Reston Fall 2011

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THE COMPLETE RESOURCE FOR LIVING, WORKING, PLAYING AND GETTING INVOLVED

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Reston Association Publication | 2011 Fall Edition | www.reston.org

Bob Simon Slept Here

Urban Oasis

Best of All Worlds RA Programs & Events INSIDE LIVE Meet the Master Planner’s Daughter

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WORK

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Why Growing a Garden Matters by Ken Plum

PLAY

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Trout Fishing in Reston

GET INVOLVED

Meet Mary Brown

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1 RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

BEST OF RESTON: 2008 - 2011

PIANO • VOICE • ACTING


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CONTENT 2011 FALL EDITION | VOLUME 2 | NUMBER 3

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Bob Simon Slept Here BY CAROL NAHORNIAK

On the cover, the DeLong-Bowman House as photographed by David Madison. The home, which will be on the Reston Home Tour, served as the “new town’s” first official reception hall and home for founder Bob Simon.

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Urban Oasis BY CLAUDIA THOMPSON-DEAHL

There is at least one location nestled in the shadows of tall buildings and bound by highways, where can take an unbelievable hike into Reston’s 15-acre wetlands.

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Reston Headquarters Brings Best of All Worlds BY ROBERT HERSHORN

Learn why the German military calls Reston the most convenient location for its American and Canadian base of operations.

PERSPECTIVES

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The Essential Reston and Managing for Change Reston To Richmond Fresh From The Market Reason To Celebrate Fall into Biking Change & Progress — We Can have Both

ON THE STREET

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Digging Deep Observe and Report: When to Call the Police Kids’ Trout Fishing Day Protect Your Family From Fire Growing to Serve Reston

AROUND RESTON

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Reston Festival 2011 Reston Royalty

On The Cover: The photo of the DeLong Bowman House as it stands today was taken by David Madison, owner of David Madison Photography, located in the Reston community. David, who studied at the Hallmark Institute of Photography, serves commercial and private clients, including work for Volkswagen and the DNC. www.davidmadisonphotography.com

| FALL EDITION 2011 Come Play in Reston : Features RA Programs & WWW.RESTON.ORG Events see page 50

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COME PLAY IN RESTON The AtoZ Guide: Follow the Colors to Your Section

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Member Services Aquatics Tennis Camps Nature Special Events

GET INVOLVED

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Volunteer Opportunities Volunteer Spotlight: Mary Brown

LIVING IN RESTON

92 93 93

Cash Flow vs Component Funding Community Association Fundamentals Fall Activities Word Find

BOARD & GOVERNANCE

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Board of Directors Actions Board of Directiors

DIRECTORY & FACILITIES 96 Directory & Facilities 97 Map

Reston is published quarterly by the Reston Association. Send correspondence or address changes to Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. All articles © Reston Association 2011. All rights reserved.

Advertising rates are available upon request to chris@bluehouse.us or by phone to 202-337-1892. Articles and letters to the editor may be submitted via mail to Amelia Townsend, Reston Association at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404, 703-435-6530. E-mail submissions may be made to Amelia@reston.org. Anonymous or incomplete information will not be published. Reston Association reserves the right to edit for length, style and clarity. Articles may be printed upon verification of authorship and availability of space.

®

The Complete Resource for Living, Working, Playing and Getting Involved

Volume 2 | Number 3 VISION: Leading the model community where all can Live, Work, Play and Get Involved™. MISSION: To preserve and enhance the Reston community through

outstanding leadership, service and stewardship of our resources. PUBLISHER: Reston Association, Kathleen Driscoll McKee, President Board of Directors EDITORIAL: Amelia Townsend, amelia@reston.org COPY EDITORS: Jennifer O’ Connor, Kathy Bush DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Long Nguyen, long@reston.org ASSISTANT LAYOUT: Sam Pallo, sam@reston.org PHOTOGRAPHER: Sean Bahrami, sean@reston.org CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jim Kirby, David Madison, Charles A. Veatch, Ha Brock, Pete Staples, Don Atreides, Sabrina Faubert, Paul Lasko, Trung Nguyen, Linda Rutledge ADVERTISING: Chris Schriever, chris@bluehouse.us Lindsay Sutton-Bilberry, lindsay@bluehouse.us RA CONTRIBUTORS: Arlene Whittick, Ashleigh Soloff, Barbara Beaver, Claudia Thompson-Deahl, Ha Brock, Katie Shaw, Laura Kowalski, Mary Conway, Nicki Bellezza, Patricia Greenberg, Sue Sims, Willa Whitacre COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTORS: Senator Janet Howell (D-Va.32), Delegate Ken Plum, (D-Va.36) Supervisor Catherine Hudgins, Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, Robert E. Simon, Jr., Kathleen Driscoll McKee, Leila Gordon, Reston Community Center, Stu Gibson, Maggie Parker, Katy DeFoe, Carol Nahorniak, Matthew Christian Davis, Robert Hershorn, Will Bailey

MAIN OFFICE (Member Services) 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, Virginia 20191-3404 Office Hours: Monday–Friday 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Extended Summer Hours: Saturdays April–July, 9 a.m.–Noon Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-435-6516 E-mail: member_services@reston.org Board & Management Services Administration Financial Services Human Resources Assessment Questions Parks and Recreation Program information, reservations and registration for all camps, aquatics, tennis, special events and facility rentals Pool & Tennis Pass sales HOTLINES Tennis: 703-435-6502 Ball fields: 703-435-6530 COVENANTS ADMINISTRATION Phone: 703-435-6530 Fax: 703-673-2040 E-mail: member_services@reston.org Design Review Board applications and design guidelines for Reston properties Use and maintenance of property, covenants information and complaints Information resource for neighborhood association operations Disclosure documents PARKS & RECREATION (Central Services Facility) Phone: 703-437-7658 Fax: 703-435-6555 E-mail: mikemc@reston.org Maintenance and facilities such as wildlife, ball fields, tot-lots, pavilions, pathways and open space (including lakes, natural areas and trees) Recreational Vehicle Central Park (RVCP) Garden Plot Program

Printed on 10% post-consumer recycled paper, using vegetablebased ink. Please recycle.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

VOLUNTEERING Phone: 703-435-7986 Fax: 703-435-9481 E-mail: habrock@reston.org To volunteer for events and programs. Volunteer to serve on RA’s advisory committees, which are organized to provide advice and assistance to the Board


The Essential Reston and Managing for Change BY KATHLEEN DRISCOLL MCKEE | PHOTOS BY JIM KIRBY

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hen you think of the Reston Association, what comes to mind?

Robert Simon’s Seven Goals In the creation of Reston, Virginia, these are the major goals:

Some of you may envision the trails, pools or tennis courts. Others may think of the open spaces, lakes and nature outside our back doors. To a few, the RA name may recall the diversity and quality of our neighborhoods. All true. In addition, we are a community in the throes of change, redevelopment and working to update the original, 47-yearold Reston Master Plan. Don’t forget the coming Metro. You hear it everywhere. Reston is changing. It is stated as if it were the first ever change to come to our community. Yet, I would argue that our foundation is constant change. As Restonians, it is in our DNA as sure as the air we breathe. In fact, it seems almost redundant to mention the words “Change” and “Reston” in the same sentence. For a moment, let’s think about why I said that. The answer lies in the earth beneath us and the visionary dreams of one Robert E. Simon, Jr. I have often heard Mr. Simon say that what convinced him to buy the land for Reston was the “serenity of the gently undulating land.”

Yet, since the purchase, Reston’s land has been an incubator for prolific change and innovative. Here’s a short list of the innovations: Residential Planned Community zoning. It was the first in Fairfax County and Virginia. The Master Plan with its colorful map that specified certain types of housing and projections for profit. The changes in leadership, as one developer after another led the development over our first two decades.

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That the widest choice of opportunities be made available for the full use of leisure time. This means that the New Town should provide a wide range of cultural and recreational facilities as well as an environment for privacy.

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That it be possible for anyone to remain in a single neighborhood throughout his life, uprooting being neither inevitable nor always desirable. By providing the fullest range of housing styles and prices — from high-rise efficiencies to 6-bedroom townhouses and detached houses — housing needs can be met at a variety of income levels and at different stages of family life. This kind of mixture permits residents to remain rooted in the community if they so choose — as their particular housing needs change. As a byproduct, this also results in the heterogeneity that spells a lively and varied community.

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That the importance and dignity of each individual be the focal point for all planning, and take precedence for large-scale concepts.

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That the people be able to live and work in the same community.

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That commercial, cultural and recreational facilities be made available to the residents from the outset of the development — not years later.

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That beauty — structural and natural — is a necessity of the good life and should be fostered.

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Since Reston is being developed from private enterprise, in order to be completed as conceived it must also, of course, be a financial success. – The Reston Concept: New Town

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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Essential Reston

Yet, what I find fascinating is that each developer continued to follow Mr. Simon and James Rossant’s master plan. The community has held tightly to Mr. Simon’s “Seven Goals”, which are embodied in our trademark statement, “Live, Work Play and Get Involved.”™ Those goals, which Mr. Simon will tell you he has mostly achieved, have been essential to holding this community together through certain, daily and sometimes very unpleasant changes. Those goals are what the Reston Association Board of Directors used as a foundation when we approved something called “Essential Reston.” These were sent in a letter to the task force that is working to update our 47-year-old Master Plan. As a board, these ideals are essential to Reston as the community continues to change. Environmental Stewardship Commitment to the Arts Accessibility Planning & Design Excellence Recreational Amenities Housing Opportunities

Managing for Change

So what does this mean for us as we face the coming of Metro, as we decide what to do about our 47-yearold infrastructure and figure out ways to allow quality redevelopment within our neighborhoods? It means we do what we have done for nearly half a century. We work together. We innovate and we make decisions for future generations. That’s what our founder gave us and what we know is the best way to move forward. Kathleen Driscoll McKee is the president of Reston Association.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations. – The Gayanashagowa, the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederation

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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PERSPECTIVES

RestonTo Richmond BY SENATOR JANET HOWELL

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ne to three times a week, I drive to Richmond. With each round trip taking about five hours on the road, sometimes it feels like I am living on Interstate 95 as much as at home in Reston. While the driving is mind-numbing, the work in Richmond is not. Each of these trips takes me to an important committee or commission meeting where most of the heavy intellectual lifting of the legislature takes place. Those sessions are where we study a subject matter in depth, find out how other states are dealing with the issue, receive recommendations from our professional, non-partisan staffs, make compromises, and draft legislation for the next General Assembly session. One of the reasons I love being your state Senator is that I love grappling with tough public policy issues and finding solutions that work for the people of our state. Here is a partial list of committees and commissions I am currently serving on and some of the most pressing issues. The Senate Finance Committee has had to dramatically downsize state government during the recessions. Now we are trying to rightsize it. Currently we are spending fewer General Fund dollars than in 2006. Particularly hard hit were our K-12 and higher education programs. At a time when we need to add 100,000 higher education slots over the next decade, how will we do it? We rank among the bottom few states in programs to help sick and elderly Virginians. The US Department of Justice is suing us for failing to provide

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community programs for persons with intellectual disabilities. Our programs for persons with mental illness are so scant that we are “streeting” persons who are a threat to themselves or others. “Streeting” is a term hospitals use when someone, who needs to be admitted, is turned out onto the street because there are no beds available. One study found that over the last year, more than 200 people who were so mentally ill they posed a danger to themselves and others, were turned out onto the streets because of insufficient beds. How will we pay for improvements to these programs? Are there less pressing programs that can be cut further? I chair the Public Safety Subcommittee of Finance as well as the Virginia Crime Commission. We have been fortunate that the crime rate has been dropping, largely due to evidence-based programs we implemented over the past decade. However, we face serious problems with 17% of the people in our prisons and jails being there largely because of mental illness. With limited community supports, they end up in jail. We are also grappling with re-entry issues and working closely with the McDonnell administration on this priority subject. The Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) evaluates state programs. Major topics include funding the Virginia retirement system and evaluating how wisely the Tobacco Settlement Funds ($4 billion) are being spent. Two studies I suggested are

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

underway. One deals with all tax preferences and whether they are having the desired effect. The other deals with economic development incentives and whether they are having unanticipated consequences. The public is welcome to attend any committee and commission meetings. Meeting schedules are posted at http://lis.virginia.gov. All the staff reports, final reports and recommendations are posted online. Also, I deeply appreciate the input of my constituents on these important studies. Of course, there is always a next step. After a commission releases its work, we still have to get a majority of the General Assembly and the Governor to agree. But, as a result of the committee process, we have a core group of legislators from across the state who are knowledgeable on the topic and who work together to get the legislation passed. And so, I keep zooming up and down I-95 to get the job done. Senator Janet Howell has been a Reston leader for 35 years. She has represented us in Richmond since 1992. Currently, she is chair of the powerful Privileges and Elections Committee and a Senate budget conferee.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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PERSPECTIVES

BY DELEGATE KENNETH R. PLUM

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John Plum shows his grandsons, including Ken’s sons, Timothy and David, how to prepare a garden plot. (1980)

grew up in rural Page County in the Page Valley that is part of the larger Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. To be more specific, I grew up in Crooked Run near the Town of Shenandoah. My parents survived the Great Depression by being frugal and sustainable in their lifestyle. After Dad left farming with his father and went to work doing maintenance with the Norfolk & Western Railroad, he continued to keep his vegetable garden that was the envy of everyone. Dad was a natural gardener who seemed always to get the one-acre garden to produce. We always harvested enough potatoes to fill the bin in the cellar to last us all winter. We had enough peas, string beans, corn, beets, and other vegetables to feed ourselves all summer and to provide enough for Mom to can in Mason jars in the early years and to freeze when we could afford a freezer. We had enough to eat all winter. Wild strawberries, huckleberries, and blackberries were turned into jams and jellies for the winter, and apples and peaches were purchased from a local orchard to be canned or made into sauce. Up until my high school years my parents also butchered a hog and, as the saying goes, would use everything but the squeal. We were pretty much sustainable on our four acres of property.

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While it is fun to nostalgically remember “the good old days,” there is no practical way to replicate that experience. The one addition to suburban life that recreates a semblance of that earlier way of life is the local farmers’ market. The opportunity to buy fresh, off-thestalk sweet corn, tomatoes — including the hybrid varieties, squash, cucumbers, peaches, apples, and all the other fruits and vegetables brings back wonderful memories. And I get the satisfaction of helping some small farmers and orchardists in business. Fossil fuels are used minimally to get the produce to me, and much of the produce is grown organically. The opportunity to chat with neighbors while shopping strengthens the sense of community.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Hope to see you at Lake Anne for the Farmers Market on Saturday mornings and at Reston Parkway and Sunrise Valley Drive on Wednesday afternoons. I have also been known to stop by the Farmers’ Markets at Frying Pan Park on Wednesday mornings, Herndon on Thursday mornings, and Vienna or Oakton on Saturday mornings. Let’s stop and chat while we shop. I would be pleased to share with you my recommendations on buys at the market, my experiences of growing up in the country, or public policy directions I think we should take. Ken Plum represents the 36th District in the Virginia House of Delegates. He lives in Reston.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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PERSPECTIVES

Reason to Celebrate BY CATHY HUDGINS, HUNTER MILL | PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESTON COMMUNITY CENTER

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n Reston, we have much to celebrate and one of my favorite celebrations is the Multicultural Festival held at the Lake Anne Village Center in late September. This annual Reston event honors the diversity that is one of our community’s greatest assets and invites participants to immerse themselves in music, food and performing arts from countries around the world. If you come early, you can even be witness to the moment when a handful of men, women and children, now living in our community, are naturalized as new citizens of the U.S. as part of a naturalization ceremony held as the event kick-off. Last year, we welcomed new citizens from China, Cuba, El Salvador, Israel, Iran and Pakistan.

Community Achieving Simon’s Dream

For these new Americans, it is a very special time. For founder, Bob Simon, it is confirmation that one of Reston’s founding principles is still very much in practice: Reston is a community open to all. Some 46 years ago, Reston was built upon the belief that a community is strengthened by the vibrant exchange of individuals with different backgrounds, abilities and heritages who can come together to share their various perspectives with one another. I believe that by recognizing and accepting our many differences, we learn to appreciate and respect the complexity of the world in which we live, and we develop those essential skills that can help us forge productive relationships with those around us.

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Our 2010 census results confirm that our community is more diverse than ever. The number of Asian residents has grown by 50 percent, making them the largest minority group in Fairfax County. Hispanics are the second-largest minority group, followed by African Americans. Here in Reston, more than 30 percent of our population is made up of non-white persons. And Fairfax County Public Schools report that more than 100 languages are spoken by county residents, which I’m sure feels challenging at times to our teachers. But this variety and richness is a gift to be welcomed.

Hopes and Dreams

A Fairfax County Immigrant and Refugee Study Report from 2000 of eight immigrant and refugee communities reflected the hopes and values of our new residents. The study found overwhelmingly that the new residents feel at home in Fairfax County, wanted their children to attain educational success by graduating high school and college and we found at least one parent or guardian in the home was employed. We also learned there was a desire to improve English skills and volunteer in the community, as well as aspiring to the American value of homeownership, where immigrants surpass the 2000 national average of over 45 percent.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Gifts of Diversity

Our new residents help us broaden our perspectives and open our hearts and minds to receive the gifts of others and share ours as well. It provides great opportunities for us to learn about people and to know who they really are instead of labeling them based on things that may not be true. Multiculturalism is the appreciation, acceptance or promotion of multiple cultures and respect for ethnic diversity. One way to do this is to be aware as you plan programs, events, meetings and activities in the coming months of the other holidays and cultural celebrations that may be important to those you work with, serve or who have chosen to call Reston home. A few of the non-traditional American events to be celebrated later in the year include: Rosh Hashanah, which is September 29–30. Yom Kippur is October 8 and Diwali is October 26. I hope you will join me at the Multicultural Festival at Lake Anne Village Center for a fun time. I also hope you will look for other opportunities to learn about the ethnic and individual variety within Reston and grow to treasure it as much as I do. Cathy Hudgins has represented the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors since 2000. As a long time Restonian, she has been involved with local, county and state politics for over 30 years.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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PERSPECTIVES

Fall into Biking BY ROBERT E. SIMON

Reston’s bike club has some 600 members who go on rides together and enjoy social occasions. Typically, they travel the roads rather than the paths, finding the paths too narrow and winding for their groups and the speeds they are accustomed to. The paths in Reston are ideal for the kind of biking I used to enjoy for a leisurely trip, taking time to soak in the scenery, the flora and fauna. Today, I walk these paths, no longer able to handle a twowheeler. I often stop to chat with one or more of the many mature adults who share my pleasure in being outdoors in beautiful surroundings. What is truly disappointing is how rarely I have encounters with the young. Where are they? At home glued to their computer or TV? What could be better for the health of these kids than to be outdoors on their bikes? The underpasses make it safe for them to travel distances. With parents accompanying them they could tie into the WO & D Trail and cover the 25 miles to Washington, D.C. or go 30 miles in the opposite direction past Leesburg to Purcelville. Or they could just stay closer to home with lakes, ball fields and tennis courts within easy reach. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT BIKING IN RESTON www.restonbikeclub.org WO & D Trail, http://www.wodfriends.org The Bike Lane, http://thebikelane.com

Reston Association maintains 55 miles of trails On our website, www.reston.org search for “Pathways” Join the Pedestrian & Bicycling Advisory Committee www.reston.org, search for “Committees”

Robert E. Simon Jr., founder of Reston.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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PERSPECTIVES

Change & Progress

WE CAN HAVE BOTH BY STU GIBSON

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airfax businessman Marty Irving has a saying that has come to be one of my favorites: “Change is inevitable; progress is optional.” During this fall season, especially during this fall election season, truer words were never spoken. And while we each might have a different definition of what constitutes “progress,” in my view the changes brought by 2011 bode well for our schools and children in Reston. First, we have seen positive changes in Reston’s schools. Achievement is up at South Lakes High School, with more students than ever earning the coveted International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma. According to The Connection newspapers, South Lakes sends a higher percentage of its graduates to the University of Virginia than all but three schools in Northern Virginia — one of which is Thomas Jefferson, a regional Governor’s School.

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Achievement gaps are closing dramatically at Dogwood Elementary. Thanks to our dedicated teachers working under the visionary leadership of Principal Robyn Cochran, Dogwood students are making impressive progress toward ending the unfair, oppressive sanctions under “No Child Left Behind.” Next, we are seeing progress as the next generation of instructional leaders takes the helm at three of Reston’s elementary schools. Earlier this year, the school system tapped Armstrong principal Shane Wolfe to lead Bailey’s Elementary School for the Arts and Sciences. Shamarlas Allens stepped in without missing a beat to keep our Armstrong children achieving to their highest potential. After the June retirement of Lake Anne Principal Linda Hajj, Brendan Menuey will follow in her footsteps to move Reston’s first elementary school to new levels of success–in what will soon be a newly renovated, 21st century building. And we have selected Kim Price to carry on the legacy of Reston’s longest-serving principal, Frank Bensinger, who retired in June after having led Forest Edge Elementary School for the past 21 years.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Finally, this fall brings important changes to the Fairfax County School Board. Most of you know that I have decided not to seek reelection to a fifth term as the Hunter Mill District representative on the school board. The past 16 years have brought incredible change — and great progress — for our students and our county. But, alas, that is the subject of another column. The changes on the school board you will see in 2012 will be shaped in large part by decisions you make in the voting booth on November 8. As I write this column, five of my colleagues on the Board have also decided not to seek reelection this year. At least half of the school board will be “new” come January 1, 2012. So your decisions really count. As we approach Election Day, I ask us all to consider how, working together, we can elect leaders who understand and can make the difference between mere “change” and real “progress” for our children, our community of Reston, our Commonwealth and our Country. Stu and his family moved to Reston in 1984, and his children are graduates of South Lakes High School. Stu works as Senior Litigation Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice, where he litigates large tax shelter cases. Mr. Gibson represents the Hunter Mill District on the Fairfax County School Board.


WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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ON THE STREET

Digging

Deep Reston’s Newest Neighborhood BY MAGGIE PARKER | PHOTOS BY PAUL LASKO

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

A Model Public/Private Partnership Agreement Defines Transit Oriented Development


Within four months, over 200,000 cubic yards of dirt will have been excavated.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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Under the guidance of the general contractor, James G. Davis Construction, over 70 people per day are at work. That number will grow to 200 at the time of full production. Overall, the county garage will require more than one million man-hours of labor to complete.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


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ou cannot escape the view from any direction as you drive along Wiehle Avenue near the Dulles Toll Road. The chain link fence covered in banners read “Reston

Station” announce the advent of a remarkable new lifestyle coming to Reston in less that two years. Metro.

With a delivery deadline of fall, 2013, work at the site has been intense since the April 5 groundbreaking. Plans will be finalized for the first building at Reston Station – a luxury apartment building with 450 homes.

Five years of proposals and negotiations resulted in a contract between Fairfax County and Comstock Partners to jointly develop county-owned land at the intersection of Wiehle Avenue and the Dulles Toll Road. The nine-acre parcel previously hosted the Reston East Park and Ride and will soon be home to an inground public parking and bus facility to serve the Metro station and a 1.5 millionsquare foot mixed use development above the garage.

The company will build the private development above the garage which will be comprised of housing, office space, hotel rooms, retail and entertainment.

This public/private partnership agreement (PPPA) has several components. Comstock Partners managed rezoning the property and now acts as the construction agent for the county garage.

Maggie Parker is the Director of Community Outreach and Communications for Restonbased Comstock Partners. A twenty-five year resident of Northern Virginia, she enjoys being an engaged participant in and supporter of all things Reston.

