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Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Yearbook & Directory 2019/20

IRELAND

We understand how you strive for constant product quality and optimized costs.

CONSISTENT + CONFIDENT You are poised to meet your safety and quality requirements while optimizing resources and securing process repeatability.

Published in association with FDI – Food Drink Ireland


On Time, Everytime!

Packaging Manufacturers, Distributors & Packaging Consultants • Corrugated Boxes (RSC, Die Cut, Sheets, Pads, Divs, Etc) • Protective Foam Packs (EPS, EPE, EPP, EPU) • Industrial Polyethylene Bags, Sleeves & Sheets

• Pallet Edgeguards • Litho Printed Cartons & Litho Laminated Outers • High Quality Post Printed Corrugated Boxes

T: + 353 61 400035 F: + 353 61 400036 E: info@lmkpkg.ie • Shelf-Ready/Retail-Ready Packs.

• Pallet Wrap / Strapping Strapping Accessories / Tapes / Labels

Limerick ad.indd 1 Food Cover.indd 1

T: + 353 61 400035

21/12/2010 11:58

E: info@lmkpkg.ie

11/01/2012 15:56

W: www.limerickpackaging.ie


contents

2

18

w 2 Minister’s INTERVIEW

Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD, discusses the big issues facing Irish agri-food, including Brexit, the Climate Action Plan and the Mercosur trade deal, and highlights the opportunities for the sector in the months and years ahead.

6 SECTOR Overview

Ireland’s food and drink Industry is safe, sustainable and competitive, writes Paul Kelly, Director, Food Drink Ireland. Let’s try to ensure it stays that way, post-Brexit.

10 Bord Bia Brexit Barometer

Brexit preparedness at food and drinks firms has jumped to 93%, while levels of stockholding double to 70%, according to Bord Bia’s 2019 Brexit Barometer.

28 Brewing – Beers

While undoubtedly a challenge, Brexit can also bring opportunities for food and drink companies, writes Owen McFeely, Director, Consumer Markets, PwC Ireland.

20 Food Safety

An international food safety science conference marked the 20th anniversary of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland.

22 Reformulation

A major industry report shows reformulation remains high on agenda of food companies across Ireland.

24 Labour Market

Labour shortages are really impacting in the Prepared Consumer Foods sector, writes Linda Stuart-Trainor, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, FDI. The future is extremely bright for Irish whiskey, with more markets around the globe opening up to our premium spirit, reveals William Lavelle, Head of the Irish Whiskey Association.

47 Pallets & Packaging

Jonathan McDade, head of the Irish Brewers Association, on the world class asset that is the Irish beer sector.

30 Brewing – Cider

Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging is one of the leading manufacturers of pallets in Ireland, and also supplies customers with all their corrugated packaging needs.

The Irish Cider Association is back to highlight cider’s economic performance, explains its head, Jonathan McDade.

32 Labelling Regulations

New EU legislation may prohibit the use of terms like ‘sausage’ and ‘burger’ for non-meat products, writes food lawyer, Raymond O’Rourke.

34 Dairy

A €2 billion investment is driving a renaissance in Irish dairy, according to Conor Mulvihill, Director, Dairy Industry Ireland.

38 Sweeteners

18 Expert Opinion

26 Distilling

44

Only 11 low-calorie sweeteners are approved for use in soft drinks in Europe, notes Colm Jordan, Director, Irish Beverage Council.

40 Training & Development

Companies are increasingly turning to learning and development to address the key strategic challenges of the sector, writes Mark Skinner, Network Manager, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet.

42 Recycling

Brian Walsh, Packaging Technologist, Repak, reveals the likely impact of changing legislation on Irish agri-food.

44 Invest Northern Ireland

Jen Guiney, Business Development Executive with Invest Northern Ireland, provides an insight into why Northern Ireland food and drink producers continue to make an impact in the Republic.

50 Traceability

Traceability is not just important for legal compliance, it also makes sound business sense. New Irish research reveals the commercial benefits of sharing traceability information with consumers.

54 Process Control

Endress+Hauser has developed a digital strategy that generates real added value from the virtual world for its customers.

56 Packaging

Limerick Packaging is one of the most reliable packaging suppliers in the country, having built its formidable reputation on delivering ‘on time, everytime’.

59 Food Works 2020

Food & Drink start-ups are being encouraged to enter the Food Works accelerator programme, which offers supports valued at over €50,000.

60 Education

The Food Industry Training Unit at UCC is celebrating its 25th birthday, and offers part-time industry training, CPD and Digital Badges.

64 Packaging Systems

Goliath Packaging Systems has positioned itself as the BIG name in the supply of automated solutions to the Irish food industry.

66 Instrumentation

Bonner are uniquely positioned to offer site wide solutions across food, beverage and dairy facilities nationwide.

46 Truly Grass Fed

The Truly Grass Fed brand from Glanbia has recently entered the US retail market with a range of cheese and butter products.

Food www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Food Ireland is published by: Tara Publishing Ltd 14 Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 6785165 Fax: 01 6785191 Email: kathleenbelton@tarapublications.ie Web: www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Yearbook & Directory 2019/20

IRELAND

We understand how you strive for constant product quality and optimized costs.

CONSISTENT + CONFIDENT You are poised to meet your safety and quality requirements while optimizing resources and securing process repeatability.

LISTINGS SECTION Product & Service Index

67

Company Listings

70

Relevant Organisations

81

Three-Year Diary

83

Year Planner 84

Managing Director: Patrick Aylward Editorial and Marketing Director: Kathleen Belton

Editor: John Walshe Sales: Brian Clark, Aaron Stewart Production: Ciara Conway Design: Tony Hunt Printed by: WG Baird

Published in association with FDI – Food Drink Ireland

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 1


minister’s interview

Facing the Challenges Head-On Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD, discusses the big issues facing Irish agri-food, including Brexit, the Climate Action Plan and the Mercosur trade deal, and highlights the opportunities for the sector in the months and years ahead.

A

gri-food is the sector that is most exposed to Brexit. What is the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine and the wider Government doing to help offset some of the risks of Brexit, particularly in the event of a no deal Brexit? “The exposure of the agri-food sector is well documented. Almost 40% of our exports in agri-food go to the UK, so we are the front of the firing line in terms of the consequences of Brexit. I have often said, ‘there is no upside to Brexit’ and certainly not in agri-food. What we have been trying to do is to build resilience in the sector. That has taken a number of forms, in terms of financial supports to the sector. In some respects, they have been dealing with the consequences of Brexit already, for example insofar as currency fluctuations have moved against us, which is indicative of a lack of confidence [in the UK] and consequently a comparative disadvantage for us. So providing low interest loans, looking for new market opportunities, engaging with the industry in terms of preparations, building resilience all along the supply chain is a critical part of it. “What we have regrettably also had to do is to face the reality that a no deal Brexit could happen, that the UK will be a third country, so we need to have the necessary arrangements. There has been significant investment in infrastructure at our ports and airports, both in terms of staff recruitment and building the infrastructure, investing in the IT systems – that is all underway. “We still have hope, but we’re probably closer to a crash-out Brexit than we have ever been at any time since June 2016. What we hope is that the withdrawal agreement will be ratified and that within the transition period, a comprehensive trade agreement will be negotiated: that is still the best way forward.

2 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD.


minister’s interview

Even if the UK crashes out, we will still all have to come back to the table and work out what a future trading relationship looks like.

“The absolute reality is that even if the UK crashes out, we will still all have to come back to the table and work out what a future trading relationship looks like. We believe that it’s preferable to do that in an organised and orderly fashion and that is the Withdrawal Agreement, which allows us all to manage this game-changing event in the best way possible. “The unfortunate reality is that the future trading relationship, comprehensive and all as it might be in terms of Ireland and the UK and the European Union and the UK, won’t be as good as what we currently enjoy, so there is a downside to Brexit.” It is looking increasingly likely that there will be no deal and the UK will be a third country in trade terms, which would mean tariffs. Despite all the work that has gone into opening up new markets, the reality is that 37-40% of our agri-food exports go to the UK. How do we ensure that we get those goods into that market, which will remain a hugely important one for us? “Regrettably, tariffs on beef or on dairy would be so significant as to make the continued viability of the UK market very difficult, without very significant state supports. And of course, therein lies the challenge for us. But part of our strategy has been to look at new market opportunities; that is not in any way to walk away from the UK market. In April 2018, Ireland became the first European beef exporter to secure access to China. We have made significant progress in terms of new market opportunities for beef, dairy, pig-meat - just recently, sheep-meat entered the Japanese market. We are very active in all those spaces, working collaboratively with the industry in all its manifestations, inside and outside the farm gate, but also with Bord Bia, to mitigate the worst excesses of Brexit and to mobilise the state machinery in terms of state agencies but also our diplomatic service, to help us in that regard.” Ibec has called for a Tariff Stabilisation Fund at a national and European level to offset some of the serious damage of tariffs, at least in the medium term. Is this something you can foresee happening? “We will be part of a Single Market. We are staying in the European Union. How we access the UK market in the future and the supports that we deliver, whilst we ride out the short-term difficulties that might be associated with a crash-out, because even in the event of a crash-out we will have to come back and negotiate a trade agreement, that is something we are putting a lot of thought into; how we can best structure that in terms of supports to primary producers and support to the industry generally. But at this stage, I think it’s best that the detail is not commented on. But we are conscious that is a very significant challenge. “Even with the best will in the world, new market opportunities are important and significant, but from the EU’s point of view, they don’t want us coming with 300,000 tonnes of beef into the remainder of the European Union and collapsing that market. So we need to find ways to support the industry to remain in the UK market while we work out the difficulties that would arise with a crash-out Brexit.”

Looking to the environment post-Brexit, has there been any progress on ensuring that there will not be any regulatory divergence between the UK and the EU? “They are issues entirely for the UK. We will be part of the EU regulatory regime: that won’t change. Consumers can expect that the standards to which they have become accustomed won’t diminish and we will insist that insofar as we are dealing with any third country importing into Ireland, be it the UK or elsewhere, we will be vigilant as regards standards. Equally, the fear in the European Union around the integrity of the Single Market, is that we wouldn’t be a back-door for sub-standard goods coming into the European Union, and that brings with it all the issues of the Border.” A lot of goods that leave Ireland for continental Europe have traditionally used the UK as a landbridge. What is being done to ensure that Irish food and drink products can still access the EU market in a timely fashion? “Oscar Wilde said in The Importance of Being Earnest, ‘to lose one parent may be regarded as misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness’. To lose one market in terms of the UK would be unfortunate, but to lose access to the rest of the European Union market would be a real travesty. “As we continue to transit the UK and access the French market or the rest of the European Union market via Dover to Calais, for example, we need to ensure that when we arrive in Calais, we are not caught up in the snarl that is all the other non-EU produce coming through. We have been engaged with the Commission and with other Member States in particular, including the Belgians, the Dutch and the French, whose ports are the ones we use, along with Santander in Spain to a lesser extent, to make sure that the landbridge issue and accessing the EU market is not compromised for us. That is a challenge. “Unfortunately, my over-riding impression is that the UK is far from prepared in terms of dealing with the reality of being a third country and all the checks that go with that. As we transit through, the risk of being caught up in that snarl as we enter Dover or any of the other ports that might be used, is a problem. “We have also looked at alternative access routes, directly from Ireland.” Leaving Brexit aside for a while, what work is being carried out on putting together a successor strategy to FoodWise 2025? “We are beginning the process and the thinking around that, and the engagement with the stakeholders that will be necessary. It is hard to believe we are at that stage so quickly again and that the world has changed so significantly. So very much front and centre stage in framing any successor strategy will be sustainability. That is because our experience in the international marketplace is that sustainability is really coming to the fore. We are recognised as leading in that space. The issue of nutrition is almost a given now internationally but increasingly they are asking questions about sustainability, antimicrobial resistance and welfare issues.” FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 3

€1.9 billi Consum the hom and supe country.


minister’s interview

My over-riding impression is that the UK is far from prepared in terms of dealing with the reality of being a third country and all the checks that go with that.

Let’s look at some of the other issues facing the sector. What will be the repercussions of the Climate Action Plan for our farmers and processors? “I think the Climate Action Plan is about future-proofing the industry. There is an imperative from three sources to act in that area: we have to act because it is the right thing to do for future generations - the world’s climate is changing and nobody knows that more than farmers; there are punitive, legal and financial obligations on us, so we have to act; but in our own economic interest, we have to future-proof this industry and ensure that we have a story to tell in terms of sustainability. For those reasons we will, can and must do more in that space. “I think the industry recognises that, and how we do it is important. I think some people tend to be overwhelmed by it but I see it as very simplistic in that it is future-proofing the industry, but it will require a significant change in practice by all farmers and the agri-food processing sector. “I think there are three steps to it. Everything we produce, whether it’s a pound of butter, a leg of lamb or a loaf of bread, we must make sure it is produced as efficiently as it can be in terms of sustainability and its carbon footprint. As a consequence of being a food producing island, we must acknowledge that food producing anywhere produces greenhouse gases, so we must do it as efficiently as we can and we must then sequester the carbon, so that any greenhouse gases we produce in producing food, we then take steps to take those out of the atmosphere again. That involves afforestation, appropriate soil management strategies etc. The third piece of that jigsaw is displacing non-renewable energy sources. I think this is the best way that we can future-proof this industry. It will be informed by annual estimates, by things like the next Common Agricultural Policy, which will give us the toolbox to bring farmers with us.” There have been a number of high profile trade deals in the media recently. The Mercosur deal between the EU and South America has generated much debate, with you noting that it could be a worrying development for Irish beef farmers. What are the likely repercussions if this deal goes through? “Generally speaking, as a principle, we export 90% of what we produce, so as a small open trade economy and an agri-food economy in particular, we need trade deals and we are actively going around on the EU’s coat-tails in terms of those trade agreements. Whether it is the EU-Japan economic partnership, the EU-Mexico deal, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada or most recently, the EU-Vietnam deal, we are going in the doors that have been opened for us in terms of these trade agreements. The evidence is there in terms of the significant growth in our exports to third countries, albeit from a low base, in recent years. “Mercosur is a beast of a different colour. In all trade agreements, we have offensive and defensive interests. In this one, in particular for our beef sector, it is not a pretty picture. What I have said is that we are very much at a stage where this is a high level agreement 4 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

between Mercosur and an EU Commission that is on its last legs, that is going out the door to be replaced with a new Commission. With the best will in the world, which it hasn’t got, it will be a number of years before the legal implications of this become apparent and clear. So we have to use that intervening period to extract and deliver the best possible deal for our industry. “In my view, we are not without friends in that context because we have found common cause with other Member States in this area, who are equally dissatisfied; for example, the French, the Belgians and the Polish signed a letter to the outgoing President of the EU Commission, President Juncker, only weeks ago. We have to find common cause with those Member States and we must use the broad outline that is there to deliver the best possible deal for us in terms of trying to thwart the ambition and intention [of Mercosur] in a legally robust way. No Government, no Council of Ministers and no State has approved this deal yet, so it is not a done deal.” The last time Food Ireland spoke to you, Minister, you voiced the opinion that trade wars are no good for anybody. Given the escalation of such practices in recent years, especially the ongoing issues between the USA and the EU, we assume that remains your view? “Absolutely. The more that these things rumble on, the more they come into sharper focus in terms of the product list that has been produced by the US, with butter and whiskey being of particular concern to us. The background is complex in the context of AirBus and Boeing but anything that talks about protectionism and closing down global trading opportunities is for us a bad thing. We live or die by global trade.” Closer to home, we are effectively at full employment, with huge pressure on the agri-food sector in terms of attracting the right staff, both at a management level and particularly at the level of general operative. Is there an argument to be made for the provision of more work permits for non-EEA workers? “Generally, the requests that come in here are at the general operative level, whether that is the horticulture sector, the dairy industry or the meat processing sector. There is a problem here and indeed in the wider economy, I am aware of other issues – for example, in the catering sector there is a shortage of chefs. These are the problems of a successful economy and in the past, we have been working with the Department of Enterprise & Employment in terms of work permits and we are engaged with them again in that context regarding the agri-food sector and the dairy industry in particular.” Business costs in Ireland remain very high, and do not help Irish food and drink companies in terms of competitiveness. We are talking about areas like insurance, with premiums still very high despite all the reports and recommendations of recent years. “The area of insurance is obviously an ongoing area of concern and one that the Government has had a number of initiatives on. We are on the third piece of legislation going through the Dáil to deal with this. There was a task force in 2016, which at that stage was primarily


minister’s interview

Minister for Agriculture, Food & the Marine, Michael Creed TD, pictured with Bord Bia CEO, Tara McCarthy, at the launch of the third Bord Bia Brexit Barometer.

focused on motor insurance and I think those premiums, from peak to now, have shown a significant drop. For leisure businesses and the catering sector, however, there is a real problem now with ‘compo culture’, particularly the disproportionate awards made for soft tissue injuries here. I know that in the context of the Judicial Council Bill, there is an amendment under discussion to give guidelines to the judiciary in terms of awards. I think there is a lot of work being done on the legal framework and we have had some success on the motor side, but I believe we need to do more in terms of how out of kilter we are from what is considered the normal or acceptable levels of compensation for soft tissue injuries in particular. People are going out of business because of this and that is not acceptable.” The EU has introduced a raft of new legislation around the use and recycling of plastics, and Single Use Plastics in particular, as part of its overall strategy towards implementing a circular economy. However, plastic is still very important to the agri-food sector in terms of protecting product for consumers, increasing shelf life and preventing food waste, which can be far more damaging to the environment. So realistically, what can be done to address the sustainability and recyclability of plastics, while taking into account their importance? “I know there is huge effort going in by practically all of the agri-food industry to crack this one in terms of finding a biodegradable form of packaging that does the exact same thing as plastic does, and I’m not sure that has been cracked yet. In the food industry, we are seeing a willingness to engage, to look at alternatives and to invest in the research necessary. At Bloom, I met a small juice business based in Carlow who had new packaging that was biodegradable, for example. So there is progress being made in

that area. “In this Department, in the area of ocean plastics, we have been working on an initiative with the fishing industry, who are sieving the waters every day of the week. I think we’ve already brought home something like 300 tonnes of plastic waste from the oceans and we are looking at reducing and recycling what we can of that waste. “I’m a firm believer in the power of one; we don’t have to wait for Government to move to make a difference. Government will move on Single Use Plastics and on mirobeads, but the legal framework is one thing; all of us individually have a role to play as well.” Finally, what consumer trends strike you as being particularly relevant for Irish food and drink companies, and how can your Department and Bord Bia assist domestic companies to identify and take advantage of those opportunities? “One of the great assets we have, and it’s interesting to see its standing reflected in awards, is Bord Bia, which was voted the most trusted and reputable state body. They do fantastic work and fantastic research in this area; they have been critically important to us. We’ve been working with them in terms of looking at new market opportunities and identifying what different markets are asking for etc. One of the things we are very much aware of is the importance of welfare, the importance of antimicrobial resistance and how we are dealing with antimicrobials in our livestock sector, and the whole area of sustainability. We also can’t dismiss veganism and the opportunities that might be there for us in that sector. These are trends that are not going to be reversed. We need to ensure that in everything we do, we are conscious of consumer sentiment in these areas and that, as far as we can, we are ahead of the curve.” FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 5


sector overview

Maintaining our Industry in the Face of Brexit Ireland’s food and drink Industry is safe, sustainable and competitive, writes Paul Kelly, Director, Food Drink Ireland. Let’s try to ensure it stays that way, post-Brexit.

T

he economic contribution of the food and drink industry is greater than any other manufacturing sector due to its deep linkages to the wider economy, particularly in regional areas. Whilst the current business environment for food and drink companies is difficult, it is deeply resilient and the longer-term growth opportunities largely remain for the sector. However, the immediate response must be to ensure the sector is fit for purpose to meet the substantial challenges ahead.

The Unprecedented Challenge of Brexit Brexit involves an unprecedented fracture of the Single Market, with Ireland particularly exposed. Agri-food and drink remain particularly reliant on the UK market and is the sector most exposed to Brexit. Whilst the UK as a percentage of our overall exports has dropped in recent years and now stands at 37%, in absolute value terms it continues to increase and now stands at €4.5 billion (a 32% increase since 2010). This demonstrates the importance of maintaining our market position in this high value, 6 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

high quality market that has a substantial food deficit and not relinquishing the market to global competitors. Irish food and drink exposure in absolute value terms is similar to other large exporters to the UK (France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Italy). However, in percentage terms we are 4-5 times higher. Typically, less than 10% of those other member states’ agri-food exports go to the UK. This highlights the unique circumstances faced by Irish agri-food and the need for exceptional mitigation measures. A further €4 billion of exports go to the other EU-26, with most using the UK land-bridge. Protecting our connectivity to continental EU markets is critical. It is also an important trade route for food ingredients and finished goods travelling from the continent to Ireland.

Tariff Stabilisation Fund In the event of a no deal Brexit and the immediate imposition of tariffs, it is therefore vital that the EU institutions and national governments recognise the potential for economic disruption


sector overview and take decisive steps to offset such risks. Tariffs are in effect a tax on trade and commerce. They would decimate much of Ireland’s agri-food exports to the UK. In order to support businesses during a hard Brexit, alleviation measures will be needed to support Irish agri-food. Tariffs flow back to central exchequers at national and EU level and must be recycled into a tariff stabilisation fund to offset serious damage to exports and job losses. Additionally, a temporary EU state aid framework to support companies through any adjustment period, with funds amounting to 5% of the value of current annual export sales to the UK, will be needed annually for three years from domestic and EU sources to help Irish companies innovate, diversify into new markets, train staff and invest for the future in capital towards enabling technology, carbon efficiency, plant renewal and expansion geared to improved competitiveness. Measures are also needed to ensure land-bridge access to continental Europe and the provision of sufficient capacity on direct sea-routes.

Avoiding Regulatory Divergence

must be continuing joint risk assessment with a common database to minimise divergence in standards and avoid trade impediments.

Skills and Labour The development of the Irish agri-food sector over the last 50 years has been supported by the development of a wide range of expertise and knowledge in both private and public sectors and across all levels of the industry. Food and drink companies spend over €20 million annually on formal training, the highest amount of any manufacturing sector. This skills and knowledge base provides a valuable and solid footing for the continued development of the sector and there is a clear need to ensure that those working in the food and beverage industry are valued and recognised as key to the industry’s success. However, with the changing economic landscape and for the sector to reach its full potential, there are numerous challenges and skills gaps which must be filled up and down the supply and value chains. These include:

In the event of approval of the Withdrawal Agreement, discussions will begin on the future relationship between the EU and the UK. A priority for the food and drink sector will be the minimisation of regulatory divergence in the sector. The focus should be to establish a mechanism that will allow EU and UK food standards under the scope of veterinary legislation as well as under food law in general to remain as closely aligned as possible, and ensuring mutual recognition of SPS certification (food safety and phytosanitary) by the EU and the UK.

 The need to attract and develop management and leadership capability.

A continued close relationship between the UK and EFSA is also key to continued future alignment of food standards. The objective

 Inability to develop management teams, implement succession planning, plan for mergers and acquisitions and

 Lack of ‘in-company’ capability to accelerate market development and direct market access.  Capability to access finance through business and financial planning expertise.  Lack of technical capacity to absorb new research and innovation from research bodies.

Ireland needs to maintain our market position in the UK and not relinquish the market to global competitors.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 7


sector overview

FDI is calling for measures to ensure the provision of sufficient capacity on direct sea-routes from Ireland to continental Europe.

professionalise corporate governance structures.  Limited ability to attract and access third level graduates with skillsets to address these gaps.  Lack of skilled operatives in certain key areas such as engineering, maintenance and technicians.

There is a need to ensure the skills base of the agri-food industry reflects not just the current business demands but the challenges of future growth in existing and new markets. A welcome development has been increased funding supports for enterprise-led training initiatives, including Skillnets and industrial apprenticeships. There now needs to be a focus on apprenticeships and upskilling to address the lack of technical operators for a fast-growing indigenous industry that is spread across the country. While the lack of skilled workers and upskilling needs to be addressed, it is also important to highlight that labour availability remains a critical issue within agri-food. Many food processors are facing a serious challenge in securing the necessary labour resources at general operative level which are essential to maintaining current operational activity in processing. The consequences could seriously hinder industry capability and undermine its ability to retain high-end customers and take advantage of much needed market diversification opportunities. Recent Irish economic recovery, increased job creation and the surge in construction activity has meant that food processors are now faced with a major challenge in attracting workers into all positions, but particularly into unskilled general operative roles. 8 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Despite ongoing significant efforts to recruit from the Irish and European labour force, the critical nature of the current situation is deepening as the economy approaches full employment again. The situation has now deteriorated to levels where it is having a real impact at individual factory level and negatively impacting the ability of companies to plan for expansion and indeed to meet day-to-day operational demands to service existing customers. Government assistance in the form of employment permits is essential. A failure to resolve this issue will in the short term reduce processing capacity, limit companies’ ability to serve existing customers and take on new business opportunities which are critical in the context of Brexit and will, in fact, endanger existing business. In the longer term, it will undermine the potential future expansion of the sector as per the Food Wise 2025 targets. There is a need to urgently extend the employment permit schemes across the food processing sector so that labour shortages do not impact on existing business and growth prospects.

