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SA MP LE

Level 4

training and assessment in the workplace Part 1


INTRODUCTION Welcome to Training and Assessment in the Workplace Part 1. This training resource covers two core areas:

Title

7106

Provide guidance for individual adult trainees

7108

Deliver on-job training to adults

SA MP LE

Unit

Successfully completing these unit standards will earn you 13 credits towards the National Certificate in Retail (Level 4).

How to use this resource

This training material will help you prepare for your assessment to achieve the unit standards listed above. The sections follow through the steps involved in the process of: 1 preparing Individual Development Plans and training plans 1 providing trainees with guidance and feedback 1 delivering on-job training 1 reviewing training

1 reviewing trainee’s individual goals and objectives.

You will find the assessment on the coloured pages at the back of this training material.

The sections are:

Page

Section 1: Why do we train? . ............................................................................................. 3 Section 2: Preparing for on-job training .............................................................................. 5 Section 3: Preparing an Individual Development Plan........................................................... 23 Section 4: Delivering on-job training ................................................................................... 31 Section 5: Providing guidance and feedback ....................................................................... 47 Section 6: Reviewing on-job training . ................................................................................. 51 Section 7: Reviewing trainee’s goals and objectives ............................................................. 63 What’s next? ..................................................................................................................... 65 Notes . ................................................................................................................................ 66 Glossary ............................................................................................................................. 73

Training and Assessment in the Workplace Part 1

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RIRL4.TA1SAMP Feb ’10

Note: Apply the knowledge in this resource to the type of training session you are facilitating. For example, what you do in one-on-one training may be different from what you do with a small, medium or large sized group.


Icons The following icons have been used in this training resource. Outlined below is an explanation of what the icons mean. This icon identifies an example.

This icon gives you a Hot Tip.

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HOT TIP!

This icon tells you there is a key point to remember.

This icon lets you know that there is more information on this subject in another module, section or training resource.

This icon indicates that there is a DVD clip to watch.

This icon indicates an activity for you to do. The activities do not form part of the assessment but will help to reinforce your learning.

Contact us

If you require help with any part of this material, please contact your Retail Institute Training Adviser on the freephone number – 0800 486 738.

Glossary

In this material you may come across some new or unfamiliar terms. These are explained in the margin when they appear for the first time. In addition, you will find a full glossary of terms at the back of this material.

Notes A note section is available at the back of this resource for you to write down any notes or queries that you may have.

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Š 2010 Retail Institute


Section 1

why do we train? Everybody needs training at some point in their working life.

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You might find yourself both receiving and giving training. This may be because you or your trainees have started a new job, or because of a need to update skills and knowledge to cope with new technology. Whatever the reason, there will always be advantages for you and your workplace as a result of training. Much of the training you will deliver will be on-job training.

Write down some ideas for the following questions:

What are some advantages of on-job training for your trainees?

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Trainee A person undergoing training; also known as a learner or student

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What are some advantages of training for a workplace?

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Training and Assessment in the Workplace Part 1

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SA MP LE 4

Š 2010 Retail Institute


Section 2

Preparing for on-job training On-Job Training

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On-job training is training carried out in the workplace to help people develop the skills and knowledge needed to carry out their work.

It is an effective method for transferring knowledge and skills relating to workplace practices. It can also ensure that consistent standards are set.

Preparation

Preparation for on-job training includes:

1 making sure it meets the needs of your internal stakeholders

Learning outcomes These describe the skills and knowledge

1 ensuring clear learning outcomes

students can expect

1 organising the training

to gain from an

1 taking barriers to learning and learning styles into account

activity

1 establishing review criteria and 1 completing a training plan.

Each of these areas above are explained in detail in the following pages.