Comstock will pay ground rent (via the 99 year ground lease component of the PPPA) to the County. The amount of the rent will be determined by appraisals conducted on a preset schedule. Additionally, the county will receive operations revenue from the garage as well as the revenue from the increased tax rolls.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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ON THE STREET

Observe & Report When to Call the Police BY KATY DEFOE

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ave you ever driven past a car crash and thought, “I’m sure someone has already called that in.”

Well chances are, no one has called the police or fire departments yet. The Fairfax County Police Department depends on its citizens to be the eyes and ears of the community where they live, for the streets that they travel and the area where they work. Reporting incidents to police allows for the strategic deployment of resources to combat the issue at hand.

Who Should You Call

There are several ways to report incidents to the Fairfax County Police Department. Any crime in progress, person in immediate danger or life threatening situation should be considered an emergency and you should call 911 to make a report. Any incident that has already taken place, is suspicious in nature or does not pose a serious threat to any individual should be directed to the Fairfax County nonemergency number, 703-691-2131. All calls are answered at a central dispatch center and the information you give is sent to officers via computer and radio transmission.

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What is suspicious?

Something that is suspicious is anything you think is out of the ordinary, doesn’t look or feel right to you. There is no right or wrong answer. Everyone’s reaction to a situation is different. The best thing you can do is call the police. You do not have to wait for a crime to be committed before you call the police and what you see may be something the police are seeking. The more information the police have, the more informed they are when responding to an incident. Please do not think you are bothering the police if you call in something suspicious. It is the officers’ job to investigate the suspicious activity. It is your job to observe and report.

More Reporting Options

There are several other ways to report a crime or incident in Fairfax County. The Citizens Reporting Service is a tele-reporting system for situations that do not require a police response. This system can be accessed through the non-emergency number and an officer will call you back to make a report.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

You can make a police report online at www.fairfaxcounty.gov/police and click on the “online crime reporting” link. Crime Solvers is another option when you have witnessed a crime or know someone who has committed a crime. Callers never have to give their names or appear in court. You can contact Crime Solvers by phone at 1-866-411-TIPS(8477), e-mail at www. fairfaxcrimesolvers.org or text “TIP187” plus your message to CRIMES(274637). A $100 to $1,000 cash reward will be paid for information that leads to an arrest. Katy DeFoe is Crime Prevention Specialist with Fairfax County Police Reston district office.


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Spotlight on Reston is your guide to businesses contributing to the community while ensuring that Reston continues to be one of the best places to live, work, play and get involved

Experience Luxury

Need advice on what ring to choose for your soon-to-be fiancé or looking for an original piece of jewelry? M. Beem Jewelers provides full jewelry services with outstanding customer service for your convenience. In addition to its master goldsmith, the store employs a GIA Gemologist and a full time Master Watch Technician certified by Rolex and Tag Heuer who is skillful in working with all fine Swiss timepieces. M. Beem Jewelers professional staff will assist you with every aspect of your jewelry experience. Visit their store at the Plaza America II Center or www.mbeemjewelers.com.

Open House

Buying or selling your home can be an overwhelming prospect. That’s why Boofie’s Buyer and Seller Guides arm you with valuable tips to ensure your success. Boofie O’Gorman’s team provides you the highest level of service and her realtor skills and personal familiarity with the Reston area allows her to guide clients to the perfect property for their needs. Visit her website at www.boofie.com.

Bliss Out

Beloved Yoga will help bring back peace to your mind and body. The talented teachers practicing at Beloved Yoga are committed to share their passion and provide quality group, private yoga, corporate classes and workshops to the community. Visit one of their centers in Reston or Great Falls or call 703-860-YOGA (9642) for more information.

Off Leash

Dogs have been known as man’s best friend for decades. Owning a dog can be a positive, enjoyable experience for the entire family, but it can also become a nightmare if it is not trained properly. Off-Leash K9 Training is the highest rated dog training business in the greater DC area and is based in Northern Virginia. They specialize in private lessons, dog behavior consultations, and teaching owners to understand their pet. Don’t wait any longer to create a strong bond between you and your dog. Visit Off-Leash K9 Training’s website at www.offleashk9training.com or call 703-981-4265.

To have your business included in an upcoming Spotlight on Reston please contact Lindsay Sutton-Bilberry at 202-499-2131 or by email at lindsay@bluehouse.us

Learn About Neighborhood Watch See Police Safety and Rescue Equipment

Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011

10:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free Reston Association 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston 20191

Neighborhood Watch Educational Workshops You will learn:

How to Start a Neighborhood Watch Tips on Home Security and Safety Keeping a Neighborhood Watch Active How to Recruit Volunteers in Your Community

Brought to you by Fairfax County Police Department and Reston Association


ON THE STREET

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Kids’ Trout Fishing Day A BIG SUCCESS O BY NICKI BELLEZZA | PHOTOS BY JIM KIRBY AND SEAN BAHRAMI

ver 400 children and parents turned out for the first ever Reston Kids’ Trout Fishing Day. The event, sponsored by Reston Association, Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. (WSSI), Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, and Northern Virginia Trout Unlimited, provided a venue for children ages 2-12 to spend a day outdoors, and for some, the opportunity to catch their first fish.

The event was held along a one-mile long section of Snakeden Branch (between Soapstone Drive and Lake Audubon) in Reston, which was restored in the spring of 2009 as part of the Northern Virginia Stream Restoration Bank (NVSRB).

WSSI stocked the stream with 400 rainbow trout the day prior to the event, which created favorable fishing conditions for even the most novice of anglers. A fun day was had by kids, parents, and volunteers alike, with many planning to return to the stream again for another day of fishing and stream exploration. Nicki Bellezza is the community liaison for the Northern Virginia Stream Restoration Bank, educating Reston residents on the process involved in stream restoration.

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ON THE STREET

Protect Your Family Bring the entire neighborhood to the Reston station nearest you. Fire Prevention Open House Day October 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reston Fire Station 425

1820 Wiehle Avenue, Reston Captain II Eric Cunningham, Station Commander

Fox Mill Fire Station 431

2610 Reston Parkway, Herndon Captain II Norman Propst, Station Commander

North Point Fire Station 439

1117 Reston Avenue, Herndon Captain II Sean Evans, Station Commander

You’ll find educational materials and tip sheets on

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The leading causes of home fires Information about protecting your home Making a home escape plan


COMMUNITY BUILDING RENTAL MEETING FACILITIES RA’s Glade Room and Brown’s Chapel are frequently used for group functions, including cluster meetings, scout meetings, wedding ceremonies and a variety of classes. RENTAL FEES: $12.50–$70 per hour (security deposit required) Contact Member Services to reserve a community room by calling 703-435-6530 or emailing member_services@reston.org.

BROWN’S CHAPEL GLADE ROOM 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue 11550 Glade Drive Size: 914 square feet Size: 881 square feet Its tall ceilings provide excellent acoustics and its park-like grounds offer a lovely setting. The facility has chairs to seat 65 people, 3 tables, restroom facilities, heating, air conditioning and ample parking. It is perfect for church services, small meetings or classes.

Located above the pool bathhouse at the intersection of Glade and Soapstone Drive. This facility is equipped with chairs to seat 65 people, 4 tables, restroom facilities, heating and air conditioning. It is an ideal facility for preschool groups, dance classes, small meetings and club functions.

PICNIC PAVILIONS Available for rent 7 days a week April through October, a perfect place for private parties and group gatherings. RENTAL FEES APPLY $150/RA Members, $300/Corporate & Non-members HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (James “Jimmy” Wright Memorial Pavilion), at the corner of Steeplechase Drive and Reston Parkway. Size: 842 square feet The pavilion offers 4 picnic tables,1 grill and ample parking (shared parking at Hunters Woods Pool or Hunters Woods Park). NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION Center Harbor Road and North Village Road Size: 1,024 square feet North Hills Picnic Pavilion offers electricity, water, lights, 3 large brick barbecue grills, 2 portable restrooms, 6 picnic tables (under cover of pavilion), tot lot and ample parking.

BROWN’S CHAPEL PICNIC PAVILION Located next to Brown’s Chapel, 11300 Baron Cameron Avenue This pavilion is equipped with 4 picnic tables, 2 grills, and restrooms. The pavilion is near a basketball court, ball fields, an exercise trail and a tot-lot. Lake Newport is close by for fishing off the dock/ dam. Brown’s Chapel Picnic Pavilion is available on a firstcome, first-serve basis at no charge. LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION 11301 North Shore Drive Size: 900 square feet Lake Anne Park includes a tot-lot, 2 large grills and a restroom facility. Six picnic tables are situated under cover. Basketball court, tennis court, sand volleyball court, water, electricity, and ample parking also are available. Recreational courts are not included in private reservation.

PONY BARN Corner of Steeplechase Drive and Triple Crown Road Size: 2,006 square feet A wood-chipped tot-lot, equipped with swings and a jungle gym, is an inviting place for youngsters to romp and play. The Pony Barn contains 7 picnic tables, 2 grills and 2 portable restrooms. Water available.

TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION Corner of North Shore Drive and Temporary Road Size: 892 square feet The pavilion is equipped with 10 picnic tables (8 of which are under cover), 1 large grill, 2 portable restrooms, swing set and 4 benches situated throughout the park. Parking is available in 16 marked spaces or at curbside. Water fountain available.

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ON THE STREET

Growing to Serve Reston BY LEILA GORDON | PHOTOS BY TRUNG NGUYEN AND LINDA RUTLEDGE

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n June 2010, the community heartily endorsed the Reston Community Center Board of Governors’ planning to expand our RCC Lake Anne facility, which originally opened with 8,500 square feet of space in September of 1999. The expansion adds a total of 3,500 square feet to make RCC Lake Anne a 12,000 square-foot facility that will be able to accommodate several hundred new patrons in our programs.

NEW FEATURES Two dedicated fitness studios A dedicated Wellness Studio A new 3-d media fine art studio, expanded ceramics studio, and expanded fine art studio A three-dimensional art hallway to feature teacher/student work New air conditioning and improved acoustics Construction efforts got underway in March of 2011 after going through all the design and approvals processes. Patrons, RCC Board members, and staff all provided input to the new building features. RCC Lake Anne will expand fitness and wellness offerings to support the interest in such popular classes as yoga, body sculpting, pilates, and more. Our fine art classes will have an entirely new threedimensional media classroom, an Art Studio twice the size of our prior classroom, and two more wheels and related equipment in the ceramics studio. By working creatively with our patrons, instructors, staff and our contractors, we were able to simultaneously offer classes and programs at Lake Anne with the construction process throughout the spring and summer. Please come celebrate the finished product with us at the Grand Re-opening of the RCC Lake Anne on Sept. 10, 2011. Leila Gordon has been the RCC Executive Director since 2008.

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Top: Trung Nguyen, RCC Maintenance Supervisor  with Ed Myers, ASIO Services International Project Superintendent. Middle: Three-Dimensional Art Gallery Walkthru. Bottom: Wellness Studio flooring being installed.


Grand Re-opening Celebration Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Noon

Contractor preparing framing for new fitness studios. ď‚

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AROUND RESTON

Reston Festival PHOTOS BY DON ATREIDES AND HA BROCK

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eston Festival 2011 took visitors on a trip through time as it celebrated the past and future of Reston. The theme was Reston through the Decades. Founder Robert E.Simon, Jr. celebrated both his birthday and the 47th anniversary of the planned community he created.

Reston Festival Planning Committee Ludo Van Vooren, Festival Chair Ashleigh Soloff, Vice Chair Amy York, Contests & Awards Committee Buzz Carder, Historical Display Committee Daniela Sileo, Publicity Committee Ed Robichaud, Webmaster Evan Hardy, Publicity Committee Gregory Gallardo, Food & Beverage Chair Ha Brock, Volunteer Chair Jackie Curran, Activities Co-Chair Jay Monroe, Finance Chair Jessica Wilder, Logistics Committee Kevin Danaher, Entertainment Chair Ladan Madresehee, Activities Co-Chair Marc Pollak, Contests & Awards Chair Nicole McGee, Publicity Committee Sam Pallo, Publicity Committee Sean Bahrami, Publicity Committee Visitors strolling through Reston Town Center on the July weekend were greeted by 60’s hippies, 70’s flower children, 80’s and beyond yuppies and 21st century “characters.”

Volunteers Make the Reston Festival “Happen”

Reston Festival would not be possible without the hundreds of volunteers who, year after year, man booths, direct traffic, provide information and keep both the guests and the event moving along happily. The members of the 2011 Reston Festival Planning Committee offer their deepest appreciation to the amazing volunteers.

Reston Festival Major Sponsors

Reston Association Reston Community Center Reston Town Center Whole Foods Virginia Army National Guard Cafe of Life JK Moving Services Great Kids Village Ameritech Construction ABC7/WJLA-TV and News Channel 8 College Hunks Haul Away Junk TD Ameritrade ING Financial Partners, Inc. Washington Area Chevy Dealers Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

There’s a Spot for You in Reston Festival 2012

How would you like to help us plan next year’s festival? We have some open seats on the 2012 Reston Festival Planning Committee. To learn more, contact Ha Brock, volunteer chair at habrock@reston. org or call her at 703 435- 7986. www.restonfestival.com

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AROUND RESTON

Bob Simon Slept Here See the Old House that Spawned the New Town BY CAROL NAHORNIAK | PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON AND ARCHIVAL PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE BOWMAN FAMILY

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“George Washington never slept here, but a lot of other top brass and international dignitaries have in the past.” Reston Times Betty Reed, July 19, 1984

Left: Fox hunters at the DeLong Bowman House in its early days. 

Right: Bowman House living room (2011).

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here may be no other place that bridges the worlds of the “gentleman farmers” and the new town residents of Reston like the DeLong Bowman House. Sometimes, in the quiet of an early morning before the traffic and bustle of Reston Town Center overtake the moment, you can almost see riders in full dressage on the lawn or hear the laughter from one of the many splendid dinner parties held in the elegant home. In Reston’s founding days, this 1941 home is where Robert and Anne Simon entertained and wooed prospective investors for Bob’s vision, a “New Town,” to build on the 6,750 acres he purchased in 1961. At that time, there were certainly no hotels or restaurants near this land of dairy farms and fox hunts, and this dignified white mansion provided the stage to present the financial and philosophical aspects of Reston.

10TH ANNUAL RESTON HOME TOUR Saturday, October 15 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets: www.RestonMuseum.org Get an exclusive view of the historic DeLong Bowman House, plus five more outstanding private Reston homes with inspiring interior design and architecture. Presented by Reston Historic Trust to benefit Reston Museum.

‘Virginia-Colonial’ in style, the home was part of the Sunset Hills Farm (c.1927) package that Bob purchased, and from 1961 until 1967 it was his part-time home as development of Reston began.

The House as a Community Center

Bob and Anne would fly in from their New York residence for long weekends, often bringing friends and potential investors with them. They also brought their New York decorator, who transformed the house into the Virginia country home that Bob envisioned. Some guests would fly down in the morning, have a bus tour of Reston, a fine lunch and then fly back to New York in the evening. For their 50th birthdays in April 1964, the Simons chartered a plane for friends and family to celebrate “A Spring Frolic” in Reston that included a tour of construction in progress and ended with a party at the Bowman House. All these guests needed special care and good food. Those tasks were admirably achieved by a talented couple, Norris and Rudean Williams, the chef and housekeeper who maintained the home and kept visitors well fed. As well as providing hospitality for Reston visitors, Norris also prepared lavish hunt breakfasts and fine fare for the annual New Year’s Eve Hunt Ball for Fairfax County’s elite of the day. Among those who attended was the distinguished Martha Pennino, attired in her Scottish kilt. Having served on the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors for 24 years, as vice chairman for 17 of those years, she was a driving force behind the formation of Reston.

DeLong Bowman House as it appears todays. 

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Top: Bowman Distillery, Reston 1980s. 

Bottom: Bowman House in its early days.

Kentucky Distillers and the House The DeLong Bowman house owes its existence to a Kentucky family. A. Smith Bowman, Sr. and his sons, A. Smith, Jr. and E. DeLong, started the Bowman Distillery in 1934, producing Virginia Gentleman Bourbon.

As Reston was formed, production of spirits was in full swing on 60 acres excluded from the sale of the farm. However, in 1988 the distillery relocated to near Fredericksburg where it is still producing Virginia Gentleman Bourbon to this day. Meantime, other historic buildings remained at the 60-acre site as Reston developed, including the impressive Wiehle-Bowman Manor House.

Bowman House dinning room (2011). 

Stairs to the Bowman House living room (2011). 

The House Evolves

In 1967, Gulf Reston brought in new leadership for its investment in Reston, and Bob and Anne left their Bowman House days behind. Except for a book, Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, the house was vacated. Still, the stately Bowman House went on to serve as Reston’s only meeting place until the Lake Anne community hall was completed (now Jasmine Café), hosting gatherings of The Reston Foundation, foreign dignitaries, Methodist services, tennis tournament luncheons, Christmas buffets, and Gulf Reston dinners. The Reston Music Center was born there and guest artists stayed there when they came to perform.

Bowman House Office Building. Encircled by townhouse office buildings in the hub of Bowman Green Drive, the DeLong Bowman House has been a dwelling for successful businesses ever since. Anne Simon, fondly known as Nan, will always be remembered in Reston by the lake that bears her name, which is also where her daughter, Lynn Lilienthal, and her family, have resided since 1967. Carol Nahorniak, creative director at Myers PR, and secretary of Reston Historic Trust, lives, works and plays in Reston.

For economical reasons, Gulf Reston “decommissioned” the Bowman House in 1977. After it was sold, this community landmark underwent a transformation with a wing addition that enlarged the house to 12,300 square feet. In 1984, renovations were complete and it was unveiled as the

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AROUND RESTON

An Urban BY CLAUDIA THOMPSON-DEAHL | PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON

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SUNRISE VALLEY WETLAND NATURE PARK

If you are going… This park is one minute from the intersection of Fairfax County Parkway and Sunrise Valley Drive. From this intersection, head west on Sunrise Valley Drive toward Thunder Chase Drive. Go past the Herndon Monroe Park and Ride and make a right turn across from Milburn Lane into 12700 Sunrise Valley Drive. It is a four-story building that says “ASG.” Park at the far left section of the parking lot and the trail is in front of you.  Visitors can view the wetland from the bridge that spans the water.

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Claudia Thompson Deahl  Upclose view of the Sunrise Valley Wetland 

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here is nowhere in Reston quite like Sunrise Valley Wetland Nature Park. It is about 15.75 acres and is comprised of approximately 3.3 acres of created wetlands that was once a farm pond and 12.45 acres of upland buffer. It is a natural assumption that it is managed by the Reston Association or by Fairfax County Park Authority. But that is not the case. It is owned by Massachusetts Life Insurance Company and managed by CBRE. Sunrise Valley is a mitigated wetland, which means that it was constructed to compensate for other wetlands that were destroyed during development. This particular wetland was created to mitigate for the impacts due to the development of Reston Town Center and North Point village. This is a favorite spot for environmental education, birds and birders, wildlife and nature enthusiasts, dog walkers and office workers looking for a quiet spot to take a lunchtime walk.

Depending on the season that you walk the trails you might encounter a box turtle crossing the path, hear the harsh trillkon-ka-reeee of the Red-Winged Blackbird, spot Painted and Red-eared Turtles sunning them selves on a log in the lily covered pond, or see fox tracks in the snow. It is a great place to hear the spring peepers calling in early spring and see warblers moving through each spring and fall. It is common to see deer and you may be lucky enough to see either a Green or Great Blue Heron fishing along the banks of the pond. You may see catbirds that like to nest in the Black Willows or see the Red Shoulder Hawk perched looking for prey. If you pay close attention you may even see the long-tailed Cooper’s Hawk zip through the woods making a surprise attack on an unsuspecting songbird. Even though frogs are declining nationwide, six different species call this home–Pickerel, Upland Chorus, Bull, Green, Gray Tree Frog and Spring Peepers.

What makes this area so special is that it is the only marsh in Reston. We have our beautiful lakes, ponds and 19 miles of streams. We have the beaver wetland that is in the Glade Stream Valley but it goes through cycles, only one of which is a marsh. Sunrise Valley Wetland Nature Park has a unique combination of shallow marsh habitat and old field habitat. There are species here that are never or rarely found in other parts of Reston. The American Bittern has been seen here, which is truly remarkable as it is listed on the rare bird list maintained by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage.

breeze. This trait had given them the nickname sky-gazer. Other species that are particularly exciting finds are the Yellow and Prairie Warbler, Willow Flycatcher and Wilson’s Snipe. The Merlin is a medium sized falcon and has been seen in only a few other locations in Reston. Claudia ThompsonDeahl applauds those who create habitats for wildlife because they contribute to a healthy ecosystem. Claudia has received numerous awards and accolades for her preservation and beautification efforts throughout her career.

Bitterns have been declining mostly due to habitat loss. They are difficult to spot and have an amusing habit of blending in with the surrounding reeds. They will look up at the sky and with their long stripped necks they will sway back and forth with the reeds as they move with any

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AROUND RESTON

Reston Royalty J BY MATTHEW CHRISTIAN DAVIS | PHOTOS BY DAVID MADISON

uliette Rossant coined the term ‘Super Chef’… also the title of her first book “Super Chef” [Simon & Schuster 2004], and an online magazine www.SuperChefBlog.com.

A resident of Reston, Juliette is also the daughter of renowned New York architect James Rossant (‘the’ designer/planner/ sculptor of Reston) and Colette Rossant from Paris, celebrated cookbook author and renowned writer on culinary arts. Juliette started publishing poems at age 14 years and graduated from St. Ann’s in Brooklyn,

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then attended Dartmouth College (where she co-founded The Stonefence Review literary magazine), and later studied creative writing at Johns Hopkins University (studying under Kenneth Koch and Richard Eberhart). Rossant’s journalism work in the 1980s included living in Istanbul, Paris, Moscow, and Jeddah — where she wrote for newspapers and magazines such as Business Week. Her work included writing about the Kurds in Northern Iraq during the Gulf War, and developments in the oil industry in Central Asia and the Middle East.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Ms. Rossant has written for Forbes and Business Week, as contributing editor to many other magazines, from Portfolio to Gourmet, among others. A leading expert with SuperChefs and celebrity chefs for nearly a decade, Juliette Rossant started the “Celebrity Chefs” column in the Forbes annual “Celebrity 100” issue. We caught up with Juliette to learn more about the legacy of her father’s work, his influence on her, and why she chose to live and work in Reston.


Of all the places in the world you could have lived, why did you and your family choose Reston?

That’s easy. We last were living in Washington, DC, and my husband got a job in Reston’s center. We had already lived in Los Angeles, New York, and Jeddah. Whether to live here was an easy decision. My husband would have a short drive to work — and I could explore Reston. You see, this town has intrigued me since childhood. As soon as construction on Washington Plaza finished, my sisters and I would swim in Lake Anne and play in the fountain. I thought it would be wonderful if at least one of my parents’ four children actually lived here.

Chef. Poet. Author. Editor. Publisher.

For the first few years, we lived just off Lake Anne, the heart of my father’s Reston. It was wonderful to visit there with my father and mother — to watch my own child play in the fountain and run around the plaza, just as I had done. My parents visited many times and walked the plaza and around Lake Anne with us.

What does it mean to you, Juliette Rossant, to walk the streets of Reston and know your father planned them?

I think of my father all the time here. I think about his intention in planning–to create a community that wasn’t suburban, but real– like small towns I have visited in Europe, in Asia, and here in the United States. I think he succeeded in creating a sense of community. When I go to the Farmers’ Market on Lake Anne all summer or whenever I’m crossing Washington Plaza on a cold winter’s day, I think about the handsome townhouses overlooking the lake.

