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2014 RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

DIRECTORY OF EXPERTS

FOR POLICYMAKERS AND THE MEDIA www.rff.org/researchers


RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE Resources for the Future (RFF) is an independent, nonpartisan organization that, through its social science research, enables policymakers and stakeholders to make better, more informed decisions about energy, environmental, and natural resource issues. Located in Washington, DC, its research scope comprises programs in nations around the world. Resources for the Future 1616 P St. NW Washington, DC 20036 202.328.5000 www.rff.org Š 2013, Resources for the Future

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


2014 RFF DIRECTORY OF EXPERTS FOR POLICYMAKERS AND THE MEDIA About the Directory..............................................................II Expertise and Index..............................................................III RFF Experts............................................................................1 RFF University Fellows.........................................................52 About RFF............................................................................63 Board of Directors........................................................64 RFF Leadership.............................................................65 RFF Centers of Excellence............................................65 Connect with RFF.........................................................66

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ABOUT THE DIRECTORY This directory highlights the work of experts at Resources for the Future (RFF) on energy, environmental, and natural resource issues for policymakers and the media. The Areas of Expertise and Index section details key areas of current research at RFF and lists experts who can address those issues. The RFF Experts section includes profiles and contact information for each expert, in alphabetical order. All of the experts’ profiles, in addition to their current work, video interviews, curriculum vitae, and other information, are available online at www.rff.org/researchers. The titles senior fellow, fellow, and resident scholar refer to full-time staff research positions at RFF. Visiting scholars are experts who are in residence for a limited time to collaborate on RFF research. Nonresident fellows are established experts affiliated with other institutions with relevant expertise in particular disciplines. Center fellows are experts who are closely affiliated with a particular RFF center and who work exclusively on its research. University fellows are outstanding scholars at universities around the world who are appointed to establish closer working relationships between RFF and the wider academic community. As an independent, nonpartisan, and nonprofit institution, RFF shares the results of its research and analysis with all interested parties. Most RFF publications are available for download at www.rff.org. RFF takes no institutional positions on policy matters. Views expressed by the staff and experts are their own and should not be attributed to RFF, its Board of Directors, or its officers. Media inquiries should be directed to Peter Nelson, Director of Communications, at nelson@rff.org or 202.328.5191. Requests from Congress, agencies, or public officials should be directed to Shannon Wulf, Deputy Director for Government and Public Affairs, at wulf@rff.org or 202.328.5019.

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AREAS OF EXPERTISE Air Quality

Ecosystem Management

Air Pollution

Ecosystem Services

Clean Air Act

Endangered Species Act

Climate

Fisheries and Fishing

Cap and Trade

Forest Conservation

Carbon Pricing

Green Infrastructure

Carbon Sequestration

Invasive Species

Clean Air Act

Oceans

Climate Adaptation

Wetlands

Climate Change

Wildlife

Climate Mitigation

Electricity

Forest Carbon

Electricity Markets and Regulation

Global Trade

Energy Efficiency

Greenhouse Gases

Renewable and Clean Energy

Satellites State and US Regional Policies Development and Environment

Energy Biomass and Plant Biofuels CAFE Standards

Coffee

Coal

Deforestation

Energy Efficiency

Global Trade

Energy Security

Sustainable Development

Natural Gas

Ecosystems

Nuclear Energy

Biodiversity

Oil

Clean Water Act

R&D Technology

Coastal Resources

Renewable and Clean Energy

Deforestation

Shale Gas

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Food and Agriculture Agricultural Land Use Coffee Food Safety Forests

Urban Sprawl Policy and Analysis Benefit–Cost Analysis Cap and Trade

Biomass and Plant Biofuels

Discounting

Deforestation

Emissions Pricing

Forest Carbon

Environmental Accounting

Forest Conservation

Fees and Rebates

Global Forest Monitoring

Green GDP

Timber and Forest Product Markets

Incentives

Tree Biotechnology

Information Disclosure

Wildfire Management

Markets

International

Regulation

Africa

State and US Regional Policies

Asia

Subsidies

Central America

Taxes

China

Valuation

Europe

Value of Statistical Life

India

Voluntary Programs

Mexico South America Land Use Agricultural Land Use Green Infrastructure Mining Outdoor Recreation Parks, Refuges, and Wildernesses

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Public Lands

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

Risk Management Disasters Extreme Events Liability Risk Analysis Risk Regulation Uncertainty


Space Global Forest Monitoring Satellites Space Debris Transportation Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Auto Insurance CAFE Standards Fuel Taxes Gasoline Heavy–Duty Vehicles Public Transit Traffic Congestion Vehicle Pollution Waste Management Solid Waste and Recycling Waste Liability Waste Regulation Water Clean Water Clean Water Act Drinking Water Flooding Fresh Water Groundwater Oceans Water Quality Wetlands

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INDEX AGRICULTURAL LAND USE

Allen Blackman  2 Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Ariel Ortiz-Bobea  33 Leonard A. Shabman  41 AIR POLLUTION

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Maureen Cropper  8 Arthur G. Fraas  14 Winston Harrington  17 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Randall Lutter  25 Virginia McConnell  28 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Anthony Paul  35 Daniel Shawhan  43 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Juha Siikamäki  46 ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND VEHICLES

BIODIVERSITY

Allen Blackman  2 James W. Boyd  3 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Juha Siikamäki  46 BIOMASS AND PLANT BIOFUELS

Roger A. Sedjo  40 CAFE STANDARDS

Alan J. Krupnick  21 Joshua Linn  23 Jan W. Mares  27 Virginia McConnell  28 Richard D. Morgenstern  29

Carolyn Fischer  12 Winston Harrington  17 Joshua Linn  23 Virginia McConnell  28 Kenneth A. Small  47

ASIA

CAP AND TRADE

Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Roger A. Sedjo  40 BENEFIT–COST ANALYSIS

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Dallas Burtraw  6 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Arthur G. Fraas  14 Marc Hafstead  16

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Mun Ho  18 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Randall Lutter  25 Jan W. Mares  27 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Daniel Shawhan  43 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Margaret A. Walls  48 Roberton C. Williams III  50