Competitiveness Whilst agri-food is most at risk in any Brexit outcome, most particularly in a hard Brexit, the sector must also respond to the challenges of public health, sustainability and competitiveness. A hugely important measure to mitigate these risks is to implement policies to control our cost base whilst helping companies innovate and improve both productivity and sustainability, including: 

Reducing industrial energy costs to the EU average and


sector overview significantly reducing other utility and local authority charges. 

Implementing the Cost of Insurance Working Group’s report on Employer and Public Liability Insurance, in particular the recommendations on claims transparency, benchmarking the level of personal injury damages, and streamlining the litigation process. Ensure a taxation environment which encourages increased investment in innovation and incentivises expansion of existing indigenous businesses, investments in start-ups and succession planning.

With one in eight jobs in the economy linked to agri-food, failure to do this will be damaging to the wider economy and not just the food and drink industry.

Sustainable Packaging Packaging is essential to bring many food and beverages to our tables. It helps reduce food waste and protects quality and freshness. Food packaging also lets consumers see the nutritional information on the label to help make informed choices. Food and beverage packaging pay a key role in protecting, containing and preserving the produce contained within. Modern packaging is a central element in the efficient manufacturing, handling and distribution of food from the factory to the consumer’s kitchen. Consumer safety is the overriding objective of food and beverage producers and packaging ensures effective communication to consumers and its safe use and handling. Because of effective packaging processes, food wastage rates (pre-consumption) are 2-4% in industrialised countries. This compares with 50% in developing countries. Moreover, the environmental impact of avoidable household food waste is eight times greater than the impact of total packaging waste going to landfill.

‘ ’

Packaging ensures that people can buy and use products when they want them, in good condition and with little wastage. Inadequate packaging is far worse for the environment that over-packaging, since 10-15 times more energy and materials are locked up in household goods and food than in the packaging around them. Food and drink companies have a strong focus on sustainable sourcing, resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and are now working to integrate a circular economy approach to their business operations. Packaging is a very important pillar within this approach and includes measures such as efficient use of natural resources, reduced packaging weight, refills, less packaging, awareness and education programmes on packing use and recycling and research and development. The food and drink industry have shown leadership in designing more sustainable and recyclable packaging, but Government now needs to support the development of more sustainable packaging solutions for SMEs. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 9


bord bia brexit barometer

Pictured launching the Bord Bia Brexit Barometer 2019 to over 150 senior figures from the food and drink industry are Tara McCarthy, CEO of Bord Bia, and Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD.

Brexit Preparedness at Food and Drinks Firms Rises Brexit preparedness at food and drinks firms has jumped to 93%, while levels of stockholding double to 70%, according to Bord Bia’s 2019 Brexit Barometer. 10 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20


Brexit Barometer 2019

Industry Findings

THE IMPACT OF BREXIT Despite the increasing preparedness of Irish food and drink companies in prioritising management of risks within their control, high levels of uncertainty regarding the impact of Brexit still prevail. This is by no means surprising, given Brexit Barometer 2019 British political developments over the last year.

+

68% are uncertain around what the impact of Brexit will be

+

22% are pessimistic about the potential impact of Brexit on their business

+

10% are optimistic. These are primarily Prepared Consumer Foods businesses, who have identified a niche growth opportunity Industry Findings in Ireland, or are a sole/key supplier to the UK market. The company interviews indicated that certain UK retailers are working in partnership with their suppliers to ensure that they are as prepared as possible to deal with the consequences of Brexit.

bord bia brexit barometer

B

This engagement is generally based on the UK customer’s dependency on the supplier and volume of

How optimistic or pessimistic are you about the impact of Brexit? REXIT preparedness amongst Ireland’s food and drinks imports within the category. By sector, 83% of Dairy & Dairy Ingredients companies have received Brexit questionnaires from their UK customers, as have 55% of Prepared Consumer Foods businesses. companies has risen to 93%, up from 74% in 2018. However, Brexit Barometer 2019 Industry Findings firms are increasingly concerned by the cost implications of UK MARKET GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES customs compliance and stockholding, potential weak links in logistics 10% Optimistic Looking ahead, the UK continues to be a very important market for Irish food and drink manufacturers, and many have halted investment plans due to the continued with 7 out of 10 companies planning to maintain or grow sales in the UK: uncertainty of the evolving Brexit landscape, according to the Bord Bia Brexit Barometer 2019: Results & Actions published recently. + 41% of respondents intend to grow their UK sales Bord Bia’s 2019 Brexit Barometer is the third in a series of annual 22% Pessimistic Given current Brexit challenges, intend protect/grow + 36% intend to to at least maintain their current levels studies that provide a comprehensive measure of Brexit readiness do you across Ireland’s food and drink with 130 yoursector, sales in findings the UKfrom market? + Of the 13% who plan to reduce UK sales, feedback from Bord Bia interviews indicate that this is a deliberate strategy by some of those businesses to diversify away from the UK. companies. It is the basis and risk diagnostic tool from which Bord Bia to Ireland’s largest indigenous offers a tailor made suite of supportsGrow UK Sales Maintain UK Sales Reduce UK Sales industry, which is uniquely impacted by Brexit. The UK accounted for 37% (+2%) of all Irish food and drink exports last year, amounting to 7 OUT OF 10 COMPANIES ARE PLANNING TO trade worth €4.5 billion. MAINTAIN OR GROW Informed by the findings from the 2019 Brexit Barometer, Bord Bia SALES 68% IN THE UK. Uncertain Primary Meats is moving into the next phase of Brexit support for industry, focusing on specific services and actions to prepare client companies, including upskilling on Commercial Marketing Strategy development, as well as Seafood Key Customer Management. This will complement new and existing Given current Brexit challenges, do you intend to protect/grow your sales in the UK market? training in critical areas such as customs compliance, logistics and Dairy and Dairy Ingredients supply chain and currency management. To date, Brexit related customers may be put under strain. 57% of Brexit will impact 86% of respondents. Of that companies who expect Brexit to have a medium total, 48% believe Brexit will have a high impact, support has been provided by Bord Bia to companies representing 13% Reduce UK Sales impact are in the Prepared Consumer Foods and a further 38% call out a medium impact to Prepared Consumer Foods to the UK. 72% of exports

Horticulture Emphatic Progress Made

Tara McCarthy, CEO of Bord Bia, said that the 2019 results point to a year of emphatic progress as Ireland’s largest indigenous industry preparesAlcoholic for one ofBeverages its most significant challenges ever: “With 93% of food and drinks companies that responded to the Barometer, representing 72% of all UK exports, makings plans and taking action, 0 levels of engagement 10 20 to two 30 we have witnessed transformative due interlinked factors: firstly, the expectation for much18of 2018 that a negotiated agreement was finally in sight and, secondly, the return to prominence of a ‘cliff edge’ no deal Brexit, which remains a looming threat. This experience left Irish exporters in no doubt that their future trading relationship with UK customers should be managed as a priority.

Don’t sector. The companies10% that are of know the view that Brexit will have a low impact (14%) have a relatively lower level of export dependency on the 36% Maintain UK Sales UK market.

their business. Companies that expect a medium impact have put in place robust systems to manage any potential costs and complexities that may emerge from logistics and customs. They are also looking to new markets but are conscious that their service levels for UK

41%

40

50

60

70

Grow UK Sales

80

Alcoholic Beverages, andintend Prepared Consumer Foods are the leading sectors in terms of Given current Brexit challenges, howHorticulture do you intention to grow sales in the UK. to protect / grow your sales to the UK?

Low priority

Medium priority

High priority

New product development Enhanced key account management New channels Enhanced commercial marketing strategy Placing staff resources in-market Market research Attending trade fairs

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 11

28

27


bord bia brexit barometer Brexit Barometer 2019

Industry Findings

 65% have made clear progress, defined as having taken actions

How confident do you feel managing customs processes?

17%

Not Confident

39%

High Confidence

44%

Slightly Confident

The Brexit Barometer measured respondents’ confidence to manage customs processes.

Whilst “Also a very large numberclear of manufacturers strikingly from thehave 2019 data is the spirit of resilience and CUSTOMS AGENTS upskilled themselves on customs compliance determination that is at the core of the response from the Irish food through Bord Bia, Local Enterprise Office and respondents have identified an external industry. It has been said that there are45% noofnet upsides to Brexit for other training programmes and have taken the customs agent for doing business in the future It is a challenging political and economic scenario that puts Ireland. necessary steps to prepare for this new trading with the UK. Just under half of these (19%) have reality, they will on not feel untilour nearest pressure thehighly closeconfident tie with neighbour and ourto largest already hired them. 9% intend manage this those systems have been tested in practise. internally. This is reasonably consistent with the

trading partner. What the 2019 Brexit Barometer shows is that our

51% of respondents who identified their logistics industry is attuned toofthe issues that lie ahead and both realistic and In terms of company size, 95% €100m+ partners as being willing or able to act as their turnover companies either highly or Eight out of 10 companies plan to in itsare response to(67%) them. resolute customs agent for the UK market (refer to the slightly (29%) confident in managing maintain or grow sales in customs the UK, whilst simultaneously, Supply Chain section). three quarters of compliance. At the other end of the scale, 35% Irish companies are actively looking beyond familiar marketplaces. This of companies with turnover of less than €1m are The 41% of companies that have not yet identified momentum around Brexit translates into not,process due to lackisofgaining experience and practise. as planning an agent will need use one of a number of

concrete actions in the months ahead.options: ” find one as soon as possible, identify There is high confidence in sectors including logistics partners that can offer this as part of an The Bord Bia Brexit Barometer 2019 measures Brexit preparedness Alcoholic Beverages (67%), Primary Meats (64%) overall package or set up the necessary training, six key Brexit (58%) related issues; customer relationships, supply chain, andacross Dairy & Dairy Ingredients in managing IT systems and software to manage this in house. customs compliance, due to either their scale or customs and tariffs, financial resilience, market diversification and their experience in exporting to emerging issues. The findings of the Barometer inform the Brexit Action third countries. Plan which Bord Bia provides to companies to guide and inform their individual Brexit response strategies.

45% OF RESPONDENTS HAVE IDENTIFIED AN EXTERNAL CUSTOMS Interestingly, 68% of companies are uncertain around what the impact AGENT TO HIRE FOR DOING impact BUSINESS of Brexit will be. 22% are pessimistic about the potential of Brexit WITH THE UK.

Uncertainty Remains

on their business, but 10% are optimistic; the latter 10% are primarily Prepared Consumer Foods businesses, who have identified a niche growth opportunity in Ireland, or are a sole/key supplier to the UK market. Overall, 36% of respondents see some opportunities for growth in the Irish market due to Brexit, while 56% expect sales to remain stable. The RoI market opportunity will always be limited by Ireland’s small population, relative to the UK market. Over half (51%) of the respondents stated that the UK market accounts for less than 20% of their turnover. At the other end of the scale, 22% of companies derive more than 51% of their sales income from the UK. 57% of respondents reported an increase in their sales to the UK over the past 12 months, which ties in with Bord Bia’s own findings, which revealed that the value of Irish food and drink exports to the UK in the first quarter of 2019 was €1.14 billion, 6% higher than the same period in 2018.

Key Findings Key findings from the full report are as follows: Brexit Readiness:  86% of respondents are clear that Brexit will have an impact on their business but 68% are still uncertain about what that impact will be.

(a seismic leap from 20% in March 2018).  28% have made some progress, defined as making plans. The number of companies making no progress is 8%, compared with 26% in March 2018, which is a marked improvement. Supply Chain: companies fear supply chain partners will be weak link  The number of firms who have actively mapped their supply chain has increased significantly to 89% (62% in 2018). 62% of firms have identified a critical dependency on a supply chain partner. How ever, there are clear levels of discomfort amongst respondents about how prepared some supply chain partners are.  This is of particular importance in the case of the 69% of respondents who have a commercial model which is sensitive to an increase in lead times. Of those that do have sensitivity to lead times, 60% stated that both export and import supply chains would be impacted by a time increase, while 27% of respondents believe only the export element of their supply chains will be impacted.  70% of companies have developed contingency options for holding stock in response to Brexit, with 85% of companies activating those plans. Stockholding adds a layer of unrecoverable cost for companies and it is important that this is incorporated into financial planning.  Over half (52%) of respondents are holding up to three weeks of stock outside of Ireland. In the lead up to the October Brexit deadline, stockholding will become far more complex due to storage being at full capacity in preparation for busy Christmas trading.  One in five (21%) respondents have changed their raw materials and input sourcing away from the UK because of Brexit. Of these, a large number are sourcing from within the EU. Ireland and other international markets have also benefitted. A further 20% intend to but have not yet activated this plan. Just under half (48%) have no intention of sourcing away from their current UK suppliers yet, with reasons varying from the complexity of sourcing elsewhere and wanting to support long-term UK partners. Customs and Controls: A doubling in firms now counting the cost of customs  The number of companies expressing high or slight confidence in managing customs compliance in the 2019 Brexit Barometer has increased four-fold to 83%, up from 28% last year, and highlights the extensive customs training resources Bord Bia and Getting Ireland Brexit Ready partners have deployed across the food and drink industry.  Food and drink firms are taking many of the practical steps required to be customs ready, evidenced by the 85% of respondents who have applied to the Irish Revenue Commissioners for an EORI number, bucking the trend nationally in other sectors, but there is still more to do ahead of the next Brexit deadline.  51% of respondents have now calculated the cost of customs processes and compliance, a doubling on the 25% in 2018. Given the impact of additional customs costs on the profitability of companies, it is concerning that despite much progress, 49% of companies have yet to factor this into financial planning.  45% of respondents have identified an external customs agent for doing business in the future with the UK. Just under half of these (19%) have already hired them. 9% intend to manage this internally. This is reasonably consistent with the 51% of

12 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

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bord bia brexit barometer respondents who identified their logistics partners as being willing or able to act as their customs agent for the UK market Brexit Barometer 2019  Almost half (49%) of respondents are aware that in order to prepare for a Hard Brexit, they must register with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) to import from and export to the UK. For companies using a customs agent to handle PEOPLE the import procedure, they must ensure those agents are IMPACT also registered with DAFM, FSAI and other relevant bodies. In the context of being as prepared as possible, it is important for to Bord interviews, many businesses toAccording understand the impactBia of controls on products of animal and plant origin, such as: have charged a member of their companies  Sanitary & Phytosanitary requirements senior leadership(SPS) team with ownership of Brexit  Registration with DAFM planning. In most cases, this individual has then  Registration with the EU TRACES system created a cross-functional Brexit taskforce.  Awareness of documentation and identification checks for imports  Knowing that UK been establishments exporting to Ireland must Brexit has a time-consuming issue for be listed as EU approved establishments businesses to deal with. Many companies have  Pallets for consignments to the UK should be IPSM15 had to divert key staff time from activities that compliant would enable execution andinspections. drive  Potential delays due tostrategy animal, plant and product Bord Bia’s Brexit Action Plan offers guidance on how to manage growth into Brexit planning projects. This point these issues.

Industry Findings The Landbridge to the Continent

After decades of easy access to Europe via the UK, over half (53%) of respondents are dependent on the UK landbridge for exports to other markets and 51% report concern on how Brexit will impact CHANGES TO COST BASE AS A this route. 57% are dependent on the landbridge for their imports RESULT OF BREXIT into Ireland. The main issues causing concern amongst manufacturers are longer travel times, potential delays for both There is an expectation that and Brexit will disturbance, add imports and exports due to inefficiencies weather significantly to the cost of doing business, as well as increased costs. All these factors could cause customer throughincost in customs and compliance as dissatisfaction both the domestic market and on the continent. Just over half of respondents are either planning alternative routes well as supply chain and logistics. Unfortunately, to avoid the UK (38%)can or have implemented many oflandbridge these costs be already quite high and, in plans most to avoidcases, it (14%).are unavoidable.

April is likely to have crystalised Brexit as a material risk to which firms responded by tightening future investment.  29% of respondents have put investments on hold, while 20% have delayed or put operational spend on hold. is supported by feedback from the Bord Bia  Brexit costs relating to logistics and supply chain and customs client meetings, with many citing Financial Resilience: half of companies expectcompanies Brexit hit of up to the compliance are having the biggest impact on companies’ cost base. Estimating the financial impact of Brexit is challenging due 10% on EBITDA opportunity cost in relation to employee time to uncertainty around the outcome. However, almost half (45%)  Two thirds (62%) of food and drink firms outlined that Brexit is spent on Brexit. of respondent companies expect Brexit to cost them in the region having an impact on their investment plans, compared to one of 1-10% of their profitability. year ago, when half (50%) said that Brexit was having no impact  One of the most common changes in strategy in relation to the on their plans. The passing of two Brexit deadlines in March and

What elements of your cost base will be most impacted by Brexit? Low/no impact

Medium impact

Low - medium impact

Medium - high impact

High impact

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 Additional R&D spend

14 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Working capital costs

Cost of entering Raw materials cost increase new markets

Supply chain and logistics cost

Increased cost of customs & compliance


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bord bia brexit barometer UK market is, whether to maintain the status quo from a volume perspective, or to make a deliberate decision to seek out alternative markets. Customer Relationships: stockholding and customs top of agenda for UK customers  Irish food and drink firms are now highly engaged with their customers on Brexit planning. 79% have spoken to their customers about Brexit in the past month, rising to 96% in the past three months, while many large food and drink firms cite daily conversations with key buyers. Key discussion topics are stock holding (58%), customs duties (47%) and the sharing of general Brexit updates (42%).  In the past year, 57% of respondents reported an increase in sales to the UK and a further 29% reported stable revenues.  That said, Irish companies are taking a more measured approach to growth projections for the UK due to the continuing uncertainty that prevails. Eight in 10 companies are planning to maintain (36%) or grow (41%) sales in the UK. Of the 13% who plan to reduce UK sales, feedback from Bord Bia interviews indicates that this is a deliberate strategy by some of those businesses to diversify away from the UK. Market Diversification: 74% seeking to expand in new markets in response to Brexit  The 2019 Barometer has seen a shift in focus from growth in the UK to maintaining market share.  Encouragingly, 74% of Barometer respondents are actively seeking to expand into new markets in response to Brexit.  57% of respondents have reported encouraging growth outside of the UK and ROI markets and a further 24% are reporting stable sales in these markets.  Two thirds of companies have a marketing strategy for non-UK export markets to assist them unlock growth potential. Emerging Issues 70% of respondents have actively engaged with external advisers to better understand the challenges and risks that Brexit has created. The top Brexit-related emerging risks have been identified as: 1. Economic performance / risk of recession; 2. Competitiveness; 3. UK consumer confidence; 4. Ferry capacity; 5. Changes to food safety standards; 6. Availability of customs agents; 7. Allocation of state aid for the agriculture sector; 8. Food labelling rules; 9. New market entrants; 10. Irish consumer confidence. The outputs from Brexit Barometer 2019 are designed to:  Continue to raise awareness of key Brexit issues for Irish food and drinks manufacturers;  Capture the level of risk exposure;  Inform manufacturers of key risks facing their business specifically, as well as the sector more broadly;  Highlight areas for risk management;  Inform Bord Bia on how best to support the sector through tailoring appropriate support programmes. For the full report, visit www.bordbia.ie/industry/brexit/. 16 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Bord Bia Action Plan

Bord Bia have produced an Action Plan, providing practical information that Irish food and drink manufacturers can utilise in order to prepare for increased complexity in UK trade, and therefore mitigate the risks posed by Brexit. It key actions that Irish food and drink manufacturers should consider. These include: Customer Relationships • Identify key customers; • Assess how Brexit developments may impact your business and ability to supply your customer; • Review customer contracts; • Schedule regular meetings with customers to discuss Brexit; • Understand and respond to customers’ Brexit concerns; • Develop a commercial marketing strategy for the UK market; • Understand your market position; • Assign a UK focused sales & marketing team; • Explore growth opportunities. Supply Chain • Map your supply chain; • Examine preparedness of logistics partners; • Manage use of the UK landbridge; • Consider groupage implications; • Examine supply chain costs; • Understand customer supply chain needs; • Consider the viability of stockholding; • Test business resilience regularly; • Conduct traceability deep dives; • Implement strategic purchasing; • Manage shelf life and lead times; • Create a business continuity management plan. Customs & Controls • Review possible changes to customs and tariff rules; • Apply for EU & UK EORI numbers; • Identify tariff classification codes for products; • Review financial and operational impact of customs and duties; • Assess whether supply chain partners are registered under the Trusted Trader/Authorised Economic Operator Scheme; • Decide on a customs agent or in-house customs management; • Apply for Comprehensive Guarantee and Special Procedures; • Identify Exposure to SPS Controls; • Register with Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; • Obtain a Health Certificate for export to non-EU countries. Financial Resilience • Understand the impact of currency exposures; • Mitigate currency exposure; • Consider hedging to protect against currency volatility; • Reduce business costs. Market Diversification • Expand knowledge of market growth opportunities; • Establish a market diversification strategy; • Identify markets for expansion; • Localise your product range; • Activate your market diversification strategy. Emerging Risks • Identify emerging risks; • Monitor effectiveness of preventative controls; • Escalate significant risks if necessary. For more information, see https://www.bordbia.ie/industry/brexit/.


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expert opinion

The Other Side of Brexit? While undoubtedly a challenge, Brexit can also bring opportunities for food and drink companies, writes Owen McFeely, Director, Consumer Markets, PwC Ireland.

W

ith over one third of all Irish food and drink exports destined for the UK market, it highlights both the threat of a no-deal Brexit and the resilient performance of Irish food and drink exporters since the UK Brexit referendum back in June 2016.

18 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

This deep trading relationship with the UK, combined with the real threat of a no-deal Brexit, creates serious longer term consequences for the Irish food and drinks industry. Whilst many businesses have focused on risk mitigation, the need to seek out new market opportunities, whilst

challenging, has never been greater. With the UK sitting outside of the EU, the lack of a negotiated deal will create a situation whereby the UK is treated as a third country for trading purposes, with new rules applying to Irish operators and businesses importing from and exporting to or moving


expert opinion goods through the UK. With over 60% of Irish prepared consumer food exports destined for the UK, the new processes required need to be fully understood and implemented if stock is to continue flowing freely.

Preparedness is Key Since the referendum in 2016 and even before this vote, the Irish food and drink industry has been quick to identify the risks and develop plans to address the challenges ahead. However, there is still plenty that business can do to build a robust Brexit strategy, with both risk and opportunities needing to be addressed. For some organisations, these preparations began back in 2016 and for others, often those with more limited resources, preparations may not have been so thorough. Regardless of the level of Brexit planning undertaken, it is practically impossible to have mitigated all risks until the exact trading relationships are defined and the new post Brexit trading norms emerge. Whilst businesses have been busy focusing on preparedness, continued focus on customs readiness, phyto-sanitary requirements, supply chain changes, UK based competitors and most importantly, the UK based customer, must continue. It is important that the Irish food and drink sector understands their competitive landscape, their supply chains and how to respond to the growing pressure that Sterling exchange rate movements place on margins and profitability. Many companies have been examining their supply chains to develop a better understanding of the key touchpoints. For those using the UK landbridge to access continental EU markets, alternative direct routes can provide risk mitigation options. However, these

routes may not satisfy customer lead time requirements nor the practicality of logistics where both the UK and EU market is being serviced via one logistics solution. Ultimately, comprehensive supply chain mapping is key to identifying risks and opportunities.

Maximising Opportunities With a shared language, similar food tastes and easy market access, it is clear why Irish food and drink businesses have been so successful in the UK market. We have satisfied demand for high quality food supported by a logistics infrastructure that supports the just-in-time nature of the UK retail and food sectors. For every business, dealing with their UK-based challenges is the key priority. However, depending on the final political outcome and until the ultimate impact on individual businesses is fully understood, opportunities for Irish food and drink companies to expand into continental Europe, with over 350 million consumers, will need to be identified and appropriate plans developed. It is widely recognised that either entering or expanding into mainland EU or other markets is costly and requires careful understanding and prioritisation of market opportunities. In addition to overseas expansion, opportunities can also exist within the Irish market. If production capacity exists within an Irish business or there is potential to expand, there may also be opportunities for locally based businesses to manufacture product under licence or similar arrangements in Ireland. This provides the opportunity for UK-based companies to manufacture their EU-destined product in Ireland and reduce the complexities of exporting to the EU as a third country. Import substitution also creates similar opportunities to displace lost UK volumes. For those heavily dependent on the

UK, a review of the entire value chain may present opportunities to shift a portion of activity closer to the UK customer. This may involve the finishing of product, packaging or storing of product within the UK. The ultimate goal of any such changes is to potentially reduce costs, including the tariff regime applicable to the product category in question. Such changes are significant in nature and the opportunity versus the wider business implications needs to be taken into account. A key supply chain issue exists for those using the UK landbridge to access the EU market. Whilst the direct EU sea routes will work for some, it does not solve everybody’s problem. Direct EU sea routes will add additional transit time, and for fresh foods, this time delay may be simply not acceptable due to product freshness issues and customer lead-time expectations. Nonetheless, the direct sea route option has to be explored before being ruled out.