I wish more of the intended work of James Rossant had survived the many sales of Reston and its further development. I’ve looked at some of the drawings he did of Hunters Wood and North Point Village, and it saddens me that other village centers in Reston diverge so far from the ideals of the original Master Plan. Reston could have become more beautiful and wonderful for its residents. My father did not intend the other village centers to form around malls. He never intended for a monolithic town center to develop, which might cannibalize business from the village centers. Walkways for pedestrians and bike trails for bikers were supposed to dominate, not cars — nor did he ever intend for a massive highway like the Dulles Greenway to cut Reston in two. That’s not to say that the bike trails and walkways are not here — but it is to say that Lake Anne represents what more of Reston could have become. Speaking of toll roads and the Metro, I confess ambivalence with the coming of the Metro system. On the one hand, I look forward to riding the subway all the way into Washington. Moreover, I think the Metro will encourage many people who are in walking distance to walk to Metro stations — and this fits with the vision of Reston that my father had. On the other hand, I fear that the Metro may compound traffic jams along the access roads. Recently, my husband changed jobs and now works 12 miles away in Dulles. The strange thing is that it takes him less time to get to work 12 miles away in Dulles than it did two miles away in Reston’s center — because he used to have to cross the toll road. That’s a bit ridiculous, no? The coming of Metro gives us a chance to straighten out our road mess: I hope we take advantage of this moment.

How do you feel about bringing up your son here?

Overall, I’m very happy to raise a child here in Reston. That’s very much because my son himself likes living here. A few years ago when my son turned six, I asked him how he liked it here. This was shortly before my father’s eightieth birthday. (We celebrated that year in France — complete with a three-piece Dixie-Land jazz band made up of two Frenchmen and one banjo-strumming American woman). I thought part of what my father would like to hear is how one of his grandchildren liked living in a town he had planned.

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covered flatbread called barbari. If I go in there with my family and the bread is hot out of the oven, we usually dispose of a whole slab before we get home.

What do you think about running your business from Reston?

The late James Rossant (designer of Lake Anne Plaza) posed with his grandson Raphael Chambers. 

My son said that when we lived in Washington he felt he didn’t know anyone and people didn’t say “Hi,” when we passed them in the street. In Reston, he goes out and plays — and swims and bikes and plays tennis and basketball. He walks to see his friends by himself. He sees squirrels, deer, and other animals. He hears the honk of geese at night. He walks on many different trails. He knows his neighbors. He watches the seasons — and the stars. He plays in the fountain in Washington Plaza when it gets hot. And he knows how all this came about: we were living in “Jimmy’s town.” When my father used to come visit, my son would overwhelm him with questions about how and why he designed Reston. Eventually, we helped our son film interviews with my father over a two-day visit. My husband made a rough-cut edit, which we showed during my father’s memorial in 2010. One thing I’d like to see is “Lake Anne Day.” I’d like to see students from all the Reston elementary schools come to Lake Anne and learn about town planning, the architectural movements in 20th Century America behind Lake Anne, and the sculpture and architecture at Washington Plaza.

Now, let’s turn our attention to your work. When you cook for yourself at the end of a long day, what are your favorite standbys?

Cooking! That subject is as integral to my family as architecture. That is my mother’s department, but it involves my father and the rest of us, too. In fact, when my parents first met, my mother won his heart through

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his stomach by serving him a delicious tomato salad. It’s true! I’ve heard my father say it many times — and my mother, Colette Rossant, recounted it in her first of three food memoirs, called Apricots on the Nile. Also, my father designed several restaurants for my mother, two of which won praise for both menu and design in The New York Times: Buddha Green and Dim Sum Go Go. What do I cook? Well, I lived for many years in the Middle East, so I like to cook Persian, Turkish, and Arab dishes: estamboli polo (Persian-style stew with rice), foul madammas (Arab-style fava beans), and mercimek corbasi (Turkish-style lentil soup). I also grew up in New York City near Chinatown and near a lot of Japanese restaurants, so I tend to cook Asian, too: stirfry dishes, lots of pea shoots and fresh green vegetables, and oden (Japanese tofu soup). Being half French, I tend to approach all food with that style — and cook French dishes like boeuf bourguignon, blanquette de veaux (for which I have developed a light recipe with little cream) — and crepes, of course! My son does a lot of cooking with me, as I did with my mother. I should mention that I review many cookbooks for my online magazine, Super Chef, so I wind up learning new recipes all the time. That means first I have to find the right ingredients. Reston itself has few ethnic markets these days, but I like Lotte in Chantilly for Asian ingredients as well as their fresh fruits and vegetables. There are also many Turkish, Arab, and Persian stores encircling Reston for Middle Eastern specialties — particularly “Mash Hassan Bakery,” where they make fresh, sesame-

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

I write about the businesses of celebrity chefs and food issues in general in a daily, online magazine called Super Chef. I wrote a book, also called Super Chef (Simon & Schuster 2004) that chronicled the business adventures of six of America’s top chefs. It is easy to cover food stories from Reston, since most of my work is remote. Reston is a great place for any online work. We’re so close to Washington DC, which has begun to attract a lot of globally-recognized chefs — so if I need to do a one-on-one interview, they usually come here. Plus I do travel to New York and Europe. Being so close to Dulles is a plus.

What do you want the people of Reston to know about your father? About yourself? I hope the people of Reston, especially children who live here, learn more about what makes this place special. It is the most successful new town in America, and that, I believe, is largely thanks to my father’s vision that Bob Simon recognized and bravely followed in Lake Anne’s design. I hope Washington Plaza continues to draw new businesses, new people, and new life. Every time I go there, I feel the same kind of peaceful well-being I got when I was in the central square of Sienna, Italy, the courtyard in front of Chartres Cathedral, or Ibn Tulum in Cairo — all of which I have seen with my father — a respite from the craziness of urban life, and a kind of respect for the human perspective. We aren’t humbled by the size of the square, we aren’t dwarfed by it, but we are encouraged to reach out and explore it. As for me, I am proud to be my father’s daughter and grateful for the gift of a fine place to live that encourages our better selves.

Matthew Christian Davis is an author, speaker and publisher. His last work is the widely recognized book, BEST OF DC: ‘Defining Change’ in American Leadership — an innovative hardcover book with sector-specific chapters profiling success-stories of arts, culture, diplomacy, and key issues about social responsibility and community impact.


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AROUND RESTON

Reston Headquarters Brings

Best of All Worlds BY ROBERT HERSHORN | PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE GERMAN ARMED FORCES COMMAND

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German Command offices in Reston. 

Each year, Germans and American units conduct joint training at Lake Audubon. 

A

utopilot Drive near Dulles Airport has the feel of a place in which one would face immediate arrest for displaying even a hint of unseemly conduct. The airport and its iconic observation deck loom close by. Much of the real estate not taken up by cab services or rental car drop-off points is made up of hangars and storage warehouses. Guard boxes, chain link fences, and low-key yet unmistakably direct signs all contribute to the low humming whisper: “Any remotely suspicious behavior will get you a visit from airport police.” Within this panoply sits a considerable stockpile of supplies and material waiting to be transported to German military forces stationed throughout the United States. There are more of these forces than the average citizen might think: our vast expanses of land allow the German military to conduct the entirety of their missile testing operations on U.S. soil, and the German Air Force likewise does all of its test flying in these United States. Not to be outdone, Autopilot Drive has provided German forces with a vast and expansive hangar in which to store their wares; big enough, in fact, to accommodate over two thousand guests for an annual all-you-caneat German Beer Night. The hangar and its attendant beer fest are administered by the German Armed Forces Command Unit of the United States, headquartered in Reston off of Sunrise Valley Drive. Based in Reston for the past 25 years, the Command Unit supports and oversees the over 1,500 German soldiers and airmen stationed in the United States and

fosters cooperation and synergy between the German and American militaries as they pursue joint efforts in Afghanistan and elsewhere across the globe. Reston’s proximity to Washington, D.C. and to the hangar at Dulles makes it a perfect spot for the Command Unit to carry out its duties.

For example, pilot training takes place alongside U.S. forces in New Mexico where there is plenty of space and good weather. Germans attend military and leadership schools across the U.S. and Canada. Conversely, Americans learn from the Germans both in the field and in classrooms.

What the Germans Do

International Office A Quiet Neighbor

Brigadier General Hasso Körtge, who became the commander of all German forces in the U.S. and Canada in 2010, says the purpose is to provide leadership, support and training.

“We work alongside our American counterparts, developing joint training skills that will help us to work together in locations such as Afghanistan,” Körtge said. “We also provide leadership and education through a variety of locations throughout the U.S. and Canada.”

Situated in an office park so wooded and bucolic as to belie the fact that it backs up onto the Dulles Toll Road, the Command Unit’s headquarters shed their otherwise uncanny resemblance to a run-of-the-mill Northern Virginia office complex when one realizes the uncommonly high incidence of German license plates in the parking lot. The sizable chunk of the Berlin Wall that greets you at the building’s entryway removes any lingering misconceptions. Officers serving their three-to-four-year tours at the Command Unit exude an assured calm that comes with having the best of both worlds. They have found in Reston, and in the D.C. area as a whole, a perfect balance between the friendly open-mindedness of the United States and the cosmopolitanism of their European homeland. “Our staff is linked to where they live,” said Commander Körtge. Captain Walter Froehler, Commander of the Unit’s headquarters, is on his second goround in the States after a tour of duty in the mid-1980s in Huntsville, Alabama. He’s been in the D.C. area since 2009.

 Hangar at Dulles International Airport

serves as both a storage and distribution facility.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

45


Commander Kortge welcomes the community to the annual German Beer Night which 

raises funds for Rotary Club International of Dulles.

Welcoming Neighbors

A classic American tableau, to be sure, and one that illustrates an important aspect of the lives of the men and women of the German Armed Forces Command. Unlike Americans living in enclosed military bases overseas, or even their comparatively close-knit German military counterparts in other parts of the U.S., the German Armed Forces Command Unit is made up of commissioned officers living wholly enmeshed in the societal and cultural fabric of their adopted town. Many have personal histories in Reston dating back decades. “I remember when, further down Sunrise Valley, it would end in just a dirt road,” says Sergeant Major Mike Moeller, a German Air Force officer serving at the Command Unit. “It was much quieter in the early 90’s.”

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Sergeant Major Moeller served in Reston from 1991 until 1995; he’s been on his current tour since May 2008. “It normally takes about six months to adjust,” he says. “It’s mainly a language issue. Even those [at the command unit] who are fluent in English mostly know British English. I went to open a bank account once and was very confused since they kept saying ‘double L’ when they would spell my last name.” He adds, “Personally, I think we’re at a big advantage. We don’t want to just export our presence into another country. If you have no reason to leave the military base, you lose one of the greatest challenges of serving abroad.” It’s an opinion shared by the Command Unit’s personnel. “Once they are here, all of them like it,” Captain Froehler says. “It’s more enriching to be able to blend into a community.”

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


“It is very easy for us to find it comfortable. People here are so friendly and open-minded. Of course it is a big advantage that you have places like Reston Town Center that have a more urban, European environment, but still, I like it when people are always ringing your doorbell.” – Captain Walter Froehler

Top: Commander Hasso Körtge.  Middle: German Beer Night offers a large selection of food. Bottom: German soldiers and families celebrate Christkindl Market night. All-you-can-eat German Beer Night. 

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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48

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


Left: Christkindl Market celebration at  Command Center in Reston. Right: Annual Christkindl to benefit Reston Interfaith.

Mission: Community Involvement

In fact, Körtge says German wives spearhead community involvement such as helping to stock backpacks with food for children enrolled at the Laurel Learning Center of Reston Interfaith. The Command Unit naturally seeks any opportunity to give back to the region that has sustained and informed its continued efforts throughout the years. Their annual Christkindl Market has been in operation for the past four years and is open to the public in December in the parking lot of the Command Center at 11150 Sunrise Valley Drive. The soldiers’ wives make crafts, baked goods, and smoked sausage to sell at the day-long event; all proceeds go to Reston Interfaith. Proceeds from German Beer Night tickets go to the Rotary Club International of Dulles, which matches all donated funds. In 2008, the market raised about $10,000. We look for ways to link to the community institutions,” said Commander Kortge. “That is why we invite local people to join us at our events. It is a good way to extend our cultures.”

Command raised $10,000 to support 

Reston Interfaith.

Live band at Christkindl Market. 

The Command Unit also conducts an annual march with U.S. troops from around the country. U.S. and German troops carry out exercises including shooting contests and, a 12-kilometer march with 35 pounds of weight strapped on. The event is open to all spectators and takes place this year on September 27. Sergeant Major Moeller and Captain Froehler field any number of questions. Is there a disconnect that comes with serving in the U.S. while representing another nation? Aside from language quirks, are there significant adjustments that need to be made in order to live in the U.S? Are there ever unfortunate individuals who, for whatever reason, just can’t make it here? All are met with a smile and a shake of the head. These things rarely, if ever, occur.

Captain Froehler eventually takes a moment to recall his days in publishing. “You know, I used to work as a public affairs officer [for the German military],” he says. “They would send me out to write something or get pictures, but when I brought it back, it was always, ‘too big, too small.’” Demanding work, it was clear, but a challenge he relished all the same.

Robert Hershorn grew up in Reston and has returned after an extended stay in Richmond, Virginia. He is currently working as a producer and wire service writer for a D.C. — area broadcasting service.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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MEMBER SERVICES VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

Register now for classes and activities with Reston Association.

FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT MEMBER SERVICES AT 703-435-6530 OR E-MAIL MEMBER_SERVICES@RESTON.ORG.

n n n n n

AQUATICS 52 TENNIS 56 CAMPS 66 NATURE 68 SPECIAL EVENTS

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Reston Association headquarters has moved. The new address is 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston 20191-3404. Living in Reston is like living in a park. 1,300 acres of open space are maintained throughout the community and a wide variety of facilities and programs offer year-round opportunities for fitness, fun and exploration. 55 miles of paved pathways and natural surface trails connect our facilities, neighborhoods, schools and shopping, and are perfect for walkers, joggers and bicyclists. More than 700 acres of forest, 50 meadows and four wetlands provide beautiful vistas and important habitat for local wildlife. Aquatic habitats include

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four lakes, three ponds and 20 miles of streams, enjoyed by boaters and anglers.

Let us help you get the most out of Reston’s parklands and facilities.

In Reston’s 15 community pools, patrons swim laps in the Olympic-sized pool, splash in the children’s interactive area, speed down a giant slide and relax in heated spas. Reston’s vibrant tennis community plays on 48 community courts, eight of which are clay and 26 of which are lighted. Friends and teams practice and compete on ballfields and multipurpose courts. Playgrounds, garden plots, picnic facilities and community buildings are popular places to gather and enjoy.

MEMBERSHIPS A current Reston Association Pool and Tennis Pass is required for every member (age 1 or older) visiting the pool & tennis courts. To protect your member privileges, adults may also need to present a current photo ID proving Reston residency.

Parks & Recreation staff conduct an exciting line-up of top notch programs and special events for all ages. From nature programs and summer camps to dive-in movies and festivals, there is something fun for everyone. Many activities are free while others require reservations and have fees.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

You must present your pass for entry to the pool or tennis courts. Sorry, we cannot accept an online receipt. RA Members may purchase Pool and Tennis Passes online or in person at 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 201913404.

RA MEMBER SERVICES 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404. HOURS OF OPERATION Monday–Friday from 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Extended summer hours are Saturdays, April–July from 9 a.m.–Noon.


COME PLAY IN RESTON TWO EASY WAYS TO REGISTER 1. Online — www.reston.org 2. Walk-In — Come to the Reston Association Member Services desk and RA staff will be happy to assist you. RA MEMBERS Pool/Tennis Pass Adults 18 years & older Children under 18 Season Long Guest Pass for Members Only Prepaid Pool Guest Pass Prepaid Tennis Guest Pass

Price $15 $10 $35 $25 $25

Members can only receive a 20 percent discount when the 2011 Assessment is paid through the RA Website, by 3/1/11. The discount will only be applied to online purchases completed prior to 4/30/11. Tennis Key Fobs are available at the Reston Association Member Services desk for $2 with the purchase of a Member or Non-member Tennis Pass. Replacement passes can be purchased at the Reston Association Member Services desk at a discounted rate.

To Purchase Passes are available online at the “Shop RA” link on www.reston. org or in person at RA’s Member Services desk, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 201913404. Replacement passes can only be purchased in person at the Member Services desk. Requirements RA Members may purchase passes for themselves, one adult household member and immediate family members under the age of 18 online at www.reston.org or at RA. Two additional passes may be purchased for family members 18–22 years of age in person at the Member Services desk.

Passes can be purchased at Member Services if: 1. You are 18 years or older 2. Bring a current photo I.D. or 3. Bring proof of owning or occupying a Reston residence where the RA Annual Assessment account is current. NON-MEMBERS/ CORPORATE Non-resident Pool and Tennis Memberships are also available. If you don’t live in Reston you’re still invited to come play. SPECIAL FOR NON-MEMBERS: $20 off if purchased prior to 4/1/11, excluding Corporate Memberships. Pool/Tennis Pass Family Pool & Tennis Family Pool Only Family Tennis Only Couple Pool & Tennis Couple Pool Only Couple Tennis Only Individual Pool & Tennis Individual Pool Only Individual Tennis Only

Price $610 $580 $340 $525 $510 $295 $435 $350 $235

CORPORATE INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP Must be employed in Reston. Proof required. Corporate memberships are limited to weekday use only and available for purchase at the Reston Association Member Services desk only. E-mail member_ services@reston.org for more details. Pool/Tennis Pass Individual Pool & Tennis Individual Pool Only Individual Tennis Only

Price $260 $210 $200

To Purchase Non-resident passes are available online at the “Shop RA” link on www.reston.org or in person at RA’s Member Services desk, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-3404. Corporate memberships can only be purchased in person at the Member Services desk, with proof of employment.

Requirements Non-members may purchase passes for themselves and immediate family members (1–17 years of age) online at www.reston.org or at RA. Passes can be purchased at Member Services if: 1. You are 18 years or older 2. All non-members are required to have a picture taken to obtain passes. If you have not taken the picture for 2010, you must come into the office to get your picture taken. Only then will the pass be issued to you. 3. For 2011: non-members who order passes online and have taken pictures in 2010 will NOT have to come into the office for a new picture. GUEST PASSES Please remember that the RA host Member must accompany all guests at all times while visiting the pools or tennis courts.

PRE-PAID GUEST PASS RA Members and non-members may purchase a pre-paid guest pass good for 5 pool entries. The pass is available for $25 online or at our Member Services desk. This convenient pass can be used for one or more guests at a time and eliminates the need to carry cash to the pools. TENNIS ONE-DAY GUEST PASS $5 Tennis Guest Passes can be purchased during Reston Association normal business hours in packs of five. You also have the option of paying the court monitor $5 at the tennis court. For more information, please refer to the Aquatics and Tennis sections, or email Member Services at member_services@reston.org. REFUND POLICY All pool and tennis pass memberships are nonrefundable.

UNLIMITED GUEST PASS Only RA Members (18 years or older) may purchase an unlimited guest pass for $35 (limit one per household). The pass is good for one (1) guest only per visit. The unlimited guest pass and the host RA Member’s pass must display the same address. Host Member must accompany guest to pools or tennis courts at all times. AQUATICS ONE-DAY GUEST PASS The option of a $5 one-day guest pass is also available at your local RA pool for additional guest(s). The pool only accepts cash for guest passes.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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AQUATICS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

The mission of the aquatics department is to provide Reston residents with an array of aquatic facilities and programs. Members can participate at all levels — including learn-to-swim programs, safety training and exercise classes or relaxing by the pool — and do so at well-maintained, clean facilities under local health department standards and managed by a well-trained staff.

FOR MORE INFO ON AQUATIC PROGRAMS, CONTACT AQUATICSINFO@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6532.

WANT TO BECOME A LIFEGUARD?

The American Red Cross is in the process of updating their Lifeguard Training program with an expected release during the fall of 2011. Reston Association will be teaching the updated program beginning in 2012. Classes will be scheduled through the summer months and registration for those classes will begin April 2, 2012.

ARE YOU ALREADY EMPLOYED BY RA AND PLAN TO RETURN?

Keep your eyes open for e-mails about the hiring process in the month of November. Applications will open in December so that all your re-hire paperwork can be completed during time off from school. If you are interested in advancing in aquatics please e-mail WIlla at aquaticsinfo@ reston.org to learn about additional certifications you can obtain in the off-season.

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CERTIFICATION CLASSES

American Red Cross Community Classes now offered at Reston Association. Reston Association is excited to be an authorized provider of all American Red Cross programs and will begin offering Community CPR, First Aid, and AED training this fall. All courses will be taught by certified instructors and the fee includes all class materials. Six student minimum in each class. Registration opens 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 1, 2011 online at www. reston.org or in person at our Member Services desk.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Adult CPR/AED with Standard First Aid DATE: September 24, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $50/RA Members $60/Non-members DATE: October 22, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.–4 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $50/RA Members $60/Non-members DATE: November 26, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $50/RA Members $60/Non-members

Adult, Child and Infant CPR/ AED with Standard First Aid DATE: October 2, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.–6 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $65/RA Members $75/Non-members DATE: November 6, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.–6 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $65/RA Members $75/Non-members DATE: December 4, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.–6 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association headquarters building, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $65/RA Members $75/Non-members


COME PLAY IN RESTON

WATER AEROBICS

YEAR-ROUND PROGRAM TEACHES WATER SAFETY

Nationwide, drowning remains the second leading cause of injury-related death among children ages 1 to 14. For each child who drowns, four more receive medical treatment for submersion-related injuries. This year, Reston Association and Reston Community Center joined to launch the Drowning Education Awareness Program, or D.E.A.P, designed to teach parents and children life-saving water safety techniques. You can sign up for a community presentation through either RA or RCC or call the aquatics directors at either organization to learn more. For more information contact: Reston Community Center (RCC) Contact 703-476-4500 Reston Association (RA) Contact 703-435-6528

D.E.A.P PROGRAMS WHALE Tales (5–12 years old)

1, 60-minute session Free Registration required Longfellow’s WHALE Tales is a FREE 1-hour interactive presentation that provides easy to follow information to help children learn safe behavior in, on, and around the water. Taught in a classroom environment, WHALE Tales makes water safety fun and easy to learn. Each lesson is reinforced with color posters, worksheets, activities, and a video that features Longfellow, the animated whale. This program is offered to Cub Scouts and Webelos, Daisy, Brownie, and Junior Girl Scouts, and day care centers.

Last call for water aerobics! Classes are wrapping up in the next few weeks but we’re always interested in new participants. Please join us for one of the last few classes of 2011.

Parent Orientation To Swim lessons (18 years and older)

1, 60-minute session Free Registration required

This FREE 1-hour presentation (30-minute presentation, 30 minutes of Q&A) will provide parents with an orientation to the American Red Cross swimming lessons offered at the RCC. It is designed to teach parents of Level 1, Level 2, Rookies, and Skippers how to provide guidance, care, supervision, motivation, and support as their children participate in our swim lessons program.

General Water Safety (18 years and older)

1, 90-minute session Free Registration required This FREE 90-minute presentation (60-minute lecture and 30 minutes of Q&A) focuses on the importance of water safety training and provides general information for keeping family members safe in, on, and around the water. The presentation is designed for rotary clubs, PTAs, home school networks, church groups, and other civic organizations and can be scheduled at their facility.

To register for water aerobics, come to Member Services where you can buy a punch pass with as many classes as you would like or simply drop in on a class at the pool. RA provides noodles and floating weights but we ask that you bring your own water aerobics belt if you would like to use one in deep water.