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Dallas Burtraw  6 Brian Flannery  13 Marc Hafstead  16 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Daniel F. Morris  30 Karen L. Palmer  34 Nigel Purvis  36


Stephen W. Salant  39 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Roberton C. Williams III  50 Michael Wolosin  51 CARBON PRICING

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Dallas Burtraw  6 Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Marc Hafstead  16 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jan W. Mares  27 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Daniel F. Morris  30 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nigel Purvis  36 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Roberton C. Williams III  50 CARBON SEQUESTRATION

Brian Flannery  13 Jan W. Mares  27 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Juha Siikamäki  46 CENTRAL AMERICA

Allen Blackman  2 CHINA

Maureen Cropper  8 Mun Ho  18 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Zhongmin Wang  49

CLEAN AIR ACT

Dallas Burtraw  6 Arthur G. Fraas  14 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Randall Lutter  25 Daniel F. Morris  30 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anothony Paul  35 Nathan Richardson  37 Phil Sharp  42 CLEAN WATER ACT

Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Leonard A. Shabman  41 CLIMATE ADAPTATION

Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Brian Flannery  13 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Carolyn Kousky  20 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jan Mares  27 Daniel F. Morris  30 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Nigel Purvis  36 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Margaret A. Walls  48 CLIMATE CHANGE

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Roger M. Cooke  7 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Robert Fri  15 Mun Ho  18 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Molly K. Macauley  26 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Daniel F. Morris  30

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Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nathan Richardson  37 Margaret A. Walls  48 Michael Wolosin  51

DEFORESTATION

CLIMATE MITIGATION

DISASTERS

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Dallas Burtraw  6 Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Marc Hafstead  16 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jan W. Mares  27 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nigel Purvis  36 Nathan Richardson  37 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Juha Siikamäki  46 Roberton C. Williams III  50

Roger M. Cooke   7 Carolyn Kousky  20 Jan W. Mares  27 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Daniel Shawhan  43

COAL

Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Maureen Cropper  8 Joshua Linn  23 COASTAL RESOURCES

Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Daniel F. Morris  30 Juha Siikamäki  46 COFFEE

Allen Blackman  2

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Allen Blackman  2 Daniel F. Morris  30 Nigel Purvis  36 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Michael Wolosin  51

DISCOUNTING

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Roberton C. Williams III  50 DRINKING WATER

Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

James W. Boyd  3 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Carolyn Kousky  20 Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Molly K. Macauley  26 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48 ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

Allen Blackman  2 James W. Boyd  3 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Carolyn Kousky  20 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Leonard A. Shabman  41


Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48 ELECTRICITY MARKETS AND REGULATION

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Dallas Burtraw  6 Joel Darmstadter  9 Joshua Linn  23 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 EMISSIONS PRICING

Carolyn Fischer  12 Marc Hafstead  16 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Jan W. Mares  27 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Daniel F. Morris  30 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Stephen W. Salant  39 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Roberton C. Williams III  50 ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

Rebecca Epanchin-Niell   11 ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Brian Flannery  13 Jan W. Mares  27 Karen L. Palmer  34 Nigel Purvis  36 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Margaret A. Walls  48

ENERGY SECURITY

Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Joel Darmstadter  9 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Jan W. Mares  27 Nigel Purvis  36 Heather L. Ross  38 Phil Sharp  42 ENVIRONMENTAL ACCOUNTING

James W. Boyd   3 Joel Darmstadter  9 Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48 EUROPE

Dallas Burtraw  6 Carolyn Fischer  12 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Joshua Linn  23 Nigel Purvis  36 Nathan Richardson  37 Roger A. Sedjo  40 EXTREME EVENTS

Roger M. Cooke   7 Carolyn Kousky  20 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jan W. Mares  27 Ariel Ortiz-Bobea  33 Leonard A. Shabman  41 FEES AND REBATES

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Carolyn Fischer  12 FLOODING

Roger M. Cooke  7 Carolyn Kousky  20 Molly K. Macauley  26 Leonard A. Shabman  41

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FOOD SAFETY

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Randall Lutter  25

James W. Boyd  3 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Carolyn Kousky  20 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Margaret A. Walls  48

FOREST CARBON

Allen Blackman  2 Molly K. Macauley  26 Daniel F. Morris  30 Nigel Purvis  36 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Juha Siikamäki  46 Michael Wolosin  51 FOREST CONSERVATION

Allen Blackman  2 Juha Siikamäki  46 FRESH WATER

Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Daniel F. Morris  30 FUEL TAXES

Joshua Linn  23 Kenneth A. Small  47 GASOLINE

Winston Harrington  17 Zhongmin Wang  49 GLOBAL FOREST MONITORING

Molly K. Macauley  26 Juha Siikamäki  46 GLOBAL TRADE

Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Nigel Purvis  36 GREEN GDP

James W. Boyd  3 Brian Flannery  13 Zhongmin Wang  49

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GREENHOUSE GASES

Brian Flannery  13 Arthur G. Fraas  14 Mun Ho  18 Nathan Richardson  37 Stephen W. Salant  39 GROUNDWATER

Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Ariel Ortiz-Bobea  33 HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLES

Winston Harrington  17 Alan J. Krupnick  21 INCENTIVES

Allen Blackman  2 James W. Boyd  3 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Dallas Burtraw  6 Maureen Cropper  8 Marc Hafstead  16 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Jan W. Mares  27 Virginia McConnell  28 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Daniel Shawhan  43 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Zhongmin Wang  49 Roberton C. Williams III  50 INDIA

Maureen Cropper  8


INFORMATION DISCLOSURE

Allen Blackman  2 Lucija Anna Muehlenbachs  31 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Zhongmin Wang  49 INVASIVE SPECIES

Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Carolyn Fischer  12 LIABILITY

Roger M. Cooke   7 Carolyn Kousky  20 Nathan Richardson  37 Hilary Sigman  45 MARKETS

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Marc Hafstead  16 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Joshua Linn  23 Lucija Anna Muehlenbachs  31 Stephen W. Salant  39 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Roberton C. Williams III  50 MEXICO

Jan W. Mares  27 Lucija Anna Muehlenbachs  31 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nathan Richardson  37 Phil Sharp  42 Zhongmin Wang  49 NUCLEAR ENERGY