Looking to the Future Whilst Brexit has forced business to focus on risk mitigation, business preparedness and winning in new markets, remaining focused on emerging trends and technologies is critical if the Irish food and drink industry is to retain its name for quality and innovation. New technologies including automation, artificial intelligence and the shift to cloud-based computing, combined with changing consumers, who are much more interested in the environment, sustainability and supporting businesses with socially responsible agendas, cannot be underestimated. Whilst the impact of Brexit on the food and drink sector is immense, businesses must balance their Brexit challenge with remaining focused on the longer-term macro factors at play in their markets.

About the Author Owen McFeely is a director in the strategy consulting division of the PwC Ireland advisory practice, working with a broad base of clients across the retail and consumer sectors. Owen also leads PwC Ireland’s retail and consumer Brexit activity within the Irish market. Owen has over 20 years of experience in food retailing and wholesaling gained across the UK and Ireland, having previously worked with Sainsbury’s, Dunnes Stores and Musgrave. Having held senior management roles within the food wholesale sector in both operational and business change capabilities, Owen has a deep understanding of the issues facing the retail and food sectors.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 19


food safety

The Importance of Science in the Future of Food

Pictured are Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO, Food Safety Authority of Ireland, Dr Bernhard Url, Executive Director of the European Food Safety Authority.

An international food safety science conference marked the 20th anniversary of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland.

A

n international conference exploring the challenges and opportunities facing the safety of global food supply heard that whilst producing food sustainably is a major issue, food safety needs to be central to any debate to ensure innovations in production are matched with robust food safety risk assessments to protect public health. Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) outlined to over 300 delegates at ‘The Science of Food Safety – What’s our Future?’ at the Convention Centre, Dublin that as ways to produce food evolve to feed an increasing global population, scientific research is critical in enabling our regulatory controls adapt and develop so that we can protect consumers. At the conference, a range of national and international experts outlined the rapid advances in food sciences that are being made that are leading to healthier and safer foods, all with the aim of building

20 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

sustainable food systems to feed what is expected to be the needs of 10 billion people on the planet by 2050.

Key Stakeholders The conference brought together the key stakeholders to enable discussion on how regulators, inspectors, industry, scientists and academics can work in collaboration and partnership to utilise the latest science that is impacting on food, from technological advances through to the evolution of food bacteria that can be harmful to human health. The event focused on the microbiological and chemical safety of food, and the public health implications, as well as exploring what is required for effective regulatory control strategies in the future. Keynote speaker, Dr Bernhard Url, Executive Director of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) outlined the critical importance of trust in science in underpinning bold policies aimed at the design of more


food safety

sustainable global food systems. “Food in Europe has never been safer. This is because science plays a crucial role in the way the food system within the European Union is set-up,” said Dr Url. “A system that is worth four billion euros in turnover every year. A system that most importantly delivers on citizens’ health. Looking at the present and future challenges and the more and more pressing questions on how to feed a growing global population using less resources and restoring at the same time a degraded environment, I believe solutions are found again in the scientific process. And more precisely in the integration of food safety into food security, enabling ‘one-health one planet’ policies which would deliver on the fulfilment of the UN global agenda.”

choices, whilst transparently addressing new concerns. Future food safety systems and regulatory frameworks will need to enable change, while remaining effective and transparent on risk assessment. This can only be addressed if scientific research has sufficiently developed the evidence base to support scientific risk assessment. Food safety research funding, both nationally and at EU level, needs to reflect this new context and be better co-ordinated. There is funding being made available by the European Commission through H2020 and Horizon Europe and it would make sense that researchers in Ireland and elsewhere would apply to secure funding through entering together in a variety of consortia.”

The Need for Research Funding The Evolution of Food Systems Dr Pamela Byrne stressed that we are at an important milestone in the evolution of our food systems. Science is required to create more sustainable, nutritious and healthier food, but the rapid speed of change in production processes must be mirrored by robust analysis and oversight to ensure food integrity and safety. We know that over half of Irish people (51%) consider food safety important when buying food, whilst just 16% care about ethics and beliefs when buying food. And that two out of five (40%) have permanently changed their consumption behaviour after hearing about a food risk at least once in their life. “Like all food regulators across the EU, we face the challenge that we must expand our capacity and capabilities so that we have the right skills and research to be able to analyse these new food processes, allowing us to continually protect our consumers,” Dr Byrne noted. “Now more than ever with the increasing globalisation of food and the creation of food in new ways, based on scientific advancements, there is a need for increased focus on ensuring a secure, safe, nutritious and authentic food supply chain.”

Professor Mark Ferguson, Director General, Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Advisor to the Irish Government, emphasised the need for research funding in the food safety area to protect public health and facilitate innovation by the Irish food industry. “There is merit in developing a mechanism that could enable researchers and the FSAI to access modest research budgets to address immediate gaps in the evidence base through short term research projects that run over a number of months rather than years,” Professor Ferguson noted. “This would be an agile way to complement existing partnership mechanisms which facilitate longer in-depth research collaborations. Scientific advances could revolutionise the way we produce, transport and process food, so it is essential for the industry to remain innovative and competitive and for a strong evidence base from research, both to support that innovation, and to ensure public safety and acceptance.”

Sustainable Development Dr John Bell, Director of the Healthy Planet Directorate, European Commission, speaking at the event, outlined that for a sustainable food supply that meets the United Nations sustainable development goals, food must be safe to protect public health. Current and emerging risks will surround our food supply into the future as a result of climate change, new technology and a desire to restrict carbon outputs. “We need a systemic approach to future-proof our food and improve its resilience and fairness, while coping with a growing demand for safe and nutritious food and increasing competition for biological resources and biomass,” stated Dr Bell. “We also need to ensure that our food safety system is future-proofed for the upcoming changes in production and consumption and that it generates trust, that it effectively helps citizens to make informed and healthy food

Dr Pamela Byrne, CEO, Food Safety Authority of Ireland, addresses delegates at ‘The Science of Food Safety – What’s our Future?’ at the Convention Centre, Dublin.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 21


The evolution of food and drink in Ireland 2005-2017 Reformulation Reformulation and innovation: supporting Irish diets

Reformulation Helps to Drive Health Agenda A major industry report shows reformulation remains high on agenda of food companies across Ireland.

F

ood and drink companies constantly innovate in response to changing consumer lifestyles, tastes and demands. In February 2019, Food Drink Ireland (FDI) launched a new report that showed reductions in sugar and saturated fat in Irish diets between 2005 and 2017 as a result of voluntary undertakings by food and drink companies. The report, entitled ‘The Evolution of Food and Drink in Ireland, 2005-2017: Reformulation and Innovation – Supporting Irish Diets’, is based on product composition and sales data submitted by 15 major food and drink businesses (see panel). It examines changes in levels of total fat, saturated fat, energy, sodium and sugar in over 1700 products, and models the impact on intakes of these nutrients among four population groups: pre-schoolers, children, teenagers and adults. The main findings of the report are: Direct reformulation of products on the market in both 2005 and 2017:  Sodium reduced by 28%;  Saturated fat reduced by 10.1%;  Sugar reduced by 8%;  Energy reduced by 1.6%;  Total fat reduced by 0.3%.

Reductions in sugar intake between 2005 and 2017:  Adult sugar intake reduced by 0.8g/day;  Teen sugar intake reduced by 2.7g/day; 22 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/202016/17

 

Child sugar intake reduced by 3.2g/day; Pre-schooler sugar intake reduced by 2.0g/day.

Reductions in saturated fat intake between 2005 and 2017:  Adult saturated fat intake reduced by 0.5g/day;  Teen saturated fat intake reduced by 0.2g/day;  Child saturated fat intake reduced by 0.2g/day;  Pre-schooler saturated fat intake remained constant. Results for the other nutrients were more modest, with sodium, total fat and energy intake remaining relatively stable over the period. Speaking about the report, Linda Stuart-Trainor, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods in FDI said: “This report makes a major contribution to the store of public knowledge on intakes of sugar,


Reformulation Right: Pictured at the launch of the Food Drink Ireland report are Danny Mc Coy, CEO, Ibec; Pamela Byrne, CEO, Food Safety Authority of Ireland; Cronan McNamara, CEO, Creme Global; Linda Stuart-Trainor, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, Food Drink Ireland.

salt, saturated fat, total fat and energy. It analyses how reformulation and new product development by the food and drink industry interacts with consumer choices to impact on the nutrient intakes of adults, teenagers, children and pre-schoolers. “The findings demonstrate the food and beverage industry’s ongoing commitment to the societal effort to tackle obesity and improve public health,” she continued. “Reformulation is a lengthy and complex journey; each step in the right direction counts. For many products, changes must be gradual in order to ensure consumer acceptance and lock in the health benefits.”

Key Findings Of the products analysed, those on the market in both 2005 (baseline) and 2017 showed average reductions in all of the nutrients of interest: energy (1.6%), total fat (0.3%), saturated fat (10%), sodium (28%) and sugar (8%). Modelling the impact of food industry activities (reformulation, new product launches, removal of products), as well as the impact of consumer choice on purchasing within product categories, shows that overall, between 2005 and 2017, sugar and saturated fat intake in the average Irish diet has decreased, while sodium, total fat and energy intake remained stable. In higher consumers of the food categories sold by FDI members, between 2005 and 2017 energy intake also decreased for all ages except teens. The most significant reductions were in intakes of sugar, which was largely driven by reductions in the beverage category through direct reformulation and consumers switching to low and no sugar variants. Reductions in sugar intake were also observed in high consumers of breakfast cereals and milk and dairy products. Reducing sugar content can present challenges from a technical, sensory, and safety perspective. However, decreased sugar levels did not lead to overall increases in dietary intakes of salt, fat, saturated fat or energy – a welcome result.

Ireland Leads the Way Ireland has established itself as an international leader in the investigation of food and drink industry reformulation efforts. A previous Food Drink Ireland report in 2016 gave a first look at data in this regard. The latest report represents a significant progression of the research methodology, taking a more holistic approach and including new products placed on the market since 2005. The presence of FSAI and other policy stakeholders at the report launch highlighted the importance of continued collaboration between Government and industry when it comes to improving public health. A sub-group of the government’s Obesity Policy Implementation and Oversight Group is in the process of drafting a national reformulation roadmap, which is due to be completed by the end of 2019.

Participating Companies The 15 FDI member companies that provided data for the research outlined in the report represent some of the biggest food and beverage brands in Ireland, ensuring that some of the most consumed and loved products in the country have been analysed. The participating companies are Britvic, Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company Ireland and Northern Ireland, Coca-Cola Ireland, Danone, Glanbia, Kellogg’s, Kepak, Kerry Foods, Largo Foods (now Tayto Snacks), Lucozade Ribena Suntory Ireland, Mars, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Unilever, Valeo Foods.

The Evolution of Reformulation As the practice of product reformulation has evolved, most reformulation now considers the broader nutrient profile of a product. The addition of positive ingredients and nutrients is an important element. The changes in one nutrient should not come at the expense of other nutrients of public health concern. As well as providing a source of energy or nutrients, ingredients like salt, sugar and fat often fulfil a wider technical role within a product. Therefore, it needs to be highlighted that reformulation often involves a very complex technical balancing act. This can take significant time and investment and differs greatly depending on the category/product. Changing a product’s ingredients and nutritional profile while maintaining quality and the taste that consumers love and expect can be a challenge. Reformulation does not happen overnight. It is often a lengthy process that usually requires multiple changes to the original recipe, reducing certain nutrients or adding new ingredients to balance taste, while maintaining the integrity and safety of the product. Reducing a nutrient gradually in small incremental steps can be vital to reformulation’s success, to ensure the consumer also adapts to the new recipe. This ‘health by stealth’ approach has worked well for nutrients like sodium in particular: if salt levels dropped suddenly in savoury snacks, for example, consumers may add salt back in independently, possibly to even higher levels than contained in the original product before reformulation.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 23


labour market

Labour shortages are really impacting in the Prepared Consumer Foods sector, writes Linda Stuart-Trainor, Director of Prepared Consumer Foods, FDI.

Government Must Act to Alleviate Labour Shortages

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eople are at the heart of Ireland’s Prepared Consumer Foods (PCF) sector – from food scientists to operatives on the factory floor to top marketing talent. Therefore, changes in the labour market are felt directly by the sector. Ireland’s current tight labour market is having an impact on PCF companies in every part of the country. PCF is highly diverse, encompassing companies producing value-added food and beverages, whether they sell in Ireland or internationally to grocery, convenience retail, foodservice or other food companies. The sector includes foods from breakfast meats to yogurts, ingredients, value-added seafood, value-added horticulture and non-alcoholic beverages. Such a diverse sector employs people in a wide variety of roles. It is a highly inclusive sector, with a range of skill levels, nationalities and areas of expertise. Over 20,000 employees are spread across 500 manufacturing units in every county in Ireland. Despite this variety and diversity, the recent surge in employment, linked to Ireland’s economic recovery, is posing real challenges to the sector. Labour shortages have emerged at production level, alongside skills shortages for specialised

24 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

technical and commercial roles. Companies are impacted in different ways, but attracting and retaining talent are high on the agenda of business leaders across the sector. These challenges come at a time when, more than ever, the right people are needed to drive the sector forward. Skills and talent will be essential to achieving the growth targets set out in the Government’s Food Wise 2025 strategy and to embracing a shifting landscape, including:  Increased focus on sustainability and packaging;  The need for product and market diversification to respond to Brexit;  Changing consumer demands on the nutrition and health front. At this critical juncture, it is vital that access to labour and skills does not become the weak link in the food supply chain. Already, some companies are expressing caution in bidding for contracts or making plans to expand capacity as they are not confident there will be an adequate supply of labour and skills to deliver on these commitments. Food Drink Ireland is calling on Government to take decisive action to

support a sector which is of vital strategic importance to the Irish economy and society. The main proposals from the PCF sector are: 1. Remove food process operatives from the list of ineligible occupations for work permits and provide an initial allocation of permits; 2. Drive research into automation and its application in the PCF sector through all available mechanisms (e.g. FIRM, PCF Centre); 3. Bring all stakeholders together to map how roles in the PCF sector will change over the next 10-20 years; 4. Convene a focus group of millennials to better understand how the sector can attract and retain graduates; 5. Maximise the impact of the National Training Fund (NTF) by: - Providing NTF funding for an agri-food careers portal; - Orienting the fund more towards in-employment training; - Increasing funding for enterprise-led initiatives such as Skillnet; 6. Renew the focus on apprenticeships to address key challenges around marketing to employers, affordability and value, administrative burden.


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distilling

Irish Whiskey Targeting Further Growth The future is extremely bright for Irish whiskey, with more markets around the globe opening up to our premium spirit, writes William Lavelle, Head of the Irish Whiskey Association.

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he past decade has been widely hailed as the decade of the Irish whiskey renaissance. In 2010, there were only four working Irish whiskey distilleries. By 2019,

it’s proving difficult to keep pace with the number of new openings and we expect to commence 2020 with approximately 30 fully operational distilleries across Ireland. This

boom in distillery development has been matched by a global doubling in sales over the past decade from less than six million cases (approx. 70 million bottles) in 2010 to over 12 million cases (over 145 million bottles) in 2020. Projections for the next decade suggest that this growth will continue unabated, although the external risks of trade wars and tariffs remain a real threat. Being optimistic, and with a further decade of growth in mind, the question now being posed is which international markets will drive forward this next phase of growth? In 2019, the Irish Whiskey Association (IWA) conducted a comprehensive markets assessment project. This was not about prioritising markets, but instead about understanding where Irish whiskey is growing and can grow further. This is a ‘living’ piece of work, which will be continually reviewed and updated as new data and trends emerge.

Looking Beyond US Success While Irish whiskey is sold in 140 markets, the United States remains by far the largest market for Irish whiskey, accounting for 42.5% of global sales in 2018. In real terms, 26 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20


distilling 4.5 million cases, or 54 million bottles, were sold in the US last year. The current growth trajectory of Irish whiskey is such that sales of Irish whiskey may overtake sales of Scotch in the US in the coming decade, a feat not achieved since before Prohibition. This is a target the Irish whiskey industry has now firmly set its sights on. In 2019, the IWA embarked on a concerted effort to ‘mainstream’ Irish whiskey amongst top-tier US media. As part of this strategy, the IWA hosted a major pre-St Patrick’s media event in New York, hosted by the Irish ConsulGeneral. It also organised a media tour of Ireland’s whiskey distilleries for leading international journalists and influencers. Regrettably, alongside these emerging opportunities, 2019 has also been a year of increasing risks in the US, most notably the threat of tariffs on Irish whiskey as part of ongoing US/EU trade disputes. Even before such risks, and notwithstanding the goal of further growth to overtake Scotch sales, Irish whiskey must also look beyond the US market. Growth in the US must be matched by even greater growth in markets further afield. The good news is that this is happening. North of the border in Canada, Irish whiskey sales are booming and the recent CETA agreement between the EU and Canada has particularly helped drive sales of premium Irish whiskey. In Ontario, the largest Canadian province, sales of certain brands of premium Irish whiskey have grown by in excess of 30% as a result of CETA reforms to the provincial levies imposed on imported spirits.

is non-traditional markets in Asia and Africa that hold the keys to the next phase of growth.

High-Performing City-Regions Key to Asian Market Sales of Irish whiskey across the entire Asia region remain at very low levels - led by sales in Japan. But this means there is no shortage of headspace to grow. However, the challenge posed by Eastern markets must not be underestimated. The lack of cultural appreciation of brown spirits and more acutely, the lack of consumer awareness of Irish whiskey, will require a determined and well-designed category promotion effort, supported by intense in-market activity delivered by boots-on-the-ground category champions and brand ambassadors. There is also a need for a critical focus on high-performing city-regions such as Shenzhen-Hong Kong, Tokyo, Delhi and Ho Chi Minh. In short, growth won’t come easy but with the right approach, it can and will come.

Mercosur Trade Deal: New Frontiers Sub-Saharan Africa is proving to be one of the emerging hotspots for Irish whiskey, with strong growth experienced in markets such as Kenya, Mozambique and Namibia.

The recently concluded EU-Mercosur trade agreement offers the short-term elimination of excessive tariffs in Argentina and Brazil. This opens up fresh new opportunities for future Irish whiskey growth, particularly for brands linked to multi-national partners with established routes-to-market in the region. To this end, if this next phase of growth is to be realised, it will be as a result of hard work, continued investment and the correct strategic partnerships. State agencies including Bord Bia and Invest NI have a key role to play in this. The Irish whiskey industry has benefited from a close working relationship with both agencies to date and their support has proven pivotal in providing consumer insights and expanding access into new markets. We are also encouraged by further positive developments in EU trade policy. Recent EU-negotiated trade agreements with Canada, Japan, Vietnam and Mercosur have reduced tariffs, eliminated behind-the-border trade barriers and delivered protection for the name Irish whiskey, meaning only authentic Irish whiskey can be sold in these markets. These trade developments have helped pave the way for increased exports, and the EU Commission, in particular Commissioner Phil Hogan, are to be congratulated on their success. Free trade benefits Irish whiskey and Ireland.

Opportunity in Central and Eastern Europe Amongst the most positive current trends for Irish whiskey is the emergence of Central and Eastern Europe as a strong and sustainable counterbalance to the North American market. In 2018, sales of Irish whiskey in Germany, Russia and the markets in-between reached 1.9 million cases, or 23 million bottles, with cumulative growth of over 13% competitively shared across a multitude of brands, both large and small. Over coming years, the Central and Eastern Europe region can continue to deliver real and substantial volume growth for Irish whiskey producers. Unleashing the potential in this region will be a top priority for the Irish Whiskey Association over the next three years. In short, the IWA expects established markets in Western Europe, Scandinavia, South Africa and Australia to continue, in the main, to perform strongly. However, if Europe, North America and South Africa have been the story of the past decade, it FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 27


brewing – beers

A Nation of World Class

Beers

Jonathan McDade, head of the Irish Brewers Association, on the world class asset that is the Irish beer sector.

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reland is a beer country. We drink it, we produce it and we export a lot of it. Beer is Ireland’s favourite alcoholic beverage, making up 45% of the total market share. The Irish brewing sector’s established brands are steeped in cultural heritage, while its craft beer sector offers the innovation and variety that consumers demand. The sector draws tourists to our shores, wins international awards and is at the heart of many occasions of conviviality in our society. There is certainly a lot to be proud about. In 2018, just under 460 million litres of beer were consumed in Ireland, up by 2.7% on the previous year. Beer also contributed €430 million in excise alone last year, a 2.4% increase from the previous year. Over the past decade, beer has generated €3.8 billion in excise for the exchequer. Irish beer drinkers pay the second highest rate of excise on beer in the EU, behind Finland.

Changing Consumption Habits In recent years, Irish beer drinkers have begun to modify beer preferences and consumption habits. Increased sales in 2018 were partially driven by an expanding range of quality beers, from global brands to indigenous craft brewers. A 2018 Irish Brewers Association survey with The Taste found that 51% of beer 28 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

drinkers either ‘always’ or ‘often’ pair beer with food when eating out, with 45% of people stating that there are not enough beer options in restaurants when dining out. Shifting brand loyalty and increased experimentation is reflected in the fact that 45% of beer drinkers stated that they regularly alter beer preferences depending on the occasion, with seasonal factors being the biggest reason. Despite the ever-expanding range of ales and IPAs in the market, lager remains the preferred variant of choice for the consumer, making up around 60% of sales in the Irish beer market. Stout makes up around a third, which is quite a high share compared to other markets. The IBA’s survey on favourite beer preferences also showed lager to be the nation’s preferent variant by 45% of respondents. However, IPAs are the second most popular beer variant, according to the survey, with 22% of respondents. What has also emerged in recent years is the emergence of non-alcoholic beers. More brands are offering non or low alcoholic beer alternatives for consumers due to popular demand. On the continent, non-alcoholic beer sales have increased significantly in 2018, albeit from a low base. The IBA’s survey also found that 57% of respondents wanted more non-alcoholic beer options available in restaurants and pubs. In time, the market

share of non-alcohol beers will increase as consumption habits evolve further.

Uncertainty on the Horizon While it is encouraging to see sales growth and variety in the sector, there is uncertainty on the horizon. There is the eternal threat of an increase in excise on beer in the Budget, allied to the uncertainly of Brexit. The Brewers of Europe annual report stated that Ireland is the seventh largest exporter of beer in Europe, exporting 354 million litres of beer in 2017. Most of Irish beer exports go to the UK and if it leaves the EU without a trade deal, it could pose a great challenge for our beer exports. Ireland’s brewing sector is quite resilient. It has survived economic shocks, regressive legislation and punitive taxes. Despite these challenges, the brewing sector continues to provide its consumers, both domestic and abroad, with a world class product that is enjoyed by millions every day. This is something that needs to be acknowledged by Government and celebrated by all. In order to ensure that millions continue to enjoy Ireland’s world class beers, the State must mitigate against the Brexit fall-out in the short term and then treat the brewing sector as the cultural asset that it deserves to be.


Every Retailer. Every County. Everyday!

Contact Jason Mallon today for more information:

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brewing – cider

Looking at the Bright Cider of Life The Irish Cider Association is back to highlight cider’s economic performance and promote the product to more consumers, explains its head, Jonathan McDade.

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he production of cider is steeped in heritage, tradition and enjoys the status of being Ireland’s third most popular alcoholic beverage, with 7.5% alcohol market share. While it doesn’t grab the headlines of craft beer, gin and Irish whiskey, it is a drink enjoyed by many and a significant contributor to the exchequer. In the past decade alone, the excise revenue generated by cider is over half a billion euro. Many more hundreds of millions are contributed through VAT, plus the employment generated in the cider supply chain from orchard to outlet.

Irish Cider Association Cider is a beverage that uses over 50,000 tonnes of Irish apples every year. Indeed, 75% of cider consumed in Ireland is from Irish cider brands, according to the Irish Cider Association’s (ICA) 2018 Market Report, launched in July. The association was reformed by existing members of the Alcohol Beverage Federation of

30 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Ireland (ABFI) that are involved in cider production and distribution. Its market report is the first since 2012 and recently about 10 craft cider producers have joined the ICA to promote the economic and social contribution of the category. The first half of the past decade saw a substantial decline in cider consumption in Ireland. In 2009, over 68 million litres of cider were consumed, while the category made up 8.5% of the total alcohol market share. By 2015, cider consumption dropped by 10 million litres and only had 6.6% of the total alcohol market share. In that time, the average cider consumption per adult fell by 17%. Other alcohol categories over the past decade have seen similar declines in per capita consumption due to people’s changing consumption habits, most notably moving towards premium drinks products. However, the decline in cider’s per capita onsumption was starker.