Internal Stakeholders

Effective on-job training must meet the needs and responsibilities of the internal stakeholders in your workplace. Internal stakeholders are people who have an interest in or will influence the training. They are also the people who will benefit from the training. Internal stakeholders may include:

You (the trainer)

Management/ owner operator

Trainees

Barriers An obstacle or something that gets in the way of communication or progress

Internal stakeholders People in a workplace who have an interest in and may influence the training

Internal stakeholders Supervisor/team leader/manager

Trainee’s work colleagues Quality assurance/ compliance staff

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Stakeholder needs and responsibilities may include: 1 induction of a new employee into a role or department 1 introduction of a new procedure or equipment 1 improvement of performance where required 1 staff skills or development. Talking to your stakeholders will help you identify the purpose of the training and the outcomes to be achieved. It will help you develop learning outcomes to meet those needs.

Learning Outcomes

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Learning outcomes are what you expect trainees to know, understand and/or be able to demonstrate at the end of a training session or programme. The outcomes must:

1 be observable and measurable

Measurable

Able to be measured or assessed

1 indicate the timeframe required

1 meet the needs identified by the internal stakeholders

1 help guide trainees in their learning (because they explain what is expected of them) 1 provide a detailed guide to inform trainees and their employers about the knowledge and understanding trainees will have gained on completion of the training.

Learning outcomes may come about as a result of: 1 unit standards 1 qualifications

1 vourse programmes 1 trainee needs

1 workplace needs and requirements.

When writing your learning outcomes, make sure you:

1 Develop a clear aim or objective, stating the learning outcome for the training session or programme 1 Describe the outcomes in terms of observable and measurable performance and timeframes 3 What do you want the trainees to do?

3 What do you want the trainees to achieve?

1 State the conditions if required: 3 Where will the performance or assessment take place? 3 What is provided? 3 What help is allowed? 3 What are the physical factors I need to address?

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Physical factors include Ergonomics

Lighting

Visual

Temperature

SA MP LE

Sound

For example...

This is an example of learning outcomes for a training session for a small to medium group of trainees. The training session covers:

1 answering the phone

1 responding to customer enquiries on the phone 1 taking messages

1 transfering phone calls according to workplace procedures.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this session, trainees will be able to:

1 respond courteously to three types of customer enquiries, giving accurate advice 1 write clear and accurate messages (at least two)

1 make required transfers courteously and accurately (at least two).

Conditions

The demonstrations will take place without assistance in a simulated office environment.

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For example... Here is an example of learning outcomes for a training session for one-to-one training with a trainee. This training session is about ‘Applying skills and qualities of a salesperson in a retail environment’. Learning outcomes

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By the end of this session, the trainee will be able to:

1 describe the skills and qualities of a salesperson according to workplace requirements

1 demonstrate the skills and qualities of a salesperson during a sales transaction.

Conditions

The demonstration will take place without assistance in the small meeting room.

You will learn about how to use learning outcomes in a training session in the Delivering on-job training section.

Write a set of learning outcomes for a training session you are planning to deliver. ………………………………………..............................................………………..…...............

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© 2010 Retail Institute


Organising your training This can involve: 1 identifying any equipment required, and arranging availability 1 identifying any other resources you will need and making sure they are ready to go. For example, do you need DVDs, handouts, workbooks, visual aids? Are these available for your training session? Is the technology working? 1 planning the location (will it take place in the training room, in a department, on a checkout, in the lunchroom?)

Visual aids Aids using sight, such as pictures, charts, slides or DVD

1 arranging with or notifying your trainee’s supervisor/team leader/manager and your trainee

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1 ensuring interruptions are eliminated or kept to a minimum.

Barriers to Learning

A barrier to learning is anything that could get in the way of your trainee/s learning or that may slow down their learning process. When planning your training you need to minimise or eliminate any barriers that could get in the way of your trainee’s ability or opportunity to learn while they are being trained. Barriers can include:

1 Previous learning experiences – Adult trainees bring a range of previous learning experiences with them. Their attitude to training, the subject matter and the trainer may all be affected by their previous experience, training and education. These can include learning experiences when they were younger that have had an effect on their confidence, such as unhappy memories of being in a classroom.

Language

1 Language – Language barriers can include the use of jargon, technical terms or slang, or difficulty for trainees who have English as a second language.

English language)

For example...

Jamelia is attending a training session on tills at the checkout. English is Jamelia’s second language. She is struggling to keep up with and understand what the trainer is saying, and with what her workmates are contributing.