Joel Darmstadter  9 Robert Fri  15 Jan W. Mares  27 Phil Sharp  42 OIL

Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Joel Darmstadter  9 Brian Flannery  13 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Jan W. Mares  27 Lucija Anna Muehlenbachs  31 Nathan Richardson  37 Heather L. Ross  38 Phil Sharp  42 Zhongmin Wang  49 OUTDOOR RECREATION

Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48 PARKS, REFUGES, AND WILDERNESSES

Allen Blackman  2 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Richard D. Morgenstern  29

Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48

NATURAL GAS

James W. Boyd  3 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Nathan Richardson  37 Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48

Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Joel Darmstadter  9 Brian Flannery  13 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Joshua Linn  23

PUBLIC LANDS

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PUBLIC TRANSIT

Kenneth A. Small  47 R&D TECHNOLOGY

Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Robert Fri  15 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jan W. Mares  27 Zhongmin Wang  49 REGULATION

Joseph E. Aldy  1 James W. Boyd  3 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Maureen Cropper  8 Joel Darmstadter  9 J. Clarence (Terry) Davies  10 Arthur G. Fraas  14 Marc Hafstead  16 Winston Harrington  17 Raymond J. Kopp  19 Carolyn Kousky  20 Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Joshua Linn  23 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Randall Lutter  25 Virginia McConnell  28 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nathan Richardson  37 Heather L. Ross  38 Stephen W. Salant  39 Roger A. Sedjo  40 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43

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Hilary Sigman  45 Juha Siikamäki  46 Margaret A. Walls  48 Zhongmin Wang  49 RENEWABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Joshua Linn  23 Jan W. Mares  27 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nigel Purvis  36 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 RISK ANALYSIS

Roger M. Cooke   7 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Heather L. Ross  38 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 RISK REGULATION

Roger M. Cooke   7 Nathan Richardson  37 Heather L. Ross  38 Leonard A. Shabman  41 SATELLITES

Allen Blackman  2 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Molly K. Macauley  26 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 SHALE GAS

Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Brian Flannery  13


Alan J. Krupnick  21 Jan W. Mares  27 Lucija Anna Muehlenbachs  31 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Nathan Richardson  37 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 Zhongmin Wang  49 SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLING

Molly K. Macauley  26 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 SOUTH AMERICA

Allen Blackman  2 Maureen Cropper  8 Roger A. Sedjo  40 SPACE DEBRIS

Molly K. Macauley  26 STATE AND US REGIONAL POLICIES

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Stephen P.A. Brown  5 Dallas Burtraw  6 Carolyn Kousky  20 Joshua Linn  23 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Karen L. Palmer  34 Anthony Paul  35 Nathan Richardson  37 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Phil Sharp  42 Daniel Shawhan  43 Hilary Sigman  45 Margaret A. Walls  48 Michael Wolosin  51 SUBSIDIES

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Stephen P.A. Brown  5

Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Marc Hafstead  16 Roberton C. Williams III  50 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Allen Blackman  2 Maureen Cropper  8 Joel Darmstadter  9 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Michael Wolosin  51 TAXES

Joseph E. Aldy  1 Timothy J. Brennan  4 Carolyn Fischer  12 Brian Flannery  13 Marc Hafstead  16 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Richard D. Morgenstern  29 Roberton C. Williams III  50 TIMBER AND FOREST PRODUCT MARKETS

Roger A. Sedjo  40 TRAFFIC CONGESTION

Kenneth A. Small  47 TREE BIOTECHNOLOGY

Roger A. Sedjo  40 Juha Siikamäki  46 UNCERTAINTY

Roger M. Cooke   7 Rebecca Epanchin-Niell  11 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Ariel Ortiz-Bobea  33

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URBAN SPRAWL

WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT

Virginia McConnell  28 Margaret A. Walls  48

Carolyn Kousky  20 Sheila M. Olmstead  32

VALUATION

WILDLIFE

James W. Boyd  3 Maureen Cropper  8 Alan J. Krupnick  21 Molly K. Macauley  26 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Juha Siikamäki  46

Carolyn Fischer  12

VALUE OF STATISTICAL LIFE

Timothy J. Brennan  4 Alan J. Krupnick  21 VEHICLE POLLUTION

Maureen Cropper  8 Winston Harrington  17 Joshua Linn  23 Virginia McConnell  28 Kenneth A. Small  47 VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS

Allen Blackman  2 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44 WASTE LIABILITY

Hilary Sigman  45 WASTE REGULATION

Hilary Sigman  45 WATER QUALITY

Yusuke Kuwayama  22 Antung Anthony Liu  24 Molly K. Macauley  26 Sheila M. Olmstead  32 Leonard A. Shabman  41 Jhih-Shyang Shih  44

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J OS EPH E. A LD Y Nonresident Fellow 617.496.7213 joseph_aldy@hks.harvard.edu

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation Energy: Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Policy and Analysis: Regulation, Subsidies, Taxes

Joe Aldy is an assistant professor of public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. Aldy also currently serves as the faculty chair of the Regulatory Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School. In 2009–2010, he served as the special assistant to the president for energy and the environment, reporting through both the White House National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Harvard University, 2005 •  Master of Environmental Management, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, 1995 •  BA in water resources (independently designed curriculum), Duke University, 1993 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Environmental Risk and Uncertainty (with W.K. Viscusi), in Handbook of the Economics of Risk and Uncertainty, M.J. Machina and W.K. Viscusi (eds.), Elsevier, Winter 2013. A Preliminary Assessment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s Clean Energy Package, Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Winter 2013. Climate Negotiators Create an Opportunity for Scholars (with R.N. Stavins), Science, Aug. 2012. Willingness to Pay and Political Support for a US National Clean Energy Standard (with M.J. Kotchen and A.A. Leiserwitz), Nature Climate Change, May 2012. Real-Time Economic Analysis and Policy Development during the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Vanderbilt Law Review, Nov. 2011. Designing Climate Mitigation Policy (with A. Krupnick, R. Newell, I. Parry, and W. Pizer), Journal of Economic Literature, Dec. 2010.