Green Shoots However, since 2015, some green shoots have begun to emerge. New entrants into the cider market and an emerging indigenous craft cider sector are offering Irish consumers an unprecedented range of cider products with a diverse range of tastes to accommodate any palate. This combination has begun to turn the fortunes of the cider sector in recent years. Total cider consumption is up by over six million litres (per annum) since 2015 and its market share is also around one percentage point higher as well. The potential growth of the Irish cider market cannot be understated. As consumers gravitate to brands that place a high value on authenticity, many Irish cider brands have an opportunity to promote the heritage around their products. Apple growing is on the rise in Ireland, with continued growth in the number of orchards and hectares of land dedicated to apple growing. Many of these orchards produce high quality apple-based juices and alcohol products such as cider. Indeed, apples have been growing in Ireland for over 3,000 years and have even been referenced in Celtic mythology in that time. In an era where consumers value authenticity and gravitate towards premium products, cider is well placed to exploit that. Ideally the institutions of the State need to recognise the potential contribution of the cider sector to our tourism, retail and hospitality sectors. A reduction in the excise rate for cider in Budget 2020 would be a bright start.


labelling regulations

The Death of the

Veggie Burger? New EU legislation may prohibit the use of terms like ‘sausage’ and ‘burger’ for non-meat products. Food lawyer, Raymond O’Rourke explains the reasoning behind the new regulations and their possible implications.

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hese past two years as a food lawyer, I have been constantly asked questions about the legal implications of Brexit for food producers and retailers. There have been numerous seminars, booklets and dedicated web pages advising about these issues, so I planned instead to highlight an issue that is getting lots of traction in Brussels at the moment. We saw in the recent European elections the surge in the Green vote throughout Europe, especially in Member States like Germany, Belgium and Finland. At the same time, climate change and sustainability are spoken about every day in the news. In that context, numerous vegetarian/vegan food products are gaining a foothold in the food retail market. It is therefore not surprising to see plant-based substitute products being sold as “veggie burgers”, “plant cheese” etc.

Existing Judgement There has already been a judgement from the European Court of Justice in the case Verband Sozialer Wettbewerb eV v. TofuTown.com GmbH (June 14, 2017) regarding purely plant-based products being sold under the names ‘Soyatoo tofu butter’, ‘plant cheese’, ‘veggie cheese’, ‘cream’ and other similar designations. The company said consumers were not misled by such terms since consumers’ understanding of such terms has changed considerably in the past number of years and it did not use terms like ‘butter’ etc 32 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

on their own but always in association with words referring to their plant origin such as ‘tofu butter’. The European Court ruled that, in principle, for the purposes of the marketing and advertising in question, the relevant EU legislation [EU Regulation 1308/2013] reserves the term ‘milk’ only for milk of animal origin. In addition, except where expressly provided, that legislation reserves designations like ‘cream’, ‘chantilly’, ‘butter’, ‘cheese’ and ‘yogurt’ solely for milk products, that is products derived from milk. The Court concluded that the designations for ‘milk’ etc cannot be legally used to designate a purely plant-based product unless that product is mentioned on the list of exceptions, which is not the case for soya or tofu. Lastly, the European Court was quite clear in the TofuTown case ruling that the addition of descriptive terms or explanatory terms cannot completely exclude the likelihood of confusion on the part of consumers.

Meating Market Demand? In April of this year, the European Parliament Agriculture Committee, when discussing a Commission proposal to amend EU Regulation 1308/2013, adopted an amendment in line with the ECJ TofuTown court case, stating that the designations used for meat and meat preparations shall be reserved exclusively for products containing meat. These designations include, for example ‘steak’, ‘sausage’, ‘


labelling regulations escalope’, ‘burger’, ‘hamburger’. This legislation will come before the new Parliament in the coming months. The approach of the EP Agriculture Committee mirrors developments at State-level in the United States. Recently, Arkansas was the latest state to prohibit the use of terms like ‘meat’, ‘sausage’, and ‘beef’ on products that are not made from animals, as well as prohibiting the labelling of items like cauliflower rice as ‘rice’ or soy milk as ‘milk’. Each violation will be punishable by a fine of up to $1,000. Similar laws have passed in other states throughout the US, including Missouri, Mississippi, Louisiana and South Dakota. Opponents of these laws say it is merely an attempt to protect the interests of traditional agricultural producers from the increasing popularity of alternative products which are enjoying a surge in popularity in Europe and the United States. In addition, the new laws are seen as being in contravention of attempts by consumers to purchase more sustainable food products.

Citizens’ Initiative from the Vegetarian & Vegan Community The issue is not quite that simple – at the same time in Brussels, a Citizens’ Initiative has been registered at the European Commission highlighting that vegetarian and vegan consumers struggle across the EU to identify suitable food. They must study the list of ingredients of a food product to determine if it is fit for purchase with a hyper-awareness of ambiguous ingredients that could be either plant- or animal-based. The Citizens’ Initiative proposes mandating one of three simple pictorial labels on all food product labels: Non-Vegetarian, Vegetarian, or Vegan. Some may scoff at such EU Citizens’ Initiatives but they are a new mechanism introduced in the Lisbon Treaty aimed at increasing direct democracy by enabling EU citizens to participate in the development of EU policies. Such initiatives require one million citizens who are nationals of at least one

quarter of the Member States to support the initiative before the Commission is mandated to respond, yet you only have to look at the issue of Glysophate /Pesticides to see where such a Citizens’ Initiative has radically reformed the EU rules on the authorisation of plant protection products.

Is This the End for the Veggie Burger? The new European Parliament and new Agriculture Commissioner, who may be Irishman Phil Hogan, will therefore have to grapple with this issue of the designation of plant-based food products in the very near future. If the EP Agriculture Committee amendment is adopted by the full Parliament in the coming months, it then must be adopted by the EU Member States. In that case, it could take 18-24 months before this ban on the use of terms like ‘veggie burger’ and ‘vegan sausage’ would come into operation. The European Commission might instead decide to deal legislatively with this issue by means of a simple logo: Vegetarian or non-Vegetarian as per the Citizens’ Initiative suggestion. Whatever approach it decides upon, you can be certain that there will be much debate on this issue in the coming months in the EU where the issue of producing sustainable food has become a priority for EU politicians in a new globalised world.

If the European Parliament Agriculture Committee amendment is adopted by the full Parliament in the coming months, it could mean a ban on terms like ‘vegan sausage roll’. About the Author Raymond O’ Rourke is a qualified Barrister and a specialist food regulatory and consumer affairs lawyer. He worked for many years in legal firms both in Brussels and Dublin and now has his

own law practice. He is a member of the management board of both Bord Bia and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and was previously a Board Member of the FSAI. He is the current Vice-Chair of the Consumers Association of Ireland (CAI). FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 33


dairy

The Dairy Revival

A €2 billion investment is driving a renaissance in Irish dairy, according to Conor Mulvihill, Director, Dairy Industry Ireland.

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reland currently is seen as a tiger economy in the global dairy industry, with one of the fastest growth rates on the planet. What might be less known is that the current renaissance in the industry is built on the back of a policy decision in the heart of Brussels: namely the ending of the EU dairy quota regime in 2015. Since the lifting of this quota regime, the industry in the Republic of Ireland has flourished, jumping from producing just over 5 billion litres of milk in 2015 to a staggering 8 billion litres today. Irish dairy processing is an all island industry, so when you count activity in the North, the industry will hit the 10 billion litre mark this year. The fact that over 90% of this output is exported makes the industry not only a huge contributor to the Irish economy, but it also makes it Ireland’s largest natively owned industry. The scale of this growth, allied with the quality of the output from grass fed systems, has meant that Ireland’s traditional primary processors like Dairygold, Kerry, Glanbia and Lakeland have been joined here by huge multinational specialised nutrition manufacturers like Abbott, Danone and Wyeth/Nestlé. These companies are now at the vanguard of innovating and creating a range of value-added functional foods from Irish dairy, such as sports nutrition products, infant formulae and foods for special medical purposes for sale around the globe.

Investment ‘Outside the Toll Roads’ So, what is underpinning this growth on the processing side? Since the announcement of the abolition of quotas by the EU, Dairy Industry Ireland members have invested a staggering €1.5 billion in new processing capacity to handle new growth, with a further €500 million in capital investment in the pipeline. Also, a key fact about this investment is that not only is it taking place beyond the M50, but beyond even the toll road network into areas where Ireland needs it most. Examples of completed investment include the new plants by Glanbia in Belview in Kilkenny and Wexford town, huge upgrade by Dairygold in the towns of Mallow and Mitchelstown, Ornua also in Mitchelstown, Lakeland in Killashandra, Aurivo in Ballaghderreen 34 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

and Wyeth in Askeaton. Ongoing capital projects by traditional players are being completed in Tipperary town by Tipp Co-op, Ballineen by Carbery in West Cork, Kanturk by North Cork and Macroom by Danone. These traditional Irish dairy processing giants are being joined by new international players such as the Norwegian Tine in Mogeely Co. Cork, NewBaze in Carrickmacross, Emeri in Navan and Leprino in Portlaoise. These factories will not only bring wealth and employment to rural Irish areas, but they also position Ireland as a state-of-the-art player on global dairy markets, as well as greatly diversifying our product portfolio as we prepare for Brexit and the probable decline of the British market.

Facing the Twin Challenges Ahead This means that as the umbrella body for these companies, Dairy Industry Ireland has to be extremely active at a national and Brussels level, working also with our Ibec-central colleagues, to deliver the political and regulatory services to allow these companies the support they need to succeed in Europe and internationally. To this end, Dairy Industry Ireland is a member of both the European Dairy Association and Specialised Nutrition Europe and we are regular visitors to Brussels to vigorously represent and advance the interests of the industry. This is also augmented with global membership of the International Dairy Federation and the International Special Dietary Foods Industries Association. The industry is facing the twin challenges of dealing with the sustainability challenge and Brexit, so diversifying and innovating to deal with these challenges will continue to be an integral part of the Dairy Industry Ireland agenda for the foreseeable future.


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Reducing (unplanned) downtime Reducing(unplanned) (unplanned)downtime downtime Reducing CPX MPA: This modular electric automation platform incorporates CPXMPA: MPA:This Thismodular modular electric automation platformissues incorporates active diagnostics management toautomation detect and address fast, CPX electric platform incorporates active diagnostics management to detect and address issues fast, reducing the need for time-consuming fault-finding exercises. active diagnostics management to detect and address issues fast, reducing the need for time-consuming fault-finding exercises. reducing the need for time-consuming fault-finding exercises. PPS Cushioning: The self-adjusting pneumatic cushioning on Festo cylinder supports quick PPSCushioning: Cushioning: The self-adjusting pneumatic cushioning onFesto Festoincylinder cylinder supports quick replacement with noThe adjustment, so it’s easy to set multiple cylinder parallel,supports simplifying PPS self-adjusting pneumatic cushioning on quick replacement with noadjustment, adjustment, soit’s it’seasy easyto toset setmultiple multiplecylinder cylinderin inparallel, parallel,simplifying simplifying maintenance and reducing downtime. replacement with no so maintenance and reducing downtime. maintenance and reducing downtime. 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The ELGA/ ESBF can be used ELGA/ ESBF: These actuators been specifically for applications and wherever thereimpact is a need for clean, protected and/or high performance ensuring high machine haveaahuge huge impact onthe theaperformance performance andprocess process ofaamachine. machine.The Theaxes, ELGA/ ESBFcan can beused used have on and of ELGA/ ESBF be cycles and optimum life. wherever there is a need for a clean, protected and/or high performance axes, ensuring high machine wherever there is a need for a clean, protected and/or high performance axes, ensuring high machine cycles and optimum life. cycles and optimum life. 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sweeteners

The Truth About Sweeteners Only 11 low-calorie sweeteners are approved for use in soft drinks in Europe. Colm Jordan, Director, Irish Beverage Council, examines the four most popular sweeteners.

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weeteners, also known as low-calorie sweeteners and artificial sweeteners, are used to provide sweetness of taste without the calories. There are many types of sweeteners, including aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K, neotame, neohesperidine DC, cyclamates and saccharin. Only approved sweeteners may be used in food and drink products and they are subjected to a lengthy and vigorous valuation procedure before approval is given. In the EU, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) must provide a scientific assessment on all sweeteners. Safety assessments are also carried out by numerous national and international food safety authorities including the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) of the World Health Organisation and the Food and Agriculture Organisation, as well as regulatory agencies in many countries worldwide.

Sweeteners and Soft Drinks Sweeteners are used in no- and low-calorie soft drinks in order to provide sweetness without calories. Soft drinks sweetened with a low-calorie sweetener can play a useful role in helping people to manage their calorie intake as a part of a sensible and healthy lifestyle. The soft drinks industry is always seeking to improve its offering to consumers by developing innovative products, using new sweeteners which satisfy the demands of consumers to be excellent tasting, natural and low in calories. New sweeteners can only be used after approval has been obtained from the EU Commission based on EFSA’s scientific assessment. Sweeteners are always clearly labelled at least twice on soft drinks in the EU. European food labelling legislation requires that the presence of a low-calorie sweetener in foods and drinks is indicated on the label as ‘With sweetener(s)’ next to the description of the product. On a label, an additive must be designated by the name of its functional class, followed by its specific name, or its E number e.g. “sweetener: aspartame” or “sweetener: E951” 38 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Meet the Sweeteners There are 11 low-calorie sweeteners approved for use in soft drinks in Europe, and most parts of the world. Let’s take a closer look at the four that are most frequently used, either on their own or in combination, to achieve the desired taste profile. Acesulfame K (E950) Discovered in 1967, Acesulfame K has been approved for use in Europe since 1983. It is 150-200 times sweeter than sugar and so only a tiny quality is used. Extensive studies support the safety of Acesulfame K and demonstrate that it is safe for human consumption. Aspartame (E951) The three components of aspartame, phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol, are commonly found in nature, including in eggs and tomatoes. Aspartame is one of the most thoroughly tested ingredients in history. Over 200 studies confirm its safety, including the latest EFSA Scientific Risk Assessment in 2013. Steviol Glycosides (Stevia – E960) Used in Europe since 2011, natives of Paraguay have been using Stevia widely for over 1,500 years. Stevia is the only low-calorie sweetener of natural origin approved in Europe. Regulatory agencies around the world have reviewed the safety and authorised the use of steviol glycosides. Sucralose (E955) Discovered in 1976, this sweetener measures 500-600 times sweeter than sugar on the sweetness index. Sucralose is produced from sucrose (table sugar) and is therefore structurally very similar. Extensive studies support the safety of sucralose and demonstrate that it is safe for human consumption.  This article is based on the UNESDA Sweeteners Infographic – for more, see UNESDA.eu.


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training & development

Food Drink Ireland Skillnet:

Delivering for Agri-Food

Companies are increasingly turning to learning and development to address the key strategic challenges of the sector, writes Mark Skinner, Network Manager, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet.

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s the food and drink sector faces many challenges, increasingly learning and development is seen as a key part of the solution. In this regard, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet is collaborating with member companies to develop learning interventions critical to the success of the sector. In 2019, the network will be rolling out their Diploma in Global Sales with Technological University Dublin (formerly, DIT). This 12-day programme has been created by member companies who identified a clear need to upskill in international selling as a result of Brexit. A key element of this programme is the final project, which requires learners to develop a sales plan specific to their business. Areas analysed include value proposition, the identification of key markets, distribution channels, developing strategic partnerships, negotiation skills in a global perspective, culture and key account management. Also in relation to Brexit, two other programmes that Food Drink Ireland Skillnet are running include a Level 9 Post Graduate Certificate in Food Regulations, to help companies navigate the regulatory challenges as a result of Brexit, as well as a Clear Customs initiative to address

40 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

customs clearance requirements if the UK becomes a third country.

Attracting Talent As the labour market approaches full employment, another key skills challenge for the sector centres around the attraction and retention of talent. In relation to talent attraction, an extremely successful initiative is Food Drink Ireland Skillnet’s Graduate Development programme, which is used to support 60 learners per year make the transition from academia into the food and drink sector. In supporting employee retention, companies are increasingly turning to leadership and management development programmes to aid employee progression at all levels within their businesses. Other strategically important areas being addressed by Food Drink Ireland Skillnet’s programmes centre around commercial capabilities within the sales channels, as well as lean capabilities to maximise efficiency and effectiveness.

Strategically Important, High Quality Training Looking ahead, while new challenges and opportunities will arise, the Skillnet model, which relies on the strategic input of a Steering Group of leading L&D professionals within our sector, remains a constant. This

helps ensure all programmes are strategically important, delivered to the highest standards and offer excellent value for money to member companies. Membership of Food Drink Ireland Skillnet is free, and is open to companies from the Meat, Dairy, Consumer Foods and Beverages sector. Benefits of membership include:  Industry specific training that’s relevant to your business;  Up to 60% saving on the cost of training due to network purchasing power plus part-government funding through Skillnet Ireland, funded by the National Training Fund through the Department of Education and Skills;  Flexible training that is delivered at times that suit your company;  Saving time on procurement, as all courses procured by the network are done so to ensure all trainers meet the quality standards of the sector and that value for money is achieved;  Opportunity to collaborate and learn from colleagues across the industry. More information can be found on www.fooddrinkireland.ie or if you would like to join the network for free, or would like to input into the Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Steering Group, please contact Mark Skinner, Food Drink Ireland Skillnet Manager on (01) 6051615 or mark.skinner@ibec.ie.


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UK & Ireland’s Ingredients Specialist Heterochem Dist. Ltd is the speciality raw materials supplier of choice to the Food and Beverage industries both in Ireland and the UK. ◊ Acidulants ◊ Antioxidants ◊ ◊ Antifoams ◊ Botanicals ◊ Acidulants Antifoams ◊ Colours ◊ Emulsifiers ◊ Flavours ◊ Gums ◊ Antioxidants ◊ Botanicals ◊ Preservatives & Sweeteners Benefits to your business: Benefits to your business: ◊ High quality, competitively priced products - ISO 9001, FEMAS ◊ High quality, competitively priced products - ISO 9001, FEMAS & Organic Organic Trust TrustCertified Certified & ◊ Excellent customer service service-- before before and and after after the the sale sale ◊ Excellent customer ◊A partner, assisting assistingour ourcustomers customerstotodevelop develop new ◊ A reliable reliable and and efficient efficient sourcing soucing partner, and products newexisting and existing products ◊ highlyqualified qualifiedsales sales team team of of chemists chemists available to assist assist with ◊ A highly with any technical queries queries ◊ Prime location location in Baldoyle, Dublin Dublin--situated situatedininclose closeproximity proximitytotoallalldistribution distributionchannels channels ◊ Prime in Baldoyle, ◊ On site storage of all raw materials in our controlled warehousing ◊ On site storage of all raw materials in our controlled warehousing ◊ Variety of UN approved pack sizes available: 25kg, 50kg, 200kg barrels & 1000kg IBCs ◊ Variety of UN approved pack sizes available: 25kg, 50kg, 200kg barrels & 1000kg IBCs Unit Dublin D13 H2N2, Ireland Unit 49 49Baldoyle BaldoyleIndustrial IndustrialEstate, Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2, Ireland T. +353 1 839 3127 E. info@heterochem.com W. www.heterochem.com T. +353 1 839 3127 E. info@heterochem.com W. www.heterochem.com


recycling

Repak Addresses New Recycling Targets What does the EU’s Circular Economy Package mean for Ireland’s food businesses? Brian Walsh, Packaging Technologist, Repak, reveals the likely impact of changing legislation on Irish agri-food.

Pictured at the launch of the Repak Members’ Plastic Pledge Report 2018 are (l-r): Brian Walsh, Packaging Technologist, Repak; Richard Bruton TD, Minister of Communications, Climate Action & Environment; and Séamus Clancy, CEO, Repak.

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he EU’s Circular Economy Package brings with it new challenges that mean we must rethink our relationship with plastics in order to achieve new higher recycling targets included in resulting EU Legislation. The new Packaging & Packaging Waste Directive (PPWD) was approved by the EU in July 2018 and sets new plastic packaging recycling targets of 50% by 2025, rising to 55% by 2030. These targets will exclude recovery (e.g. through waste to energy). This new legislation must be transposed into Irish law in 2020. New EU legislation will also include the modulation of fees for packaging placed on the market. This will require Repak and other producer responsibility schemes throughout Europe to charge fees to producers based on the recyclability the packaging they place on the market. The Single Use Plastics (SUP) Directive also forms part of the EU’s Plastic strategy and is designed to help tackle plastic litter ending up in our oceans. It will include the following key measures:  Ban on items made from plastic where alternative materials are available, for example plastic straws, plates, cutlery, cotton buds and packaging made from expanded polystyrene for on-the-go consumption;  Consumption reduction targets for certain SUP items such as food containers made from plastics;  Binding targets for recycled content in plastic bottles of up to 20%

What is Repak and what does it do?

Repak is a not-for-profit packaging recycling scheme funded by contributions from over 3,150 participating member companies. Since 1997, Irish businesses have invested over €425 million through Repak to support packaging recycling in Ireland, helping to grow packaging recycling and recovery from under 15% in 1997 42 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

by 2025 and 30% by 2029;  Design restrictions for plastic bottles will require caps to be tethered to plastic bottles;  Separate collection targets set for plastic bottles of 77% by 2025 and 90% by 2029;  Extended producer responsibility schemes for SUP items will require producers who place SUP items on the market to pay towards litter clean-up costs. The government will have to transpose the SUP Directive into Irish law by 2021.

Ireland and Plastic Packaging Recycling In 2017, EPA packaging waste data showed that Ireland placed 1,038,409 tonnes of packaging on the Irish market. Of that, 280,673 tonnes was reported as plastic packaging. During 2017, 94,889 tonnes of plastic packaging was recycled back into plastics (34%), 123,145 tonnes was recovered through Waste to Energy facilities (44%) with the balance (22%) sent to landfill (Source: Source: Waste Packaging Statistics for Ireland at http://www.epa.ie/nationalwastestatistics/packaging/). With plastic continuing to grow, it is estimated that in 2030, Ireland will need to recycle an additional 80,935 tonnes to meet the 55% PPWD plastic recycling target. to an estimated 93% in 2018. Repak members fund the recovery and recycling of packaging waste collected by Repak-approved ‘Registered Recovery Operators’ by funding household recycling bins, civic amenities, bottle banks and commercial back-door waste nationwide. To find out more about Repak, please visit repak.ie.


recycling Repak Addresses the Challenge In September 2018, Repak launched its Plastic Packaging Recycling Strategy 2018-2030. It aims to assist Ireland in meeting its recycling targets, and to promote the design and production of plastic products that optimise use and recycling, in order to support the circular economy in a cost effective manner. Designing better and more recyclable plastic packaging is identified as a key step within that strategy and two producer relevant actions recommended are to commit to a Plastic Pledge to reduce plastic packaging waste and help Ireland to play its part in achieving the key goals set out within the EU Circular Economy Package, as well as strengthening the benefits of green procurement. Therefore, in line with the launch of the Plastic Strategy, we also launched the Repak Members’ Plastic Pledge to help encourage better design of plastic packaging.

What Has Been Achieved So Far? In May 2019, Repak launched its first report on the Repak Members’ Plastic Pledge, highlighting some of the key achievements and plans of these proactive businesses in relation to the five objectives of the pledge. The report shows that a lot of businesses are ahead of the game in terms of the changes they are already making. As a result of activities already completed or due for completion this year, over 10,600 tonnes of plastic packaging will be diverted from waste, either through replacement of current plastic packaging with more recyclable versions, reduction in the weight of plastic packaging used, or complete removal where possible (see panel, opposite).

The Single Use Plastics Directive includes specific rules for plastic bottles, including separate collection targets of 77% by 2025 and 90% by 2029.

What is the purpose of the Repak Members’ Plastic Pledge? When members sign up to the Repak Members’ Plastics Pledge, they pledge to achieve the following objectives. On average, projects have reduced plastic packaging by 11% and there are more than 120 programmes in progress by Repak members, mostly aimed at increasing the recyclability of plastic packaging. We are also seeing some innovations in this area, such as more readily detectable black plastic packaging, to help solve some of the technical challenges associated with sorting these for recycling. Also some Repak member businesses are responding to the challenge of incorporating recycled content into plastic packaging, aiming to achieve recycled content of, on average, 45% by 2025.

What’s Next? While actively recruiting additional members to sign up to the Pledge, we are continuing to collaborate with our members and other important stakeholders to advocate, educate and lead positive change in this area. We look forward to working with Ireland’s food industry partners to help create a more sustainable plastics economy.

How Can Businesses Get Involved? You can sign up today by downloading and signing the Plastic Pledge at https://repak.ie/irelands-plastic-pledge/ and emailing the signed copy to Brian Walsh at prevention@repak.ie. If you would like more information, you can also call our offices at 01 4670 190.

1. Prioritise the prevention of plastic packaging waste by minimising avoidable single use packaging and promoting packaging reuse where possible. 2. Support Ireland to deliver the Circular Economy Package plastic recycling targets of 50% of all plastics by 2025 and 55% of all plastic packaging by 2030, as set by the European Commission. 3. Reduce complexity within the plastic packaging supply chain by simplifying polymer usage and eliminating non-recyclable components in all plastic packaging by 2030. 4. Help to build a circular economy for used plastic packaging in Ireland and Europe by increasing the use of plastic packaging with a recycled content. 5. Recognising the role that plastic plays in preserving a large number of food products, ensure our approach to plastic packaging reduction is aligned to Ireland‘s goal of a 50% reduction in food waste by 2030 as set out in Ireland’s food waste charter.