Simply Seniors ENDS: August 25 AGES: 55+ DAYS: Tuesdays and Thursdays TIME: 11 a.m.–Noon LOCATIONS: Tuesdays at North Hills Pool, Thursdays at Lake Thoreau Pool FEE: $4 per class/RA Members $8 per class/Non-members

Sunday Splash ENDS: August 28 AGES: Adult DAYS: Sundays TIME: 9–10 a.m. LOCATION: North Shore Pool FEE: $7 per class/RA Members $9 per class/Non-members

Deep Water Fun ENDS: August 22 AGES: Adult DAYS: Mondays and Wednesdays TIME: 6–7 p.m. LOCATION: Mondays at North Shore Pool, Wednesdays at Golf Course Island Pool FEE: $7 per class/RA Members $9 per class/Non-members

SCUBA CERTIFICATION

Taught by a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer, these classes will lead to Certification as a PADI Open Water Diver. The course consists of three phases: • Knowledge Development (Dive Theory) • Skill Development (Pool Training), and • Open Water Evaluation (Check-out Dives) Ages: 12 and up Class Times: Fridays, 6:30–9:30 p.m. Saturdays, 7 a.m.–2 p.m. Sundays, 2–7 p.m. Location: RA main office and various pools Knowledge and Skill Development Weekend Dates: September 9–11 Fee: $300/RA Members, $330/Non-members Open Water Evaluation Weekends Dates: August 27–28 October 29–30 Fee: $200/RA Members, $220/Non-members Please Note: Medical History Screening and watermanship skills (200-yard swim and 10-minute survival tread/float are required.) How To Register for a Scuba Certification Class Pick up a registration packet from any Reston Association pool. Complete the packet and contact PADI MSDT Frank Wilson at 571-4375189 or deep_blue_scuba@ excite.com to turn in the registration materials.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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AQUATICS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

Lost and Found

During the pool season, please contact the pool directly during open hours. After the pool has closed for the season, items in good condition will be donated by October 7, 2011. Please contact 703435-6528 if the pool is closed for the season and it is prior to October 7.

FOR MORE INFO ON AQUATIC PROGRAMS, CONTACT AQUATICSINFO@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6532.

DOGWOOD POOL RENOVATION

Please visit www.reston.org for up-to-date information regarding the project and to view the pool schedule for our 14 other pools.

Interior Features Large shade structures. ADA accessible bath house. Zero depth entry with spray features and small fountain. 25-meter lap pool with diving well and board.

Renovations Feature

Timeline

Exterior Features Additional parking. Improved pathway for pedestrian circulation. A picnic pavilion with grills. Accessible spray & play water feature available April-October outside the pool fence, with consideration for a commissioned art-piece fountain through the Initiative for Public Art Reston (IPAR) process. Future children’s tot lot. Exterior bathroom entrance for pavilion patrons. Underground cistern to collect water/gray water for irrigation.

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2011 Final DRB reviews and approvals, Fairfax County permits, demolition and construction. 2012 Final construction and grand re-opening.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

INCLEMENT WEATHER

In the event of a storm (or if the weather is cool, raining or drizzling) all Reston Association pools will close for OPEN and ADULT SWIM with two exceptions: Lake Thoreau and North Shore Pools (unless normally closed on that day).

Lightning

All Reston Association pools will close until one half-hour after the last sound of thunder or visible lightning.

Programs/Lessons

All programs, lessons, and private rentals will continue unless otherwise stated. Cancellations will be determined on-site at event time.

Special Events At The Pools Please join us throughout the summer for special events at the pools:

Ice Cream Socials Popsicle Mania Community Cookouts More information see the Special Events section on page 78.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

2011 POOL SCHEDULE OPEN SWIM TIMES

POOL

Weekdays

Weekends

CLOSED DAY

ADULT SWIM HOURS

Season 4: Aug. 22–Sept. 5 Glade Pool & Spa

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

Monday

Lake Newport Pool

10 a.m.–8 p.m.

11 a.m.–8 p.m.

Friday

Lake Thoreau Pool & Spa

10 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

10 a.m.–8 p.m.

Wednesday

North Hills Pool & Spa

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

10 a.m.–7 p.m.

Tuesday

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

11 a.m.–9 p.m.

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

Monday

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

11 a.m.–8 p.m.

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

Thursday

Tall Oaks Pool

weekends only

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

Ridge Heights Heated Pool

3–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

North Shore Heated Pool & Spa

3–9 p.m.*

11 a.m.–7 p.m.

6–8:30 a.m. weekdays 7:30–10 p.m. weekdays M/T/R/F

7–9 a.m. weekdays

Season 5: Sept. 6–25 *After Sept 11, pool closes at 7 p.m.

For RA pool descriptions, features and location, see page 96. Exceptions to the pool schedule

End of Season 4

August 21, 2011 Half of the pools will close for the season. Please check www.reston.org for the full pool schedule.

Reston Triathlon

September 11, 2011 Race starts at Lake Audubon Pool. For details see www.restontriathlon.org.

Labor Day

September 5, 2011 All pools except North Shore and Ridge Heights close for the season.

End of pool season

September 25, 2011 All remaining pools close for the season.

We Appreciate Our Sponsors

Reston Association Aquatics staff would like to thank the following businesses for the goods, services, time and effort they have donated.

Dr. Stephan Tisseront

All in Stitches

Dominion Pawn and Jewelry

www.tisserontorthodontics.com Towels for lifeguard orientation Reston Kids Triathlon

http://allinstitchesva.com Discounts for lifeguard uniforms Lifeguard Olympics t-shirts Reston Kids Triathlon

www.dominionpawn.com Prizes for Lifeguard Olympics

Vocelli pizza

www.vocellipizza.com Lifeguard Olympics prizes and food Weekly pool inspection winner Pool party catering discounts

Sweetgreen

www.sweetgreen.com Reston Kids Triathlon

Additional Sponsors Big Bowl Marquet Family Grabski Family Najjoum Family Ben & Jerrys Ice Cream American Tap Room Paolo’s Mamma Lucia’s Dairy Queen

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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TENNIS

PHOTO BY Peter Staples.

VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

With 48 outdoor tennis courts, 26 lighted for night play, Reston Association offers one of the most extensive tennis programs in the Washington metropolitan area. See map on page 97 for court location.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TENNIS PROGRAMS, CONTACT TENNIS@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6502.

GENERAL INFO

RA offers spring, summer and fall tournaments ranging from USTA-sanctioned to friendly local round robins. The tennis program also features men’s, women’s and junior leagues, as well as adult and junior individual and group lessons. Register for leagues, lessons and tournaments at Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, or online at www. reston.org. General tennis information can be found on our website, as well as on the tennis court bulletin boards at each of the tennis complexes. All registrations must be made online or at Reston Association.

FINDING TENNIS PARTNERS

Dial-a-Match list. This will give you the names, level and availability of players, along with their phone numbers. The list is updated once a month, so if you would like to add your name to the list, e-mail tennis@reston. org.

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TENNIS COMMITTEE

The RA Tennis Advisory Committee meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at Reston Association. All comments and suggestions are welcome. Send an e-mail to tennis@reston.org. To call or e-mail a committee member with suggestions, look them up on our website, www.reston.org

TENNIS KEY TAGS

Great for easy identification and your convenience. Key tags are available for $2. Come to RA to purchase one.

TENNIS LESSON GIFT CERTIFICATES

Tennis gift certificates are available at the Reston Association Tennis Office. Please call 703-435-6502 or visit our website at www.reston.org

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

COMMUNITY COURT WATCH

We have some of the best community courts in the Northern Virginia area. We are calling on you to help keep our courts in tiptop condition. If you see a broken net strap or a light out, please e-mail tennis@ reston.org or call the tennis office at 703-435-6502.

RA TENNIS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

RA Tennis provides scholarships to Reston youth whose families have demonstrated financial need, for example if the family resides in subsidized housing or participates in the school meal program. To learn more about the scholarship program, call 703-435-6502.

TENNIS ONLINE

Info on our Reston Tennis News Facebook page www.facebook. com/RestonTennisNews Find the following up-to-date information in the tennis section on the Reston Association website. www.reston.org

RTT Score Board www.restontennis.org Tennis Ladder www.tennisengine.com

HEART RESTON TENNIS STICKERS: $1 All proceeds go to the Reston Children’s Tennis Scholarship Fund.

USTA Tournament and Entry Forms www.usta.com


COME PLAY IN RESTON

YOUTH TENNIS (10 AND UNDER)

Tennis is a whole new ball game. Balls, rackets and courts sized right for kids. It’s all about the play. Children learn best when they have an opportunity to play and have fun. Reston Tennis Youth classes focus on practice, and kids learn and play using the QuickStart format. Children will learn to play tennis by playing tennis. Reston Tennis implements the games-based approach to tennis, which means involving participants in tennis play within the first hour of the program. Class size limited to six.

QuickStart Tennis For Munchkins (ages 3–4)

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring—all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. Parents or guardians must be present and join in the fun. Class size limited to six. ONCE A WEEK FOR SIX WEEKS SESSION 4: Sept. 9–Oct. 15 DAY: Fridays TIME: 3–3:45 p.m., 4–4:45 p.m., 5–5:45 p.m. LOCATION: Hook Road Courts FEE: $87/RA Members $97/Non-members DAY: Saturdays TIME: 9–9:45 a.m.,10–10:45 a.m., 11–11:45 a.m. LOCATION: Hook Road Courts FEE: $87/RA Members $97/Non-members

QuickStart Tennis For Aces (ages 5–7)

This exciting new play format for learning tennis is designed to bring kids into the game by utilizing specialized equipment, shorter court dimensions and modified scoring—all tailored to age and size. Kids enjoy a fun, motivating introduction to tennis emphasizing fun and play. It’s the fast, fun way to get kids into tennis and keep them playing. We encourage a parent or guardian to join in the fun to make this class a success. Class size limited to six. ONCE A WEEK FOR SIX WEEKS SESSION 4: Sept. 9–Oct.17 (No class on Labor Day) DAY: Mondays TIME: 3–4 p.m., 4–5 p.m., 5–6 p.m. LOCATION: Hook Road Courts DAY: Fridays TIME: 4–5 p.m., 5–6 p.m. LOCATION: Hook Road Courts DAY: Saturdays TIME: 9–10 a.m., 10–11a.m., 11a.m.–Noon LOCATION: Hook Road Courts FEE: $93/RA Members $102/Non-members

DAY: Monday and Friday LEVEL 1 TIME: 4:30–5:30 p.m. LEVEL 2 TIME: 5:30–6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Hook Road Courts FEE: $93/RA Members $102/Non-members

TENNIS COURTS

QuickStart Tennis For Champions (ages 6–8)

This is the next step for children who are committed to improving their tennis skills. A certificate from Tennis Aces is required for enrollment into this class. The QuickStart format will be implemented but there will be more of a focus on stroke production, foot movement and tennis skill development. ONCE A WEEK FOR SIX WEEKS SESSION 4: Sept. 10–Oct.15 DAY: Saturday LEVEL 1 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LEVEL 2 TIME: 11–Noon LOCATION: Hook Road Courts FEE: $93/RA Members $102/Non-members

LIGHTED COURTS The following 26 RA courts are lighted until 11 p.m. for night play. Autumnwood Courts Glade Clay Courts Hook Road Courts Lake Newport Courts North Hills Clay Courts Shadowood Courts TENNIS PRACTICE WALLS Colts Neck Hook Road Lake Anne Park

TENNIS BIRTHDAY PARTIES

QuickStart Tennis For Champions (ages 6–8)

This is the next step for children who are committed to improving their tennis skills. A certificate from Tennis Aces is required for enrollment into this class. The QuickStart format will be implemented: learn, practice; play. Champions Level 1 will concentrate on the forehand and backhand stroke so that students can consistently hit the ball over the net from a stationary position. Champions Level 2 will concentrate on movement to the ball and preparation to hitting; the serve and volley will be introduced. TWICE A WEEK FOR THREE WEEKS SESSION 7: Sept. 12–30 SESSION 8: Oct. 3–21

Call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 to schedule your party. Let one of our professionally-trained tennis pros lead the group in fun-filled instructional activities. Group size can range from six to 12 children. You supply the refreshments and we will supply the courts for 90 minutes, racquets, balls, staff and a prize for each child, plus a free lesson for the birthday child to be arranged at a later date. Cost range from: $185–$225, depending on size of the group.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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TENNIS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

PHOTO BY DAVID MADISON.

RA TENNIS PRO SHOP

LEARN, PRACTICE AND PLAY FOR JUNIORS (AGES 8–12) Twice A Week For Four Weeks SESSION 6: Sept. 6–29 (No classes on Labor Day) SESSION 7: Oct. 3– 27 FEE: $148/RA Members $154/Non-members

Saturdays Once A Week For Four Weeks SESSION 5: Aug. 13–Sept. 10 SESSION 6: Sept. 17–Oct. 8 (No classes on Labor Day weekend) FEE: $74/RA Members $80/Non-members

Level One

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 5–6 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 5–6 p.m. Lake Newport

Level Two

This class is for students who have taken Level One. DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 5–6 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 5–6 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: 10–11a.m. Autumnwood

Level Three

This class is for students who have taken Level Two. DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 5– 6 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Tuesday/ Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 5–6 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: 11a.m.–Noon Autumnwood

DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: 9–10 a.m. Autumnwood

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Futures Program For Junior Player with Chume Bertrand

New Age Goups (8–10 & 10–12) This program is for junior players previously involved in Reston junior tennis. Participants in this program must have the skill and desire to continue to improve their level of play. It is intended that these groups will develop over the years so that they are able to enter sanctioned USTA tournaments and be competitive once they reach high school. Players will be placed in a class with juniors of similar experience and ability. Each session will include: stroke analysis, instruction, drills, tactics, footwork, conditioning, doubles and singles strategy. TWICE A WEEK FOR THREE WEEKS SESSION 6: Aug.1–17 SESSION 7: Sept. 12– 28 SESSION 8: Oct. 3–19 AGES: 8–10 DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 4:30–6 p.m. Lake Newport FEE: $160/RA Members $166/Non-members

We have a great selection of the latest line of Dunlop Racquets available, as well as K-Swiss shoes and Gamma accessories. Please contact the Tennis department for further details at 703-435-6502. AGES: 10–12 DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 4:30–6 p.m. Lake Newport FEE: $160/RA Members $166/Non-members

High School Development This program is for rising high school players and those already in high school. This match play program will develop competitive skills for both singles and doubles play under actual match conditions. Emphasis will be on strategy, conditioning and footwork. Players must already be competitive to enter this program. SESSION 6: Aug. 2–18 SESSION 7: Sept. 6–22 SESSION 8: Sept. 27–Oct. 13 DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 4:30–6 p.m. Autumnwood FEE: $160/RA Members $166/Non-members


COME PLAY IN RESTON Teen Tennis (ages 13–16)

Teens will enjoy tennis with their peers and learn the fundamentals of tennis techniques and strokes. Emphasis is on fun, fitness and play. In addition, we will have a Team Tennis event at the conclusion of each session on the last day of the session. In the event of rain the Team Tennis Event will be held on Friday. Classes will meet twice a week for four weeks. Class size limited to six.

Reston Simon Cup Sponsored by Singha

Entry Fee: $20 RA Members, $22 Non-member Deadline: One week prior to match

Sept. 10–11 Sept. 17–18 Sept. 24–25 Sept. 25 Oct. 1–2

Men’s & Women’s Singles Men’s & Women’s Doubles Mixed Doubles Comcast Filming of the Men’s Singles 45/55 Men’s & Women’s Single/Doubles

TWICE A WEEK FOR FOUR WEEKS SESSION 5: Aug. 8–31 SESSION 6: Sept. 12–Oct. 6 FEE: $148/RA Members $154/Non-members

Level One

This class is for players with little or no tennis background. DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 6–7 p.m. Lake Newport

Team Tennis Event on the last class of the session 6–7 p.m. In the event of rain the Team Tennis Event will be held on Friday.

Level Two

RA US OPEN BUS TRIP

This class is for students who have taken Level One. DAY: Tuesday/ Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 6–7 p.m. Lake Newport

Team Tennis Event on the last class of the session 6–7 p.m. In the event of rain the Team Tennis Event will be held on Friday.

Level Three

Teenage players advancing beyond level two should qualify for RA High School Tennis Innovations Development Program. See bottom left for more information.

THE 2011 US OPEN THURSDAY, SEPT. 1, 2011 Fee: $140/RA Members, $145/Non-members Fee includes: Round-trip coach bus service to the National Tennis Center in Flushing, NY, a reserved seat in Arthur Ashe Stadium and full access to Louis Armstrong Stadium, Grandstand Stadium and 22 field courts!

Contact Rob (tennis@reston.org) for details about our same-day bus trip up to New York during the tournament’s first week on Thursday, September 1st. Availability is limited, so contact us today. Call Mary Conaway at 703-435-6534 or mary@reston.org.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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TENNIS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

TENNIS COURT ADDRESS Autumnwood Courts 11950 Walnut Branch Road

Hook Road Courts Fairway Drive and Hook Road

Lake Newport Courts 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue

PHOTO BY PETE STAPLES.

Newbridge Tennis Courts

ADULT TENNIS Beginners

Introduces serve, volley, forehand and backhand strokes, court positions and tennis terms.

Advanced Beginners

Reviews beginners’ strokes with an emphasis on stroke execution. Introduces lob and overhead, scoring and rules. Students must know the basic strokes and forehand rallying.

Intermediate

For those wishing to perfect their strokes through drills with an emphasis on consistency, singles and doubles strategy and match play. Note: We cannot guarantee court preference. On some occasions, classes may be combined at one location or students may be asked to move from one level to another to maximize the ability for congenial class instruction.

One Day A Week Group Lesson For Four Weeks

Beginners

SESSION 5: Aug. 13–Sept. 10 SESSION 6: Sept. 17–Oct. 8 FEE: $117/RA Members $127/Non-members

DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 8–9 p.m. Lake Newport

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor once a week for 4 weeks.

Beginners DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: Noon–1:30 p.m. Autumnwood

Advanced Beginners DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: 10:30 a.m.–Noon, Autumnwood

Intermediates DAY: Saturday TIME & LOCATION: 9–10:30 a.m. Autumnwood

Twice a Week Group Lesson

Groups of three to five students meet with one instructor twice a week for 2 weeks.17 years and older. (No classes Labor Day) SESSION 10: Aug. 8–18 SESSION 11: Sept. 6–15 SESSION 12: Sept. 19–29 SESSION 13: Oct. 3–13 SESSION 14: Oct. 17–27 FEE: $78/RA Members $88/Non-members

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

11718 Golf Course Square

Shadowood Tennis Courts 2201 Springwood Drive

DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 9–10 a.m. Newbridge

DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 6–7 p.m. Lake Newport

Advanced Beginners DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 10–11 a.m. Newbridge DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 6–7 p.m. Lake Newport

Private Tennis Lessons

For those who prefer more individual instruction or for the player needing a flexible schedule.

PRIVATE:

DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 7–8 p.m. Lake Newport

$60–66 person/hour RA Members $62–68 person/hour Non-members

Intermediates

SEMI PRIVATE:

DAY: Monday/Wednesday TIME & LOCATION: 7–8 p.m. Lake Newport DAY: Tuesday/Thursday TIME & LOCATION: 8–9 p.m. Lake Newport

$33 person/hour RA Members $34 person/hour Non-members

Book a series of six private lessons or semi-private lessons and receive a 5 percent discount.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

ADULTS TENNIS PROGRAMS Drop-in Tennis

How it works: You must have your RA pass with you to participate. Bring a can of balls and your game. Doubles will be the format when people are waiting to play. Teams will play best of five games using NO-AD scoring. The winning team will stay on the same court but will split and no longer be partners. Losing team will slide to the next court down where a winning team will have split and will except 1 player each. If the court next to you has not finished, you are asked to wait outside the court or on a bench. This format will continue until nobody is waiting to play. Once people are waiting to play, you are asked to go back to the five game NO-AD matches. Courts 1 and 2 should be used by players 3.5 and below when no line is present. Courts 5 and 6 should be used for 3.5 and above when no line is present. If court 3 has no lessons at 9 p.m., it will be reserved for drop in tennis. Call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 for details. DAY & TIME: Tuesday, 7–10 p.m. LOCATION: Lake Newport Tennis COURTS: 1,2,5,6

*Drop in tennis is for Reston Association Members and tennis members only. Non-members must purchase an RA tennis membership to participate.

TENNIS RATINGS

Reston Association tennis professionals will give free ratings. Please call 703-435-6502 to arrange a convenient time. These are Reston ratings and apply for play in the Reston Team Tennis League.

Stroke Of The Week (17 years and older)

Three to eight players. Must register at least one week in advance. DATE STROKE Sept. 6 Serves Sept. 13 Volleys and half volley Sept. 20 Serve and volley-attack the net Sept. 27 Forehands Oct. 4 Backhands: one-and two-handed Oct. 11 Overheads and lobs Oct. 18 Approach shots Oct. 25 Doubles strategy NEW TIME DAY: Tuesday Mornings TIME: 10–11:30 a.m. LOCATION: Shadowood DAY: Tuesday Nights TIME: 7–8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Shadowood FEE: $22/RA Members, $24/Nonmembers. Book four strokes and receive a 5 percent discount.

Adult Serve & Return Lesson (17 years and older)

Groups of up to four students meet once a week for four weeks to become masters of their serve. The serve is the most important stroke in tennis. It starts the game. Without being able to serve, you cannot play the game of tennis. In this class you will learn a kick serve, a slice serve and increase the pace and velocity of your flat serve. Let the games begin. SESSION 5: July 26–Aug. 16 SESSION 6: Sept. 6–27 SESSION 7: Oct. 4–25 DAY & TIME: Tuesdays, 6–7 p.m. LOCATION: Shadowood FEE: $78/RA Members $88/Non-members

ADULTS TENNIS LEAGUES Greater Washington Tennis League (ages18 years & older)

This is a women’s competitive league. All levels of players are invited to join one of our teams in the Greater Washington Daytime Doubles Tennis League. League play occurs in the spring and fall. Reston Association sponsors four women’s teams in this league. (Teams: B-2, B-3, C-1, C-2 )

Senior Round Robin (ages 55 and over )

Still looking for competitive fun play? Join the senior inter-Reston league. Register in advance at the tennis office 703-435-6502. The format will be doubles. SESSION 3: July 29–Sept. 2 (rain date Sept. 9) SESSION 4: Sept. 16–Oct. 21 (rain date Oct. 28) DAY & TIME: Fridays, 9–11 a.m. LOCATION: Lake Newport Courts. FEE: $15 for six weeks of play per person

LOCATIONS: Women play at Lake Newport, Hook Road and Autumnwood on weekday mornings or travel to other area clubs. FEE: $17/RA Members $20/Non-members

*Non-members must purchase a RA tennis membership to participate.

Reston Team Tennis (ages18 years & older)

Reston Team Tennis, formally known as World Team Tennis, is one of our most popular leagues. There are 24 teams that play on Wednesday and Thursday nights. This is a social, yet competitive league. Please call the tennis office at 703-435-6502 if you would like to join a team or start your own. FORMAT Men’s and Women’s Singles, Men’s and Women’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. Matches can be played with as few as four players or as many as ten players per team. START DATE: April 13 DAYS & LEVEL: Wednesday 3.0–3.5, Thursday 4.0–4.5 TIME: 7–10 p.m. LOCATIONS: Glade, Lake Newport, Hook Road, Shadowood, North Hills and Autumnwood Courts. FEE: $65/RA Members $70/Non-members

RA TENNIS ADVISORY COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES

ADOPT-A-BENCH Help increase seating capacity at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the bench’s court location, based on availability on a first-come, first served basis. Cost: $235 per bench, includes brass name plate, if desired. Make checks payable to Friends of Reston. “Adoptions” are 100 percent tax deductible. Call RA tennis office at 703-435-6534 or e-mail tennis@reston.org.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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TENNIS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

PHOTO BY PETE STAPLES.