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A LLEN BLA C K MA N Thomas Klutznick Senior Fellow 202.328.5073 blackman@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Forest Carbon, Satellites Development and Environment: Coffee, Deforestation, Sustainable Development Ecosystems: Biodiversity, Deforestation, Ecosystem Services, Forest Conservation Food and Agriculture: Agricultural Land Use, Coffee International: Central America, Mexico, South America Policy and Analysis: Incentives, Information Disclosure, Voluntary Programs

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An expert on environmental and natural resource policy in developing countries, Allen Blackman focuses principally on tropical deforestation, agroforestry, and industrial pollution control in Latin America and Asia. Much of his research evaluates environmental management strategies that aim to overcome barriers to conventional regulation in developing countries, including weak institutions and missing infrastructure. He coordinates RFF’s participation in the Environment for Development (EfD) initiative and is a research fellow at the EfD Center for Central America. He serves on scientific and advisory committees for the InterAmerican Development Bank, NASA, and the Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Texas, Austin, 1993 •  BA in political science and international relations, University of Pennsylvania, 1983 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Evaluating Forest Conservation Policies in Developing Countries Using Remote Sensing Data: An Introduction and Practical Guide, Forest Policy and Economics, 2013. Land Cover Change in Agroforestry: Shade Coffee in El Salvador (with B. ÁvalosSartorio and J. Chow), Land Economics, 2012. Producer-Level Benefits of Sustainability Certification (with J. Rivera), Conservation Biology, 2011. Voluntary Regulation in Developing Countries: Mexico’s Clean Industry Program (with B. Lahiri, B. Pizer, M. Rivera Planter, and C. Muñoz Piña), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 2010.

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


J A MES W. BOY D Senior Fellow and Director, Center for the Management of Ecological Wealth 202.328.5013 boyd@rff.org

EXPERTISE Ecosystems: Biodiversity, Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure Land Use: Green Infrastructure, Public Lands Policy and Analysis: Environmental Accounting, Green GDP, Incentives, Regulation, Valuation

Jim Boyd’s research lies at the intersection of economics, ecology, and law, with a particular focus on the measurement and management of ecosystem goods and services. Boyd emphasizes the need to better coordinate economic and ecological research to improve the practical performance of green incentives, markets, and investments. He advocates and works on the practical design of a “green GDP”—national environmental accounts to capture and track the status of environmental public goods and services. Boyd is director of RFF's Center for the Management of Ecological Wealth, which was created to work with practitioners, scholars, and policymakers to incorporate ecological science into public policies to protect, enhance, and manage the social wealth arising from natural systems. He is also the director of social science and policy at the National Science Foundation’s SocioEnvironmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). EDUCATION •  PhD in applied microeconomics, the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 1993 •  BA in history, University of Michigan, 1986 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Conservation Return on Investment Analysis: A Review of Results, Methods, and New Directions (with R. Epanchin-Niell and J.V. Siikamäki), RFF Discussion Paper 12-01, Jan. 2012. What Are Ecosystem Services? The Need for Standardized Environmental Accounting Units (with S. Banzhaf ), Ecological Economics, 2007.

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T IMOT HY J . BR EN N AN Senior Fellow 202.328.5084 brennan@rff.org

Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Renewable and Clean Energy

Tim Brennan focuses on public policies involving monopolies and market power, energy use externalities, and assessing methods for policy evaluation, particularly when consumers are thought to make mistakes. A principal area of his research is competition, pricing, reliability, and energy policy interventions in the electricity sector. Specific topics in recent publications include energy efficiency, utility involvement in competitive markets, and valuing information.

Energy: Energy Efficiency

EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1978

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Change

Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Discounting, Fees and Rebates, Incentives, Markets, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies, Subsidies, Taxes, Value of Statistical Life Space: Satellites

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•  MA in economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1976 •  MA in mathematics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1975 •  BA in mathematics, University of Maryland, 1973 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Energy Efficiency Resource Standards: Economics and Policy (with K. Palmer), Utilities Policy, 2013. Energy Efficiency Policy Puzzles, Energy Journal, 2013. Should Utilities Be in the Energy Efficiency Business? IAEE Energy Forum, 2013. Valuing Information, Ascertaining Risk, and Setting the Target, in The Value of Information: Methodological Frontiers and New Applications in Environment and Health, M. Macauley and R. Laxminarayan (eds.), Springer, 2012. The Challenges of Climate Policy, Australian Economic Review, 2010. Decoupling in Electric Utilities, Journal of Regulatory Economics, 2010.

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


S T EPHEN P.A . BR O W N Nonresident Fellow 702.895.3191 spa.brown@unlv.edu

EXPERTISE Energy: Coal, Energy Security, Natural Gas, Oil, Shale Gas Policy and Analysis: Markets, State and US Regional Policies, Subsidies

Steve Brown, who joined RFF in 2009 as its first nonresident fellow, has conducted inquiries into domestic and international energy markets, energy security policies, climate policy, public finance, government performance, and regional economic growth. Prior to joining RFF, Brown had 27-year career at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, where he retired as director of energy economics and microeconomic policy analysis. In addition to being a nonresident fellow at RFF, Brown is a professor of economics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Maryland, 1979 •  MA in economics, University of Maryland, 1977 •  BS in economics, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 1972 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Assessing the US Oil Security Premium (with H.G. Huntington), Energy Economics, July 2013. Energy and Natural Resources (with J. Darmstadter), in Megatrends in Global Interaction, 1st edition, Bertelsmann Foundation (ed.), 2012. Energy Security and Climate Change Protection: Complementarity or Tradeoff? (with H.G. Huntington), Energy Policy, Sep. 2008. Deliverability and Regional Pricing in US Natural Gas Markets (with M.K. Yücel), Energy Economics, Sep. 2008. The Private Sector Impact of State and Local Government: Has More Become Bad? (with L.L. Taylor), Contemporary Economic Policy, 2006.