To date, over 90 Repak Members have signed the Repak Members’ Plastics Pledge. Many of those members have recognised the need for a rethink on how we design plastic packaging but are conscious of getting the balance right to ensure that product shelf life is not reduced. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 43


Invest Northern Ireland

Our Friends in the North Jen Guiney, Business Development Executive with Invest Northern Ireland, provides an insight into why Northern Ireland food and drink producers continue to make an impact across the Republic’s retail and foodservice markets.

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Jen Guiney, Business Development Executive, Invest Northern Ireland.

ood and drink manufacturers from Northern Ireland are making increasing inroads into the market in the Republic of Ireland, many of them with the help of Invest Northern Ireland, the region’s business development body. “We offer buyers a comprehensive understanding of the products, capacity and capabilities of around 200 Northern Ireland food and drink producers. We can also pinpoint how our companies can help them to meet their business objectives with outstanding products,” explains Jen Guiney, Business Development Executive, Invest Northern Ireland.

Whilst Great Britain remains the most important destination for sales of Northern Ireland food and drink, with customers purchasing 47% of the total output, the Republic of Ireland remains the biggest export market at 14% (Source: Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) report Aug 2017). “The manufacturing capability of our wide network of food and drink manufacturers means that Northern Ireland can satisfy customer needs across many categories, as well as delivering volume requirements,” Jen reveals. “We have already assisted many buyers to identify opportunities in Northern Ireland through a successful programme of networking events, visits to our companies and ‘meet the buyer’ activities.”

Award-Winning Quality In October 2018, some 60 NI food and drink products gained awards at Blas na h’Eireann, including for the first time ever, the overall Supreme Champion. A total of 20 golds were achieved across most product categories, especially meat, dairy, bakery and fish, including smoked salmon. Champion at Blas was Rooney Fish of Kilkeel, Co. Down, a family business which exports its shellfish globally. Rooney won the top award for its superb Millbay Oysters from its own extensive oyster farm in Carlingford Lough. The 2018 Irish Quality Food Awards were also highly successful for NI food companies, with five outright winners.

The Multiple Effect Over the past year, food promotion activity has led to new business for a number of Northern Ireland companies with Aldi. In October 2018, Co. Tyrone-based Cloughbane Farm launched Cloughbane Little Farm, a range of children’s meals, in 67 Aldi stores, with plans to roll out to remaining stores this year. Earlier this year, Prep House Sauces in Crossgar won its first business with Aldi and is now supplying its pepper sauce to 137 stores. Portaferry–based Just Live a Little is now supplying two of its new Granola Trail Mixes, Plant Protein and the Smart Energy, to 130 Aldi stores. “We have already assisted many companies to identify purchasing opportunities in Northern Ireland through a successful programme of marketing activities and many retailers, including Tesco Ireland and Dunnes Stores, now list our food and drink,” Guiney notes.

Lough Neagh eels, one of the many quality products from Northern Ireland that’s proving hugely popular in the Republic of Ireland.

44 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

If you are looking for that innovative product to give you a point of difference coupled with flexibility, quality and consistency, why not make contact with Jen Guiney. T: +44 (0) 7985 111024. E: jen.guiney@investni.com W: BuyNIFood.com.


Northern Ireland’s food and drink regularly features in global awards for outstanding taste.

Cooked Lough Neagh Eels, Co. Antrim

Northern Ireland.

Bringing our world-class food and drink to your table. When you source food and drink from Northern Ireland, you can be sure of its quality. That’s why Northern Ireland’s food and drink regularly features in global awards for outstanding taste such as the Quality Food Awards, Great Taste Awards, World Cheese Awards, International Wine & Spirit Competition and the Blas na h’Éireann Irish Food & Drink Awards. This is also why Northern Ireland was named the World’s Best Food Destination at the International Travel & Tourism Awards 2018. Learn how you can serve our quality food and drink. For further information contact Jen Guiney, Invest NI E: Jen.Guiney@investni.com M:+44 79 8511 1024

Northern Ireland. Altogether more. *Source: InvestNI

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truly grass fed

Elevating Ireland’s Natural Dairy Credentials The Truly Grass Fed brand from Glanbia is taking Ireland’s natural dairy credentials to the next level, and has recently entered the US retail market with a range of cheese and butter products.

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s global consumers become more and more concerned with where their food is coming from and the impact their purchasing decisions have on the world around them and on their personal wellbeing, there’s an increasing responsibility on food producers to demonstrate these shared values. The Truly Grass Fed brand from world-leading dairy company Glanbia Ireland is one such company leading the charge in verified natural credentials. The company’s initial vision for Truly Grass Fed was a premium, grass fed ingredient brand for food and nutrition customers to support and endorse their natural brands in market. To fully achieve this goal, Truly Grass Fed has gone beyond selling Ireland’s green credentials, ideal for dairy production, and has taken significant steps to substantiate its key claims.

Independent Verification Independent verification forms a crucial part of the Truly Grass Fed story. Its farmers are committed to its grass fed programme and adhere to the strict parameters as outlined and audited by an independent third-party body, Bord Bia’s Sustainable Dairy Assurance Scheme. An additional core element of the Truly Grass Fed offering is ‘non-GMO’, and all products offered under the range have been verified by the Non-GMO Project, a US-based, non-profit organisation committed to preserving and building sources of non-GMO products, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO choices. It is North America’s most trusted seal for GMO avoidance by consumers who are concerned about what is in their food. Another common concern for consumers in this category is the treatment of animals, and Truly Grass Fed was proud to announce in 2018 its certification to Animal Welfare Approved by A Greener World (AGW), the leading animal welfare label in North America (and now operating in Europe).

46 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Avoiding Regulatory Divergence Food and nutrition brands operating in this space seek such verification for their discerning consumers, and this is proving true as Truly Grass Fed builds its client base of reputable customers. Most recently, US protein brand ICONIC partnered up with Truly Grass Fed to source its milk protein. The company prides itself on offering a clean label solution for a healthy on-the-go protein drink. “What differentiates ICONIC Protein from the rest is our meticulous sourcing of grass-fed milk protein to create a nutrient rich formula”, claims Billy Bosch, Founder and CEO. “Substantiation and animal welfare are very important to our consumers and that’s why choosing Truly Grass Fed milk protein made perfect sense.”

Expansion into US Retail Market With the success of Truly Grass Fed as an ingredient brand, in 2018 the company expanded its offering into the US retail market,

offering a range of cheddar cheeses. The Natural Aged and Natural Sharp cheddars, available in more than 2,600 retail outlets across the States, have received overwhelmingly positive feedback from consumers and retailers alike. Hot on the heels of the cheese launch, Truly Grass Fed salted and unsalted creamy butters are just hitting shelves in the US now. In a landscape packed full of vegetarian, vegan and plant-based products, consumers have been pleased to discover “real” cheese and butter that match their values while still hitting all the taste notes. “The Truly Grass Fed brand is all about natural food made the right way, with care and integrity for people, animals and the planet,” explained Nicola O’Connell, Head of Truly Grass Fed. “We are starting from a good place but we are also on a journey to strive to do more and better – this aligns very well with our customers and consumers and the choices in food that they want to make.”


pallets & packaging

Mid Cork Pallets Excellence since 1978

Established in 1978, Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging is one of the leading manufacturers of pallets in Ireland, and also supplies a large number of sectors with all their corrugated packaging needs.

M

id Cork Pallets & Packaging (MCP) have been manufacturing and supplying pallets and packaging of the highest standard for more than 40 years. One of the leading manufacturers of pallets in Ireland, they also provide a flexible stock and serve service for their growing list of customers’ corrugated packaging needs. “In operation since 1978, we know a bit about pallets and packaging, as well as the importance of a dependable, reliable, and efficient service,” explained Aidan Harty.

including 0201, Die Cuts, 4 and 6 point glued trays. They also offer an extensive range of Shelf Ready packaging solutions. They offer a range of print finishes, from standard to HD Flexo to Litho Laminated boxes. MCP offer a full Design and Sampling Service.

Specialist Packaging When it comes to specialist packaging, MCP’s product range includes:  Plywood Crates  Shipping Crates

Machine Pallet Wrap Hand Pallet Wrap  Corner Pieces “Although we don’t manufacture corrugated boxes, we offer a complete design and sampling service to help you with box design and to source your packaging,” explained Aidan Harty. “We manage the manufacturing process for you and provide a stock management service so you always have a continuous supply of packaging.” 

Pallets Their product range includes:  All types of timber pallets including Euro pallets, kiln dried and heat treated (both new and second hand);  Plastic and Aluminum pallets, as well as timber pallets;  They also have a Specialised Pallet Design Service available.

Packaging Mid Cork Pallets are BRC accredited and supply all types of corrugated boxes

Mid Cork Pallets operates from a 20,000 square metre facility near Macroom in Cork and a 7,000 square metre storage and distribution centre in Dunboyne, Co. Meath. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 47


pallets & packaging Fast, Efficient Delivery, Nationwide Operating from a 20,000 square metre facility near Macroom in Cork and a 7,000 square metre storage and distribution centre in Dunboyne, Co. Meath, MCP is strategically located to provide fast and efficient delivery of your pallets and packaging, close to all major road networks. Their Clondrohid facility in Co. Cork is over 25 acres and consists of over 250,000 square feet of purpose-built manufacturing and storage facilities. In Co. Meath, they have over 100,000 square feet of storage facilities in their seven-acre Dunboyne depot.

With over 40 years’ experience, Mid Cork Pallets and Packaging is the largest automated pallet manufacturer in Ireland.

Putting Customers First With over 40 years’ experience, Mid Cork Pallets and Packaging is the largest automated pallet manufacturer in Ireland. They boast one of the most modern facilities in Ireland and provide pallets and corrugated boxes to most of Ireland’s largest blue-chip companies. “Our customers are looking for a supplier that will put their needs at the forefront of everything that we do,” explained Aidan Harty. “We achieve that here at MCP by engaging with our customers and their evolving needs and continuously aiming to improve the overall package that we deliver to our customers.” Many of MCP’s customers operate 24/7, so MCP strive to ensure that they plan accordingly so their customers receive the service required to satisfy the demands of their business. “We get to know the customer inside out, so we have a great understanding of their needs and the demands of their business,” Aidan Harty noted. “We provide a quality, reliable product, at a competitive price, when our customer wants it.”

Certifications Mid Cork Pallets are certified to the following quality systems:  ISO9001:2008 

ISPM 15 Certified

BRC Certified

Sedex Certified

Members of TIMCON

Licenced EPAL Manufacturers

Registered member with Repak

Mid Cork Pallets are BRC accredited and supply all types of corrugated boxes.

Contact Details: For more details, please visit www.midcorkpallets.com or email sales@midcorkpallets.com or phone (026) 41311. 48 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

IRISH PACKAGING & PRINT


The Complete Package Complete print & packaging solutions for your business and Ireland’s largest automatic pallet manufacturer.

Call Clondrohid 026 41311 Call Dunboyne 01 8252059 www.midcorkpallets.com

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13/03/2019 4:14 p.m.


traceability

Traceability Makes Commercial Sense

Traceability is not just for legal compliance, but also makes sound business sense. New Irish research reveals the commercial benefits of sharing traceability information with consumers.

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he 2019 Shopper Intelligence study, which surveyed over 10,000 Irish grocery shoppers, revealed a number of insights into the business benefits for both brands and retailers from investing in and building consumer trust in traceability. Starting at a Retail Brand level, consumer satisfaction scores for Traceability are reasonably tight amongst the “Big 5”, but two domestic Irish retailers score highest for trust in their traceability capabilities. The Convenience Channel as a whole gets the lowest satisfaction score.

processes following the BSE crisis over 25 years ago, it comes as no surprise that suppliers in this category lead the field in the traceability stakes. In the intervening decades, many other sectors have followed the best practice processes adopted by the beef sector. In addition to beef, the other meat and fish categories dominate the Top 20 but interestingly we are seeing the fruit & veg, dairy and baby categories performing well on traceability capabilities.

Table 1: Retail brand shopper satisfaction scores for traceability.

“Best-In-Class” Categories for Traceability Led by Fresh Beef At a category level in store, when asked about Trust in Traceability, Irish shoppers say the fresh beef category is the standout performer. Given that the beef sector was one of the first to adopt in-depth traceability 50 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Consumer Satisfaction vs Perceived Importance The research conducted by Shopper Intelligence also enabled us to compare the categories that performed best for traceability against those categories for which traceability was deemed ‘Important’ and where their expectations are highest (i.e. where shoppers are


traceability demanding excellence in traceability). Fresh and cooked/prepared meats and the fish categories are deemed the most important when it comes to trust in traceability. However, there are a number of other interesting categories, including eggs, milk, baby, fruit & veg, vegetarian foods and prepared sandwiches to keep a watchful eye on. The good news for both suppliers and retailers is that there is good alignment between the categories where Irish shoppers expect strong traceability capabilities (Table 3, right) and the ones that are performing well on traceability (Table 2, right).

Opportunities for Improvement in Vegetarian, Food-to-Go and Frozen Categories The underperforming categories as regards satisfaction with traceability include vegetarian foods, sandwiches, fresh fruit, frozen chicken and frozen veg.

Delivering on Traceability nets High Value, Loyal Consumers The study also revealed some interesting behavioural metrics for Irish shoppers. In analysing the cohort of shoppers that deem traceability to be important, the data revealed that those shoppers were also key for traffic driving, spend and in-store engagement metrics. Retailers and brands that satisfy those shoppers who consider traceability as ‘Important’ don’t just tick the boxes for legal compliance, risk management and supply chain efficiency, but also win in the war to attract a more loyal shopper who will also drive larger baskets. a) Traffic Driving Metrics: Those shoppers who deem traceability as more important are; more organised pre-store (‘main reason to shop’ and ‘don’t want to run out’); and more importantly, strong trust levels in traceability will drive ‘loyalty’; b) • • c)

Spend Driving Metrics: (See table 5 overleaf) Shoppers who deem traceability as important are more likely to be younger (18-34) and shopping for the entire family – a key demographic for retailers to target with messagesabout traceability pre-store and in-store. Those who deem traceability as more important drive the basket as they will spend more by ‘trying new/different’ and ‘trading up to premium options’; In-store Browsing/Engagement: Those who deem traceability as more important are more likely to ‘browse’

Table 2: Irish shopper satisfaction with traceability – Top 20 categories.

Table 3: Top 20 categories for importance of traceability.

when in-store, which means more opportunities to entice;

Consumers Driving Traceability Agenda Consumer demand for data and transparency is a primary driver for traceability today. Risk management and regulatory compliance were the original drivers for the adoption of traceability practices following events such as the BSE and Pork Dioxin crises. Initially these were paper records, often manually recorded: logs of goods received, batch

Table 4: Traffic driving metrics. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 51


traceability

Table 5: Spend driving metrics.

and lot numbers, and expiry dates. However, in today’s fast-paced commercial environment, being able to retrieve fine levels of data at the touch of a button, about a specific product or ingredient to batch level, is the daily reality; and for that, electronic traceability processes are required. Traceability is about accurately and efficiently recording the identity of ingredients and products as they flow into, through and back out of your business. The next step in any business’ sustainability journey is translating all of that data into a message that is meaningful for consumers.

52 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

“Traceability is a complex metric and business driver to navigate,” explains Denis O’Brien, GS1 Ireland. “It comprises, on the one hand, a detailed amount of internal inventory and production data and, on the other, sharing and communicating that data in a way that is meaningful to consumers. That’s the real data challenge for most organisations that we deal with on a day-to-day basis.” For advice on transforming your production data to meet consumer demands for transparency and product data, contact GS1 Ireland today: http://d36.co/13B98


A new era in cloud-based Traceability Capture, record and share batch level traceability information across your organisation, with trade customers and consumers with the innovative traceability platform fTRACE. Manufacturers and retailers alike can have full visibility of their value chains at the touch of a button, while consumers can view traceability, origin, allergen and recipe information.

fTRACE is available in Ireland through GS1. Contact us today to find out more about using fTRACE in partnership with your suppliers and customers.

GS1 Ireland T: +353 1 2080660 E: ftrace@gs1ie.org www.gs1ie.org/ftrace

Connect with us

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process control

Digital View of the Installed Base Approximately 90% of the Endress+Hauser instruments installed around the world feature a fieldbus interface, yet only 3% actually utilise this digital communications capability. Endress+Hauser aim to improve this.

What does digitalisation do for the process control industry? What is the best way to exploit the opportunities afforded by system connectivity and data exchange? Endress+Hauser has developed a digital strategy that generates real added value from the virtual world for its customers.

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oday, a private life without access to the internet is hard to imagine. In contrast, industrial companies have been relatively cautious when it comes to connecting business and production processes, particularly in the area of process control. Although roughly 90% of the Endress+Hauser instruments installed around the world feature a fieldbus interface such as HART, Profibus, Foundation Fieldbus, Modbus, RS485, EtherNet/IP or Profinet, only 3% actually utilise this digital communications capability. But change is on the horizon, and Endress+Hauser, a leading global supplier of process and laboratory instrumentation, wants to be in on the ground floor to help current and future customers tap into this potential, and at the same time position itself as a leading provider in the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) environment. This digitalisation strategy is being pursued at several levels: in measurement technology products, by using the data that is available in the field instruments, and also in terms of interaction with customers. “We’re the first provider to use this approach,” emphasises Christophe Pujol, Head of Product Management for service products at Endress+Hauser. At the first level, measurement instrument connectivity,

54 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Endress+Hauser is actively developing the technology required for connectivity and data exchange. The current Proline 300/500 series of products is a good example. These flowmeters feature not only diverse signal outputs and fieldbus protocols, but also an integrated WiFi server. Apart from various process parameters – in this case mass flow, volume flow, density, concentrations, viscosity and temperature – these interfaces make it possible to monitor and retrieve a wide range of other sensor and process data as well. This additional data, which provides information regarding the status of field instruments and processes, is the centrepiece of the digitalisation approach, because it opens up new opportunities in the area of maintenance and process optimisation. Or in more concrete terms, an opportunity for predictive maintenance, which offers measurable benefits in the form of higher system availability and efficiency.

Netilion Analytics: Bringing Order to the Installed Base Before added value can be generated from the data, it first has to be available in a consistent form, which is not often the case today. Many


process control

companies own field instruments from different generations and manufacturers, for which detailed information is sometimes lacking. This can cause problems down the road if spare parts for obsolete instruments are unavailable, which then triggers a hectic procurement mission. This is where Endress+Hauser’s ‘Netilion Analytics’ digital application steps in. This tool helps capture the data from the entire installed base of field instruments and forwards it to a password-protected Cloud. After that, it is compared to the Endress+Hauser database, which is then updated with missing data. The database contains not only detailed information about Endress+Hauser’s own field instruments, but in some cases also about competitor instruments, albeit with less detail. The application creates ‘digital twins’ of the field instruments, which are visible by authorised persons from any type of end device. All that is required is an internet browser. The data can be captured in the field in one of two ways: either by scanning the type plate with a special app, or fully automatically through an interface module installed in the fieldbus network: the so-called edge device. In either case, Netilion Analytics reduces the time it takes to complete an inventory of the installed base to a fraction of what is required if the analysis is carried out by hand. Once the data is online, you can part with cumbersome trips to the field. Instrument data can then be viewed with one click. The online data brings more benefits than just the convenient access and time saved, however. Thanks to gathered information from the field, Endress+Hauser experts provide users with additional maintenance information. “Our maintenance consultants enable our customers to take management decisions regarding their critical measurement points,” explains Christophe Pujol. “Through the identification of obsolescence risks and migration priorities, our customers have a clear understanding about the potential for instrument standardisation, including recommendations for quick device replacement and optimised spares storage. Downtime risks are then largely minimised on the plant. Additionally, advice for improved calibration regimes supports our users to optimise operation costs without compromising risks of non-compliance with quality or safety requirements.” Because the entire installed base is transparent, there are no more hidden risks.

The Endress+Hauser Netilion ecosystem was independently certified with four stars by the EuroCloud organisation for highly sensitive data.

ammonium, pH, nitrate or oxygen content to the system operator’s smartphone in real time. This application is particularly interesting for surface water monitoring or aquaculture, among other environments. In another conceivable scenario, third-party manufacturers or IT service providers could offer useful applications via the Netilion ecosystem. Or it could also serve as a community platform for exchanging data and information between users.

Security: EuroCloud Certification This approach is familiar to most private individuals, but the process industry has been relatively reluctant when it comes to the issue of digitalisation. “We normally have to deal with our customers’ IT departments,” says Christophe Pujol. Data security is thus a central aspect that is raised as an issue time and again. For good reason, the process industry has completely different requirements than a private user who downloads a new fitness app. “Persuading the IT specialists can often be a long journey,” says Pujol. On the other hand, he can assure customers that when it comes to data security, Endress+Hauser leaves nothing to chance: “The Endress+Hauser Netilion ecosystem was independently certified with four stars by the EuroCloud organisation for highly sensitive data. We are also the first industrial company to receive a StarAudit certification.” Endress+Hauser thus hopes that more and more customers will place their trust in the new digital service and take advantage of the potential it boasts to optimise their processes. The fact is, however, digitalisation forces not only users, but also instrument manufacturers to question old business practices, because Netilion creates a new type of customer relationship. “This issue goes well beyond selling products,” says Pujol with confidence. “And because we will consult and support our customers more than ever before, we will have completely new opportunities for collaboration.”

Netilion Predict: Predictive Maintenance Capturing and updating the data with Netilion Analytics opens up further opportunities to exploit the information, such as adopting the previously mentioned predictive maintenance strategy. To address this area, Endress+Hauser is developing an application called Netilion Predict. It will permit customers to adapt the calibration and maintenance intervals to the actual needs of the operation. Inflexible intervals based on rule-of-thumb values are thus a thing of the past. The instrument’s digital twin ‘knows’ on its own how long production can continue to run reliably and when recalibration is required.As a result, system availability is increased and maintenance managers save time by reducing unnecessary service tasks. Netilion Analytics and Netilion Predict are two fundamental applications that can be used by the process industry as a whole. However, a wide range of industry-specific digital services is also conceivable. One example is ‘Smart Systems App’, an app that communicates with Liquiline measurement transmitters via the GSM mobile phone network to send water quality parameters such as

The digitalisation approach opens up new opportunities in the area of maintenance and process optimisation, including an opportunity for predictive maintenance, which offers measurable benefits in the form of higher system availability and efficiency. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 55


packaging

Excellence from

Limerick Packaging Limerick Packaging is one of the most reliable packaging suppliers in the country, having built its formidable reputation on delivering ‘on time, everytime’.

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e asked many packaging consumers to rank in order of importance the attributes that make a very good packaging supplier. Good quality came out on top, followed closely by on-time delivery and to our surprise, price only came third. Also hugely important was how well a company’s packaging supplier knows their business, with truly excellent suppliers capable of knowing and understanding not just their own business but their clients’ business too. Very few packaging companies are capable of this but Limerick Packaging are. In their mind, they exist to deliver ‘On Time Everytime’. How can they do this? By taking the time and effort to understand your business and usage patterns, stock products to order, in advance of your needs, and deliver weekly or daily as necessary. Many food industry and pharma/medical companies throughout Ireland are experiencing “a nice easy life”, safe in the knowledge that the packaging materials they need are but a phone-call away in Limerick Packaging. These companies no longer have stores full of boxes that they don’t need at that point in time and a packing hall without the boxes they do need. They have zero capital tied up in packaging stocks, allowing that money to be invested in turnover that perpetuates the business, and they have production and value-added activities where once they had stores.

Steely Determination Talking with the staff at Limerick Packaging, you can’t help but notice a steely determination to protect their position as the most reliable supplier of packaging materials in all of Ireland. It is as if their every waking hour is 56 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20


packaging dedicated to quality products ‘On Time Everytime’, and there is a palpable atmosphere of a business where the customer is truly king. “Our product range is quite extensive,” explains Mike Boland, Sales Director and co-owner. “While 80% of our business is Corrugated Boxes in regular slotted case and die-cut formats, we are growing rapidly in Litho printed outer boxes and inner cartons, supplying these to a growing number of customers. We also supply industrial polythene bags, sheets and pallet hoods, pallet edge-guards, high quality post-printed boxes, pallet-wrap, strapping, strapping accessories, tapes and a full range of protective foams.” Walking through their facility on the Ballysimon Road in Limerick, one is immediately struck by the cleanliness, tidiness, efficiency and sheer size of the factory, within which there is a barcoded storage system that not only controls stocks but also results in a ‘first in, first out’ stock rotation system.

Stocking to Purchase Order Set up in June 2002, Limerick Packaging has grown to a formidable size and the staff are very proud to count among their many customers some of the biggest names in the food industry and medical /pharmaceutical sectors. Once they get to fully understand their customers’ business, they stock product to purchase order and deliver daily or weekly as required. Mike Boland stresses that “customers within our famous stock and serve model can call product off today before noon and we will deliver tomorrow, anywhere in Ireland”. Limerick Packaging has experienced considerable growth in Shelf Ready/ Retail Ready packs and also in Litho-Laminated Corrugated packs due to their ability to follow market trends, their ability to design effective solutions for their customers at very competitive prices and their ability to assist their customers to get products innovatively packed to market in a timely fashion.

close but we are not there yet, and when we reach our goal, we will push on and once again set new standards for customer service.”