For the latest Reston Tennis News go to: www.facebook.com/ RestonTennisNews

MEN & WOMAN SINGLES & DOUBLES LADDER

New this year, we are offering both Adult Singles and Doubles Ladders. Prizes will be awarded at the end of the season. If you sign up for the doubles ladder with a partner, you can automatically enter the singles ladder at no additional cost. Upon completion of registering, you will receive a password to the online ladder. You must have a partner to join doubles ladder. FEE: $10 per person.

Challenge Ladder Rules

The initial ranking of players on a ladder is random. New players are added to the bottom of the ladder. The challenger must contact the player challenged. The challenged player may select the time and location of the match; however, the time and location should be mutually agreeable to both players. The challenger is responsible for providing new tennis balls and reserving the court according to Reston Association Tennis Court Rules. A match should be completed within seven days of the challenge. A person challenged who cannot play within seven

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days for any reason shall forfeit the match. A withdrawn or canceled challenge is a default loss for the challenger. The standard rules of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) apply to ladder matches. The usual method of scoring is based on winning two of three sets, with a tiebreak at the end of any set that reaches a score of six games each. In the tiebreak, the first to win seven points wins the set, but must win by at least two points. The winner of the match is responsible for recording the results online within 24 hours of the match. a. Date of the match. b. Winner’s name. c. Loser’s name. d. Match score. The ladder listing is updated each time a new challenge match score has been entered. A player inactive for a period of four weeks is moved down in the rankings at that time, with additional penalties for each succeeding period of inactivity. The rules will be interpreted and disputes between members will be settled at the sole discretion of the ladder coordinator, Rob Tucker, at 703-435-6502.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

RESTON ASSOCIATION TENNIS COURT RULES Usage RA Members with their membership cards. (Guests must have a guest pass and be accompanied by the host member). Players must show membership cards and guest passes on the changeover. RA instructors are the ONLY persons permitted to give lessons on a fee-paying basis. Only tennis shoes with nonmarking soles allowed. No jogging or running shoes permitted. Reserving a Court Players must place their membership card and a racquet (or racquet cover) on the numbered hooks on the courtside bulletin boards. Failure to display the racquet/cover and the membership card or key tag means the court is not reserved. Players reserving courts must remain courtside while waiting to play. One member may reserve court to use ball machine or ball hopper.

Players may not reserve a court while playing. RA may reserve courts for lessons, tournaments, league play and court rentals.

Priority of Play Court changes are made on the hour. Please show your pass when entering the court. Play is limited to one hour for singles and two hours for doubles when other people are waiting. Players who have used the court for a fraction of the hour must vacate on the hour when others are waiting to play. Enforcement of the Rules RA court monitors and staff will enforce the rules of court play. Failure to adhere to these rules will result in loss of court privileges. Membership cards and guest passes are available at the RA tennis office, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 201913404. Guest passes are also available from a court monitor.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

RA TENNIS PRO SHOP Call 703-435-6502 for more info on racket demos and shoes. ®

K-SWISS Tennis Tube (Womens)

K-SWISS BigShot (Black)

Biomimetic 300

Biomimetic 300 Tour

GAMMA CP-1200

GAMMA CP-1000

$179.00

$169.95

$179.00

$139.95

Biomimetic 500

$169.00

GAMMA CP-900

$159.95

Biomimetic 500 Tour

$179.00

GAMMA CP-900 Team

$159.95

Biomimetic 500 Plus

$179.00

GAMMA Tour 300X

$139.95

Biomimetic 600

$169.00

GAMMA Quick Kids 25”

$23.95

Biomimetic 600 Lite

$159.00

GAMMA BALL-TUBE

$24.95

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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TENNIS

MARY CONAWAY RA’s Tennis Manager has been involved in Reston since 1987. In 1998, Mary became certified as a PTR Instructor and taught lessons for Reston Association. Mary currently serves as chair of the USTA National Learning and Leadership Committee.

JILL GRAHAM RA Tennis is excited to have Jill on staff again for the 2011 season. Jill teaches tennis to children of all ages and will be heading up the Friday and Saturday Munchkin classes for 3-and 4-year-olds.

JAMES A. PHIFER, JR. James is an AAAI/ISMA CertifiedPersonal Trainer, AAAI/ISMA Certified in Sports Nutrition, PTR Certified Tennis Instructor and CPR and First Aid Certified. James’ passions are fitness, exercising, and motivating others to reach their goals. His belief is that fitness is a lifestyle from which everyone can benefit.

KEITH GONZALES Keith has been a serious tournament player since age 16, and has been nationally ranked, and also ranked top 15 in Florida men’s open division. He particularly enjoys training and pushing junior tournament players to maximize their potential.

JIM ELDER Jim has been a USPTA-certified pro since 1997 and co-chairs the USTA Mid-Atlantic Adult-Senior Ranking Committee. He is the VP for the men’s division of the Northern Virginia Tennis League. In 2010, Jim was ranked in singles as high as #16 nationally in his age group, won the MAS Clay doubles, and was the finalist in one national and two MAS singles championships.

CHUME BERTRAND Chume is a PTR-certified associate instructor. She has been involved with tennis since she moved to the Reston area in 1991. Chume has been very active with USTA junior tennis. She plays tennis competitively in many local tennis leagues.

PETE STAPLES A native of Australia, Peter is a PTR-Certified Instructor, now living in Reston. He is passionate about tennis and loves to share his love of the game with high energy instruction. His other passion is tennis photography. Peter photographs the pros at the Legg Mason Tournament, as well as many other ATP tour events.

JESSICA KEENER Jessica is a recent graduate from the Top 50 Division I tennis program, Marshall University, where she played on a full scholarship for her collegiate career. She loves to work with upcoming juniors, helping them to develop their game.

ROBERT TUCKER Robert is a certified PTR tennis instructor who lives in Reston. With two decades of experience in tennis sales, he is the “go to” guy when you’re trying to find the right equipment for your game.

DYANNA DELANEY Dyanna loves to inspire younger children through tennis. She teaches them games that make them want to learn tennis and sportsmanship.

ROD PAOLINI Rod particularly enjoys working with young children. He employs various activities and games that develop the skills needed for tennis. He invites parents to be involved in the lesson in order to learn and play together. Rod is a PTR-certified instructor.

MARK STEEDS Mark is a USPTA-certified instructor. He has experience teaching women’s team practices, junior programs, adult programs and private lessons to children and adults of all ages and levels.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


COME PLAY IN RESTON

RESTON ASSOCIATION

Conference Center HOLD YOUR NEXT MEETING CLOSE TO HOME CONFERENCE CENTER AVAILABLE FOR RENT Attractive Rental Rates Ideal for Corporate events Community meetings Workshops Can Accommodate Small groups of 35 or less Large groups up to 100 Features Flexible floor space Open Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturdays April–August Extras (for an additional fee) Pantry with microwave, coffee maker and refrigerator Audio visual equipment Attractive Rates: $30-$90 an hour. Please contact Member Services to make your reservation at reservations@reston.org or 703-435-6530.

12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404 | www.reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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RA CAMPS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

PHOTO BY ADVETURE LINKS.

RA CAMPS… Friendship and Fun for over 35 years!

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RA CAMPS, PLEASE CONTACT CAMPADMIN@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6567.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Our staff to camper ratio is at least one staff member for every seven campers. Age requirements must be met by September 30, 2012. Safety and supervision exceeds the minimum standards for Child Day Centers as required by the Virginia Department of Social Services. Scholarships are available for Reston youth whose families have a demonstrated financial need.

Other highlights included:

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Swimming in 13 of Reston’s Pools. Doing experiments with the scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey. Bouncing and sliding on the rides at the July 4th All Camp Carnival. Winning sportsmanship and athletic awards at Sportsters. Visiting exciting places like the Rock Creek Planetarium and a Baltimore Orioles game.

Dropping in a half-pipe and grinding a rail at Skate Camp. And searching for wildlife at the Walker Nature Education Center.

Our family of camps includes:

Nature Tots (ages 3–5) Walker’s Rangers (ages 6–8) Hug-A-Tree (ages 5–7) Sportsters (ages 6–8) Mini Camp (ages 5–10) Skate Camp (ages 6–12) Day Camp (ages 7–11) Science Camp (ages 8–12) Adventure Links (ages 8–14) Teen Camp (ages 11–14) Guard Start (ages 13–15) Counselor-In-Training (ages 14–16)

REGISTRATION

RA member registration begins January 30, 2012. Non-resident registration begins February 6, 2012.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Payment & Refunds

A $75 non-refundable deposit per camper per session is required for all camps at registration time. EXCEPTION: Nature Tots and Walker’s Rangers deposit is $40. Full payment for all sessions and services is required by May 1. Refunds, minus applicable deposits, may be recovered until June 1. Members can register online, beginning at 8:30 a.m. on January 30. Non-member registration begins February 6.

Additional Services

Transportation For an additional fee, van transportation is available within RA boundaries. Pick Up/Drop Off locations must be a home, place of employment or day care provider. Extended Care For an additional fee, extended care is provided from 7:30–9 a.m. and 4–5:30 p.m.

Where real friendships are forged, youthful energy abounds, and memories last a lifetime

RA CAMPS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Each year, donations from organizations, businesses and individuals make it possible for economically disadvantaged children of Reston to attend our valuable camp programs. SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2011 CAMP SCHOLARSHIP DONORS -- Fairfax County Department of Family Services -- Friends of Reston for Community Projects, Inc -- Reston Garden Club -- North Hills/Herndon Office -- Long & Foster Realtor Reston Office -- Bonnie Haukmess -- Pam Tobey If you would like to make a donation to the scholarship fund, please contact CampAdmin@reston.org or call 703-435-6567.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

From Nature Tots to Teen Camp, there were happy campers everywhere! Throughout the nine weeks of RA Camps, we had tons of fun. We learned about beavers and bats, put on a talent show, played with a parachute, learned to skateboard on a quarter pipe, visited the National Zoo, went rock climbing, cooled off at the Massanutten Water Park, and so much more. Many thanks to our 100 camp employees and our extended RA family for making this great summer possible. Bring a friend and join the fun next summer.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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NATURE

PHOTO BY JIM KIRBY.

VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

FOR NATURE PROGRAM RESERVATIONS, CALL 703-476-9689 AND PRESS 5 OR E-MAIL NATURECENTER@RESTON.ORG.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Reston is a community founded on the preservation and appreciation of natural areas. To this day, a strong environmental stewardship ethic is nurtured in the community. Over 1,300 acres of open space are maintained by Reston Association, including more than 800 acres of woodlands, four lakes, three ponds, four wetlands, 50 meadows, and 20 miles of streams. Environmental education programs are provided by the Walker Nature Education Center, and ample opportunities exist for volunteers to help care for our local environment. Explore, protect and enjoy the nature of Reston.

ALL AGES

All ages welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Salute to Summer Campfire DATE: Friday, Aug. 19 TIME: 7– 8:30 p.m. LOCATION: WNEC Campfire Ring — On Soapstone Drive, between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road RESERVE BY: August 16 FEE: $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Join a naturalist around the campfire while we enjoy summer’s evening splendors as the season slips away. Sing songs, play games and taste s’mores treats while gazing upon a glowing fire.

NATURE HOUSE HOURS OF OPERATION MONDAY, WEDNESDAY–FRIDAY 9 a.m.–5 p.m. TUESDAY Closed SATURDAY 10 a.m.–1 p.m. SUNDAY 1–4 p.m. Free parking, restroom and trail access dawn to dusk, 365 days a year. Check holiday schedule for additional closings.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Sounds of Summer DATE: Saturday, Aug. 20 TIME: 11 a.m.–Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Aug.17 FEE: $4/person RA Members $6/person Non-members

Frogs croak and katydids chirp. Summer is a noisy time of year in nature. Listen to the different calls of foxes, owls and other animals. Take a stroll through the woods to see how many of these noisy critters we can hear in their natural habitat.

Night Hike DATE: Wednesday, Aug. 31 TIME: 8–9 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Aug. 26 FEE: $4/person RA Members $6/person Non-members

Test your night vision as you explore the forest after sunset. Which animals are finding a place to sleep and which are just waking up? Listen to the sounds of the night chorus and tune your senses in to a new kind of nightlife!

WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER Reston Association’s Walker Nature Education Center, located at 11450 Glade Drive, provides a variety of educational and recreational resources, programs and facilities. The mission of the center is to foster an environmental stewardship ethic in the community. The center enhances people’s awareness, knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the environment.

The 72-acre wooded site features: • • • • • • • • • •

Two miles of trails, including an ADA Native Plant Trail. Nature House Interpretive Building. Picnic pavilion. Picnic tables and trailside benches. Campfire ring. Outdoor displays and interpretive signs. Demonstration gardens and meadows. Pond. Glade Stream Valley. Snakeden Branch stream’s entrance to 44-acre Lake Audubon.


COME PLAY IN RESTON September Scavenger Hunt

Autumn Campfire

DATE: Saturday, Sept. 10 TIME: 11 a.m.–Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: September 7 FEE: $4/person RA Members $6/person Non-members

DATE: Friday, Oct. 7 TIME: 6:30–8 p.m. LOCATION: WNEC Campfire Ring — On Soapstone Drive, between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road RESERVE BY: October 4 FEE: $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Nature’s treasures are hidden everywhere! Go on a scavenger hunt to find them all. Look high in the trees and low on the ground as you follow a trail of clues. Who knows where the clues will lead you? Collect a prize at the end.

As autumn temperatures and leaves drop, gather around a warm campfire. Tap your toes, clap your hands and sing along to some campfire favorites. Roast marshmallows and enjoy a tasty treat.

Gone Batty

Fall Stream Cleanup

AGE: Must be 5 years or older DATE: Friday, Sept. 30 TIME: 7–8:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Sept. 27 FEE: $6/person RA Members $9/person Non-members

DATE: Saturday, Oct. 22 TIME: 9 a.m.–Noon LOCATION: various sites along Snakeden Branch Rain or shine

See one of the most fascinating creatures of the night up close. Join a bat specialist from BatWorld NOVA to learn more about these amazing animals. After a presentation, take a night hike with a bat detector to find the wild bats of Reston.

Fall for the Birds DATE: Sunday, Oct. 2 TIME: 2–3 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Sept. 28 FEE: $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members

Come and see which birds are strutting their stuff at the nature center. Fall is the prefect time to learn about common feeder birds and make a feeder for your yard. Learn how to enjoy birds all winter and how you can help scientists at the same time.

BABES IN THE WOODS

18 months through 35 months. Children must be accompanied by an adult

Wings and Things DATE: Monday, Sept. 12 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: September 9 FEE: $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Birds are not the only animals with wings. Learn which animals have wings and how they use them. We will sing songs, make a craft and take a short hike to see winged animals.

Farewell to Insects DATE: Monday, Oct. 3 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: September 30 FEE: $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

As winter approaches, it gets too cold for insects. Let us say goodbye to these six-legged creatures before they are gone for the winter. We will sing songs, make an insect craft and take a short hike to see if any insects are still around.

See details on page 86 in the Get Involved section.

How to Make a Solar Oven Not recommended for children under 10 years.

DATE: Sunday, Oct. 23 TIME: 1–4 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: October 20 FEE: $5/person RA or RCC members $8/person Non-members

Solar ovens use sunlight as an energy source to slow cook or warm foods outdoors without the aid of electricity or other fuel source. They are primarily used in regions where there is no fuel available or a serious threat of a fire already exists. Solar ovens are also used to sterilize water and can be useful on camping trips. Participants will learn how to build a solar oven and will receive a simple recipe to prepare. Supplies will be provided. This program is jointly produced by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Leader: Diane Blust, Sustainable Reston/Fairfax Coalition for Smarter Growth.

Kids Outdoors An action packed morning of outdoor fun!

Parents — Just because summer camps are winding down, your child doesn’t need to become a couch potato.

Kids — Answer the call of the wild. Learn some tips, tricks and techniques of basic wilderness survival. Pitch a tent. Play a game of search and rescue. Discover what all backcountry hikers should carry in their packs. Find a hidden treasure in the woods using basic tools of navigation. Make your own nutritious and delicious trail mix.

Ages: 7–10 years Date: Wednesday, August 24 Time: 9 a.m.–Noon Location: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive Reserve by: August 19 Fee: $15/child RA Members, $20/child Non-members

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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NATURE

PRESCHOOL HAPPENINGS

3 to 5 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Splashy Spiders DATE: Tuesday, Sept. 20 TIME: 10:30–11:30 a.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: September 17 FEE: $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Spiders come in a variety of colors. Learn about a variety of spiders and how their color helps them. Make a colorful spider craft and take a short hike in search of spiders.

Gone South DATE: Saturday, Oct. 8 TIME: 11 a.m.– Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: October 5 FEE: $5/child RA Members $8/child Non-members

Many birds migrate to warmer places during winter. Learn which birds stay here in winter and which head south until spring. Make a craft to feed the birds that are staying and take a short hike to see who is still around.

NATURE ONLINE

Join the Walker Nature Education Center’s electronic mailing list. Receive the quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, as well as announcements of upcoming special events. To subscribe, e-mail naturecenter@ reston.org. You can also e-mail nature questions to this address.

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Planning a Birthday Party?

ATTENTION Scout Leaders

Bring the kids and the cake to a fun-filled, creative party at the nature center. Thematic parties include a two-hour pavilion or room rental, 45 minutes of activities, party favors, table setting and all paper products.

Choose from the following themes: NATURE DETECTIVES (AGES 3–7) Learn to be a good nature detective by using your eyes, ears, nose and hands. Play sensory guessing games, find what doesn’t belong on our “unnature” trail, and follow clues to solve a mystery animal trail. The birthday child receives an Earl the Squirrel stuffed toy. DINOSAURS (AGES 3–9) Share what you know about these amazing animals. Uncover bones and shells like a paleontologist and make your own fossil imprints in clay. Go on a dinosaur egg hunt that will lead you to a nest full of eggs. Favors include a dinosaur egg, a dinosaur sticker and a fossil imprint. The birthday child gets a Myrtle the Turtle key chain. NATURE CRAFTS (AGES 3–12) Learn new skills and nature facts as you make a variety of crafts to take home. Younger crafters will make bug boxes, rock insects, nature picture frames, and wildlife masks or puppets. Older crafters will try their hands at leather craft, building a bird feeder and making beaded accessories. CAMPFIRE FUN (AGES 7–12) Parties are held at the campfire ring off of Soapstone Drive. Program includes nature jokes, stories, songs, and games around the campfire. S’mores provided. The birthday child gets a nature center flashlight. FEE: $175/RA Members, $200/Non-members

HOW TO BOOK

Parties may be booked up to three months in advance. Weekend dates are limited and fill quickly. Consider a weekday afternoon or evening party. Maximum 15 children. Call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

The Walker Nature Education Center can help your organization earn patches and badges.

Make a date with a naturalist to... Lead a fun and educational program in an achievement area such as: • • • • • • • • • •

Forester Naturalist Wildlife Eco-action Earth Connections Earth is Our Home Earth and Sky Water Everywhere Senses Animals and more

FEE: $4 per participant (minimum charge $40), RA Members. $6 per participant (minimum charge $60), Non-members.

Lead a Campfire Fun or Campfire Cookery program. FEE: $5 per participant (minimum charge $50), RA Members $8 per participant (minimum charge $80), Non-members NOTE: The Campfire Ring can also be rented for self-use.

You bring the wood and the water. FEE: $10/hr. for RA Members $15/hr. for Non-members.

Lead a Community Service Project with your group. FEE: FREE

Activity kits are also available on loan for Birds, Trees and Watershed requirements. For details and reservations, call 703-476-9689 and press 3 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

Halloween House & Trick or Treat Trail

Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive, Reston VA 20191

You’re invited to the best family friendly Halloween event this side of Transylvania—RAIN OR SHINE. Choose from one of four event times:

Friday, October 28, 6-7:15 p.m. or 7:30-8:45 p.m. Saturday, October 29, 6-7:15 p.m. or 7:30-8:45 p.m. Gate opens 15 minutes prior to the event start time. Please park along Glade Drive or at the Glade Pool. This is NOT a horror show or haunted house. Meet a creative cast of characters, including live animals, along our stroller friendly trick or treat nature trail and inside our Nature House turned Halloween House for this very special evening. Enjoy jack-o-lanterns, carnival style games, sound and light effects, and creatures of the night. All adults and children must have a ticket to enter the event, except for children under 18 months of age. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Ticket price includes a goodie bag. Additional concessions will be on sale. Participants are encouraged to wear non-scary costumes and enjoy the activities at their own self-guided pace.

Tickets: Advance tickets go on sale October 1st. $10/person (adults and children) Note: A service fee per ticket will be applied to online sales. You may also purchase tickets at the Walker Nature Education Center’s Nature House. Hours: Monday and Wednesday-Friday, 9-5, Saturday, 10-1, Sunday, 1-4. Closed on Tuesdays.

Buy your tickets online at the following links: http://halloweenhousefri1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousefri2.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat1.eventbrite.com http://halloweenhousesat2.eventbrite.com

Same day tickets will be sold at the gate only if they are still available. This is a sell-out event. For more information, call 703-476-9689, and press 5 or e-mail naturecenter@reston.org. To volunteer, contact Ha Brock, habrock@reston.org. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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NATURE VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

Wine Tasting at Nature House DATE: Friday, Nov. 4 TIME: 4–6 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov.1 FEE: $7/person RA Members $10/person Non-members AGES: 55 and older

See details on page 79 in Special Events section.

ADULT PROGRAMS

FOR NATURE PROGRAM RESERVATIONS, CALL 703-476-9689 AND PRESS 5 OR E-MAIL NATURECENTER@RESTON.ORG.

16 years to adult

A “Grand” Campfire DATE: Friday, Sept. 16 TIME: 5:30–7 p.m. LOCATION: WNEC Campfire Ring — On Soapstone Drive, between Glade Drive and Lawyers Road RESERVE BY: Sept. 13 FEE: $5/person RA Members $8/person Non-members AGES: 55 and older, grandchildren invited.

See details on page 79 in Special Events section.

Backyard Composting DATE: Thursday, Oct. 6 TIME: 7–8 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Oct. 3 FEE: $5/person RA or RCC Members $8/person Non-members

Dealing with all of the fall leaves in the yard can be tough. Have you ever thought about composting them? Meet with a Fairfax County Master Gardener and learn how to recycle them the natural way right on your own property. Plants will love the rich organic soil that composting efforts provide. Participants will also learn how kitchen waste and other yard

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debris can be composted right in the backyard. This program is jointly produced by Reston Community Center and Reston Association.

Environmental Film Night: Energy Crossroads DATE: Friday, Oct. 14 TIME: 7–9 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Oct. 11, limited seating FEE: $5 suggested donation

This award-winning documentary exposes problems associated with high energy consumption. It also offers concrete solutions for those who want to educate themselves and be part of the solutions. The film features passionate individuals, entrepreneurs, experts and scientists at the forefront of their field, bringing legitimacy and expertise to the core message. After the film, participate in an energy discussion with special guest Tom Whipple (Association for the Study of Peak Oil). Brought to you in partnership with Sustainable Reston.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Rain Barrel Making Workshop DATE: Saturday, Oct. 15 TIME: 10 a.m.–Noon LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Oct.12 FEE: $50 per barrel (Limit 2 per household)

Rain barrels can help capture and control stormwater from rooftops, prevent erosion, improve water quality and conserve water. This workshop is a quick and inexpensive way to make your own 52-gallon rain barrel from a recycled pickle barrel. If you already have a barrel, volunteer your time to help others. This program is jointly produced by RCC and RA in partnership with the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District, the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, City of Falls Church and Arlingtonians for a Clean Environment. Participants must register and pay online at www.arlingtonenvironment. org/barrel.php. For questions or to volunteer, contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560 or e-mail nicki@reston.org.