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D A LLA S BU RT R AW Darius Gaskins Senior Fellow and Associate Director, Center for Climate and Electricity Policy 202.328.5087 burtraw@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Clean Air Act Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation, State and US Regional Policies

Dallas Burtraw is one of the nation’s foremost experts on environmental regulation in the electricity sector. For two decades, he has worked on creating a more efficient and politically rational method for controlling air pollution. He also studies electricity restructuring, competition, and economic deregulation. He is particularly interested in incentive-based approaches for environmental regulation, the most notable of which is a tradable permit system, and recently has studied ways to introduce greater cost-effectiveness into regulation under the Clean Air Act.

Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation

EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Michigan, 1989

International: Europe

•  BS in community economic development, University of California, Davis, 1980

Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Incentives

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Economic Ideas for a Complex Climate Policy Regime (with M. Woerman), Energy Economics, 2013.

•  MPP in public policy, University of Michigan, 1986

Flexible Mandates for Investment in New Technology (with D. Patino Echeverri and K. Palmer), Journal of Regulatory Economics, 2013. The Institutional Blind Spot in Environmental Economics, Daedalus, 2013. Soft and Hard Price Collars in a Cap-and-Trade System: A Comparative Analysis (with H. Fell, R.D. Morgenstern, and K.L. Palmer), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 2012.

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R OGER M. C OOK E Chauncey Starr Senior Fellow 202.328.5127 cooke@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Change Risk Management: Disasters, Extreme Events, Liability, Risk Analysis, Risk Regulation, Uncertainty Water: Flooding

Roger Cooke joined RFF in 2005 as the first appointee to the Chauncey Starr Chair in Risk Analysis. His research has widely influenced risk assessment methodology, particularly in the areas of expert judgment and uncertainty analysis. He is recognized as one of the world’s leading authorities on mathematical modeling of risk and uncertainty. His recent research has encompassed health risks from oil fires in Kuwait following the first Gulf War, chemical weapons disposal, nuclear risk, invasive species, nitrogen oxide emissions, and microbiological risk. Climate change is a current focus area for Cooke. His Vine-Copula method for high dimensional dependence modeling is having increasing impact in financial mathematics. His current work focuses on implementing uncertainty analysis in policy-related decisionmaking. EDUCATION •  PhD in philosophy and mathematics, Yale University, 1974 •  BA in philosophy and mathematics, Yale University, 1968 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Uncertainty Analysis Comes to Integrated Assessment Models for Climate Change … and Conversely, Climatic Change, forthcoming. Explaining the Failure to Insure Catastrophic Risks (with C. Kousky), The Geneva Papers, 2012. Ship-Borne Nonindigenous Species Diminish Great Lakes Ecosystem Services (with J.D. Rothlisberger, D.C. Finnoff, and D.M. Lodge), Ecosystems, 2012, doi: 10.1007/s10021-012-9522-6. Heavy Tailed Distributions: Data, Diagnostics and New Developments (with D. Nieboer and J. Misiewicz), RFF Discussion Paper 11-19, Mar. 2011.

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MA U R EEN C R OPPE R Senior Fellow 202.328.5083 cropper@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Development and Environment: Sustainable Development Energy: Coal International: China, India, South America Policy and Analysis: Incentives, Regulation, Valuation Transportation: Vehicle Pollution

Maureen Cropper, a professor of economics at the University of Maryland and a former lead economist at the World Bank, returned to RFF in 2008 as a senior fellow, a position she held from 1990 to 1993. Cropper has made major contributions to environmental policy through her research, teaching, and public service. Her research has focused on valuing environmental amenities, estimating consumer preferences for health and longevity improvements, and the trade-offs implicit in environmental regulations. Previously, at the World Bank, her work focused on improving policy choices in developing countries through studies of deforestation, road safety, urban slums, and health valuation. She is currently studying the externalities associated with pandemic flu control, the impact of reforms in the electric power sector in India, and the demand for fuel economy in the Indian car market. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Cornell University, 1973 •  MA in economics, Cornell University, 1972 •  BA in economics, Bryn Mawr College, 1969 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Health Effects of Coal Electricity Generation in India (with S. Gamkhar, K. Malik, A. Limonov, and I. Partridge), RFF Discussion Paper 12-25, Jun. 2012. The Cost of Fuel Economy in the Indian Passenger Vehicle Market (with R. Chugh and U. Narain), Energy Policy, Nov. 2011. The Political Economy of Health Services Provision in Brazil (with A. Mobarak and A.S. Rajkumar), Economic Development and Cultural Change, Jul. 2011.

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J OEL D A R MS TA D TE R Senior Fellow 202.328.5050 darmstad@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation Development and Environment: Global Trade, Sustainable Development Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Energy Security, Natural Gas, Nuclear Energy, Oil, R&D Technology, Renewable and Clean Energy Policy and Analysis: Environmental Accounting, Regulation, Subsidies

In his four decades at RFF, Joel Darmstadter has conducted research centered on energy resources and policy. His recent work addresses issues of energy security and trade, renewable resources, and climate change. Darmstadter has served on numerous National Research Council bodies and provided expert testimony at congressional hearings. His career has included serving as an adjunct faculty member at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, an editorial committee member of the Annual Review of Energy, and a contributing editor of Environment magazine. EDUCATION •  MA in economics, New School for Social Research, 1952 •  AB in economics, George Washington University, 1950 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Supply Chain and Industrial Organization of Rare Earth Materials: Implications for the US Wind Energy Sector (with J.S. Shih, J. Linn, T.J. Brennan, and M.K. Macauley), RFF Report, Feb. 2012. Meeting the World’s Natural Resource Needs: Confrontation Ahead? RFF Issue Brief 11-07, Jun. 2011. Unconventional Fossil-Based Fuels: Economic and Environmental Trade-Offs (with M. Toman et al.), RAND Corporation, 2008. Global Development and the Environment: Perspectives on Sustainability (ed.), RFF Press, 1992. How Industrial Societies Use Energy: A Comparative Analysis (with J. Dunkerley and J. Alterman), RFF Press by Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.