Dedication to Their Customers Having grown from zero in June 2002 to a very sizeable company today, Limerick Packaging owes its success to a number of factors, according to Connie Ryan, Managing Director and co-owner: “Our success is attributable to the generosity of our many customers, in the first instance for believing in us and placing their business with us, and for continuing to support us. Many of our customers who gave us business when we started have remained with us to this day. “We have rewarded our customers with state-of-the-art design and problem solving skills, trouble-free trading, competitive pricing and quality products delivered ‘on time everytime’,” he concludes. “We will continue to dedicate ourselves to our customers as we hope that many more fine customers will join in and be part of our success story.”

Meeting Customers’ Needs The thing that stands out above everything else at Limerick Packaging is the focus on customers’ needs, made obvious by the ultra large screens throughout the factory tracking each order’s progress, outlining the requirements for the next day’s deliveries and even separating these by county to optimise transport. The company operates its own delivery fleet, as this provides the flexibility necessary to meet all customer needs on a daily basis. “We are certified to ISO9001:2015 and FSC and we operate to ISO14001 and BRC/IOP,” Mike Boland notes. But we are never happy and we are always striving to improve our performance and to create the ultimate customer experience. We are

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 57


Kevin Woods

Machinery Limited Suppliers of machinery and service to the processing and packaging sector

• Tong engineering, manufacturers of all types of grading and conveying equipment in stainless steel • Manter weighing and packaging equipment for processed fruit and vegetable pouch fillers • REV packaging machines for fruit and vegetables • Redpack flowrappers • Upmatic automatic paper bag filler and stitchers • Marcelissen food processing equipment • Large selection of used machines always in stock

The Inch, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Tel: 086 859 5532 / 086 170 8791

www.kevinwoodsmachinery.ie

info@jmcpackaging.co.uk


food works 2020

Make Food Works Work For You! F Food & Drink start-ups are being encouraged to enter the Food Works accelerator programme, which offers supports valued at over €50,000.

Shane Ryan, founder of plant-based ready meals Fiid, an alumnus of the Food Works programme.

Eva Milka, founder of Ireland’s first snail farm, Gaelic Escargot, and participant on the 2019 Food Works programme.

ood Works is calling on food and drink entrepreneurs throughout the country to apply for its 2020 programme. The supports offered by the programme are valued at over €50,000 and include in-depth consultancy and advice from Bord Bia, Enterprise Ireland and Teagasc, the three agencies behind the programme, as well as access to consumer and market research, feasibility funding and bespoke mentoring with industry experts. The current participants of the 2019 Food Works programme exemplify the diversity of food and drink businesses that can benefit from the programme. They range from early start-up, T4 Adventure’s trekking meals, to more established brands such as Silk Tree Botanics’ alcohol-free spirit and Clintons Crisps. Ireland’s first snail farm, Gaelic Escargot, is also participating in this year’s programme, along with an oat-based savoury snack start-up.

One-To-One Mentoring As part of the programme, participants will benefit from one-to-one mentoring with some of Ireland’s best food and drink business minds, including John Stapleton, co-founder of the New Covent Garden Soup Company and Little Dish; Joanna Walker, food retail expert and former buyer with Sainsbury’s and M&S; Eamonn Rice, business consultant and former Kerry Group Director; Matt Bentley, marketing consultant; Gavin Sherry, manufacturing specialist; Moira Creedon, food business financial planning expert; and Fiona Fitzpatrick, who specialises in driving transformation growth for brands in the food industry. “Food Works is the only programme of its kind in Ireland, where three government agencies have come together to help develop innovative food and drink start-ups into commercially viable businesses

with export potential,” noted Karen Tyner, Senior Manager at Bord Bia. “This year, we are looking for scalable and export driven Irish food products that satisfy a genuine market need. As the diversity of participants for the 2019 programme suggests, this is a programme that is open to many and varied start-ups, so we encourage food entrepreneurs at all levels to apply.” Food Works is recruiting individuals and companies at the early stage of their development, who believe they have a cutting edge product which addresses a gap in the market. Interested companies can apply online at https://foodworksireland.ie/ to meet with the Food Works team.

Previous Participants Previous participants in Food Works can attest to its effectiveness. Food Works Alumnus, Shane Ryan, founder of Fiid, who produce plant-based ready meals, said: “The Food Works programme was transformative for my business. It gave me the resources, expertise and freedom to think bigger and more creatively about the problems I was trying to solve for my customers, which resulted in a whole new approach. A year on and we’ve achieved milestones beyond what I could have imagined for a small Irish start-up at this stage and I’ve gained a group of people, who are not only invaluable for brainstorming the inevitable problems that arise every day but have gone on to become what I know will be lifelong friends. I can’t stress enough the positive impact Food Works had on me as an entrepreneur as well as for Fiid. I would recommend it for anyone with ambitious goals to disrupt the food industry not just in Ireland but internationally.” Eva Milka of Gaelic Escargot who is currently on the 2019 Food Works programme, added: “Thanks to Food Works programme, we now have the tools to see the bigger picture in our business. It is an outstanding experience that equipped us with professional support, business skills and helped us to put them into actions for better outcomes. The close contact with Bord Bia, Teagasc and Enterprise Ireland and the great team spirit within the group makes the Food Works programme a remarkable experience.” The Food Works journey begins with an introductory meeting with Bord Bia, Enterprise Ireland and Teagasc, followed by a formal application. Applicants are then selected for the programme based on defined criteria including innovation, market insight, ability to scale and export, commercial potential and strength of team. The cost for entry to the programme is €3,000; however, the market value of the programme has been estimated at over €50,000. For further information on Food Works, visit www.foodworksireland.ie. FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 59


education

Part Time Courses Offered at UCC

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he Food Industry Training Unit (FITU) at University College Cork offers part-time Certificates, Diplomas and over 20 short courses for those working in the food, agri-food and seafood sectors. Located in the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences in University College Cork, the Unit was the first in Ireland to develop part-time Diplomas in Food Science and Technology, Speciality Food Production and the ICOS funded Diploma in Corporate Direction. In addition, FITU in collaboration with Taste 4 Success Skillnet have been the first to develop innovative micro-credentials called digital badges for those completing short courses related to the food, agri-food and seafood sectors. Digital badges are badges which represent new learning and skills and are awarded by Universities for

60 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Have you considered part-time industry training, CPD and Digital Badges with the Food Industry Training Unit at University College Cork?

learnings outside a traditional accreditation. FITU and Taste 4 Success Skillnet, in response to industry need for recognition of short courses, have developed the first digital badges at a University level that are specific for the food, agri-food and seafood sectors.

For further information on FITU courses and digital badges please go to the FITU website at https://www.ucc.ie/en/fitu/ or for general queries please contact Mary McCarthy-Buckley at m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie.


education

UCC’s Food Industry Training Unit Celebrates its 25th Anniversary!

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he Food Industry Training Unit (FITU) located in the School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork (UCC), is celebrating its 25th year serving the food, agri-food and seafood sectors in Ireland this year. The FITU management team received an award of excellence during the recent UCC Food Institute launch, acknowledging their unique and significant contribution to the provision of continued professional development in the food, agri-food and seafood sectors in Ireland. Manager, Mary McCarthy-Buckley, was delighted to accept the award on behalf of the team and stressed the importance of partnerships in ensuring continued success: “Partnerships are essential in ensuring that FITU meets the dynamic needs of those working with the food and agri-food sectors. We would not have been able to achieve 25 years of success without our industry partners, programme managers and academic lecturers and practitioners.”

The Food Industry Training Unit (FITU) at UCC is celebrating its 25th birthday.

The FITU management team are pictured celebrating 25 years of the Food Industry Training Unit.

Food Industry Training Unit Continuing Professional Development and Training for the Food, Agri Food and Seafood Sectors Information on courses from: Mary McCarthy-Buckley, Food Industry Training Unit School of Food and Nutritional Sciences College of Science, Engineering and Food Science University College Cork Email m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie www.ucc.ie/en/fitu FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 61


About Us A Family run business established in 1997, QPM LTD has developed a reputation for providing high performance systems, comprehensive support and specialist advice to the food and pharmaceutical manufacturing industry in Ireland.

CHECK & DETECT CHECK &fürDETECT Inspektionsgeräte die Lebensmittel-, CHECK & DETECT

Inspektionsgeräte fürequipment die Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie Inspection the Food, Inspektionsgeräte fürLebensmittel-, die for Lebensmittel-, Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie Pharmaceutical & Packaging industry. Pharmaund Verpackungsindustrie

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Combo-Systeme Combo Systems Combo-Systeme Combo-Systeme

Combo-Systeme

Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Road, Dublin43 22.7240 Tel: +353 (0) de.sales@loma.com 1 450 2421 Web: www.qpm.ie sales@qpm.ie Germany | Robinhood  +49 (0) 2064 Unit 22,|Scarva Road Industrial Estate,| Banbridge, BT32 3QD Metalldetektion Röntgeninspektion Kontrollwaagen | Service

Germany |  +49 (0) www.loma.com 2064 43 7240  de.sales@loma.com Germany |  +49 (0) 2064|43Kontrollwaagen 7240  de.sales@loma.com Metalldetektion | Röntgeninspektion | Service Metalldetektion | Röntgeninspektion | Kontrollwaagen | Service


SALES  SERVICE  CALIBRATION

Sales, Service and Calibration to the Food, Pharmaceutical and Packaging Industries

• • • • QUALITY PACKAGING MACHINERY •

FOR ALL OF YOUR CALIBRATION NEEDS ON YOUR INSPECTION EQUIPENT CONTACT QPM

METAL DETECTORS • CHECKWEIGHERS X-RAY INSPECTION SYSTEMS • SCALES & WEIGHTS TEMPERATURE MEASURING EQUIPMENT DATA LOGGERS • pH METERS • GAS ANALYSIS MAGNETIC SEPARATORS • FREEZERS / OVENS

All calibrations are traceable to the National Standard  All manufacturers and models covered  Onsite / In house Calibrations  Our experienced engineers and technicians can calibrate and test your systems as part of regular quality assurance and risk management audits Email: service@qpm.ie Phone: 01 4502421

Accurately measure chilled and frozen food temperatures with no waste. The Celsius instrument measures the mean temperature of chilled and frozen food without damaging the packaging or the product allowing you to sell your tested items instead of throwing them away.

Save product, save money, save the environment!

QPM LTD have been appointed as the distributors in Ireland for Sovereign Labelling Machines Sovereign Labelling Machines are a UK manufacturer and with over 25 years of experience are well established in the forefront of labelling and sleeving technology.

Protect Your Process - Magnetic Separation A comprehensive range of high performance products to protect processes from metal contamination includes options for gravity, pneumatic or conveyor feed.

Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: +353 (0) 1 450 2421 Web: www.qpm.ie sales@qpm.ie Unit 22, Scarva Road Industrial Estate, Banbridge, BT32 3QD


packaging systems

Food for Thought Goliath Packaging Systems has positioned itself as the BIG name in the supply of automated solutions to the Irish food industry.

G

oliath Packaging Systems Ltd, in business since 2007, supplies, installs & after-sales services a comprehensive range of automation equipment (incorporating end-of-line packaging, materials handling and industrial washing systems) to the Irish food sector. With experience gained through many years of successful project delivery for discerning customers throughout Ireland, the expertise of its international partners and the skills of its factory trained staff, Goliath is perfectly positioned to continue to meet the demands of its growing customer base. With its strongest ever sales performance in 2018, Goliath continues to deliver complex automated packaging solutions on time and within budget across all industry sectors. “This increased volume of business is very gratifying,” states Managing Director, George O’Leary, “particularly as it comes not only from repeat orders from our existing customer base but also valued new business from the frozen food, beverage, bakery and meat sectors in particular.” The past 12 months has seen business secured with companies operating in all of the above sectors.

following distinct items;  Liquid Filling & Capping Systems  Shrink Wrapping, Banding, Flow Wrapping & Over Wrapping  Cartoning  Case Erecting, Case Packing & Bag Lining / Sealing Systems  Manual & High Speed Labelling Systems  Weighing Systems  X-Ray / Metal Detection  Case Sealing (Tape & Glue)  Conveying Systems  Pallet Inverting & Exchange (Fixed, Mobile & Automatic In-line)  Pallet Stacking / De-stacking / Handling  Scissors & Vacuum Lifting Systems  Materials Handling Systems (Reel, Drum & Product Lifters / Manipulators)  Pallet Elevating Systems  Palletising Systems (Gantry, Articulated Arm & Layer types)  Stretch Wrapping / Hooding  Strapping Systems (Case & Pallet)  Automatic Corner Board Application  Washing Systems (Bottle, Jar, Utensil, Apron, Crate, Bucket, Tray, Drum, Pallet, Keg & IBC etc)  AGV Transport

Product Range

Free Packaging Consultancy Service

The Goliath product range consists of the

Goliath also offers a Project Management /

Goliath delivers complex automated packaging solutions on time and within budget across all industry sectors, including agri-food.

64 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Packaging Consultancy Service to assist in the early determination of a customer’s particular packaging equipment requirements and cost reduction potential. This service, which is free of charge, has, according to O’Leary “been instrumental in allowing our customers to determine payback periods before committing to a machine or integrated system purchase. When presented with real, identifiable cost reduction scenarios, customers are in a perfect position to argue the benefits of such investment with their finance providers, whether in-house or external.” Goliath understands the specific packaging needs of its food sector customer base. From liquid filling, shrink wrapping / banding, case-packing, labelling, palletising & pallet inverting to high speed industrial washing, via partnerships with a host of international companies, Goliath has positioned itself as ‘THE BIG NAME’ in the supply of automated solutions to the Irish food industry. Centrally located in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Goliath is less than two hours from all major markets, while trained engineers maintain spare parts and service all equipment installed with annual service contracts (reactive / preventative) available as preferred. To discuss your particular packaging equipment needs, please contact: George O’Leary, Managing Director, Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd, Well Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (067) 37893. Fax: (067) 34794. Mobile: (087) 1222816. E-mail: info@goliath.ie / sales@goliath.ie. Web: www.goliath.ie.


Instrumentation

A New Approach To Site Instrumentation

B

onner are uniquely positioned to offer site wide solutions across food, beverage and dairy facilities nationwide due to their expertise in both instrumentation and automation. Working across your entire site, looking after instrumentation from all manufacturers, supply of products and complete project delivery of advanced automation and control solutions, they can provide a solution to suit your plant.

Instrumentation Programme

thorough information-gathering exercise. This involves a complete assessment of your current instrumentation, processes and schedules that are currently in place for calibration, maintenance and monitoring, and the activity trends within your plant. The Bonner team then examines the collected data in detail, reviewing plant timetables, compiling a full instrument list and analysing every instrument individually. They compile all findings into a detailed report and develop a customised implementation plan. The plan is put into action with a range of services, including analysis, calibration & maintenance, procurement & supply, temperature mapping & control solutions.

A key component is a newly developed advanced programme, which works within the wider Quality & Engineering Management Systems, helping clients minimise risk, enhance efficiencies and Control and Automation Systems improve outputs. The system also identifies areas where data The scope of the programme is tailored Bonner_FoodIreland_90x130_4.pdf 1 08/07/2019 17:05 collection or control can be improved, to meet precise needs, beginning with an including a site wide SCADA, DCS, initial review session and undertaking a

Condition or Energy Monitoring System or parts of the process that can be improved with batching, vision systems, robotics or transport systems. The complete programme enables facilities to preserve the integrity of the plant, meet quality and safety directives and deliver long-term cost

APROL Factory automation Scalable. Flexible. Modular. C

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Food

IRELAND 2 019 / 2 0 Ye a r b o o k & D i re c to r y

Product & Service Index

ACCREDITATION Air Products Ireland Ltd Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland

ARCHITECTS / FOOD RELATED BUILDINGS BSS (Ireland) Ltd Carey Associates

BARCODING / LABELLING ADC Barcode AIS Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Avery Weigh-Tronix Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas International DSG Packaging Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology JMC Packaging Ltd Label One Ltd Obeeco Ltd SAI Global Tekpak Automation Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging

BROKERING INTRODUCTIONS / SUPPLY OF INFORMATION Invest Northern Ireland

BULK SPIRITS Great Northern Distillery

CONSUMER TASTE TESTING & SENSORY RESEARCH Innovate Solutions

EDUCATION /TRAINING / CERTIFICATE /CONSULTANCY Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics

National Standards Authority Of Ireland (NSAI) safefood SAI Global UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science

ENERGY / UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Bonner Calor Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd

FOOD SAFETY AUDITING GS1 Ireland SAI Global CONSULTANTS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration GS1 Ireland Q-Lab Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery CONTAMINANT CONTROL QPM Ltd CONTROL /INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Bonner Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Kuka Robotics QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd FOREIGN BODY REMOVAL QPM Ltd HYGIENE Cross Refrigeration Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Enviroclad Systems Ltd Festo Ltd safefood

Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Stone Food Machinery Value Stream Machinery TESTING/INSPECTION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Bonner Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Teagasc Food Research Programme Moorepark and Ashtown Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd TRACKING SYSTEMS ADC Barcode Codico Distributors Ltd GS1 Ireland Heavey Technology Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

FOOD LUBRICANTS Kevin Woods Machinery

GENERAL SERVICES /SUPPLY TO THE TRADE Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd All in All Ingredients Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Blenders Ltd Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Codico Distributors Ltd Com-Plas International Fisher Scientific Great Northern Distillery Healy Group Heavey Technology Irish National Accreditation Board JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Limerick Packaging National Standards Authority Of Ireland FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 67


product & service index (NSAI) NCC Food Ingredients Pegler & Louden Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Q-Lab Ltd QPM Ltd Saica Packaging Ireland Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

HEALTH & SAFETY Enviroclad Systems Ltd SAI Global Value Stream Machinery WrenTech Ltd

INDUSTRIAL WASHING EQUIPMENT Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Stone Food Machinery

INGREDIENTS AB Mauri UK & Ireland All in All Ingredients Ltd Andrew Ingredients Ltd Azelis Ireland Limited Brenntag Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Glanbia Ireland Healy Group Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd Innovate Solutions Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd NCC Food Ingredients Nutrition Supplies O’Brien Ingredients Ornua Puratos Crest Foods Ltd Trilby Trading Ltd D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

IT SERVICES & OUTSOURCING ALS Labelling Solutions DSG Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

LEGAL SERVICES Matheson

MATERIALS HANDLING SERVICE CONTROL / INSTRUMENTATION Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Bonner BSS (Ireland) Ltd Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks 68 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Manotherm Ltd QPM Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Tekpak Automation Ltd WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY / EQUIPMENT ABB Ltd Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix ENE Limited Festo Ltd Fischbein-Saxon Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Limerick Packaging Obeeco Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Security Pak Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd PALLETS, CRATES & CONTAINERS AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Saica Packaging Ireland Schoeller Allibert Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Syspal WrenTech Ltd PUMPS & VALVES BSS (Ireland) Ltd Festo Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Kevin Woods Machinery Pegler & Louden Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd WrenTech Ltd REFRIGERATION / COLD STORAGE Air Products Ireland Ltd Cold Move Cross Refrigeration CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd

DSG Packaging Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Kuka Robotics Ornua Schoeller Allibert Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Syspal SERVICE & CALIBRATION Bonner JMC Packaging Ltd QPM Ltd TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS Avery Weigh-Tronix DSG Packaging Ltd Irish Lift Trucks Johnston Logistics Ornua Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Storage Ltd Toyota Material Handling Ireland WrenTech Ltd WASTE MANAGEMENT/RECYCLING Avery Weigh-Tronix Irish Lift Trucks Kevin Woods Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Repak Ltd

PACKAGING AUDITS Limerick Packaging

PACKAGING /DESIGN /LABELLING ADC Barcode AiP Thermoform Packaging Air Products Ireland Ltd ALS Labelling Solutions Celtic Sales Company Ltd Com-Plas International Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd Diamond Corrugated Dollard Packaging Ltd Donoghue Packaging DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak ENE Limited Festo Ltd GS1 Ireland Greiner Packaging Ltd Industrial Packaging Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd Label One Ltd Limerick Packaging Measom Freer & Co. Ltd NPP Group Ltd Obeeco Ltd Ornua T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd


product & service index Packex Industries Ltd P.C. Packaging Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Schoeller Allibert Ltd Schütz (Ireland) Ltd Sealed Air Ltd (Cryovac) Security Pak Ltd Smurfit Kappa Ireland Syspal Tekpak Automation Ltd The Packaging Centre Ltd Versatile Packaging Ltd Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd

PEST CONTROL /FLY SCREENS Mitie Rentokil Pest Control

PLANT MAINTENANCE Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Bonner Kevin Woods Machinery NCC Food Ingredients Obeeco Ltd Value Stream Machinery

PROCESSING EQUIPMENT BAKERY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd DAIRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BSS (Ireland) Ltd Cross Refrigeration David Kellett & Partners Ltd DSG Packaging Ltd Elopak Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited

Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd DRINK Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix BSS (Ireland) Ltd Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd FRESH FOOD Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd Puratos Crest Foods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd MEAT, FISH & POULTRY Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd Air Products Ireland Ltd Avery Weigh-Tronix Cross Refrigeration DSG Packaging Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd

ENE Limited Festo Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Kuka Robotics Obeeco Ltd Pharmafoods Ltd QPM Ltd Schoeller Allibert Ltd Stone Food Machinery Syspal Value Stream Machinery Versatile Packaging Ltd Wrap It Packaging WrenTech Ltd MACHINERY AUCTIONEERS Air Products Ireland Ltd Cross Refrigeration WASTE WATER EQUIPMENT BSS (Ireland) Ltd Endress + Hauser Ireland Ltd Festo Ltd Kevin Woods Machinery Stone Food Machinery

PRODUCTION OPTIMISATION Festo Ltd Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd JMC Packaging Ltd Kuka Robotics Value Stream Machinery

RECRUITMENT ICDS Recruitment Consultants

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT BIM/Irish Sea Fisheries Board Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board Festo Ltd Innovate Solutions JMC Packaging Ltd Ornua Safefood Teagasc Food Research UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd WrenTech Ltd

STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION Cross Refrigeration ENE Limited Kevin Woods Machinery Syspal Teknomek Industries Ltd WrenTech Ltd

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS GS1 Ireland Repak Ltd

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 69


company listings AIS Ltd - Automatic Identification Systems

a ABB Ltd

Address: Auriga House, Precedent Drive, Rooksley, Milton Keynes, MK13 8PQ. Tel: (0044) 1908 350 300 (0044) 1908 350 301 Fax: Email: robotics@gb.abb.com Web: www.abb.com www.abb.com/robotics Main Products & Services: ABB is a leading supplier of industrial robots, modular manufacturing systems and service. A strong solutions focus helps manufacturers improve productivity, product quality and worker safety. ABB has installed more than 200,000 robots world wide

AB Mauri UK & Ireland

Address: Barn Way, Lodge Farm, Northampton, NN5 7UW. Tel: (0044) 1604 755 522 Fax: (0044) 1604 752 470 Email: Damien.McDonald@abmauri.com Web: www.abmauriukandireland.com Main Products & Services: Dough conditioners, yeast, soya flours, sour doughs, cake & donut mixes, icings & fillings. Contact: Director of Sales (Ireland): Damien McDonald

Advanced Packaging Machinery Ltd

Address: 718 Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 861 2141 Fax: (01) 861 2142 Email: s.dallas@test.ie Web: www.packagingmachinery.ie Main Products & Services: Metal detectors, x-ray inspection systems, check weighers & label applicators. Contact: Technical Director: Stephen Dallas

70 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Address: Unit 48, Canal Walk, Park West Industrial Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 12. AIC Plastic Pallets Ltd Tel: (01) 620 5742 Address: The Woodlands, Fax: (01) 620 5735 Carrigmore, Ballineen, Email: info@aisltd.ie Web: www.aisltd.ie Co. Cork. Main Products & Services: Tel: (023) 884 7333 RFID equipment,automatic Email: info@aicplastics.com labelling, print & apply systems, Web: www.aicpp.com industrial barcode scanning, Main Products & Services: 2D barcode equipment, Plastic, timber and aluminium hand held readers, mobile computers, fixed mount pallets, pallet boxes, totes, scanning, label printers, mobile storage boxes, stacking printers, desktop printers, containers, slipsheets, linbins, industrial printers, barcode bespoke pallets and boxes printers, labels & ribbons. (aluminium and plastic). Supply, install & maintenance Contact: Joe O’Flynn of auto ID products. Custom solution development for product traceability AiP Thermoform suitable for you.

Packaging

Address: Unit 1 A Ballymaley Business Park, Barefield, Ennis, Co. Clare. Tel: (065) 686 4486 Fax: (065) 689 3479 Email: john@aip.ie Web: www.aip.ie Main Products & Services: Design and manufacture Services of Thermoform Packaging for the Irish market.