Organic Gardening DATE: Wednesday, Oct. 19 TIME: 7–8 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center –11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Oct. 16 FEE: $5/RA or RCC Members $8/Non-members

This lecture discusses the principles of organic gardening. Organic gardening uses landscape design and the environment to improve and maximize the health and the development of plants and soil without the use of commercial pesticides and fertilizers. Organic gardening is the mainstay of sustainable gardening. This program is jointly produced by Reston Community Center and Reston Association.


COME PLAY IN RESTON Eco-friendly Cleaning DATE: Saturday, Nov. 5 or Wednesday, Nov. 9 TIME: 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (5th) or 6:30–8:30 p.m. (9th) LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 2 or Nov. 6 FEE: $5/RA or RCC Members $8/Non-members

This workshop will teach students why it is a good idea to reduce the use of harsh, sometimes toxic cleansers in the home. Students will learn how to make safe and environmentallyfriendly household cleansers, which is quick and easy to do and very economical. Students are encouraged to purchase “Clean House, Clean Planet” by Karen Logan and bring it to the workshop. This program is jointly produced by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Leader: Diane Blust, Sustainable Reston/Fairfax Coalition for Smarter Growth.

Get Nuts for Clean Water How to Help: •

• •

• •

Collect nuts in your yard or other open area where they will be unable to grow. Please do not collect at the nature center or any natural area in Reston. Separate the nuts by species and place them into breathable bags (no plastic bags). Label each bag with the kind of nuts that are inside. Store in a cool dry place then drop them off at the nature center.

When: Seed drop offs are accepted September 1- October 31. Where: Information and collection bags can be picked up at the Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive. Please deposit bagged and identified nuts in the container on the side porch at Nature House. This fall, you can help to restore native forests and protect streams throughout the Potomac River region…one acorn at a time. So, when you rake the leaves, don’t throw out the acorns. Consider getting involved in this fun activity that can be enjoyed by all.

Citizens throughout the Potomac River watershed are invited to take part in a native seed collection effort. Collected seeds are donated to state tree nurseries, where they are nurtured and transplanted for use in streamside and riverside reforestation. Growing Native is coordinated by Potomac Conservancy on behalf of the Potomac Watershed Partnership. For additional information about the program, detailed instructions (including desirable seeds), and seed identification materials, visit www.growingnative.org.

Environmental Film Night: Dirt! The Movie DATE: Friday, Nov. 11 TIME: 7–9 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive RESERVE BY: Nov. 8, limited seating FEE: $5 suggested donation

Dirt! The Movie is an insightful and timely film that tells the story of the glorious and unappreciated material beneath our feet. Inspired by William Bryant Logan’s acclaimed book, Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth, this award winning film takes a humorous and substantial look into the history and current state of the living organic matter that we come from and will later return to. After the film, participate in a discussion about the lessons of the film and its call to action. Special guests include Dan Schwartz (Soil Scientist, Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District) and Judy Zatsick (Fairfax County Master Gardeners, Green Spring Gardens Park). Brought to you in partnership with Sustainable Reston and made possible through the generosity of the Fairfax County Restoration Project.

BIRD WALKS Beginning and expert birders are all welcome to help find birds in some of Reston’s most beautiful natural areas. We will visit a variety of sites. Our collaborative efforts usually produce a good variety of local birds, and we always have a great time. These walks are jointly sponsored by Reston Association and its Environmental Advisory Committee, the Audubon Society of Northern Virginia and The Bird Feeder store.

August Bird Walk: Fred Crabtree Park DATE: Sunday, August 28 TIME: 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. LOCATION: Fred Crabtree Park, Park at Crossfield Elementary School, 2791 Fox Mill Rd., meet in the first parking area on the left. LEADER: Bill Brown

September Bird Walk

October Bird Walk

DATE: Sunday, September 11 TIME: 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. LOCATION: Upper Glade Stream Valley. Park at Glade Pool, 11550 Glade Dr. LEADERS: Carol and Jay Hadlock

DATE: Sunday, October 9 TIME: 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. LOCATION: Bright Pond, Bright Pond Lane. Park at the end of the cul-de-sac. LEADER: Andy Rabin

16 YEARS TO ADULT. FREE. NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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NATURE VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

Environmental volunteers needed. Details in “Get Involved” section. To volunteer for any of these programs, contact Ha Brock, community outreach specialist, at 703-4357986 or via e-mail at habrock@reston.org

EIGHT PROHIBITED PLANTS IN RESTON

The Invasive Exotics

Flowering Pears (Pyrus calleryana cultivars) Winged Burning Bush (Euonymus alata) Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) Exotic Bush Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.) Exotic Bamboos (Bambusa spp.) Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) English Ivy (Hedera helix) Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Invasive exotic plants are nonnative to North America. They spread quickly and out-compete our native vegetation. Often, invasive exotic plants get their start in yards and gardens where they can become a serious problem for the property owner and adversely affect neighboring private property as well as RA natural areas. The proliferation of these plants decreases plant diversity and harms the wildlife that depends on native plants for

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food and shelter. Many invasive exotics overtake native shrubs and trees that are a signature of the Reston community. Efforts to control these species on RA property are ongoing and costly. We are grateful for the many volunteers who have worked diligently to remove invasive exotic plants and educate our members about their harmful effects. By resolution of Reston Association’s Board of Directors, the Use and Maintenance Standards for all properties that fall under the Reston deed were amended in May of 2008 to include the eight invasive exotics. If you would like to learn more about invasive exotic plants, visit “Plants” on the “Natural Resources” page in the “Nature” section of our Web site, www. reston.org. If you would like to volunteer to help control invasive plants in Reston, contact Ha Brock via e-mail at habrock@reston.org. Please direct questions to our environmental resource staff at 703-437-7658.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Thank you for your cooperation in not planting any of these species in Reston.

STREAM RESTORATION UPDATE

To date, over eight miles of stream in Reston have been completely restored. There are four miles of stream for which the design is still in progress within the Colvin Run watershed north of the Dulles Toll Road and East of Reston Parkway. As construction finished in the Forest Edge section, engineers from Wetland Studies and Solutions Inc. (WSSI) have been working on designing the stream projects around Lake Anne. Once approvals are granted from the clusters and the Reston Design Review Board, then the design plans must be approved by Fairfax County, the VA Dept. of Environmental Quality and the Army Corps of Engineers. For more information, visit Reston.wetlandstudies.com, www.reston.org or contact Nicki Bellezza at 703-435-6560 or Nicki@reston.org.

BRUSH CHIPPING RA’s brush chipping program offers you a place to bring your brush for chipping at no cost. RA Guidelines state that no brush may be dumped on RA property. Just drop off your brush at the locations listed below and RA crews will chip it for use on RA open space. CHIPPING DATES & SITES

August 20-21

Central Services Facility 12250 Sunset Hills Road

September 17-18

Lake Audubon Pool 2070 Twin Branches Road

October 15-16

Central Services Facility 12250 Sunset Hills Road PLEASE: Brush only (Branches should be less than 4 inches in diameter.) No grass clippings, dirt, trash, paper, vines, thorns or other debris. Brush may be dropped off at any time during the days listed. No contractors.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

BOAT RENTALS Lake Anne Village Center

FRIENDS OF RESTON ADOPT-A-BENCH PROGRAM

Adopt-A-Bench is a program of Friends of Reston, which seeks to increase seating along Reston’s pathways and at recreational areas. Donations are appreciated in any amount and are tax-deductible. Sponsor a bench in someone’s honor for the donation amounts below.

Tennis Benches Enjoy a journey across Lake Anne in a canoe, kayak, paddleboat or rowboat. Rental tickets can be purchased at The Reston Used Book Shop, 1623 Washington Plaza (near the fountain). Contact the book shop by calling 703-435-9772. Dates: End on Sept. 4, 2011

Hours of Operation: Thursdays, 4-8 p.m. Fridays, 4-8 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $6 per boat for 1-hour rental* *Boat operator must be at least 16 years of age. A parent or legal guardian (18 years of age or older) must sign a waiver / agreement and accompany passengers under the age of 16. Swimming is not permitted. Pets are not allowed in boats.

THE NATURE OF RESTON

Donation Amount $235

Select the court location (based on availability on a first-come, first serve basis). Cost includes an engraved plaque if desired. For more details about tennis benches, contact tennis@reston. org or call 703-435-6534.

Pathway/Recreation Facility Benches

Donation Amount: $750

Locations based upon need and your preference. Benches are made of recycled plastic with heavy duty steel supports. Cost includes an engraved plaque if desired. For more information about pathway/recreation facility benches, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

Please make checks payable to the “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-ABench” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191.

ADOPT A RECYCLING BIN

Photos by: Charles A. Veatch Text By: Claudia Thompson-Deahl An art photography, nature and informational book and guide to Reston’s habitats all in one beautiful hard-bound volume. ON SALE FOR $30 at Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive All proceeds from the book sales go to the Walker Nature Education Center.

Donation Amount: $400

Help Reston increase recycling in the community. Attractive recycling bins are needed at Reston’s tennis courts. Select the court of your choice. Reston Association will manage the recyclables. The bins are made of 100% recycled plastic lumber, and fastened to a sturdy, recycled, cast-aluminum frame. The cost includes an engraved plaque if desired.

Make checks payable to “Friends of Reston” and write “Adopt-A-Recycling Bin” in the memo section. Mail to: Friends of Reston, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston VA 20191. For more information, contact CSFstaff@reston.org or call 703-437-7658.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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NATURE

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Rules for the Use of Reston Association Common Area 1.

2.

7.

Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall not attempt to nor improve, alter, landscape or mow Reston Association (RA) Common Area. Owners, including owners of property adjacent to the Common Area, shall confine all fencing (including invisible fencing), sheds, or any other development to their own property.

8.

9. 3.

RA meadows in the Common Area shall be mowed annually by RA staff only.

4.

Smoking is prohibited within all RA Community Buildings, and is also prohibited in all Pool facilities; on and within all Tennis Court facilities and Picnic Pavilions; on all Ball fields, Multi-purpose Courts, Garden Plots or Garden Plot Areas; and on or within Tot-Lots or Tot-Lot Areas. This smoking ban is also in effect for up to a 25-foot perimeter around these buildings or facilities, to the extent that the 25 feet, or any portion thereof, comprises RA Common Area.

5.

6.

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Horseback riding shall be confined to designated bridle paths. Dogs are to be walked on a leash in accordance with Fairfax County regulations. Cats, while on Common Area, must also be walked on a leash. Except for services dogs, no pets are permitted on active recreation areas, including but not limited to, such areas as playgrounds, picnic and multi-purpose courts, and play fields.

Dumping of any refuse, including but not limited to grass clippings, leaves, Christmas trees, appliances, old sofas, crank case oil, etc. is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(b)] No invasive exotic plants or animals (especially invasive plants such as bamboo and English ivy), shall be introduced to the RA Common Area. Unless specifically authorized by the Association, the use of any motor vehicles or other motorized vehicle, other than governmental police, fire and rescue vehicles, on walkways or other Common Area is prohibited. [Also see Amended Deed Section VI.2(db)(10)]

10. Loitering, as defined by Fairfax County Code Article 1 Section 5-1-2, is prohibited. Specifically, it shall be unacceptable for any person to loiter at, on or in RA Common Area in the following manner: a. To interfere, impede or hinder the free passage of pedestrian or authorized vehicular traffic. b. To threaten or do physical harm to another member or members of the public. c. To threaten or do physical damage to the Common Area; or d. To breach the peace or engage in disorderly conduct by the use of words, or acts or other conduct that clearly threaten, intimidate or present a danger to others.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Except where 10 a - d apply, before contacting local law enforcement, Reston Association, in its sole discretion, may contact an appropriate organization(s) to assist in the intervention with or removal of individuals from the Common Area. 11. Unless specifically authorized by the RA Board of Directors, the following actions are prohibited in the RA Common Area: a. Carrying or discharging of firearms, air guns, archery equipment, including but not limited to bow and arrow, and B-B guns; b. Hunting, trapping, harvesting or collecting of any wildlife, including but not limited to mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians; c. Feeding of nondomesticated wild animals (except songbirds); d. Practices that attract non-domesticated wild animals or those that may be vectors for infectious diseases, including, but not limited to, leaving pet food out of doors overnight in a location accessible to nondomesticated wild animals; e. Fires or burning. f. Overnight camping; g. Harvesting or collecting plant life, except as authorized by the Association.

12. Fishing in the Association’s Lakes and Ponds is permitted as per Section 8(i) of Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 2 on Lake Use & Access. 13. Geocaching (use of Geographic Positioning Systems (“GPS”) to locate a cache of materials) is permitted only by Members under the following rules: a. Members interested in performing Geocaching must notify the Association of all cache sites. b. Cache sites located on the Common Area must be completely hidden from view. c. Cache sites are not permitted near wildflowers, a wildlife nest or den. d. Cache sites located in the Association’s Common Area, known as the Walker Nature Education Center, must be no more than 10 feet from a pathway or trail edge. e. The Association shall not be held liable for any injuries or personal property damage incurred by those participating in Geocaching on the Common Area. The Board of Directors may, for specific management purposes on certain properties, amend these rules or implement additional rules to meet land and resource management objectives.


COME PLAY IN RESTON VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

PHOTO BY JIM KIRBY.

Help protect our wildlife.

FISHING & BOATING GUIDELINES

Reston’s four man-made lakes — Anne, Thoreau, Audubon, and Newport — along with Reston’s two ponds, Bright and Butler, cover 125 acres and provide recreation and stormwater management for the community. While swimming and ice skating are not permitted, fishing, boating, wildlife watching, and lakeside picnicking are available to RA members and their guests.

Fishing in Reston

Fishing is allowed on all of Reston’s lakes and ponds from designated areas.

Species of fish that may be caught include:

Lake Thoreau: Along 80 feet of shoreline near Thoreau pool, along dam, along bridge near golf course, and along timber wall at Purple Beach Lake Audubon: Behind Brenton Point Drive at a boat ramp at Twin Branches Road and along shoreline for 150 feet near Nature Center (Docks are private.)

Public Docks for Fishing

large mouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, blue gill and sunfish. Lake Newport: Along dam (park at Brown’s Chapel). Lake Anne: Along Lake Anne Plaza steps and dock, along south shore of the canal and along dam.

Boating in Reston

Reston’s four lakes are also available for boating. Whether you want to launch your own craft or rent a boat at Lake Anne (Now through September 4), ample opportunities exist to get on the water. We suggest taking your favorite book out, having a floating picnic or fishing for large mouth bass.

Lake Anne Village Center dock, dock by Lake Thoreau Pool at Sunrise Valley Drive.

Anglers 16 years and older must have a VA fishing license. Residents may fish from RA-owned property, which includes the dams on each lake. Much of the shoreline around each lake is private. Please respect the “No Trespassing” and “Private Property” areas indicated by signs. Please do not litter. Please do not feed ducks, geese or other waterfowl.

Lines, lures and hooks can harmful to people and animals. Please take them with you.

A free permit for general access to the four lakes is available at the RA main office,12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, during regular office hours. Proof of boat size is required. The concrete boat ramp at Lake Audubon, off of Twin Branches Road, is available to launch boats from trailers. (Electric motors only) Access points are monitored between April and October.

Other general access points for hand-carried boats include: On Lake Thoreau, the grassy area by the underpasses at the intersection of South Lakes Drive and Ridge Heights Road.

On Lake Anne, the area at the north end of the dam at the intersection of Wiehle Ave. and Inlet Court. On Lake Newport, at the east end of the dam at the wooden dock.

Boat Reminders

Boats (jon boats, canoes, deck boats, sailboats, etc.) may be up to 18 feet long, and no more than 10 feet wide. One electric motor (no gas motors) up to 3 horsepower may be used. Inflatables must have 3 separate compartments and sidewalls. All boats are required to have a wearable flotation device for each passenger on board. All boats left in the water between November 1 and March 31 require a permanent mooring permit. If you see an abandoned boat floating around or have lost your boat on our lakes, call Watershed Specialist Brian Petty at 703-435-6535 to help track it down.

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SPECIAL EVENTS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

Reston Association has something for everyone, including trips to local places of interest, monthly movies for seniors and a fun Halloween event, just to name a few. Join us at one of Reston Association’s many facilities and see what’s in it for you. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS, CONTACT ASHLEIGH@RESTON.ORG OR CALL 703-435-6577.

CHILDREN’S EVENTS

Children must be accompanied by an adult

Association office. Registration is required. Payment due at the event.

ALL AGES

Kids’ Play AGES: 2–5 years DATE: Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $3/RA Members $6/Non-members

Andy’s Parties staff will cosponsor a morning of fun with the Reston Association. We will have a variety of activities, crafts and games. Great event for a mom’s group, play dates and stay-at-home parents. Registration is required. Payment due at the event.

Halloween Fun AGES: 3–5 years DATE: Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 TIME: 10–11 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $3/RA Members $6/Non-members

All ages are welcome. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Almost Back to School Pool Party DATE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011 TIME: 2–7 p.m. LOCATION: Lake Newport Pool, 11601 Lake Newport Road FEE: FREE

End your summer with a splash. Come to the pool to enjoy the festivities before going back to school. We will have a DJ, games, contests and prizes. Pizza from Vocelli’s will be available for purchase. Registration is required. This program is cancelled in the event of rain.

Dress up in your favorite costume and join the fun with hands-on activities, crafts and go trick-or-treating around the

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Reston Presents Series

Reston Presents...is a bi-monthly lecture and presentation series that highlights the multifaceted talents of local residents. Topics include anything from cooking demonstrations to stories from war veterans and book signings with local authors. Reston Presents is sponsored by the Reston Association and the Reston Community Center. Registration is requested. For more information, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577.

Newcomers’ Night

Date: Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 Time: 7–9 p.m. Location: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Fee: FREE New or not so new to Reston? Come learn more about Reston Association (RA) and its many services, amenities and programs. Meet RA Board members and staff and find out how you can get involved in Reston. Light refreshments will be available and door prizes will be awarded. Please RSVP to Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

Positive Aging DATE: Sunday, Sept. 18, 2011 TIME: 2–4 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza FEE: FREE

This month features, “Positive Aging: Finding Happiness in Your Second Half of Life.” Thanks to the longevity revolution we have more healthy time to thrive. In this interactive workshop you will discover what matters in designing an authentic life. Candy Spitz, LCSW, ACC is a Career & Life Coach who

specializes in helping people 50+ design transitions aligned with their values and passions so they live with no regrets. Transitions give us opportunities to shake up our lives. Candy has helped thousands of people use their strengths to address challenges and make positive changes that lead to growth. As a pioneer and leader in both the Positive Aging and Life Planning Movements, Candy lives her passion helping people discover their authentic paths.


COME PLAY IN RESTON Life is a Journey...

Senior Social

A “Grand” Campfire

DATE: Monday, Nov. 14, 2011 TIME: 7–9 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Community Center at Lake Anne, 1609 Washington Plaza FEE: FREE

DATE: Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011 TIME: 1:30–3 p.m. LOCATION: Lake Anne Village Center 1609 Washington Plaza FEE: FREE

DATE: Friday, Sept. 16, 2011 TIME: 5:30–7 p.m. LOCATION: Fire ring on Soapstone Drive FEE: $5/RA Members $8/Non-members

This month features, “Life is a Journey…Death is not the End.” Do patterns repeat in your life, but you don’t know what they mean? Do you make the same mistakes with your relationships, job situations or finances over and over? It is possible to learn how to recognize the signs that can guide us to our best life path. In this insightful program, hear personal and professional development coach, Joanne Aaronson, PMP, provide some key signs along the journey of life to stay on course. She’ll address: Recognizing the signs and patterns meant to guide us Using these markers to make key decisions Knowing when you’re on the right path How we know that death is not the end Registration is requested.

SENIOR EVENTS

Ages 55 years and older

Senior Movie Day DATES: WEDNESDAYS: Aug. 24, 2011, Featuring, TBD Sept. 28, 2011, TBD Oct. 26, 2011, TBD TIME: Doors open at 9:15 a.m. Showtime is at 10 a.m. LOCATION: Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas FEE: FREE

The Reston Association, in cooperation with Reston Town Center Bow Tie Cinemas, presents, “Meet Me at the Movies.” Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are provided and door prizes are distributed prior to the movie. Movie titles are posted at www.reston.org.

Plan your fall calendar while you learn about upcoming senior adult trips, classes, and events that are facilitated by Reston Community Center and Reston Association. Enjoy a sampling of treats while meeting new people and catching up with friends. Door prizes will be awarded during the event. This event is cosponsored by Reston Community Center and Reston Association.

Write your Memories into Memoirs DATES: Thursdays, Sept.15–Nov. 17, 2011 TIME: 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $18/RA Members $28/Non-members

Whether you are just beginning or already writing your memoirs, this 10-week class focuses on turning life experiences into an engaging story. You will discuss different writing topics each week in a supportive and lively setting. All you need is a serious desire to write, the willingness to share your personal journey and the ability to put your thoughts on paper. At the end, your stories may be bound as a book for you to keep. Give the priceless gift of legacy to your children, grandchildren and future generations. Class size is limited to 10. Registration is required. Registration form is available at www.reston.org or contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703-435-6577 for information.

Hello grandparents! Bring your grandchildren out for a fun evening around the campfire ring at Walker Nature Education Center. Cook a hot dog on a stick and roast marshmallow treats. Sing classic campfire songs and share stories of the past. Enjoy a special time with your “grand” ones. This event is cancelled in the event of rain. Registration required. Payment due at the event.

Wine Tasting at the Nature House DATE: Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 TIME: 4–6 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive FEE: $7/RA Members $10/Non-members

Enjoy an evening of wine tasting in the beautiful setting of the Walker Nature Education Center. Sample red and white wines along with a variety of cheese and crackers. The evening includes a tour of the nature center’s gardens and ADA-accessible trail. Watch for birds doing their own “tasting” at feeders. Look at wild grape vines and late blooming flowers. Food and wine glasses donated by Tall Oaks Assisted Living. Registration required. Payment due at the event.

Holiday Wreath Decoration DATE: Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011 TIME: 1:30–3:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walker Nature Education Center, 11450 Glade Drive FEE: $8/RA Members $12/Non-members

SENIOR TRIPS AND TOURS

Ages 55 years and older Reston Association seniors will take a variety of trips this year to locations such as museums, a dinner theatre and local places of interest. Join us as we have fun visiting the area’s hot spots. For upcoming trip dates, details and to get on our trip mailing list, contact Ashleigh@ reston.org or call 703-435-6577. Registration form for tours can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

Trip to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond Va. DATE: Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011 TIME: 8 a.m.–6 p.m. PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS: 8 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 8:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 8:30 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $36/RA Members $42/Non-members

Join us for a guided tour of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, in Richmond, VA. Enjoy their enticing artwork from almost every major world culture. The museum houses a remarkable permanent collection of more than 22,000 works of art, including the Faberge exhibit. Participants will be on their own after a 30-minute guided tour. The Amuse Restaurant will be open for a delightful lunch in between exhibits. Registration is required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

Join us to create a beautiful seasonal decoration. We will have many options for you to choose from to make your floral decoration unique and an instructor to guide you along the way. Registration required. Payment due at the event.

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SPECIAL EVENTS VISIT THE PARKS, RECREATION & EVENT SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

For more information on upcoming senior events and to register for events and trips, contact Ashleigh@ reston.org or call 703-435-6577.

SENIOR TRIPS AND TOURS

Ages 55 years and older

Trip to National Harbor DATE: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011 TIME: 9 a.m.–3 p.m. PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS: 9 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 9:15 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 9:30 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $25/RA Members $30/Non-members

Join us for a chartered bus trip up to the National Harbor, located just across the river into Maryland. Take a stroll along the promenade and shop at the outdoor American Market, which includes a vast offering of producer-only merchandise, including farm fresh produce and meats, specialty foods, handmade crafts, jewelry and more. Enjoy lunch on your own at one of the many restaurants overlooking the Potomac River. Registration is required.

