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Retail Insights

The next step towards a career in retail

Level 3


Introduction Who is this training resource for? The Gateway Schools Programme (Level 3) is for senior secondary students (Year 11 to Year 13+) who are undertaking structured workplace learning in retail, while continuing to study at school.

Assessment Standards The training resource will assess you against the following Assessment Standards. Assessment Standard

Title

Level

Credits

11817 v5

Serve customers face to face in a wide range of contexts

3

4

11999 v5

Demonstrate product knowledge in a specified department in a retail or distribution environment

4

4

422 v2

Create in-store displays in a retail or distribution environment

3

3

22013 v1

Create and maintain materials for presentation of products

3

4

11956 v4

Prepare a float and reconcile sales records and takings in a retail or distribution environment

3

3

What will you learn? When you have completed this training resource, you will be able to: 1 create a positive first impression for your customers 1 identify and meet customers’ needs and expectations 1 close customer interactions according to store policies and procedures 1 apply product information to sales situations in your store 1 relate product benefits to customers’ needs 1 provide customers with product information that meets store procedures and legislative requirements 1 keep your store and product knowledge consistently up to date

Introduction

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Nov '11

1 create in-store displays for a range of products/services in your store


1 identify in-store display design conditions, such as design principles, location and lighting 1 make sure in-store displays meet store safety and security procedures 1 make sure in-store displays have correct, accurate and safe ticketing and promotional material 1 accurately prepare a float 1 reconcile sales records and takings 1 identify and resolve opportunities for loss prevention. This training resource is made up of four separate sections: 1 Advanced customer service 1 Product expertise 1 Displaying and presenting products 1 Working with money. This training resource has: 1 information and examples for you to read 1 activities to help you practise what you have learned and to prepare you for the assessment 1 assessment tasks which must be completed.

Features of this training resource

Icons example Key Point Classroom Activity Workplace Activity

This icon identifies an example.

This icon tells you there is a key point to remember. This icon indicates that you can complete the activity in the classroom. This icon means that you must either: • complete the activity at your workplace in a retail store or • refer to a customer service situation that you completed in your workplace.

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Retail Insights


Section

2

PRODUCT EXPERTISE What is product knowledge? Product knowledge is what you know about the products and services that you sell. Depending on the product, you will know some or all of the following: 1 where the product is in the store 1 how the product works 1 what the product is used for 1 how or where the product is made 1 how the product should be stored 1 how the product should be handled 1 what the ‘shelf life’ of the product is; for example, any use-by or best-before dates. In your role you need to be able to confidently discuss products and services with your customers. You need to know and be able to talk about their characteristics or features and benefits.

Key Point Features: Features are the facts about the product. Examples are: country of origin, materials, brand, manufacturing process, price, style, colour, size, service components and costs. Benefits: Benefits are what the customer gains from buying or using a product or service. Benefits are the value the customer places on the features of the product or service.

Section 2: Product expertise

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The following table outlines the main characteristics that are important to customers. Product quality

Meaning

Specifications

Description of the sizes, design, materials and so on that were used to make the product

Range

The number and variety of different products that belong in the same category

Features

The characteristics of a particular product or service, such as its colour, capacity and performance

Price

What the product or service will cost the customer, in terms of ‘value for money’ – some products or services may cost more initially but provide better returns to the customer than a cheaper product or service, so they provide better ‘value for money’

Product use

All the different uses of the product

Legal requirements

Any laws that regulate the sale or the use of a product or service; for example, age restrictions

After-sales service

The services that customers can use after they make a purchase

regulate to control an activity, a process or an industry officially by using rules

Workplace Activity Product knowledge 1. With your manager/supervisor or other members of your team, choose two products (from different manufacturers) that your workplace sells (for example, two types of outdoor table, two brands of shoes, two models of bike helmet). If you can’t find good examples from your workplace, think of two products you might buy from another retailer. 2. Write the name of each of your two products on the dotted lines after ‘Product 1:’ and Product 2:’ in the tables on the next page. For each of the two products, discuss the qualities listed in the left-hand column. Talk about what customers would think about their different qualities. (You may need to get information from more than one source; for example, the products’ packaging or labels, promotional flyers, advertising material and websites.) Not all the qualities apply to all products. Write N/A in the Features and the Benefits columns if a quality does not apply to your product/s. 3. In the middle column, write about what the products’ features are (the facts). 4. In the right-hand column, write about what your customers could think are the benefits of each of the qualities. Continued on NEXT Page

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Retail Insights


Product 1: ................................................................................................................................ Quality

Features

Benefits

Origin

Quality

Manufacturing process

Composition

Use

Brand

Price

Section 2: Product expertise

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Keeping product knowledge up to date We live in a world where products and information quickly become out of date. You and the other staff need to constantly update your knowledge about your products. This means that your workplace needs a system to keep you up to date. If your workplace does not have systems for communicating information about your products to you, be proactive. 1 Seek opportunities – Keep your eyes and ears open for product demonstrations, written material or other staff who are happy to share their knowledge with you. Some suppliers/ manufacturers have websites and 0800 numbers that you can call for technical support or product knowledge.

proactive taking action and making changes before they have to be made

1 Request opportunities – You may need to ask your manager or supervisor to let you know when there are opportunities for training and upskilling.

Workplace Activity Maintaining up-to-date product knowledge 1. With your manager/supervisor or other members of your team, discuss the methods your workplace uses to communicate information about products. 2. Read the examples of the methods of communication in the left-hand column below and then read the examples in the middle column of how those methods can be used. 3. In the right-hand column, briefly describe how you use each method of communication to maintain up-to-date information about products and services in your workplace. Method

How it is used

Memos or emails

Memos or emails are often used to communicate information about new product lines, upcoming sales, how to use a new product, reminders about security and so on.

How this happens in my workplace

They are often posted on a noticeboard. Staff may be asked to sign and date them after reading.

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Retail Insights


Method

How it is used

Manuals

Manuals usually contain specific information and instructions; for example, user manuals or safety data sheets.

How this happens in my workplace

Whenever information is added or updated, all staff should be told.

Brochures

New models or products are often introduced with a brochure or pamphlet that contains information or advertising about the product. This is an effective way to learn about the product because brochures usually outline all the key features and benefits.

Product training sessions

Manufacturers or suppliers often run product training sessions for businesses that stock their products. Many stores also hold regular product training meetings.

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Section 2: Product expertise

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Method

How it is used

Official sources

This means any information that is not supplied through your workplace, but comes from organisations such as the Department of Labour or the Ministry of Consumer Affairs, often as brochures and pamphlets.

Other

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Retail Insights

How this happens in my workplace


0800 486 738 www.retailinstitute.org.nz

Copyright Š Retail Institute

Nov '11

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission. Enquiries should be made to the Retail Institute, PO Box 24341, Wellington.

Retail Insights  

Retail Insights - The next step towards a career in retail. The Gateway Schools Programme (Level 3) is for senior secondary students (Year 1...

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