Refers to the trainee’s level of competence in listening, speaking and writing (in the

Jargon Slang, language specific to a certain context or situation

Slang Informal language - words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions

The trainer and her workmates are using words (jargon) that Jamelia is not familiar with. What is posware? Or back office? What do they mean by short groups? Jamelia feels too embarrassed to say anything.

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Culture All the knowledge and values shared

1 Culture – Lack of respect for, or understanding of, another person’s race; or use of inappropriate language, gestures, humour, touch or body language can all make it harder to learn.

by a society

1 Physical impairment – Lack of knowledge about or understanding of another person’s disability can reduce your effectiveness as a trainer. Physical impairment Diminished or reduced ability to perform certain functions. For

1 Numeracy – This is the bridge between mathematics and real life. It includes the knowledge and skills needed to apply mathematics to everyday family and financial matters, work and community tasks.

SA MP LE

example, deafness

1 Literacy – A person’s ability to understand, interpret and use language and numbers to achieve their goals and fully participate in society. Problems with literacy may make it harder for your trainee to learn.

is a hearing

impairment

Research shows that almost half of adult New Zealanders aged between 16 and 65 years have significant literacy and numeracy needs.

Some websites that will give you useful information about literacy and numeracy are: www.workbase.co.nz www.literacy.org.nz

For example...

Kahn has a problem with reading and writing. No one knows about this, and he has managed to get by in his job so far without drawing too much attention to himself. His manager has asked him to attend a training session on customer service with some other people he works with.

Trainer

A person who educates;

also known as a teacher, facilitator

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So far Kahn has managed to keep up by listening carefully to the trainer and feeding off what his workmates have said. The trainer gives everyone a handout which has scenarios written on it. He asks everyone to read through the scenarios and write down what they would do. Kahn panics and looks around nervously. The trainer starts to walk around the room, stopping to talk to everyone and offering help.

© 2010 Retail Institute


1 Time – Many people say they cannot learn because of time constraints. These may be real or perceived, for example, trying to balance work and family life, or feeling that you are too busy to attend training.

For example...

SA MP LE

Donald has just had a performance appraisal with his manager Cheryl. Donald is anxious, and muttering under his breath. Cheryl has told Donald that he will have to attend some inhouse training sessions on subjects like customer service, health and safety and loss prevention, during work time.

Donald tries to explain to Cheryl that he can’t because he doesn’t have time. He is so busy that he very rarely gets to stop for morning or afternoon tea. If he goes to these training sessions, how will he get his work done on top of it? He’ll be letting the rest of the team down because he won’t be there to help them.

1 Motivation – An unmotivated, unenthusiastic trainee may not be able to understand the need for or purpose of training and development.

For example...

Sam works in the storeroom of a large store. He finds his job boring. It is hard for him to get excited about doing anything. He is a creature of habit and doesn’t like change. He tends to do the bare minimum and that’s it.

Sam has been asked to attend a 2-day first aid course. He can’t understand why they chose him and not someone else. ‘Woo-hooo!’ he thinks. ‘What’s the point?’

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Choose three potential barriers to learning. Describe some methods you could use to overcome them with your trainees.

1.

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SA MP LE

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2.

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3.

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Learning Styles

Learning styles

Different ways in

which people learn

A learning style (or learning preference) is the way a person learns best. Learning involves taking in, organising and making sense of information. To learn, we all depend on our senses to process information. Your preferred style changes the way you recall information and how you choose your words. There are three main learning styles – visual, auditory and kinaesthetic (otherwise known as VAK). People use all three styles, but usually find that one or two styles may be more dominant or preferred. Learning styles are not fixed. You can develop your ability in less dominant styles as well as further developing the learning styles you already use well.

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© 2010 Retail Institute


Copyright Š Retail Institute All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission. Enquiries should be made to the Retail Institute, PO Box 24341, Wellington.

RIRL4.TA1SAMP Feb ’10

0800 486 738 www.retailinstitute.org.nz

Training and Assessment in the Workplace - Part 1  

Training and Assessment in the Workplace - Part 1

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