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Trip to Way Off-Broadway Dinner Theatre to See Chicago DATE: Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011 TIME: 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m. PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS: 10:30 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 10:45 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 11 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $62/ RA Members $68/Non-members

The Way Off-Broadway Dinner Theater, in Frederick, MD, is one of the area’s premier entertainment venues combining fine dining with outstanding live stage shows. You’ll be able to enjoy and experience this devilish yet delightful popular show. Fee includes transportation, buffet & show. All sales are final. Registration is required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Trip to Western Maryland Scenic Railroad Train Ride

Trip to Ford’s Theatre to See ‘A Christmas Carol’

DATE: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 TIME: 8:30 a.m.–6:30 p.m. PICK-UP TIMES & LOCATIONS: 8:30 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 8:45 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 9 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $55/RA Members $63/Non-members

DATE: Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011 TIME: 10:15 a.m.–3 p.m. BUS PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS: 10:15 a.m. Hunters Woods Shopping Center (Ledo’s Pizza) 10:30 a.m. Thoreau Place, 1951 Sagewood Lane 10:45 a.m. Lake Anne Fellowship House, 11450 North Shore Drive FEE: $53/RA Members $61/Non-members

Join us for a chartered bus trip up to Cumberland, MD for a roundtrip excursion on the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. Experience a mixture of mountain scenery, with the changing fall leaves. Participants are given the opportunity for not only an entertaining, but also educational experience. Pack a lunch to enjoy during your lovely train ride. Registration is required. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org.

Help us ring in the holidays with Charles Dickens’ timeless tale of redemption and charity brought to colorful life for the Yuletide season. Registration required. All sales are final. Registration form can be found on our website at www.reston.org. Contact Ashleigh@reston.org or call 703435-6577 for more information.


COME PLAY IN RESTON

FESTIVAL ON THE

SQUARE

Date: Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011 Time: 12-5 p.m. Location: 11790 Sunrise Valley Drive, just off Reston Parkway at The Westin Reston and the Sheraton Reston Fee: FREE The day will start with a Help the Homeless Community Walk. After the walk, there will be live music and entertainment, food & drink, children’s activities, and more. For more information, contact Ashleigh@reston.org or 703-435-6577. Sponsored by The JBG Companies, The Westin-Reston Heights, Vinifera Restaurant, Sheraton Reston, Syrah Restaurant, Reston Community Center, Reston Association, Reston Interfaith, Brickman and Fairfax County Times.

Seniors Advisory Committee

This committee, established by the Reston Association, is charged with developing and implementing programs to benefit Reston’s senior adults. If you have visited Reston Town Center’s Bow Tie Cinemas recently to see a movie and enjoy coffee and pastries with friends, then you have seen the work of the Seniors Advisory Committee firsthand. We are looking for NEW ideas and FRESH perspectives. Give something back to your community by sharing your talents and ideas.

Place: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive Time: 2–3:30 p.m. Date: 2nd Tuesday of each month

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SPECIAL EVENTS

2011 RESTON FESTIVAL T-SHIRT

CONTEST

WINNER KERRY BURTSCHI RISING SENIOR AT HERNDON HIGH SCHOOL

How did you come up with the concept for the design?

In following the Reston Festival’s main idea of “Reston through the Decades,” I wanted to create a piece of art that created the illusion of going through time. To do this, I warped a clock and positioned it as the focal point. I then used arrows to point out the different stops in time that the Reston Festival would be “visiting.”

Are you involved in any other artistic projects, at school or otherwise?

I am currently in my second year of taking computer graphics at Herndon High School and plan on going on to the third level for my senior year. In this class, we complete many different projects, ranging from 3D modeling to vector art.

What are your plans for after high school?

I plan on going to college and maybe taking a course in graphic design to expand my skills.

What role, if any, does art have in your future plans?

Ever since I was a kid I have looked towards art as a way to express my feelings and creativity and will continue to do so throughout my life. In the future I also picture myself furthering my abilities and possibly looking into a career in editing/rendering films in which I plan on incorporating my artwork into my videos.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


COME PLAY IN RESTON

Community Yard Sale Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011

Reston Festival 2012 The Festival committee is looking for energetic volunteers to help plan Reston Festival 2012. The festival celebrates Reston’s birthday and hosts a variety of games, crafts, kids’ activities, musical entertainment and great festival food. To volunteer to be part of this great team, call the Festival Information Line at 703-435-7989 or contact info@restonfestival.com. Check out our website at www.restonfestival.com.

RAIN DATE: Sept. 11 TIME: 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. LOCATION: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive FEE: $25/RA members, booth space $31/Non-members, booth space

95 families will be selling a variety of items, so this event is a great opportunity to find things for a new home or a college dorm. Sign up to have a booth or stop by to browse for great bargains. Booth space = two parking spaces. Tables are not provided. Space is limited. Vendors must pre-register with payment to secure space. All sales are final. No refunds unless cancelled due to rain.

Please complete the form below and return this portion with payment to: Reston Association, 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20191-3404 in order to secure your space. Your Name(s) Daytime Phone

Street Address City

State Zip

E-mail

Fee Enclosed: $

q Check q Visa q Mastercard Charge Number *Card Security Code:# *Typically a 3-digit code is located on back of credit card, to the right of the signature strip.

Cardholder’s Signature Expiration Date All sales are final. No refunds unless cancelled due to rain. For office use only: Code: SE-YARD SALE

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VOLUNTEERS VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

OUR VOLUNTEERS REALLY DIG US

TO VOLUNTEER, CONTACT HA BROCK AT 703-435-7986 OR E-MAIL HABROCK@RESTON.ORG.

GETTING INVOLVED AND SUITING YOUR OWN STYLE

You could say the ways to get involved in Reston are as unique as you. For example, if you have a special knack for gardening and like to beautify natural spaces, then the Weed Warriors program might be for you. This group is out and about in Reston, removing invasive exotic plants from our forested areas, which can grow rapidly, eventually taking over the native ferns, wildflowers and tree seedlings. Or, maybe you like to slosh around in a streambed, checking water quality, identifying wildlife and collecting data on your findings. As a stream monitor, you can actively help to assess the health of our local watersheds. There are several monitoring sessions per year, with training given by the watershed staff. A two-year commitment is encouraged for this project.

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But there are also shorterterm endeavors that will allow even the busiest person the opportunity to make a difference in the community in which they live. These include festivals or events such as Halloween Trail or Potomac Watershed Clean Up Day.

VOLUNTEER FOR YOUR PASSION

Our advisory committees are where you can really immerse yourself in a cause or area that suits you. These include: The Reston Neighborhood Advisory Committee The Environmental Advisory Committee The Parks and Planning Advisory Committee The Pedestrian and Bicycling Advisory Committee The Seniors Advisory Committee The Tennis Advisory Committee The Transportation Advisory Committee The Communications Advisory Committee

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Each committee is comprised of up to 15 members and includes a Board and at least one staff liaison and generally meets once per month. More information on the committees and an application can be found at www.reston.org.

MANY OPPORTUNITIES, ONE GOAL

At Reston’s volunteer appreciation party, at every regular Board meeting of the Association, at our annual meeting and at other events throughout the year, we have the opportunity to recognize and thank our amazing volunteers—from those who have served on committees, on a special project or even just a one-time event. From scout groups, business leaders to active retirees, all share one common goal. They want to give back to the community with their time, talent and unwavering energy.

Some say it’s the tree planting they like the best. Some like the fact that they can cultivate an idea and watch it flourish. In some cases, RA volunteers actually do “dig” into the dirt to plant a few seedlings. You can make a difference in your community, be involved in something you like, and meet some interesting people and learn some new skills in the process. Planting trees may not be what you’re into, but there are plenty of other areas in which to “grow.” RA is seeking volunteers to help enhance the community in a variety of areas. There are many opportunities available in such areas as environment and ecology, the Walker Nature Education Center, recreational programs and facilities, special events and many more.


GET INVOLVED

DO YOU NEED SERVICE HOURS FOR SCHOOL?

Often times we find that individuals (such as middle and high school students) are required to perform a specified number of community service hours. If this is the case, then you may be able to complete up to 8 hours of community service by working one of our department’s special events, such as festivals, Weed Warriors, and watershed cleanups, to name a few. We cannot guarantee that you’ll be able to complete all of the hours you need during one special event. Each special event will have a limited number of spots available for volunteers, so it is very important you notify us well in advance of your desire to work a special event.

WHAT’S THE PROGRAM ABOUT?

The RA volunteer program consists of about 500 active volunteers working in a variety of capacities and settings. Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, takes special care to make sure that there is a good match with the volunteer and the job.

To volunteer or learn more about how you can get involved in Reston, you can call Ha Brock at 703-435-7986, or via e-mail to habrock@reston.org, and she can help to provide ideas and options that are well suited for your talents. You can also visit the RA website at www.reston. org and click on “Get Involved” tab for more information or complete the online volunteer application.

Weed Warriors Projects Our native trees, ferns and wildflowers are under attack by invasive exotic plants like English Ivy, Japanese Honeysuckle and Bamboo. That is why we need warriors like you to join us in rescuing Reston’s beautiful parkland from these aggressive plants. These fast growing, invasive plants escape from people’s yards and seriously threaten local ecosystems, taking away vital food and habitat from already stressed wildlife populations. Please, spend a couple hours in our parkland protecting our forests every 4th Saturday of each month as we help restore Reston’s forests to their natural state. With new RA guidelines stating that certain invasive exotic plants may not be installed or maintained on Reston Association member property, we have more support than ever in this rigorous battle. Please join us.

All projects: 10 a.m.–Noon Please wear long sleeves and long pants if you are allergic to poison ivy. RA will provide tools, gloves, snacks and water.

Protect the Trees Saturday, Sept. 24 The heavy vines of Oriental Bittersweet continue to strangle trees and take over shrubs in the natural area at Stones Throw Drive. Oriental Bittersweet is one of the most invasive and vigorous weeds in Reston. Please help us eradicate this aggressive vine and liberate our native plants. We will meet at the Bright Pond cul-de-sac and walk down the path on the left of the pipe-stem driveway. There is poison ivy at this site.

Stop the English Ivy Saturday, Oct. 22 We will return to the restoration site inside the Old Trail Dr. horseshoe to rid this natural area of the aggressive English Ivy. It is never enough to attack English Ivy just once. It will reinvade, create a monoculture and prevent native plants from thriving. Please join us to remove this vine and help continue restoring the natural area. We will meet at the tot-lot. You can access the natural area from a pathway on the inside of Old Trail Dr. between 2368 and 2354 Old Trail Dr. There is poison ivy at this site.

Restoring Wainwright Natural Area November 19, 2011 Help protect the trees at Wainwright natural area. We will continue the restoration of the natural area at Wainwright Drive by removing the English Ivy that is battling native plants for a place to grow. We have had immense success in the past and invite you to join us in protecting these woods. English Ivy is a threat to the health of trees by crowding the roots and suffocating the bark. It can even break branches and kill a tree. Meet near the corner of Wainwright Drive and North Shore Drive. Look for the RA truck. There is poison ivy at this site. To volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@reston.org or 703-435-7986.

Halloween House & Trick or Treat Trail October 28–29

Rain or shine event

Friday, Oct. 28 Volunteer Hours: 4:30–9:30 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 29 Volunteer Hours: 4:30–9:30 p.m.

*There will be a mandatory volunteer orientation at the Nature Center on Friday, October 21 from 6-7 p.m. We’re looking for fun-loving, energetic volunteers to help at our Halloween event for children of all ages. Volunteers ages 15 through adult are needed to play character roles and run carnival games, admissions, face painting, concessions and more. All volunteers will receive free pizza and drinks. Requirements: Must be willing to have fun! Costumes encouraged, but not required. Volunteers MUST be at least 15. Volunteers between the ages of 13-14 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information or to volunteer, contact Ha Brock, RA community outreach specialist II, at habrock@ reston.org or 703-435-7986. Volunteers must be pre-registered to help with this event.

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VOLUNTEERS VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

To get more information on volunteer opportunities, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@ reston.org.

Help Monitor Streams

ENVIRONMENTAL VOLUNTEERS

Become a volunteer stream monitor and help Reston Association assess the health of our streams at several sites in Reston.

Take Part In International Coastal Cleanup Day

Do you want to make a lasting contribution to improving the health of our local streams? Tons of trash ends up in the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay. Not only is this litter an eyesore, it threatens the health of the Bay. You can make a difference in two ways.

Bring The Family and Volunteer For The Fall Stream Clean Up DATE: Oct. 22, 2011 9 a.m.–Noon AGE: All ages welcome LOCATIONS SNAKEDEN BRANCH (UPPER): Meet at Hunters Woods Village Center SNAKEDEN BRANCH (MIDDLE): Meet at Soapstone Road NATURE HOUSE: Meet at the Pavilion COLVIN RUN: Meet at Tall Oaks Pool STEVENAGE ROAD: Meet at Reston North Park

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SUMMER SESSION: July 1–Aug. 31 FALL SESSION: Oct. 1– Nov. 30

Volunteer To Be A Site Leader For The Fall Stream Cleanup

What Do Volunteers Do? Collect data about the stream. Identify insects. Work with a fellow volunteer.

HOURS: 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Responsibilities Picking up supplies from RA Central Services Facility Meet and register volunteers. Present a short safety speech, which has been provided by RA. Hand out all supplies. Ensure volunteers work safely and responsibly. Return all unused supplies and tally sheets at the end of the project. Must have a cell phone.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

What’s Involved? Four monitoring sessions in a year 3-4 hours each Training and practice Two-year commitment encouraged. How Do I Learn More? Join the volunteer monitors’ e-mail notification list by sending an e-mail to Brian Petty at bpetty@reston.org with “Add me to the Stream Monitors list” in the message. To volunteer, contact Ha Brock at habrock@ reston.org or call 703-453-7986.

Mark Storm Drains–Help Protect Watershed

When you drive or walk past one of the 4,000 storm drains in Reston, you probably don’t immediately think, “Health of the Chesapeake Bay.” But that’s exactly the connection between storm drains, the watersheds and the Bay. According to Nicki Bellezza, Reston Association’s watershed supervisor, storm drains prevent flooding of roads and neighborhoods by carrying water and snowmelt away from streams and sidewalks. This water coursing through the drains is untreated. Dumping trash, pet waste, motor oil and other materials pollutes our waterways. How to Help Take part in the Storm Drain Marking Project, which places “No Dumping” decals on the storm drains — providing a much-needed reminder to keep the drains clean. How to Get Started: You can start your own project team by calling Nicki at 703-4356560 or send her an e-mail at nicki@reston.org.


GET INVOLVED

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

Reston Multicultural Festival VOLUNTEERS MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN RESTON RA 2010 Volunteers of the Year Ron Rubin & Freya De Cola Although it may be somewhat unusual to nominate two people together for this award, the way in which these volunteers have worked together to provide leadership to the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) and the Reston community over the past 6 years is a large part of why they deserve this recognition. Establishing effective partnerships and relationships is something we all strive for in our work and home lives. Many people could learn from this “dynamic duo” as they have sometimes been referred to. Being an engaged and responsible chair for such an active and passionate committee can be an onerous task. They have capitalized on each other’s talents with outstanding results. In 2010 they donated over 200 hours to the Reston community. Ron Rubin: Member of the EAC since October 2004, co-chair since 2006. In 2008 - 2010 Ron was an advisor and educator at Reston Arbor Day events, he provided information on Reston’s environmental resources in the Nature Booth at multiple Reston Festivals, advocated stream restoration, provided pro bono tree preservation consultation for Nature House, and provided arbor care information at multiple RA Earth Day festivals. Ron also continues to volunteer to refill our brochure boxes along the pathways.

Freya De Cola: Member of the EAC since September 2004, co-chair since 2006. Provided information on Reston’s environmental resources in the Nature Booth at multiple festivals, provided watershed restoration advocacy, participated in numerous Reston Bird Counts, aided the reorganization and transfer of the Nature Center book collection to the Nature House library, volunteered at multiple Halloween Trail events at the Nature Center, and attended the Fairfax County Land Use College on behalf of the committee. Freya has been a Nature House Welcome Desk volunteer since April of 2010 and continues to refill brochure boxes and participate in weed warrior and community workdays at the Nature Center.

DATE: SATURDAY, SEPT. 24, 2011(RAIN OR SHINE) VOLUNTEER HOURS: 7 A.M.–8 P.M. LOCATION: LAKE ANNE PLAZA–1609-A WASHINGTON PLAZA,

Ron and Freya’s volunteer work has had a tremendous positive impact on the community. Hundreds, if not thousands, of Restonians have learned about the community’s natural resources, RA’s management of those resources and how they, as residents, can be good environmental stewards. Their fellow environmental volunteers and RA staff have come to know both of them as highly reliable and valued resources. They have led a cohesive and effective Environmental Advisory Committee for RA that is known and respected for its informed perspective on the environmental issues that face our community.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24, 2011 Set-up: 7–11 a.m. Festival Shifts: 10:30 a.m.– 2:30 p.m. or 2:30–6 p.m. Festival Breakdown: 5:30–8 p.m.

RESTON, VIRGINIA

VOLUNTEER QUALIFICATIONS: 13 YEARS OR OLDER. YOUNGER VOLUNTEERS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT.

The Reston Multicultural Festival is a celebration of the rich medley of cultures that make up our community. The festival opening features an official Naturalization Ceremony where America’s newest citizens take the Oath of Allegiance to the United States. Throughout the day there’s the music, dance, performances and the food and crafts of many world cultures. Come join the festivities that honor the diversity that is Reston. You can be an important part of the success of this annual event by volunteering.

VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE: You are welcome to choose your

day and the timeslot. If you choose more than two shifts, you will receive a break between shifts. FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, 2011 Festival set-up: 2:30–6 p.m.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

Parking Attendants: Control access to parking lot. Direct vendors to the parking areas around the plaza. Must be 18 years of age or older to volunteer. Information Booth: Meet the public and answer general questions. Make announcements. Conduct surveys. Hand out maps and programs. Volunteer Command Center: Check in volunteers. Make sure snacks are available. (This station is inside the Reston Community Center–Lake Anne.) Floaters: Provide relief for other volunteers who are taking breaks. Floaters must have a flexible schedule. Children’s Hands-on Area: Assist children with hands-on activities.

TO VOLUNTEER

Contact Ha Brock, 703-435-7986 or via e-mail at habrock@reston.org WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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VOLUNTEERS VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

To get more information on volunteer opportunities, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@ reston.org.

GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY

Reston Association (RA) is a not-for-profit corporation that is initially empowered by the developer, further authorized by the state and responsible to its members. Reston’s attractiveness and the amenities provided by the Association play an important role in attracting and retaining environmentally friendly commercial enterprises. The Association maintains and nurtures over 1,350 acres of open space, including 4 manmade lakes, 55 miles of paved and natural surface pathways, 800 acres of parkland in woods, meadows and wetlands, as well as a 72-acre Walker Nature Education Center and Nature House. Perhaps the best metaphor for RA is that of a “steward” responsible for maintaining the quality of life in Reston by caring for and administering the use of one of the community’s most precious assets–its real property.

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There’s no better way to raise your profile in the community and make employees feel proud than by giving back to the community where they Live, Work, Play and Get Involved. Perhaps dedicate a day of service. Close your office for a day (or a half day) and let your employees use that time to give back. Research shows that the most successful companyrun volunteer programs allow employees to select the causes they support, so you pick the day and let your people pick their cause.

Ways To Get Involved

Join the Adopt-a-Spot Program — Adopt an area around your business and call it your own by keeping your site litter free. A sign with your business name will be posted at your adopted location. Sponsor a Reston Association project or event. Work with our environmental resource staff on an environmental project.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Staff a booth at the Reston or Multicultural Festival. Donate your company’s products. Post our volunteer opportunities in your lunch room on your internal website. Encourage employees to volunteer during business hours (if applicable) or during their personal time. Be recognized for your support.

For more information about RA’s Volunteer Program, please contact Ha Brock, RA’s community outreach specialist II, at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org.

LIGHTSQUARED VOLUNTEERS RESTORE NATURAL AREA A team of volunteers from LightSquared, a Reston technology firm, worked with RA environmental resource and watershed staff on a Weed Warriors Project off of Steeplechase Drive. Volunteers removed invasive exotic plants, such as Doublefile Viburnum, Burning Bush, Barberry and English Ivy. Native plants will now have a chance to thrive thanks to LightSquared.


GET INVOLVED

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: SPOTLIGHTING COMPANIES THAT GIVE BACK VeriSign, Inc.

A team of volunteers from VeriSign, Inc.’s Dulles, Va. headquarters celebrated Earth Day 2011 on Monday, April 25, by donating their time to help clear a natural area along the restored portion of a stream near the Cedar Ridge Apartment complex. This is part of an ongoing effort to maintain the restored stream, thus protecting wildlife habitats and improving the forest floor. Volunteers walked the paths along Colvin Run Stream picking up trash and debris. A picnic table, mattress, office chair and bicycle were among the treasures found. As part of the VeriSign Cares Program, VeriSign employees from all over the world regularly take part in community service projects. “This program reflects our continued commitment to making a positive and lasting impact on the communities around us, and where our employees work and live,“ said Mark McLaughlin, VeriSign’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “It’s a great way to show support and get to know this community as part of our corporate social responsibility” said Lindsey Brooks, Community Relations Coordinator.

Centennial Contractors Enterprises, Inc.

A team of volunteers from Centennial Contractors Enterprises, Inc., based in Reston, celebrated Earth Day 2011 on Friday, April 22, by working on a habitat restoration project in the Glade Stream Valley, where invasive non-native plants were removed. Volunteers installed native trees and shrubs to help reinvigorate the area. They also removed additional invasive exotic shrubs, expanding the restoration site and providing native plants a chance to thrive. “It was extremely gratifying to celebrate Earth Day by working on such an important environmental project in our own community. The knowledgeable staff from the Reston Association made this a wonderful experience for our team and we look forward to volunteering again in the near future.” said Laura Roland, Sustainability Program Officer for Centennial’s Corporate Office.

THANK YOU POTOMAC RIVER WATERSHED CLEANUP VOLUNTEERS

In Reston, on Saturday, April 9, 2011 we collected a total of 141 bags of trash and 5 tires. We were able to recycle 46 of the 142 bags at the local recycling center!

More Cleanups

Volunteers cleaned the tributary to Snakeden Branch along Saddler Oaks Cluster with Ashlea Smith as site leader. Ashlea works for the sponsor organization, the Alice Ferguson Foundation that provides Reston with the bags and gloves for the Potomac River Watershed Cleanup each year.

Thank you to the 90 volunteers who helped us to accomplish this goal.

Starbuck Volunteers

Interesting items found: Plastic sword, salad dressing, mattresses, pillows and cushions, shoes, fake bird, cans, $15 Verizon refill card, pipe, shopping cart, syringes, car cassette player, 25’ of orange conduit pipe, toy car, deer skeleton, bolt cutters, bicycle wheel, parts of a motorcycle, Barbie in a monokini, car ash tray, roller blade, fortune cookie, tape measure, laptop power supply, shark goggles, keys, bike and a rubber ducky.

A special thank you goes out to Kelley Fitzgerald for coordinating a successful cleanup.

Ten Starbucks volunteers cleaned up the stream and natural area around Hunters Woods Village Center. On April 30, they collected 13 bags of trash, 7 full of trash and 6 full of recyclables.

Top brands: Cobra, Rite Aid, Budweiser, 7-11, McDonald’s, Home Depot, Wendy’s, Hurricane Liquor, Corona, Coca Cola and Deer Park water.

Thanks to all the volunteers who participated on Earth Day. WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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VOLUNTEERS VISIT THE GET INVOLVED SECTION AT WWW.RESTON.ORG.