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J . C LA R EN C E (T ERRY ) DAV I E S Senior Fellow 202.328.5080 davies@rff.org

EXPERTISE Policy and Analysis: Regulation

Terry Davies is a political scientist who has extensively analyzed environmental policy during the past 40 years, writing several books and numerous articles on the government’s environmental mandates. He chaired the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Decisionmaking for Regulating Chemicals in the Environment. While serving as a consultant to the President’s Advisory Council on Executive Organization, he coauthored the reorganization plan that created the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Davies is currently serving as a senior advisor to the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, advising the center on managing the adverse effects of nanotechnology. EDUCATION •  PhD in American government, Columbia University, 1965 •  BA in American government, Dartmouth College, 1959 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Nanotechnology and Risk, Resources 172, Summer 2009. Oversight of Next Generation Nanotechnology, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Apr. 2009.

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R EBEC C A EPA N C H I N -N I E L L Fellow 202.328.5069 epanchin-niell@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Adaptation, Climate Change Ecosystems: Biodiversity, Coastal Resources, Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services, Endangered Species Act, Invasive Species Land Use: Green Infrastructure, Public Lands Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis Risk Management: Risk Analysis, Uncertainty

Becky Epanchin-Niell’s research focuses on ecosystem management, including design of cost-effective conservation investment strategies and analysis of policies and private incentives on ecological resources. Much of her work focuses on invasive species, including strategies to control established invaders, improved monitoring and surveillance strategies, and cross-jurisdictional management. Her research also evaluates implementation of the US Endangered Species Act and application of adaptive management and ecosystem services approaches to natural resource management. She draws on bioeconomic modeling, optimization, and econometric methods and often addresses spatial aspects of resource movement and use. EDUCATION •  PhD in agricultural and resource economics, University of California, Davis, 2009 •  MS in applied economics and statistics, University of Nevada, Reno, 2003 •  MS in biology, University of Nevada, Reno, 2001 •  BS in Earth systems, Stanford University, 1997 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Optimal Surveillance and Eradication of Invasive Species in Heterogeneous Landscapes (with R. Haight, L. Berec, J. Kean, and A. Liebhold), Ecology Letters, 2012. Optimal Spatial Control of Biological Invasions (with J. Wilen), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Mar. 2012. Conservation Return on Investment Analysis: A Review of Results, Methods, and New Directions (with J.W. Boyd and J.V. Siikamäki), RFF Discussion Paper 12-01, Jan. 2012. Controlling Invasive Species in Complex Social Landscapes (with M. Hufford, C. Aslan, J. Sexton, J. Port, and T. Waring), Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2010.

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C A R OLY N F IS C HER Senior Fellow and Associate Director, Center for Climate and Electricity Policy 202.328.5012 fischer@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, Global Trade Development and Environment: Sustainable Development Ecosystems: Invasive Species, Wildlife Energy: CAFE Standards, R&D Technology, Renewable and Clean Energy International: Europe Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Fees and Rebates, Subsidies, Taxes

Carolyn Fischer works primarily on policy mechanisms and modeling tools that cut across environmental issues, from allowance allocation in emissions trading schemes to wildlife management in Zimbabwe. In the areas of climate change and energy policy, she has published articles on designing cap-andtrade programs, fuel economy standards, renewable portfolio standards, energy efficiency programs, technology policies, the Clean Development Mechanism, and the evaluation of international climate policy commitments. A current focus of her research is the interplay between international trade and climate policy, options for avoiding carbon leakage, and the implications for energy-intensive, trade-exposed sectors. In areas of natural resource management, her research addresses issues of wildlife conservation, invasive species, and biotechnology, with particular emphasis on the opportunities and challenges posed by international trade. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Michigan, 1997 •  BA in international relations and economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1990 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Comparing Policies to Combat Emissions Leakage: Border Carbon Adjustments versus Rebates (with A.K. Fox), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Sep. 2012. Emissions Targets and the Real Business Cycle (with M. Springborn), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Nov. 2011. The Role of Trade and Competitiveness Measures in US Climate Policy (with A.K. Fox), American Economic Review, May 2011.

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BR IA N F LA N NERY Center Fellow 214.529.1596 flannery@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, Greenhouse Gases Development and Environment: Global Trade, Sustainable Development Energy: Energy Efficiency, Natural Gas, Oil, R&D Technology, Shale Gas Policy and Analysis: Green GDP, Subsidies, Taxes

In semi-retirement, Brian Flannery collaborates with scientists at the Joint Global Change Research Institute and as a center fellow at RFF’s Center for Climate and Electricity Policy. He also continues to participate in the international climate and energy arena, serving as chair of the Business Engagement Task Force of the Major Economies Business Forum and of the Green Economies Dialogue project. He received degrees in astrophysics from Princeton and the University of California, Santa Cruz, and pursued research at the Institute for Advanced Study and as a professor at Harvard University. He is coauthor of the widely used reference Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing. EDUCATION •  PhD in astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1974 •  AB in astrophysics, Princeton University, 1970 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Perspectives from the Abundant Gas Workshop (with L. Clarke and J. Edmonds), Joint Global Change Research Institute, 2013. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC): Doha COP 18/CMP 8; presentation at the NARUC Winter Meeting Subcommittee on Clean Coal and Carbon Sequestration, 2013. Global Long-Term Implications of Abundant Natural Gas (with L. Clarke, J. Edmonds, and H. McJeon); presentation at RFF seminar, Informing the Next Generation of Natural Gas Research, 2013.

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13


A RT HU R G. F R A A S Visiting Scholar 202.328.5164 fraas@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution, Clean Air Act Climate: Greenhouse Gases Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Regulation

Art Fraas’s research encompasses a variety of issues related to energy and the environment, including the treatment of uncertainty in regulatory analysis of major rules, the potential regulation of greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act, and the opportunities for and trade-offs of using alternative fuels in transportation. Fraas joined RFF after a distinguished career in senior positions within the federal government. In 2008, he retired after 21 years as chief of the Natural Resources, Energy, and Agriculture Branch of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the US Office of Management and Budget. Much of his work has examined the federal regulatory process, with a particular focus on environmental regulations. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of California, Berkeley, 1972 •  BA in engineering physics, Cornell University, 1965 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Uncertain Benefits Estimates for Reductions in Fine Particle Concentrations (with R. Lutter), Risk Analysis, Aug. 2012, doi: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2012.01883.x. Efficient Pollution Regulation: Getting the Prices Right: Comment (with R. Lutter), American Economic Review, Feb. 2012. Tradable Standards for Clean Air Act Carbon Policy (with D. Burtraw and N. Richardson), RFF Discussion Paper 12-05, Feb. 2012.

