an open-air billiard room. Park your hog next to the patio, have a steak for lunch and let everyone know you’re living the dream.

2950 CAMOZZI ROAD Located at the base of Revelstoke Mountain Resort, the Rockford’s patio is several kilometres out of town. This licensed restaurant is a great option if you’re looking for a quieter, upmarket experience in a contemporary setting. The interior decorations are about as latest-thing as it gets, and the patio overlooks the hive of construction activity at the new resort, and a stunning view of Mt. Begbie.

1601 VICTORIA ROAD Voted Revelstoke’s best take-out food in the Revelstoke Times Review’s 2011 readers’ poll, the Nomad caters to travellers passing through town and locals alike. The Nomad is huge portions of classic drive-in food done right, including lots of contemporary and vegetarian options, and an ice cream bar. The patio is surrounded by a parking lot. It’s a place to see who’s coming and going. (Not licenced.)


www.revelstoketimesreview.com

Swim Holes

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Alive

Echo Lake

By Alex Cooper

Y

ou’ve just completed a long bike ride or gruelling hike through the alpine and there’s no better way to refresh than a dip in the water. While Revelstoke isn’t known as a warm water destination like the Shuswap or Okanagan, there are still some great spots to go for a dip. You could pull off the road anywhere along Highway 23 North and jump in the frigid waters of Lake Revelstoke or you could hit up a few of the more popular spots, listed here:

E

cho Lake, with its grassy lakeside clearing and warm water is a great spot for swimming. Head south of Revelstoke along Airport Way, past the end of the pavement and then make a left at the Akolkolex Forest Service Road. Echo Lake is a few kilometres beyond the turnoff. The lake is ringed by camp sites making it an ideal spot for a weekend trip.

Williamson’s Lake

Blanket Creek

Martha Creek

L

T

T

ocated a few minutes south of downtown Revelstoke off Airport Way, Williamson’s Lake is a popular spot for swimming because of the warm water. It features a nice long beach, playground, dock, several RV camping sites and every year its stocked with fish.

he lagoon at Blanket Creek Provincial Park is a pleasant but cold place for a swim. With several camping sites, a great picnic area and thundering Sutherland Falls nearby, it’s a great place to spend the day or night. Drive down Highway 23 south for about 40 kilometres to get there.

The

Last Drop 

his provincial park 23 kilometres north of Revelstoke is located on the shores of Lake Revelstoke. The water is cold but there is a little inlet where it warms up a bit more. There’s a boat ramp available, nice curving beach, picnic sites and camping spots available.

BAD PAUL’S

Roadhouse Grill

‡˜ ‡Ž•–‘‡

The Place for Prime Rib in Revelstoke

STEAKS . . . RIBS MEXICAN . . . PASTA Powder Springs Hotel and The Last Drop Enjoy a meal and drink in our British theme pub on site, relax by the fireplaces or in the booths. Coming soon; our new function room available for weddings, meetings and parties. Enjoy our patio, outdoor hot tub, relax with a massage, stay in one of our clean affordable rooms.

Specials every day and night in The Last Drop: Come in and check us out!

POWDER SPRINGS

Call 250.837.5151 or visit www.powdersprings.ca for more information. 200 3rd St. West • 1-800-991-4455

837-9575 R

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TIMESReview

On the Grizzly Plaza Open ‘til 10:00 p.m. FULLY LICENSED

VIEW brought to you by The Revelstoke Times Review

If you would like to advertise in the Autumn edition of VIEW please contact Mavis at 250.837.4667. VIEW Autumn is due out at the beginning of October The advertising deadline is Friday, September 23rd.


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Arts

All paintings and jewellery by Keishia Treber; Photo below courtesy Keishia Treber

KEISHIA TREBER’S MUSES

W

hen Keishia Treber saw the art gallery in Kimberley where her first solo show was going to be, she decided she would fill both floors herself. Over the course of six months, she created 80 works of art to go on display “They had never seen so many paintings,” she said. The show was called Muse and it attracted great crowds and a great response. This July, she will be putting on her first solo show in her hometown of Revelstoke and, once again, she has created a whole new collection of paintings to display, though this time there will be 15 works on display. Her Revelstoke show is also called Muse, so I asked her what that meant. “My paintings are my muse,” she replied. “Its my life. Every single painting is my muse.” Treber now calls Kamloops

home. She went there for art school at the age of 19, where she inspired by one of her teachers to take up painting. Now, still only 23, she has succeeded in becoming a full-time artist, attracting interest across the province and producing art work on commission. She said she works constantly in her basement studio; her goal is to paint every day. “I’m always painting, making new works and expanding my skills,” she said. “If I keep at it I’ll be better and better before you know it.” Treber calls herself an expressionist painter who likes to paint with bright bold shapes and colours. Her works have two dominant themes – nature and women. On her website, she notes that the female form can even be found in her landscape and abstract paintings. “I paint what I feel, what makes me happy, what I find at-

WELCOME!

By Alex Cooper

tractive and appealing,” she said. “I suppose it’s because I’m so attracted to the figure and curves.” Another distinct aspect is her use of odd shaped or multiple canvasses for some her paintings. She also likes to produce large pieces of work – one of the paintings that will be on display in Revelstoke will be 7’X4’. “I’m going for the WOW factor,” she said. Recently Treber has taken up glass art and has begun creating and selling her own jewellery. She has also started painting with acrylic on glass. Keishia Treber’s solo show Muse premiers at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre on July 8 at 6 p.m. and runs until Aug. 5. If you miss it, she has work on display at the Woolsey Creek, Sangha Bean, the Cabin, Energy Matters and Style Trend in Revelstoke. Her website is located at www.ktreber.com.

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View 03 Summer 2011  
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