To get more information on volunteer opportunities, contact Ha Brock at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@ reston.org.

THANK YOU TO ALL THE KIDS’ TROUT FISHING DAY VOLUNTEERS WHO MADE IT A SUCCESS!

Boy Scouts Jacob and Freddy, with their mom, Jacqueline Bruner, were instrumental in getting everything prepared for the Kids Trout Fishing Day. Jacob, Freddy, and a few other scouts helped RA, VA Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF), Trout Unlimited (TU) and Wetland Studies and Solutions (WSSI) stock the stream with 400 rainbow trout the day prior to the event, which created favorable fishing conditions. A special thank you to WSSI for providing the fish, TU for providing experienced volunteers, Dick’s Sporting Goods for providing over $500 worth of gift certificates and coupons, Five Guys at Plaza America for donating cups for bait, Herndon Parks & Recreation and the VA Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF) for the fishing rods to make it all happen.

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THANK YOU 5K FUND RUN AND SPRING FESTIVAL VOLUNTEERS

Many thanks to volunteers who helped to make the Nature Center’s 5K Race and Spring Festival a huge success on April 30. We wouldn’t be able to put on the 5K Fund Run and Spring Festival if it wasn’t for our volunteers! The day kicked off with the 8th Annual 5K Fund Run to benefit Nature House. There were 161 runners from age 5 to 87. The race raised approximately $7,000. Later that day over 550 people of all ages came out to the festival, including many of the morning runners. They bought native plants, took boats out on Lake Audubon, met live animals and enjoyed 27 information and activity booths. Over 50 volunteers kept patrons entertained throughout the day.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

THANK YOU FLORIS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH AND ST. ANNE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH CAMPERS On Friday, July 1, approximately 50 Floris United Methodist Church (FUMC) campers worked with RA’s Environmental Resource and Watershed staff on a Weed Warriors Project as part of their week-long service camp. Campers pulled English Ivy and Japanese Pachysandra at two sites, one near the Colts Neck Tennis Court natural area and the other behind Quorn Lane. The campers pulled about 1,300 square feet of invasive exotics. Thank you FUMC campers. You did an amazing job. Picking up from where Floris United Methodist Church campers left off, on Wednesday, July 6, a dozen St. Anne’s Episcopal Church “Mission Possible” rising sixth through eight grade campers worked with RA’s Environmental Resource Staff on a Weed Warriors Project. Campers pulled about 900 square feet of English Ivy Colts at the natural area behind Quorn Lane off Colts Neck Road. This is “Mission Possible’s” Annual Weed Warriors Project with

RA. Thank you “Mission Possible” campers for all your hard work on a rainy, hot, humid and wet day. We look forward to seeing you again next summer.

RESTON ADOPT-ASPOT PROGRAM Reston Association sponsors a clean up program called “Adopt-a-Spot.” It is modeled after the highway adoption program along our state and federal roads. The intent of the program is to encourage citizen participation in beautification and litter cleanups of designated areas on RA property. This quarter, RA would like to welcome the Shedlock & Mizner Family, Fist Virginia Community Bank and the Reston Jaycees to the Adopt-a-Spot Program. If you know of any friends, neighbors, local clubs, service groups, businesses, and community organizations that would be interested in joining the Program, contact Ha Brock, community outreach specialist II at 703-435-7986 or e-mail habrock@reston.org.


GET INVOLVED

Volunteer Spotlight Q: How long have you lived in Reston? Since 1993. Q: Where are you from originally? I was born in Maryland, but grew up mostly in Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. Q: What do you do as a volunteer for RA? What sort of projects have you worked on? I started as a member of the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC). I now work on projects EAC initiated — pulling invasive plants with Weed Warriors, picking up litter with Adopt-A-Spot, and filling brochure boxes along the paths. Q: How long have you been an RA volunteer and what is it that you like about volunteering? I started volunteering with RA about ten years ago. I’ve learned so much from RA staff and other volunteers. My husband and I were recently walking near one of the streams that hasn’t been restored and we both realized that if we saw that stream 10 years ago we’d have no idea that it was in trouble and certainly wouldn’t have been able to identify any invasive plants nearby.

Mary Brown Q: What is one of your proudest accomplishments as an RA volunteer? About five years ago, when I was member of EAC, we worked with Reston Environmental Action (REACT) to help RA look for ways to lessen its environmental impact. We touched on many areas, including purchasing recycled paper, recycling electronics and recycling bottles at the pools. Q: Do you volunteer with other organizations in Reston? I’m a volunteer staff member for REACT. We develop neighborhood projects to help residents develop green habits like recycling all they can, conserving energy, carpooling and using mass transit, installing rain barrels, composting, planting native plants, and using less synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. Q: What do you do for fun? Hiking and going to shows at Reston Community Center CenterStage and Jammin’ Java. Q: What’s the last book you read and last movie you saw? I can’t remember the last movie I saw from beginning to end. I tend to see parts of them after they end up on TV. I’m now reading Maria Rodale’s “Organic Manifesto”

| PHOTO BY SEAN BAHRAMI on the importance of organic farming for the environment and for food supply. Q: Aside from what you do now, what would be your ultimate dream job? Well, I have none of the skills required to sing and play in a band . . . but fortunately, my current job is pretty dreamy. I’ve been interested in the environment for a long time and my background is in community development, so doing this work in Reston is ideal. Q: What would you say to someone who was considering volunteer opportunities with RA based on your experiences with RA? It means being involved in a community that places a priority on engaging residents to work together to improve our quality of life. That’s a pretty special opportunity. And RA staff go out of their way to make everyone’s experience worthwhile.

Do you know someone who has given much to the Reston community through volunteering with Reston Association? Send your nominations to Ha Brock at habrock@reston.org.

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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COVENANTS

CASH FLOW vs COMPONENT FUNDING: Understanding The Differences In Methodologies BY PETER B. MILLER, ARCHITECT, RS

R

eplacement Reserve Studies have become a widely accepted part of our budgeting process for condominium and homeowner association communities. Many Board Members and Community Managers will provide enthusiastic testimonials to how a Reserve Study helped their community maintain or regain its financial health. Today, there is a greater understanding of the logic behind how the Reserve Study numbers are generated. Unfortunately, there is still much confusion about which of the two methods of calculating Reserves is “best and safest”!

So why do we have two different methods? Why can’t the industry agree on one and ignore the other? To answer that question would take more than the space we have here, but suffice it to say that it has to do with interpretations of certain state laws on the West Coast, interpretations of IRS Revenue Rulings, and requirements by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). With the involvement of these disparate entities, not to mention the architects and engineers that actually provide the Reserve Studies, we should be thankful that we only have two primary methods and not a dozen or more.

The Commonwealth of Virginia statutes which address Reserve Studies are silent on which method is to be used. Even the nomenclature in the industry is confusing; some call the two methods “Cash Flow and Component” while other refer to them as the “Threshold and Full Funding” methods! Both methods rely on the same data, but use different mathematical models to calculate the Reserve Funding recommendations. Both methods, if done correctly, adequately fund the Reserves, meaning that they both provide adequate funding for all of the future replacement obligations. However, many feel, (and I tend to be one of these), that the Component method actually overfunds the Reserves. That said, my experience is that most of our clients choose to use the Cash Flow method because it generally requires lower funding dollar amounts. In today’s economy, why place any more of a financial burden on our homeowners than necessary! If you would like to get more detailed information on the history, reasoning and application of the two mathematical models used to calculate the Reserve Funding recommendations, please feel free to download and share the PDF of the article “Cash Flow vs Component Method” at www.MDAreserves.com/resources/articles. While at the website, please also view our video library of Frequently Asked Question. Peter B. Miller, a principal in Miller-Dodson Associates and one of the leading national experts in Reserve Studies and Strategic Financial Planning for Community Associations. Peter serves on the board of the Southeast Virginia Chapter of CAI and is a graduate of the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech.

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RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™


LIVING IN RESTON

Community Association Fundamentals Each common-interest community has its own history, personality, attributes and challenges, but all associations share common characteristics and core principles. CAI developed the Community Association Fundamentals to foster a better conceptual understanding of how associations function and the roles of residents and association leaders. We hope this primer will help people recognize the core principles at the heart of the community association model and, even more importantly, inspire effective, enlightened leadership and responsible, engaged citizenship. 1.

Associations ensure that the collective rights and interests of homeowners are respected and preserved.

2.

3.

Associations provide services and amenities to residents, protect property values and meet the established expectations of homeowners.

7.

Association leaders protect the community’s financial health by using established management practices and sound business principles.

4.

Associations succeed when they cultivate a true sense of community, active homeowner involvement and a culture of building consensus.

8.

Association leaders have a legal and ethical obligation to adhere to the association’s governing documents and abide by all applicable laws.

5.

Association homeowners have the right to elect their community leaders and to use the democratic process to determine the policies that will protect their investments.

9.

Association leaders seek an effective balance between the preferences of individual residents and the collective rights of homeowners.

6.

Association homeowners choose where to live and accept a contractual responsibility to abide by established policies and meet their financial obligations to the association.

Associations are the most local form of representative democracy, with leaders elected by their neighbors to govern in the best interest of all residents.

10. Association leaders and residents should be reasonable, flexible and open to the possibility—and benefits—of compromise. Reprinted with permission from Community Associations Institute. For more information on CAI, visit www.caionline.org or call (888) 224-4321.

FALL ACTIVITIES G G N E M A Q P S V I D V G C P N H T Y

C N O B T U N S O D K M N Z R V Z S T Q

L S I A O R I R H Y X I W E Q L A I H E

E I T T P A V N I Z P Y S E V I R Q K B

A N A Z E R R I I A M E F U Q U K Q Q B

N G I X Z E X D C M R P F A C H A Q E E

U L C N P A M S M V O D X E D X K C E C

P E O J Y N D L E E G D S S J C G H S N

E F S C G N T S A I M D N J H X N D A A

F A S H A Z T S N U O B R O V E P X K N

G M A L M U N C I O N Z E H C P A L Q E

J I N F D T L L H B M N A R I A G I E T

B L O Y Z U B R Q Z P E A C S F I J J N

D Y T Y S C O S N M I C O R S I B N J I

Y K S T U B S P O H S K R O W C A N R A

Y R E O H I S Z O A O M W V R E K W Y M

Q R R G H O F O V M R S Y Z K F K I T S

U B I O D E T S N L B B X J L Q Z O M L

D E N E R G Y A U D I T S L F J Q R Y A

N T N E M T R A P A B F S K C C U K Q B

WORKSHOPS ANNUAL MEETING APARTMENT BOARDMEMBERS CAI (Community Associations Institute) CLEANUP CLUSTER CONDOMINIUM ENERGY AUDITS LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE NEIGHBORHOOD SECURITY RESERVE STUDY RESTON ASSOCIATION RNAC WORKSHOPS SINGLE FAMILY (Detached Homes)

Neighborhood Security September TBD

Fire Safety October

TBD

Metro Impact on Reston November

TBD

Energy Audits

December TBD

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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BOARD & GOVERNANCE

Board of Directors Actions March 2011–May 2011

March 2011 Appointed Bart Astor to the Fiscal Committee, whereby he shall serve for a term of two years, ending March 2013. Decided to support the principles of the letter of the Polo Fields Home Owners Association regarding parking, traffic and access associated with the Metro stop planned at the current Herndon-Monroe Park & Ride and related transit oriented development. Decided to direct staff to draft a letter informing Fairfax County, the Reston Master Plan Special Study Task Force, and the Washington Metropolitan Airports Authority of the Association’s support of the positions of the Polo Fields Home Owners Association. Decided to support the position of the Association’s Environmental Advisory Committee that Reston Master Plan Special Study Task Force Vision Subcommittee’s Planning Principal number 2 does not provide sufficient protection for Reston’s environmental and natural resources, whereby the discussion of the adverse impacts being minimized should include a statement that any adverse impact shall be remedied; and, that the statement on the tree canopy should include recognition of the key environmental benefits of the tree canopy. Decided to authorize Freya DeCola, chair of the Association’s Environmental Advisory Committee, to speak at the Tuesday, March 15, 2011 Reston Master Plan Special Study Task Force Meeting providing testimony consistent with the motion adopted by the Board regarding the Reston Master Plan Special Study Task Force Vision Subcommittee’s Planning Principal number 2. Authorized the Reston Masters Swim Team to use Lake Audubon and Lake Audubon Pool Facilities for its “Two Mile Lake Swim” on Sunday, May 29, 2011 and on Saturday, May 28, 2011 for course setup and open water swim clinic, subject to the execution of an acceptable written agreement, as appropriate, to protect the interests of the Reston Association, as reviewed by Reston Association’s legal counsel.

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Reappointed the following Design Review Board & Covenants Committee Appointments: Richard Newlon and Neal Roseberry to the open design professional positions on the DRB for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Barbara Byron to the open lay member position on the DRB for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Eileen Dubose to the open Lake Anne/ Tall Oaks district seat on the Covenants Committee for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Approved the following Committee Chair & Member Appointments: John Bowman to the position of CoChair of the Transportation Advisory Committee for one year. Loren Bruce to the Transportation Advisory Committee, whereby he shall serve for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Mike Martin to the Transportation Advisory Committee, whereby he shall serve for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Brandon Ashby to the Environmental Advisory Committee, whereby he shall serve for a term of three years, ending March 2014. Approved the Environmental Advisory Committee Work Plan for March 2011 to April 2012, as amended.

Approved Design Review & Covenants Administration Resolution 8 Design Review Application Procedures, as amended. Granted and conveyed to Fairfax County a bus stop facilities easement and related grading agreement and temporary construction easement for the purposes of construction of a concrete pad and drainage improvements for a bus stop on Soapstone Drive, subject to necessary approvals from the Design Review Board. Decided to close Dogwood Pool for the 2011 swim season to enable renovations to commence during the 2011 season. Directed staff to work with the Southgate Community Center to identify and provide resources to transport summer camp participants to alternate Reston Association pool facilities. Authorized the expenditure of no more than $4,000 to engage consultants to review the October 2010 revenue and operating expense projections, assumptions, and methodology for the proposed Indoor Tennis facility. Appointed Directors Mike Collins and Ken Knueven to review and amend the October 2010 Lake Newport tennis facility construction, operation and maintenance assumptions document with specific focus on the construction & financing section of the document before it is distributed further. Approved the 2012/2013 budget calendar.

Approved the Seniors Advisory Committee Work Plan for March 2011 to April 2012, as amended. Approved the proposed letter to Hunter Mill District Supervisor Cathy Hudgins with regard to the establishment of a task force to review Phase II of the Reston Master Plan Special Study, whereby the Reston Association asks to be the lead community organization to assist Fairfax County in the process of collecting information, evaluating alternatives, hosting public meetings, and developing recommendations in the Phase II Study effort, as amended.

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

Appointed the Association’s Board Officers– President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer–and Legal Council to establish no later than December 15, 2011 a formal process in the form of a policy resolution, to evaluate the Chief Executive Officer, whereby such policy shall include but not be limited to compensation setting, employment agreement review, and goal setting.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kathleen Driscoll McKee, President South Lakes District Representatives Kathleen.driscoll.mckee@gmail.com April 2011 Elected to the Board of Directors of the Reston Association, Andrew Sigle, At-Large Director, and Cheryl Beamer, Hunters Woods/ Dogwood Director. Accepted the Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplemental Materials for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2010; as presented by the Association’s independent auditing firm BDO USA. May 2011 Elected to the Board of Directors of the Reston Association, Amanda Andere, Apartment Owners’ Representative for a term of three years, ending April 2014. Removed Chris Broad from the Board of the Friends of Reston for Community Projects, Inc., for being absent from more than three (3) consecutive meetings without sufficient cause. Approved amendments to Common Area Rules & Regulations Resolution 8, Ballfield Use, which clarifies that use fees can be charged to non-members regardless of age group. Directed staff to review the facts and circumstances behind the conduct of the April 19, 2011, DRB hearing related to the 2004 Cutwater Court application based on the comments and concerns raised by certain Reston Association members at the May 12, 2011 Reston Association Board of Directors meeting.

Paul Thomas, Vice President At-Large Representative pabloreston@gmail.com

Joe Leighton, Secretary At-Large Representative Joe_Leighton@comcast.net

John Higgins, Treasurer Reston Association Member john.higgins@fairfaxcounty.gov Tim McMahon, Board Director Apartment Owners’ Representative tim.mcmahon@restoninterfaith.org Cheryl Beamer, Board Director Hunters Woods/Dogwood District Representative cherylbeamer@verizon.net

Andrew “Andy” Sigle, Board Director At-Large Representative awsigle@gmail.com Tom Vis, Board Director At-Large Representative tvisrasoc@hotmail.com

Ken Knueven, Board Director Lake Anne/Tall Oaks District Representative kknueven@hotmail.com Mike Collins, Board Director North Point District Representative mike4ra@gmail.com

Milton Matthews, Chief Executive Officer matthews@reston.org

WWW.RESTON.ORG | FALL EDITION 2011

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DIRECTORY & FACILITIES

FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS (outside Reston Association) TRANSPORTATION Fairfax Connector/ RIBS Bus 703-339-7200 LINK-Transportation 703-435-5465 METRO 202-637-7000

COMMUNITY

Reston Association Member Services 703-435-6530 Reston Community Center 703-476-4500 Reston Historic Trust 703-709-7700 Reston Regional Library 703-689-2700 Reston Town Center 703-689-4699 Reston Visitors Center/ Chamber of Commerce 703-707-9045 YMCA 703-742-8800

PARKS

Fairfax County Parks 703-324-8702 Fairfax County Ball fields 703-324-5533 Lake Fairfax Park 703-471-5415 Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority 703-352-5900

SPORTS

Reston Soccer Association 703-859-6268 Reston Swim Team Association 703-326-0526 www.rsta.org Reston Youth Baseball 703-860-4400 Reston Youth Basketball 703-391-8533 Reston Youth Football 703-620-2019 SkateQuest 703-709-1010

RESTON ASSOCIATION FACILITIES

RESTON ASSOCIATION HEADQUARTERS (14) 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive, 703-435-6530 NORTH HILLS POOL (1)  1325 NORTH VILLAGE ROAD 703-707-9367 Depth: 2–5 ft Length: 25 meters Wading pool with fountain Spa ADA access and hydrolift chair to main pool Grass area and picnic tables Tennis within walking distance

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AUTUMNWOOD POOL (2)  11950 WALNUT BRANCH ROAD 703-437-3847 Depth: 3.5–5.5 ft Length: 25 meters Wading pool with fountain Covered picnic area Grass area Tennis and playground within walking distance DOGWOOD POOL (24) Dogwood Pool will be closed for renovation this summer. Please visit www. reston.org for up to date information. Additional amenities will include a zero-depth entry, outside water play area and picnic pavilion. We will host a Grand Re-opening in May 2012. GLADE POOL (29) 11550 GLADE DRIVE, 703-860-9765 Depth: 3.5–12.5 ft Length: 25 meters 1-meter diving board Spa Zero-depth wading pool with fountains Picnic tables Tennis and playground within walking distance 20-foot slide GOLF COURSE ISLAND POOL (12) 11301 LINKS DRIVE, 703-437-9792 Depth: 3–12 ft Length: 25 meters 1-meter diving board 2 Grass areas Wading pool Picnic tables Playground and pavilion within walking distance HUNTERS WOODS POOL (26)  2501 RESTON PARKWAY, 703-860-9763 Depth: 3.5–8.5 ft Length: 25 meters In-water basketball and volleyball Diving board Children’s splash area Large spa ADA ramp into main pool Picnic tables Playground, tennis and pavilion within walking distance LAKE AUDUBON POOL (22) 2070 TWIN BRANCHES ROAD 703-620-9801 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters Diving board Grass area Picnic tables Wading pool Boat ramp to Lake Audubon within walking distance LAKE NEWPORT POOL (3) 11601 LAKE NEWPORT ROAD 703-689-9862 Depth: 3.5–5.5 ft Length: 50 meters 2, 1-meter diving boards Wading pool Covered picnic area with grills Sand volleyball area Playground Softball and basketball within walking distance

RESTON | LIVE, WORK, PLAY AND GET INVOLVED™

LAKE THOREAU POOL (19) 2040 UPPER LAKES DRIVE 703-860-9843 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters Diving board Spa Wading pool Grass area and picnic tables Lake overlook NEWBRIDGE POOL (17) 11718 GOLF COURSE SQUARE 703-860-9713 Depth: 3.5–12 ft Length: 25 meters 1-meter diving board Wading pool Picnic tables Tennis and playground within walking distance TALL OAKS POOL (13) 12025 NORTH SHORE DRIVE 703-437-9854 Depth: 3–12 ft Length: 25 meters 1-meter diving board Wading pool Picnic tables Tall Oaks Shopping Center within walking distance UPLANDS POOL (7)  11032 RING ROAD, 703-437-9784 Depth: 3.5–8.5 ft Length: 25 meters Separate zero-depth (0-3 ft) children’s pool with interactive fountains Interactive sand pit ADA ramp into main pool Picnic tables NORTH SHORE POOL (8) 11515 NORTH SHORE DRIVE 703-437-9888 Depth: 3–11 ft Length: 25 meters Parking only on North Shore Drive Spa Main pool heated Shaded upper deck with picnic tables Lake Anne Plaza and tennis within walking distance Wading pool Diving board RIDGE HEIGHTS POOL (21) 11400 RIDGE HEIGHTS ROAD 703-860-9767 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 25 meters Main pool heated Diving board Wading pool Grass areas with picnic tables SHADOWOOD POOL (23) 2201 SPRINGWOOD DRIVE 703-860-9708 Depth: 3–5 ft Length: 20 meters Small slide Wading pool Grass area and picnic tables

LAKE NEWPORT TENNIS COURTS (5) 11452 Baron Cameron Avenue NEWBRIDGE TENNIS COURTS (17) 11718 Golf Course Square SHADOWOOD TENNIS COURTS (23) 2201 Springwood Drive NORTH HILLS TENNIS COURTS (1) 1325 North Village Road HOOK ROAD TENNIS COURTS (9) Fairway Drive/Hook Road AUTUMNWOOD TENNIS COURTS (2) 11950 Walnut Branch Road BARTON HILL TENNIS COURTS (20) Sunrise Valley Drive/Barton Hill Road COLTS NECK TENNIS COURTS (27) Colts Neck Road GLADE TENNIS COURTS (29) 11550 Glade Drive LAKE ANNE TENNIS COURTS (6) 11301 North Shore Drive NORTH SHORE TENNIS COURTS (8) 11515 North Shore Drive UPPER LAKES TENNIS COURTS (18) Upper Lakes Drive/Sunrise Valley Drive UPLANDS TENNIS COURTS (7) 11032 Ring Road BROWN’S CHAPEL PARK (4) Baron Cameron Avenue HUNTERS WOODS PICNIC PAVILION (25) Steeplechase Drive LAKE ANNE PICNIC PAVILION (6) 11301 North Shore Drive NORTH HILLS PICNIC PAVILION (1) 1325 North Village Road PONY BARN PICNIC PAVILION (28) Triple Crown/Steeplechase Drive POLO FIELDS RECREATION AREA (15) Thunder Chase Drive RESTON ASSOCIATION CENTRAL SERVICES FACILITY (10) 12250 Sunset Hills Road, 703-437-7658 TEMPORARY ROAD PICNIC PAVILION (11) Temporary Road/Northshore Drive WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER (30) 11450 Glade Drive, 703-476-9689 WALKER NATURE EDUCATION CENTER CAMPFIRE RING (31) Soapstone Drive & Lawyers Road


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Reston Farmers’ Market

Lake Anne Plaza Saturdays May 7 – October Farmers & Vendors

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PRSRT STD US POSTAGE  PAID RESTON, VA PERMIT NO.21 12001 Sunrise Valley Drive | Reston | Virginia | 20191-3404