Air Products Ireland Ltd

Address: Unit 950, Western Industrial Estate, Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 1800 99 50 29 Email: ieinfo@airproducts.com Web: www.airproducts.ie Main Products & Services: Air Products brings you the latest, most innovative solutions in cryogenic freezing, chilling, cooling and Modified Atmosphere Packaging. Freshline Gases® include CO2, Nitrogen and Oxygen in liquid or gaseous form. Backed by over 40 years’ knowhow in food processing. To find out more please visit our website. Contact: Air Products on 1800 99 50 29

Andrew Ingredients Ltd

Address: 27 Ferguson Drive, Knockmore Hill Industrial Park, Lisburn, Co. Antrim, BT28 2EX. (048) 9267 2525 Tel: Email: johngraham@andrewingredients.co.uk Web: www.andrewingredients.ie Main Products & Services: • Food and Bakery ingredients, flour, bread, cake and confectionery mixes, gluten free and vegan products, icings, dried fruit, savoury and sweet sauces, colours and flavours, baking powders, raising agents, sugar etc. • Dedicated technical team. • Test Bakery and Kitchen available to existing and potential customers to support NPD, innovation and problem solving.

Avery Weigh-Tronix

Address: Dublin: Airton Park, Airton Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 400 0720 Fax: (01) 400 0750 Address: Antrim: 1 Sentry Lane,Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT36 4XX. Tel: (028) 9083 9092 Fax: (028) 9083 5393 Email: irelandinfo@awtxglobal.com Web: www.averyweigh-tronix.com /ireland


LIFE SCIENCE

INDUSTRIAL

INgREDIENTS

company listings BSS (Ireland) Ltd.

Bonner

Instrumentation, Calibration and

Control Solutions Camida know LeCithin... Azelis Ireland Limited

y o u r

Address: 35 Western Parkway Address: Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Business Centre, Blackthorn Avenue, Instantising Milk Powders with Lecithin has its challenges. Ballymount Drive, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Ballymount, Whether it is controlling the rate of hydration of a high Foxrock, Dublin 18. Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 295 6977 protein powder or the rapid wetting of a high fat powder, the (01) 450 5050 Tel: 295 8338 Fax: choice of(01)Lecithin to improve the instantising properties of a Email: contact@bonner.ie Email: graeme.locke@azelis.ie Web: www.bonner.ie powder is essential. not one Lecithin resembles another, Main Products & Services: As Products & Services: Food Ingredients, the importance of making the rightMain decision cannot be Services inc. Analysis, Flavours and Colours. overstated. Calibration, Maintenance & Contact: Managing Director: Temperature Mapping, Graeme Locke Instrumentation products for Camida wants to understand the application and customer measurement and control, needs to choose the Lecithin that suits you and your product. Automation & Control solutions. Contact: Managing Director: Wetting and flow-properties, flavour, colour, viscosity, GM M Bonner status and many other properties must bePatrick adapted to the Service Manager: needs of the finished product. We analyse yourJefferson needs. We Roddy & Control: Automation tailor each approach to the individual processing plant and Vernon Smit

Address: White Heather Industrial Estate, 301 South Circular Road, Dublin DO8 C78P Tel: 00 353 (1) 416 5100 00 353 (1) 416 5165 Fax: Email: 1930-sales@bssgroup.com Web: www.bssireland.ie Main Products & Services: Pipeline and heating solutions Contact: Business Director: Jason Warnock

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with over 40 years combined experience of Dairy across Europe, we manage the process and most importantly add BIM/Ireland’s value to your Seafood end product. Development Agency

i s

AD-Joe.indd

Address: Whitestown Road,Tallaght, Dublin 24, D24 VY75. Tel: (01) 453 6960 Fax: (01) 453 7607 Email: sales@blenders.ie Web: www.blenders.ie Main Products & Services: Mayonnaises, dressings, bouillons, cooking sauces, table sauces, carvery sauces, relishes in bulk catering, sachets and retail jar formats.Branded and private label.

Calory

o u r

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Address: Long Mile Road, Dublin 12. Tel: 1850 812 450 Email: info@calorgas.ie Web: www.calorgas.ie i s o v e r Main Products & Services: Supply of LPG in bulk tanks or cylinders. Contact: Sales Director: Oliver Kenny.

Camida Ltd Camida Ltd., Tower House,

o v e r

Address: Crofton Rd, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. This service is provided by a dedicated and experienced team Tel: (01) 214 with in-depth 4100 technical and market knowledge and who Fax: (01) 284 1123 deliver a customer focused approach to your business. So Email: info@bim.ie Bordsolutions Bia Web: www.bim.ie challenge Camida to find tailor-made for you and Main Products & Services: The Irish Food Board your production. Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) Address: Clanwilliam Court, helps to develop the Irish Seafood Lower Mount Street, Industry by providing technicalENQUIRIES Dublin PLEASE DIRECT YOUR TO 2.jOE gUINEY expertise, business support, Tel: (01) 668 5155 funding, training and promoting Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie responsible environmental practice Main Products & Services: Marketing, promotion and development of Irish 3 food, drink & horticulture.

Blenders

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Brenntag

Address: Unit 405, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Dublin 24 Tel: +353(0) 1 4013500/ +353 (0) 86 2958750 Email: dublin.sales@brenntag.ie/ james.dixon@brenntag.ie Web: www.brenntag.ie Main Products & Services: Food ingredients, cake mixes, blends, NPD Contact: Key Account Manager: James Dixon

Address: New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, E91 YV66 New Quay, Clonmel, Tel: (052) 612 5455 Co(052) Tipperary, Ireland. 612 5466 Fax: Mobile: (087) 622 6810 Email: michael.odonovan@camida.com LIFE SCIENCE INDUSTRIAL INgREDIENTS t: +353 52 6125455 Web: www.camida.com Main Products & Services: e: joe.guiney@camida.com Ingredients (Food, Beverage, m:Feed). +353Lecithin, 86 2413223 Esters (Fatty acids & MCT Oils), Emulsification w: www.camida.com systems, Sweeteners (Sucralose, Stevia, NHDC), Vitamin blends, Flavour systems, Meat Functional blends (Texture & Yield improvers). Feed Sector – Vitamins (Dry and liquid form), Glycinates (Copper, 02/06/2015 Iron, Manganese & Zinc), Organic acids (buffered propionic acid & buffered formic acid). Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Contact: Sales Manager: Michael O’Donovan

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 71

12:48


company listings Carey Associates

Architects for the Food Industry Address: Office 1, Second Floor, Building 3b, Killegland Street, Ashbourne Town Centre, Ashbourne, Co. Meath A84 NX77 Tel: (01) 835 1572 Email: info@careyassociates.ie Web: www.careyassociates.ie Main Products & Services: Architects and Project Managers Contact: Fergus Carey MRIAI

D Corcoran Chemicals Ltd

Address: 17 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 (01) 679 3521 Fax: Email: info@corcoran-group.com Web: www.corcoran-group.com Main Products & Services: Distributors of raw materials for the food, pharmaceutical, polymer & chemical industry. Contact: Sales

Celtic Sales Co (Cork) Ltd

Address: Unit 3b, Waterfront Business Park, Little Island, Cork. Tel: (021) 429 7984 (021) 429 7990 Fax: Email: mary@celticsales.com Main Products & Services: Packaging materials for fresh food.

Cold Move

Address: Glenasaul Industrial Park, Oranmore, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 792 926 Mobile: 086 8091 893 Email: innovation@coldmove.ie Web: www.coldmove.ie Main Products & Services: Controlled Storage & Distribution.

Com-Plas International

Address: Unit F5 & F6, Southern Link Business Park, Naas, Co. Kildare, Ireland, W91 RT9P. Tel: +353 (0)45 874 088 Email: sales@complas.ie Web: www.complas.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging products for food, pharma and chemical industries. 72 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Diamond Corrugated

Address: 12-13 Pennyburn Industrial Estate, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, BT48 OLU. (048) 7126 2957 Tel: Fax: (048) 7126 7094 Email: mail@diamondcorr.com Web: www.diamondcorr.com Main Products & Services: Corrugated, multi-point glued, litho-laminated corrugated, folding cartons.

Dollard Packaging Ltd Corcoran Products (Irl) Ltd

Address: Unit 12 Northern Cross Business Park, Finglas, D11 DC67, Ireland. Tel: (01) 864 4422 Email: info@corcoran-group.com Web: www.corcoran-group.com Main Products & Services: Suppliers of packaging to the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industry. Contact: Derek Lennon

Address: Units 6-11, Eklad Park, Malahide Road Industrial Park, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: (01) 847 0044 Email: sales@dollard-packaging.ie Web: www.dollard-packaging.ie Main Products & Services: Print and Packaging.

Donoghue Packaging

CRS Mobile Cold Storage Ltd Address: Carnisle, Kildalkey, Co. Meath. Tel: (046) 943 5000 Fax: (046) 943 5068 Email: enquiry@crs.ie Web: www.crs.ie Main Products & Services: Increase your on-site cold storage capacity: CRS offer a wide range of temperature controlled storage solutions both new and professionally refurbished for rent and purchase. Our products include 1-58 pallet portable cold stores and 10-106kw portable blast freezers.

Address: Donpack Business Park, Bandon, Co. Cork Tel: (023) 884 2111 Fax: (023) 884 1211 Email: donpack@donpack.ie Web: www.donpack.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of Waxed Solid Board & Corrugated Packaging Products. Contact: Managing Director: Ray Donoghue

DSG Packaging Ltd

Address: L2 Toughers Industrial Park, Newhall, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 454 900 Email: rdoyle@dsgpack.ie Web: www.dsgpack.ie Main Products & Services: Specialists in Contract Packaging, Outsourcing and “End of Line� Filling and Packaging Services.


company listings

E

F

Elopak

Address: 67 Broomhill Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 452 1111 Web: www.elopak.com Main Products & Services: Liquid Packaging, Milk, Soup and Juice Cartons, Packaging Machines.

Endress+Hauser Ireland Ltd

Address: Exchequer House, Embassy Office Park, Kill, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 989 200 Email: info@ie.endress.com Web: www.ie.endress.com Main Products & Services: Endress+Hauser are a global leader in instrumentation solutions and services for the food and beverage industry.

Ene Limited

Address: Unit 24, Scarva Road Industrial Estate, Banbridge, Co. Down. BT32 3QD Tel: +44 28 4062 2215 Email: info@eneconveyors.com Web: www.eneconveyors.com Main Products & Services: Conveyor systems and replacement belts. Contact: Belting Manager: Darren Horner

Enviroclad Systems Ltd

Address: Unit 57B, Hebron Industrial Estate, Hebron Road, Co. Kilkenny. Tel: (056) 775 2866 Fax: (056) 777 0955 Email: info@enviroclad.com Web: www.enviroclad.com Main Products & Services: Supply and Fitting of Enviroclad Hygienic Wall and Ceiling Cladding in P.V.C. for the Food Industry.

Fisher Scientific Festo Ltd

Address: Head Office: Unit 5, Sandyford Park, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. (01) 295 4955 Tel: Fax: (01) 295 5680 Email: sales_ie@festo.com Web: www.festo.com/ie Main Products & Services: Automation Technology · Industrial Automation · Electrical Automation · Process Automation Training & Consulting Food, Beverage & Packaging Expertise

Address: Suite 6, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown, Corporate Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15, DI5VY66. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fishersci.com Business: Laboratory supplies, Chemicals, Consumables, Reagents, Equipment & Instruments. Contact: Commercial Product Manager: Gerry Fitzmaurice

G

Fischbein-Saxon

Address: 274 Alma Road, Enfield, Middlesex, EN3 7BB, England. Tel: (0044) 844 372 2877 Fax: (0044) 844 372 2876 Email: sales@fischbein-saxon.co.uk Web: www.fischbein.com/eastern Main Products & Services: If your business consists of ‘bagged products’, in any industry, Fischbein has a solution to fulfil your needs. From low-cost Manual sealers, semi-automated Industrial bag sealers and sewing systems and sewing consumables, to high speed fully automated bagging and palletizing solutions. With finance available at cost effective rates, companies can invest in technology now, enabling them to produce their products faster, neater and with lower labour costs, within minimal initial financial outlay. Contact: Sales & Services Manager: Barry Cox

Glanbia Ireland

Address: Glanbia House, Ring Road, Kilkenny Tel: (056) 883 6346 Email: jennygraham@glanbia.ie Web: www.glanbiaingredientsireland.com Main Products & Services: B2C Dairy, Ingredient Solutions & Agribusiness Contact: Marketing Manager - Food: Jenny Graham

Goliath Packaging Systems Ltd

Address: Well Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: (067) 37893 Fax: (067) 34794 Email: info@goliath.ie Web: www.goliath.ie Main Products & Services: Supply & installation of End of Line Automation Systems, Materials Handling Equipment & Industrial Washing Machinery.

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 73


company listings Great Northern Distillery

Address: Carrick Road, Dundalk, Co. Louth, Ireland. Tel: 042-9429005 Email: office@gndireland.com Web: www.gndireland.com Main Products & Services: Suppliers of bulk Irish Whiskey & Gin Contact: John Lynch

Greiner Packaging Ltd

Address: Killyman Road Industrial Estate, Dungannon, County Tyrone, BT 71 6LN. Northern Ireland. Tel: (0044) 28 8772 3131 Fax: (0044) 28 8772 7318 Email: Sales.Dungannon@greiner-gpi.com Web: www.greiner-gpi.com Contact: Sales Director: Oliver Murphy Sales Manager: Philip Hogan

H Healy Group

Address: HCL House,Second Avenue, Cookstown Industrial Estate, Tallaght, Dublin 24. D24 XDR5 Tel: +353 (0)1404 9200 Fax: +353 (0)1404 9201 Email: info@healy-group.com Web: www.healy-group.com Main Products & Services: Healy Group are a solutions-driven agent and distributor, supplying high-quality food ingredients, chemicals, nutraceuticals and raw materials. We are committed to providing an excellent range of products and unrivalled technical support to all of our customers. From beverages to bakery, pharmaceuticals to cosmetics, our customers can depend on the collective experience and expertise of our dedicated team.

GS1 Ireland

Address: Second Floor, The Merrion Centre, Nutley Lane, Donnybrook, Dublin 4, D04 KF62 Tel: (01) 208 0660 Fax: (01) 208 0670 Email: info@gs1ie.org Web: www.gs1ie.org/food Main Products & Services: Global Supply Chain Standards Body. Barcode Numbers, Barcode Manager Tool, Barcode Symbols, fTRACE, ProductDNA, EDI Message Standards, Data Synchronisation (GDSN), EPC/RFID, Traceability Standards, Barcode and EDI Message Verification, Advisory and Training Services. Contact: Chairman: Thomas Shortall (Kerry Group) Vice Chairman: Pat Tracey (DCC Vital) Chief Executive Officer: Mike Byrne

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I

Heterochem (Dist.) Ltd

Address: Unit 49, Baldoyle Industrial Estate, Dublin D13 H2N2 Tel: (01) 839 3127 Email: info@heterochem.com Web: www.heterochem.com Main Products & Services: Acidulants, Antifoams, Antioxidants, Botanicals, Colours, Emulsifiers, Flavours, Gums, Preservatives & Sweeteners. Contact: info@heterochem.com Accreditation: ISO, FEMAS & Organic Trust Certified

HH SOLUTIONS

Address: 12 Ritaville, Old Cork Road, Limerick. Tel: (061) 603 742 Email: info@hhsolutions.ie Web: www.hhsolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Food Probes & Data Services: Loggers & Wireless Monitoring Systems. Irish agents for Eltex of Sweden & Comark Ltd.

Innovate Solutions

Address: 2nd Floor, 6 South William Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 707 9856 Email: sales@innovatesolutions.ie Web: www.innovatesolutions.ie Main Products & Services: Consumer Research – NPD taste testing, product benchmarking, expert sensory panels, focus group research

Invest Northern Ireland

Address: Bedford Square, Bedford Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Tel: 0044 7895 111024 Email: jen.guiney@investni.com Web: www.investni.com Main Products & Services: Brokering introductions to Northern Ireland food and drink sector. Contact: Business Development Executive: Jen Guiney

Irish Exporters Association

Address: 28 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 661 2182 Email: iea@irishexporters.ie Web: www.irishexporters.ie Main Products & Services: Food and Drink Export Ireland, a division of the IEA, provides assistance to Irish food and drink companies in the home market and to increase their sales abroad.

Irish Lift Trucks

Address: Clonlara Avenue, Baldonnell Business Park, Baldonnell, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 403 4100 Fax: (01) 403 4183 Email: info@irishlifttrucks.ie Web: www.irishlifttrucks.ie Main Products & Services: Materials Handling Equipment/Forklifts. Contact: Conal McCourt / Wayne Uzell


company listings Irish National Accreditation Board

J

LL Kevin Woods Machinery Limited

Company Listings

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3003 Email: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie

Address: The Inch, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin, Ireland. Tel: 086 859 5532 / 086 170 8791 Web: www.kevinwoodsmachinery.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of machinery and service to the processing and packaging sector.

K David Kellett & Partners Ltd

Label One Label OneLtd Ltd

Address: 3 Advantage Way,

Address: 3 Advantage Way, Ballygomartin Industrial Ballygomartin Estate, Ballygomartin Industrial Estate, Road, Belfast BT13 3LZ. Ballygomartin Road, Telephone: (048) 9077 7444 Belfast BT13 3LZ. Fax: (048) 9077 4067 (048) 9077 7444 Tel: Email: info@labelone.ie Fax: (048) 9077 4067 Web: www.labelone.ie Email: info@labelone.ie Main Products/ Self-adhesive labels, Web: www.labelone.ie Services: extended content leaflet Main Products & Services: labels. Self-adhesive labels, extended Contact: Sales Manager, ROI: content leaflet labels

JMC Packaging Ltd

Address: 37 Seagoe Industrial Estate, Craigavon, Co. Armagh, BT63 5QE. 028 3839 1723 Tel: Mobile: +353 86 0234177 Email: info@jmcpackaging.co.uk Web: www.jmcpackaging.co.uk Main Products & Services: Specialists in packaging materials and equipment. Shrink wrap equipment, tray sealing equipment, automatic label applications, automatic stretch wrappers, checkweighing & metal detections, polyolefin shrink film, smoothwall foil trays, soft fruit punnets, food grade stretch film & lidding film and meat & poultry trays.

Food Ir

Chris Moore 087 252 3335

LogoPak Inte

Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: Web: www.log Main Products/ Services:

Contact:

M

Kiernan’s Food Ingredients Ltd

Address: Unit 8 Steadfast Industrial Estate, Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (042) 966 2096 Fax: (042) 966 3954 Email: info@kiernans.ie Web: www.kiernans.ie Main Products & Services: Food ingredients - seasonings, cures, sauces, marinades etc. Food packaging - aluminium trays, vac pack, shrink bags, etc. Contact: Martin Kiernan Mobile 087 2567694 James Kiernan Mobile 087 6866993 Marty Boyle Mobile 0044 7585808976

Kuka Robotics

Address: Great Western Street, Address: Maple Court, Wednesbury, West Midlands, Wormbridge House, WS10 7LL United Kingdom. Wormbridge, Tel: (0044) 121 505 9970 Hereford, HR2 9DH. Email: katherinenowill@kuka-robotics.co.uk Tel: (0044) 1981 570 611 Web: www.kuka.com Email: davidkellett@davidkellett.co.uk Main Products & Services: Main Products & Services: Robotics & Automation Dairy Engineering, Filtration Contact: General Sales Manager - Ireland: Systems/Membranes, RO, UO, Brian Cooney UF & MF. OsmosisÂŽ, Ultra Filtration and Micro Filtration, Effluent Treatment, Spiral Wound and Plate & Frame, Cheese Maturing Vacuum Pouches. Contact: Managing Director: David Kellett

Limerick LimerickPackaging Packaging

Manotherm Lt Address:

Address: Park, Address: Eastlink Business Eastlink Business Park, Ballysimon Road, Limerick. Telephone: Ballysimon Road, Tel: (061) 400 035 Fax: Co. Limerick. info@lmkpkg.ie Email: Email: Telephone: (061) 400 035 Web: www.limerickpackaging.ie Website: Fax: (061) 400 036 Main Products & Services: Main Products/ Email: info@lmkpkg.ie Web: Corrugated Boxes, Polythene Services: www.limerickpackaging.ie Main Products/ Palletwrap, Bags, Edgeguards, Corrugated Boxes, Services: Polythene Bags, Strapping, Tapes, Litho printed Contact: Cartons,Edgeguards, Palletwrap, Litho Laminated outers, High Quality Post-Printed Outers, Strapping, Tapes. Contact: Mike Boland Shelf-Ready Packs. Contact: Mike Boland

LINPAC Allibert Address: 17 Ridgeway, Quinton Business Park, Bimingham, B32 1AF, United Kingdom. Manotherm Ltd Telephone: (0044) 1606 56 1929 Address: 4 Walkinstown Road, Fax: (0044) 1606 56 1998 Email: brendan.mcgarry@linpac.com Dublin D12 RP83 Web: www.linpacallibert.com Tel: (01) 452 2355 Main Products/ Plastic Materials Handling Fax: (01) 451 6919 Services: Products - Boxes, Bins, Email: info@manotherm.ie Trays, Pallets etc. Web: www.manotherm.ie Contact: Sales Manager, Ireland: Main Products & Services: Distributor of processBrendan McGarry instrumentation 087 676 7161 and controls.

M

Measom Freer

Address: Telephone: Fax: Email: sal Web: w Main Products/ Services:

44 f

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FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 75


company listings Matheson

Address: 70 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland. 00 353 1 232 2000 Tel: Email: louise.tolerton@matheson.com Web: www.matheson.com Main Products & Services: Legal Services

Measom Freer & Co. Ltd

Address: 37/41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicester, LE18 2FL, England. Tel: (0044) 116 288 1588 (0044) 116 281 3000 Fax: Email: sales@measomfreer.co.uk Web: www.measomfreer.co.uk Main Products & Services: Measom Freer manufacture and stock quality plastic bottles, custom moulded bottles, dropper caps, scoops, measures, boxes, jars, tubes, fasteners etc, for food use. Services include 3D design, in-house tool making and screen printing.

Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging Ltd

Address: Clondrohid, Macroom, Co. Cork. Oranstown, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (026) 41311 (01) 825 2059 Email: sales@midcorkpallets.com Web: www.midcorkpallets.com Main Products & Services: Established in 1978, Mid Cork Pallets & Packaging is one of the leading manufacturers of pallets in Ireland. We also provide a flexible stock and serve service for our growing list of customers corrugated packaging needs. Operating from a 20,000 square meter facility near Macroom in Cork and a 7,000 square meter storage and distribution centre in Dunboyne, Co. Meath, MCP is strategically located to service the Irish market, close to all major road networks. Contact: sales@midcorkpallets.com

76 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

N National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI)

Address: 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: (01) 807 3800 Fax: (061) 332 982 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie Main Products & Services: Certification and inspection services to national & interna- tional product & management system standards including ISO 22000, ISO 9001, OHSAS and BRC Global Food Standard.

Food Ingredients

NCC Food Ingredients

Address: NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Fax: (01) 661 6261 Email: foodsales@ncc.ie Web: www.nccingredients.com Main Products & Services: Food Ingredients: Natural Flavours, Acidulants, Preservatives, Biocides, Enzymes, Texturants, Hydrocolloids, Stabilizers, Antioxidants, Carriers, Binders, Gelling agents, Fibres, Sweeteners (natural & high intensity), Amino Acids, Colours, Fats & Oils, Starches, Texturizers, Clean Label ingredients, among other ingredients. Ingredients Sourcing: With a team of dedicated and qualified food personnel we have a deep and informed understanding of the many challenges facing the food industry today. Working in close partnership with highly innovative producers across the globe we provide our customers with a wide range of functional, clean label products and technologies. Our customer base ranges from international producers of foods and beverages to small niche artisan creators of fine foods. We support our customers from the very early stages of product development through to end production. Contact: Product Manager: Fintan McConnell (fmcconnell@ncc.ie)

NPP Group Ltd

Address: Unit 509, Mitchelstown Road, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (00353) (0) 1 880 9299 Fax: (00353) (0) 1 880 9298 Email: sales@npp.ie Web: www.npp.ie Main Products & Services: Flexible plastic packaging distributors.


company listings T.S. O’Connor & Son Ltd

Nutrition Supplies

Address: Innishannon, Co. Cork, T12 F248. Tel: (021) 477 5522 Fax: (021) 477 5449 Email: ursula.lecane@nutritionsupplies.ie Web: www.nutritionsupplies.ie Main Products & Services: Vitamin & Nutrient Precision Premixes.