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R OBERT F R I Visiting Scholar 202.328.5011 fri@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Change Energy: Nuclear Energy, R&D Technology

Bob Fri has been active for more than 35 years as both an administrator and analyst of energy and environmental policy. As the first deputy administrator of both the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Energy Research and Development Administration, he was instrumental in organizing the federal government’s programs in environmental regulation and energy technology. He served as president of Resources for the Future and director of the National Museum of Natural History during major transitions in the roles of these institutions. Fri has served on numerous National Research Council studies of energy and climate change, most recently as chair of the panel on limiting future climate change. He currently directs the Alternative Energy Future project at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a national associate of the National Academies and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. EDUCATION •  MBA, Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration, 1959 •  BA, Rice University, 1957

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MA R C HA F S T EA D Fellow 202.328.5169 hafstead@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Emissions Pricing, Incentives, Markets, Regulation, Subsidies, Taxes

Marc Hafstead's research spans environmental economics and macroeconomics, with an emphasis on developing detailed dynamic general equilibrium models. Within environmental economics, he models the effects of alternative environmental policies such as carbon taxes, cap-and-trade programs, and clean energy standards in economies with multiple nonenvironmental frictions and distortions on key outcomes such as emissions reductions, welfare, and employment. Within the field of macroeconomics, his interests are focused on measuring the impact of micro-frictions on aggregate outcomes and the implications of those frictions on macroeconomic and monetary policy. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Stanford University, 2011 •  BA in mathematical methods in the social sciences and economics, Northwestern University, 2004 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Aggregate Implications of Reducing Firing Costs in the Short and Long Run, Working Paper, Stanford University, Aug. 2013. Financial Shocks, Bank Intermediation, and Monetary Policy in a DSGE Model (with J. Smith), Working Paper, Stanford University, Oct. 2012. Impacts of Alternative Emissions Allowance Allocation Methods under a Federal Cap-and-Trade Program (with L.H. Goulder and M. Dworsky), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Nov. 2010.

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W INS T ON HA R R IN G T O N Senior Fellow 202.328.5112 harrington@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Policy and Analysis: Regulation Transportation: CAFE Standards, Gasoline, HeavyDuty Vehicles, Vehicle Pollution

Winston Harrington’s research interests include urban transportation, motor vehicles and air quality, and problems of estimating the costs of environmental policy. He has worked extensively on the economics of enforcing environmental regulations, the health benefits derived from improved air quality, the costs of waterborne disease outbreaks, endangered species policy, federal rulemaking procedures, and the economics of outdoor recreation. EDUCATION •  PhD in city and regional planning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1985 •  MA in mathematics, Cornell University, 1970 •  AB in mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1968 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Promoting Innovative Climate Adaptation through Federalism, RFF Issue Brief 10-17, Aug. 2010. Reforming Regulatory Impact Analysis (with L. Heinzerling and R. Morgenstern), RFF Report, Mar. 2009. Automobiles Externalities and Policies (with I. Parry and M. Walls), Journal of Economic Literature, 2007.

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17


MU N HO Visiting Scholar ho@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Change, Greenhouse Gases International: China Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis

Mun Ho’s research is focused on economic growth, productivity, taxation, and environmental economics. He coauthored a 2013 book, Double Dividend: Environmental Taxes and Fiscal Reform in the United States, which discusses how carbon taxes not only reduce environmental risks but also help in making the tax system more efficient. He also coedited Clearer Skies over China: Reconciling Air Quality, Climate, and Economic Goals, a 2013 book that reports on research at the Harvard University China Project on local and global impacts of Chinese environmental policies. He is a senior economist at Dale Jorgenson Associates and recently coauthored the article Economic Growth in the Information Age: A Prototype Industry-Level Production Account for the United States, 1947–2010. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Harvard University, 1989 •  AB in mathematics, Northwestern University, 1983 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Energy, the Environment and US Economic Growth (with D. Jorgenson, R. Goettle and P. Wilcoxen), in Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier, 2012. Reconciling Control of Carbon and Air Pollution with Economic Growth in China (with J. Cao and D. Jorgenson), in The Chinese Economy: A New Transition, 2012. Carbon Pricing with Output-Based Subsidies: Impact on US Industries over Multiple Time Frames (with L. Adkins, R. Garbaccio, E. Moore, and R.D. Morgenstern), RFF Discussion Paper 12-27, Jun. 2012. Information Technology and US Productivity Growth: Evidence from a Prototype Industry Production Account (with D. Jorgenson and J. Samuels), Journal of Productivity Analysis, 2011.

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R AY MON D J . K OP P Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Climate and Electricity Policy 202.328.5059 kopp@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Adaptation, Climate Mitigation International: Europe, Mexico Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Emissions Pricing, Markets, Regulation

Ray Kopp has been a member of the RFF research staff since 1977 and has held a variety of management positions within the institution. During his career, Kopp has specialized in the analysis of environmental and natural resource issues with a focus on federal regulatory activity. He is an expert in techniques of assigning value to environmental and natural resources that do not have market prices, which is fundamental to benefit–cost analysis and the assessment of damages to natural resources. Kopp’s current research interests focus on the design of domestic and international policies to combat climate change. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, State University of New York, Binghamton, 1978 •  MA in economics, University of Akron, 1973 •  BS in finance, University of Akron, 1970 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS If Walmart Were in Charge: Sourcing CO2 Emissions Reductions at Least Cost, RFF Issue Brief 11-14, Sep. 2011. Reforming Institutions and Managing Extremes: US Policy Approaches for Adapting to a Changing Climate (with D.F. Morris, M.K. Macauley, and R.D. Morgenstern), RFF Report, May 2011. The Climate Has Changed—So Must Policy, RFF Issue Brief 11-03, Mar. 2011.