O Obeeco Ltd

Address: Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 278 2323 Fax: (01) 278 2374 Email: sales@obeeco.ie Web: www.obeeco.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging Processing and Automation Machinery. Coding and Printing Solutions and Materials. Contact: Sales Director: Richard Burke Managing Director: Olive Walker

O’Brien Ingredients

Address: 11 Magna Drive, Magna Business Park, Citywest, Dublin D24 T97Y Tel: 00353 [0]1 469 1400 Fax: 00353 [0]1 469 1360 Email: ingred@obrien-ingredients.ie Web: www.obrien-ingredients.ie Main Products & Services: Supplier of ambient, frozen and chilled ingredients to Bakery, Beverage, Confectionery, Dairy, Ice Cream, Feed, Pharmaceutical, Infant Formula and Savoury sectors in Ireland. Contact: Sales Account Manager: Christopher Doyle

Address: Unit C, 67 Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 5696 Fax: (01) 295 5741 Email: andrew@bags.ie Web: www.bags.ie Main Products & Services: Printed Carrier Bags, Tapes, Labels & Flexible Packaging. Contact: Sales Manager: Andrew Haughton

P.C. Packaging Ltd

Address: Derrynane House, Eadestown, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 883 510 (045) 880 934 Fax: Email: philip@pcpackaging.ie Web: www.pcpackaging.ie Main Products & Services: Packaging machinery/ shrink films, flexible packaging, Belca range of shrink wrappers, Ilapak flow wrapping, Sovereign labelling systems, Sick sensors.

Ornua

Address: Grattan House, Mount Street Lower, Dublin 2. +353 1 661 9599 Tel: Fax: +353 1 661 2778 Email: communications@ornua.com Web: www.ornua.com Main Products & Services: Ireland’s largest exporter of Irish dairy products (butter, cheese and milk powders) and proud owner of the Kerrygold brand.

P Packex Industries Ltd

Address: Unit 1, Village Mills Business Park, Rathnew, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (0404) 69 851 Fax: (0404) 69 861 Email: sales@packex.ie Main Products & Services: High quality flexible packaging. Contact: Ivan Cruise

Pharmafoods Ltd

Address: Lower Waterford Road, Carrickbeg, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. (051) 645 066/645 084 Tel: Fax: (051) 645 033 Email: info@pharmafoods.net Web: www.pharmafoods.net Main Products & Services: Bilwinco Multihead Weighers, Mondini Tray Sealers Vacuum and Gas, Limitech Liquid Processing Equipment, Rovema Vertical Form Fill Sealers, Cartoning, Bag In Box, Abtech Premade Pouch Production for Tuna in Foil.

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company listings Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

Puratos Crest Foods Ltd

Address: 70 - 71 Dunboyne Business Park, Dunboyne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 825 5505 Fax: (01) 825 5506 Email: info_ireland@puratos.com Web: www.puratos.com Main Products & Services: Bakery, patisserie and chocolate ingredients. Belcolade Belgian chocolate, Puratos bakery & patisserie products, PatisFrance premium patisserie ingredients. Contact: General Manager: Sean McDaid www.linkedin.com/in/seanmcdaidgm Puratos’ Virtual Innovation Center www.poppr.be/virtualtour/puratos_innovationcenter/

Q

Address: St Brendan’s Road, Portumna, Co. Galway, H53 HX51 Tel: (090) 97 41148 (090) 97 41459 Fax: Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.qonpack.com Main Products & Services: Stockist and Distributors of Packaging Contact: General Manager: David O’Neill

R Rentokil Pest Control

Nationwide Coverage Tel: 1890 869 869 (045) 852 890 Fax: Email: pestcontrolinfo@rentokil.ie Web: www.rentokil.ie Main Products & Services: Suppliers of Pest Control to ISO 9001:2008 specification. Contact: Pest Control: Michael O’Mahoney

Address: PO Box 27, Kerlogue Industrial Estate, Drinagh, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 914 5600 Fax: (053) 918 4575 Email: info@qlab.ie Web: www.qlab.ie Main Products & Services: Microbiological & chemical analysis of food, water & environmental samples.

QPM Ltd

Address: Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 2421 Email: anevin@qpm.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Main Products & Services: X-ray inspection, Metal Detection, Checkweighing, Scales, Temperature Probes, Data Loggers, pH Meters, Gas Analysis, Magnetic Separators, Automatic Labelling Machines and Automatic Sleeving Machines, Service & Calibration. Contact: Andy Nevin 78 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

www.foodirelanddirectory.com

Q-Lab Ltd

Repak Ltd

Address: Red Cow Interchange Estate, 1 Ballymount Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. (01) 467 0190 Tel: (01) 403 0929 Fax: Email: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie Main Products & Services: Repak is Ireland’s only government- approved packaging compliance scheme, licensed by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. Repak was set up in 1997 in accordance with EU Packaging Regulations. Repak is a not for profit organisation that has over 3,150 Members. Repak Members subsidise the collection and recovery of waste packaging through registered recovery operators across Ireland. Since 1997, Repak’s members have contributed €425m to the recycling industry and diverted over 11m tonnes of packaging waste from landfill. There are many benefits to becoming a Repak Member, including access to its Prevent & Save programme which can cut packaging waste at source and save your business money.

S safe food

Address: 7 Eastgate Avenue, Eastgate, Little Island, Co. Cork T45 RX01 Tel: 021 230 4100 Fax: 021 230 4111 Email: info@safefood.eu Web: www.safefood.eu Main Products & Services: safefood is the all island public agency promoting food safety and healthy eating to consumers through education and awareness campaigns. It also acts as an independent source of scientific advice,


company listings commissions and funds relevant research, co-ordinates scientific co-operation and facilitates knowledge exchange among those working in the food sector and other key stakeholders.

SAI Global

Address: Block 3, Quayside Business Park, Mill St, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: 042 932 0912 Email: information@saiglobal.com Web: www.saiglobal.com Main Products & Services: Food Safety certification, BRC Certification, GFSI Scheme Certification, Environmental Management, Quality Management Systems, Supply Chain Management, Aquaculture Services, Fishery Services, Compliance Solutions, Risk Management.

Saica Pack Ireland

Address: Ashbourne Industrial Estate, Ashbourne, Co. Meath. Tel: (01) 801 0400 Fax: (01) 835 1249 Email: michael.shaw@saica.com Web: www.saica.com

Schütz (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Townmore, Killala, Co. Mayo Tel: (096) 33044 Fax: (096) 33045 Email: info1ireland@schuetz.net Web: www.schuetz.net Main Products & Services: Manufacturer of IBCs and PE Drums.

Sealed Air Ltd

Address: Clifton House, 1 Marston Road, St. Neots, Cambridgeshire PE19 2HN. Tel: (0044) 148 022 4000 (0044) 148 022 4063 Fax: Email: cryovac.ukmkt@sealedair.com Web: www.sealedair.com Main Products & Services: Cryovac® Packaging Solutions, including films, barrier bags, rigid trays, punnets and pots. Diversey Hygiene Solutions including detergents, disinfectants, dosing equipment and energy and water management solutions. Contact: Timothy O’Connell Mobile: 086 225 3172

Smurfit Kappa Ireland

Address: Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 409 0000 Fax: (01) 456 4509 Email: info@smurfitkappa.ie Web: www.smurfitkappa.ie www.skpackaging.ie www.smurfitkappadirect.ie Main Products & Services: Ireland’s leading manufacturer of packaging and point of purchase displays, with a wide product range to suit the needs of the food industry. Standard packaging & promotional products can now be bought on-line via our webshop at www.smurfitkappadirect.ie

Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Address: Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 808 2100 Fax: (01) 808 2002 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie

Syspal

Address: Cockshutt Lane, Broseley, Shropshire, TF12 5JA, England. Tel: (0044) 1952 883188 Fax: (0044) 1952 884 093 Email: sales@syspal.com Web: www.syspal.com Main Products & Services: Manufacturers of stainless steel

and aluminium products, specifically designed for regulations within the food industry. Contact: Nicky Davies

T Teagasc Food Research Programme

Moorepark and Ashtown Address: Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, P61 C966. Ashtown, Dublin 15, D15KN3K. Tel: (025) 42 222 / (01) 805 9500 Email: mark.fenelon@teagasc.ie / declan.troy@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie Main Products & Services: Research, development and innovation, food bioscience, food safety, food chemistry and technology, food industry development, pilot plant facilities, analytical services, training, consultancy.

Tekpak Automation Ltd

Address: Whitemill Industrial Estate, Wexford, Ireland. The Packaging (053) 916 3033 Centre Ltd Tel: For all your packaging needs Email: jkehoe@tekpak.ie Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. TPC Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 Web: www.tekpak.ie www.thepackagingcentre.ie Main Products & Services: Vision guided pick and place robots, product Contact: John Kehoe

The Packaging Centre Ltd For all your packaging needs

TPC

Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: 01 450 8759 ~ Fax: 01 450 7567 www.thepackagingcentre.ie

The Packaging Centre

Address: Fox & Geese House, Naas Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 8759 Fax: (01) 450 7567 Email: sales@thepackagingcentre.ie Web: www.thepackagingcentre.ie Contact: Managing Director, Ivan Powell FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 79

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CMY

Cyan: 10 Magenta


company listings

UCC - Department of Food Business and Development

Toyota Material Handling Ireland

Address: Killeen Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 419 0200 (01) 419 0325 Fax: Email: materialhandling@toyota.ie Web: www.toyota-forklifts.ie Main Products & Services: Toyota forklifts and BT warehouse equipment. Diesel/LPG and electric forklifts, powerpallet trucks, stackers etc.

Trilby Trading Ltd

Address: Boyne House, Boyne Business Park, Greenhills, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 983 2137 Fax: (041) 983 5463 Email: sales@trilbytrading.ie Main Products & Services: Food Grade Vegetable Oils. Contact: sales@trilbytrading.ie

U

UCC - Food Institute

Address: 3rd Floor, Food Science Building University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3810 Email: infofoodinstitute@ucc.ie Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - School of Food and Nutritional Sciences

Address: Room 242, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. Tel: (021) 490 3393 Email: foodandnutrition@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fns/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training. 80 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

Address: O’Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Cork. (021) 490 2570 Tel: Email: foodbusiness@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/foodbus/ Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCC - Food Industry Training Unit

Address: Room 246, Food Science Building, University College Cork, Cork. (021) 490 3363 Tel: Email: m.mccarthybuckley@ucc.ie Web: www.ucc.ie/en/fitu Main Products & Services: Education, research, continuing education & training.

UCD - School Of Agriculture and Food Science Address: UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4. Undergraduate Programmes: UCD Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine programme Office UCD Agriculture and Food Science Centre. Tel: (01) 716 7194 Email: agandfoodprogrammes@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfood Postgraduate Programmes: UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine UCD Veterinary Sciences Centre. Tel: (01) 716 6100 Email: agfoodvet@ucd.ie Web: www.ucd.ie/agfoodvet

V Versatile Packaging Ltd

Address: Silverstream Business Park, Silverstream, Co. Monaghan. Tel: (047) 85 177 Fax: (047) 85 199 Email: info@versatilepackaging.ie Web: www.versatilepackaging.ie

Main Products & Services: Food Packaging Materials and Equipment - Tray Sealers, CPET, Barrier, Antifog Films, Aluminium Trays, Stand Up Pouches, Vacuum Pouches, Pouch Filling & Sealing Equipment.

W

Weber Packaging Solutions Ltd

Address: Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. Tel: (053) 923 3778 Fax: (053) 923 3284 Email: sales@weberireland.com Web: www.webermarking.ie Main Products & Services: Print & Apply Labelling Systems, Desktop Printers, Laser Coders. Manufacturers of Blank& Pre Printed Labels.

D.D. Williamson (Ireland) Ltd

Address: Little Island Industrial Estate, Little Island, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 435 3821 Fax: (021) 435 4328 Email: info@ddwmson.com Web: www.ddwilliamson.com Main Products & Services: Caramel colours, natural colours, burnt sugars, natural colour blends, liquids & powders.

WrenTech Ltd

Address: Eversley, Church Bay Road, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 483 2644 Fax: (021) 483 1363 Email: smurray@wrentech.ie/ mwren@wrentech.ie Web: www.wrentech.ie Main Products & Services: Ytron & Matcon Mixing & Blending, Powder Dispersion / Incorporation, Dust free transfer batch sytems, Powder bins / Silo discharging, Auger filling, Dosing,Formulation,Batching, Flexibatch.

WWW.FOODIRELANDDIRECTORY.COM


relevant organisations

relevant

Organisations AN BORD PLEANÁLA

64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-858 8100 Lo-call: 1890 275 175 Email: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie

BORD BIA

Clanwilliam Court, Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-668 5155 Email: info@bordbia.ie Web: www.bordbia.ie

BORD GÁIS ENERGY

1 Warrington Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 1850 632 632 Emergency: 1850 205 050 Email: info@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgaisenergy.ie

BORD IASCAIGH MHARA

(Irish Sea Fisheries Board) BIM Dun Laoghaire, Crofton Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-214 4100 Email: info@bim.ie Web: www.bim.ie

COMPETITION AND CONSUMER PROTECTION COMMISSION Bloom House, PO. Box 12585, Dublin 1. Tel: 1890 432 432 Web: www.consumerhelp.ie

CONSUMERS’ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND 120/121 Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-659 9430 Email: cai@thecai.ie Web: www.thecai.ie

DRINKS INDUSTRY GROUP OF IRELAND (DIGI) 50 Upper Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-637 1777 Web: www.drinksindustry.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND

The Plaza, Eastpoint Business Park, Dublin 3. Tel: 01-727 2000 Email: client.service@enterpriseireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland.com

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF IRELAND

Heraghty House, 4 Carlton Terrace, Novara Avenue, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: 01-276 1211 Email: info@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehai.ie

EUROPEAN COMMISSION IN IRELAND

Europe House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-634 1111 Email: eu-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu Web: www.euireland.ie

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

EXPERIAN IRELAND LTD Newenham House, Northern Cross, Ground Floor, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-846 9200 Email: info@experian.ie Web: www.experian.ie

FOOD DRINK IRELAND (FDI) Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@fooddrinkireland.ie Web: www.fooddrinkireland.ie

FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE Dublin Institute of Technology, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-814 6080 Email: fpdc@dit.ie Web: www.fpdc.dit.ie

FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY OF IRELAND

The Exchange, George’s Dock, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1300 Lo-call: 1890 336 677 Email: info@fsai.ie Web: www.fsai.ie

European House, 12-14 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 7900 Email: epdublin@ep.europa.eu Web: www.europarl.ie

GUARANTEED IRISH LTD

EXCELLENCE IRELAND

The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1. Lo-call: 1890 289 389 Email: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

26 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 4. Tel: 01-660 4100 Email: info@eiqa.com Web: www.qmark.ie

1 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-661 2607 Email: info@guaranteedirish.ie Web: www.guaranteedirish.ie

HEALTH & SAFETY AUTHORITY

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 81


relevant organisations INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (IDA) Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-603 4000 Email: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

IRISH BUSINESS & EMPLOYERS CONFEDERIATION (IBEC) Head Office, Confederation House, 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

IRISH SECURITY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Chase House, City Junction Business Park, Northern Cross, Malahide Road, Dublin 17. Tel: 01-484 7206 Email: info@isia.ie Web: www.isia.ie

IRISH SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES ASSOCIATION (ISME) 17 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-662 2755 Email: info@isme.ie Web: www.isme.ie

MANDATE

O’Lehane House, 9 Cavendish Row, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-874 6321 Email: news@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie

NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL The Studio, 55C, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-290 2451 Email: info@ndc.ie Web: www.ndc.ie

THE PRIVATE SECURITY AUTHORITY Davis Street, Tipperary Town, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 062-32600 Email: info@psa.gov.ie Web: www.psa.gov.ie

82 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

REVENUE COMMISSIONERS Head Office, Dublin Castle, Dame Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-647 5000 Web: www.revenue.ie

RGDATA

Mentec House, Pottery Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01-288 7584 Email: rgdata@rgdata.ie Web: www.rgdata.ie

SMALL FIRMS ASSOCIATION (IBEC) 84-86 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-605 1500 Email: info@sfa.ie Web: www.sfa.ie

TEAGASC FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE Ashtown, Dublin 15. Tel: 01-805 9500 Email: info@teagasc.ie Web: www.teagasc.ie

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, C/O NSAI 1 Swift Square, Northwood, Santry, Dublin 9. Tel: 01-807 3800 Email: info@nsai.ie Web: www.nsai.ie

WORKPLACE RELATIONS COMMISSION

O’Brien Road, Carlow, R93 W7W2 Tel: (059) 917 8990 Web: www.workplacerelations.ie

Government Departments: AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE

Agriculture House, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-607 2000 Lo-call: 1890 200 510 Email: firstname.surname@agriculture.gov.ie Web: www.agriculture.gov.ie

BUSINESS, ENTERPRISE & INNOVATION 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-631 2121 Lo-Call: 1890 220 222 Email: info@dbei.gov.ie Web: www.djei.ie

COLLECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE VAT/PAYE/PRSI Sarsfield House, Francis Street, Limerick. Lo-call: 1890 203 070 Email: cgcustserv@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE

Bloom House, Gloucester Place Lower, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-804 5200 Lo-call: 1890 220 226 Email: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie

CUSTOMS PROCEDURES BRANCH

St. Conlons Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Tel: 067 63370 Email: tarclass@revenue.ie Web: www.revenue.ie

EMPLOYMENT AFFAIRS AND SOCIAL PROTECTION Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-704 3000 Email: info@welfare.ie Web: www.welfare.ie

FINANCE

Government Buildings, Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-676 7571 Lo-call: 1890 661 010 Email: webmaster@finance.gov.ie Web: www.finance.gov.ie

HOUSING, PLANNING, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT Custom House, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-888 2000 Lo-call: 1890 202 021 Email: qcsofficer@housing.gov.ie Web: www.housing.gov.ie

JUSTICE AND EQUALITY

51 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. Tel: 01-602 8202 Lo-call: 1890 221 227 Email: foi@justice.ie Web: www.justice.ie

VALUATION OFFICE

Block 2, Irish Life Centre, Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. Tel: 01-817 1000 Email: info@valoff.ie Web: www.valoff.ie


Three Year Diary Dublin Port Yearbook 2019

2018 January Week 1 1 M T 2 W 3 T 4 F 5 S 6 S 7

2018

February

2

3

4

Week 5

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

July

5

1 2 3 4

March

7

8

Week 9

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 26 20 27 21 28 22 23 24 25

2018 August

Week 26 27 28 29 30 31 M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

2018 6

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

9

2018

Week 31 32 6 M T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

33 34 35 27 28 29 30 31

M T W T F S S

2018

1 2 3 4

10 11 12 5 12 19 6 13 20 7 14 21 8 15 22 9 16 23 10 17 24 11 18 25

September

13 26 27 28 29 30 31

2018

Week 35 36 37 38 39 M T W T F S S

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

2019

March

6

7

8

9

Week 9

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 2

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

April

2018 May

Week 13 14 2 M T 3 W 4 T 5 F 6 S 7 S 1 8

2018

15 16 17 18 Week 18 19 7 M 9 16 23 30 T 10 17 24 1 8 W 11 18 25 2 9 T 12 19 26 3 10 F 13 20 27 4 11 S 14 21 28 5 12 S 15 22 29 6 13

October

2018

20 21 22 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

November

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

2018

Week 40 41 42 43 44 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

Week 44 45 46 47 48

April

May

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30

June

2018

Week 22 23 4 M T 5 W 6 T 7 F 1 8 S 2 9 S 3 10

24 25 26 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

December

25 26 27 28 29 30

2018

Week 48 49 50 51 52 53 M T W T F S S

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

2019 January Week 1 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

2019 2

3

4

5

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

July

2019

Week 27 28 29 30 31 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

February Week 5 M T W T F S S

1 2 3

August

2019

Week 31 32 5 M T 6 W 7 T 1 8 F 2 9 S 3 10 S 4 11

33 34 35 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

6

7

8

9

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26 27 28 29

M T W T F S S

2019

1 2 3

10 11 12 4 11 18 5 12 19 6 13 20 7 14 21 8 15 22 9 16 23 10 17 24

September

13 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

2019

Week 14 15 16 17 18 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

2019 October

2019

2019

Week 18 19 6 M T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

20 21 22 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

November

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

2019

Week 35 36 37 38 39 40 Week 40 41 42 43 44 M M 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 T T 1 8 15 22 29 3 10 17 24 W W 2 9 16 23 30 4 11 18 25 T T 3 10 17 24 31 5 12 19 26 F F 4 11 18 25 6 13 20 27 S S 5 12 19 26 7 14 21 28 S S 6 13 20 27 1 8 15 22 29

Week 44 45 46 47 48

March

May

M T W T F S S

1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

June

2019

Week 22 23 3 M T 4 W 5 T 6 F 7 S 1 8 S 2 9

24 25 26 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

December

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

2019

Week 48 49 50 51 52 53 M T W T F S S

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

2020 January Week 1 M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5

2020

February

2

3

4

5

Week 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

July

1 2

2020 August

Week 27 28 29 30 31 M T W T F S S

M T W T F S S

2020

1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

2020

2020

Week 9 M T W T F S S

1

September

2020

Week 31 32 33 34 35 36 Week 36 37 38 39 40 M T W T F S S

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

April

2020

10 11 12 13 14 Week 14 15 16 M 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 T 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 W 4 11 18 25 1 8 15 T 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 F 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 S 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 S 8 15 22 29 5 12 19

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

17 18 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

October

27 28 29 30

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4

20 21 22 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

2020 November

Week 40 41 42 43 44

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

2020

Week 18 19 4 M T 5 W 6 T 7 F 1 8 S 2 9 S 3 10

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

2020

June

2020

Week 23 1 M T 2 W 3 T 4 F 5 S 6 S 7

24 25 26 27 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

December

22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27 28

2020

Week 44 45 46 47 48 49 Week 49 50 51 52 53 M T W T F S S

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 25 26 27 28 29

M T W T F S S

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

= Public Holiday

FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20 | 83

119

125


2019/2020 Year Planner MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

1

2

3

4

5

6

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

7

8

9

10

11

SAT

12

13

14

September 1

2

October

November

December 1

January

2019

3

2

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

1

2

3

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

5

6

7

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

3

New Year’s Day Public Holiday

February

March 1

2

April

4

2020 3

4

8

Easter Sunday

Easter Monday Public Holiday

1

May

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

March June 1

2

3

4

5

1

2

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

July

August 84 | FOOD IRELAND YEARBOOK 2019/20

MON TUES WED THUR FRI

Public Holiday

SAT


er FRI

13

SAT

14

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

15

16

17

18

19

20

SAT

21

SUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI

22

23

24

25

26

27

SAT

28

SUN MON TUES

29

30

September 2019

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29 30

31

Public Holiday

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

October 2019 26

27

28

29

30

November 2019

13

17

14

18

15

19

16

20

17

21

18

22

19

23

20

24

21

25

22

26

23

27

24

28

25

26

Public Holiday

Public Holiday

29

30

Christmas St. Stephen’s Day Day

27

28

29

30

31

New Year’s Eve

December 2019

31

January 2020 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23 24

25

26

27

28

29

Febuary 2020 13

14

15

16

17

St Patricks Day

18

19 20

21 22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

March 2020

Public Holiday

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

April 2020 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22 23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

May 2020

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

June 2020 17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

July 2020 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

August 2020 FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

SUN MON TUES


TRULY GRASS FED

TM

95% GRASS FED

NATURAL DAIRY FROM GLANBIA IRELAND OM

CLA’s

EG

TY FAT

THE TRULY GRASS FED BRAND SIGNIFIES

VI

A

AC

ID S

TAMIN

A

BETA-CAROTENE

95%

95%% 95

GRASS FED

Verified

From cows that

Verified From cows that grass fed graze 300 At least grass 95% naturally fed graze 300 days per year days per year grass fed

CLA’s

OM FAT

E

GA

TY

AC

ID S

Currently, 95% of our cows’ diet is A harvested grass and silage (grass during summer for use during winter) with the remaining 5% coming from concentrates. VI

TAMIN

Non-GMO Animal welfare Non-GMO Animal welfare Project Verified friendly Independently verifi ed Project Verified friendly

Environmentally Antibiotic-free Environmentally Antibiotic-free responsible and rBST-freehormones No artificial responsible andgrowth rBST-free

Truly Grass Fed products are Non-GMO Project Verified and Animal Welfare Approved.

Truly Grass Fed dairy products are 100% free from rBST (also known as rBGH), a genetically engineered variant of a natural growth hormone produced by dairy cows.

BETA-CAROTENE

95% Verified

250 days on grass pasture fed

From cows that Non-GMO Co-op graze 300 Farmer-owned Project Verified days per year

Truly Grass Fed cows spend most of the year roaming outdoors grazing as nature intended with access to shelter when the weather turns bad in the winter months.

Animal welfare Environmentally Antibiotic-free responsible friendlyEnvironmentally responsible and rBST-free

Many Truly Grass Fed farms have been passed down through generations, and our farmers represent a mix of young, highly skilled entrepreneurs and seasoned veterans.

Truly Grass Fed is as much about the quality of our dairy and the health of our cows as it is about the world they live in. Our seal represents our dedication to innovating efficiencies that will create a net-zero impact on the environment.

Wholesome dairy ingredients and consumer products from cows living their best lives outside, grazing on green grass. GET IN TOUCH hello@trulygrassfed.com

WWW.TRULYGRASSFED.COM

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Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2019/20  

An annual information guide & reference source of products and services for the food & drink manufacturing and processing industries in Irel...

Food Ireland Yearbook & Directory 2019/20  

An annual information guide & reference source of products and services for the food & drink manufacturing and processing industries in Irel...

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