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C A R OLY N K OU S K Y Fellow 202.328.5188 kousky@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Adaptation Ecosystems: Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services Forests: Wildfire Management Land Use: Green Infrastructure Policy and Analysis: Regulation, State and US Regional Policies Risk Management: Disasters, Extreme Events, Liability

Carolyn Kousky’s research focuses on natural resource management, decisionmaking under uncertainty, and individual and societal responses to natural disaster risk. She has examined how individuals learn about extreme event risk, the demand for natural disaster insurance, and policy responses to potential changes in extreme events with climate change. She also is interested in ecosystem services policy, and has examined the design of incentive-based mechanisms to supply ecosystem services and the use of natural capital to reduce vulnerability to weather-related disasters. EDUCATION •  PhD in public policy, Harvard University, 2008 •  BS in Earth systems, Stanford University, 2002 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Explaining the Failure to Insure Catastrophic Risks (with R. Cooke), The Geneva Papers, 2012. Risk Premia and the Social Cost of Carbon: A Review (with R.M. Cooke and R.E. Kopp), Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Dec. 2011. The Role of Land Use in Adaptation to Increased Precipitation and Flooding: A Case Study in Wisconsin’s Lower Fox River Basin (with S.M. Olmstead, A. Stern, M.A. Walls, and M.K. Macauley), RFF Report, Nov. 2011.

Water: Flooding

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A LA N J . K R U PN ICK Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Energy Economics and Policy 202.328.5107 krupnick@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution, Clean Air Act Ecosystems: Ecosystem Services Energy: Energy Security, Natural Gas, Oil, Shale Gas International: China Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Incentives, Valuation, Value of Statistical Life Risk Management: Risk Analysis, Uncertainty Transportation: Alternative Fuels and Vehicles, Heavy-Duty Vehicles

Alan Krupnick’s research focuses on analyzing environmental and energy issues, in particular, the benefits, costs, and design of pollution and energy policies, both in the United States and in developing countries, with an emphasis on China. In 2011, he was elected president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) and earlier that year was named an AERE fellow. As head of RFF’s Center for Energy Economics and Policy, he leads research on the risks, regulation, and economics associated with shale gas development. His primary research methodology is in the development and analysis of stated preference surveys. His work has been published in many scholarly journals and books, and he regularly blogs on energy issues. He served as senior economist for environmental and energy policy on President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers. Krupnick is a regular member of expert committees from the National Academy of Sciences, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and various Canadian government and nongovernmental institutions. Krupnick also consults with governments around the world and the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Maryland, 1980 •  MA in economics, University of Maryland, 1974 •  BS in finance, Pennsylvania State University, 1969 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS A Fair Share: Perceptions of Climate Justice in the US and China (with F. Carlsson, M. Kataria, E. Lampi, Å. Löfgren, P. Qin, S. Chung, and T. Sterner), Resource and Energy Economics, forthcoming. Shale Gas Development Impacts on Surface Water Quality in Pennsylvania (with S.M. Olmstead, L.A. Muehlenbachs, J.S. Shih, and Z. Chu), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Mar. 2013.

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Y U S U K E K U WAYA M A Fellow 202.328.5190 kuwayama@rff.org

EXPERTISE Ecosystems: Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services Food and Agriculture: Agricultural Land Use Policy and Analysis: Markets, Regulation Water: Fresh Water, Groundwater, Water Quality

Yusuke Kuwayama’s research focuses on the economics of environmental regulation, with an emphasis on water resources and ecosystems. His work seeks to understand how the interaction between economic and natural systems affects the efficiency of policy instruments to regulate environmental externalities. Kuwayama’s recent work addresses the management of agricultural activities that deplete and pollute fresh water, the water resource impacts of unconventional fossil fuel development, the societal value of hydrologic information, and interactions between water resource use and ecosystem service function. EDUCATION •  PhD in agricultural and applied economics, University of Illinois, UrbanaChampaign, 2011 •  MS in economics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2006 •  AB in economics, Amherst College, 2004 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Regulation of a Spatially Heterogeneous Externality: Tradable Groundwater Permits to Protect Streams (with N. Brozović), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.jeem.2013.02.004. Analytical Hydrologic Models and the Design of Policy Instruments for Groundwater-Quality Management (with N. Brozović), Hydrogeology Journal, 2012, doi: 10.1007/s10040-012-0851-5.

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J OS HU A LIN N Fellow and Associate Director, Center for Climate and Electricity Policy 202.328.5047 linn@rff.org

EXPERTISE Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation Energy: Coal, Natural Gas, Renewable and Clean Energy International: Europe Policy and Analysis: Markets, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies Transportation: Alternative Fuels and Vehicles, CAFE Standards, Fuel Taxes, Vehicle Pollution

Josh Linn’s research centers on the effects of environmental regulation and market incentives on technology, with particular focus on the electricity sector and markets for new vehicles. His work on the electricity sector has compared the effectiveness of cap and trade and alternative policy instruments in promoting new technology, including renewable electricity technologies. Several of his studies on new vehicles markets investigate the effect of CAFE standards on new vehicle characteristics and the effect of gasoline prices on new vehicle fuel economy. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005 •  BA in astronomy and physics, Yale University, 2000 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Renewable Electricity Policy, Intermittency, and Cost-Effectiveness (with H. Fell), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, forthcoming. New Vehicle Characteristics and the Cost of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standard (with T. Klier), RAND Journal of Economics, forthcoming. Regulating Greenhouse Gases from Coal Power Plants under the Clean Air Act (with E. Mastrangelo and D. Burtraw), RFF Discussion Paper 11-43, Jan. 2012.

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A N T U N G A NT HON Y L I U Fellow 202.328.5182 liu@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation International: China Policy and Analysis: Regulation, Taxes Water: Water Quality

Anthony Liu’s research focuses on two broad areas: climate change policy and the environment in developing countries. Some of his current work addresses carbon taxes and the unique properties that could make them attractive components of modern tax systems. Using a combination of analytical models and general equilibrium simulations, Liu has found that the cost of carbon taxes could be much lower than has been previously believed. Liu is also interested in pollution issues and the interactions between the environment and the economy in China, and has studied large-scale water treatment infrastructure in China. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of California, San Diego, 2012 •  MA in economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2005 •  BA in economics, Stanford University, 2000

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R A N D A LL LU T T ER Visiting Scholar 240.271.8430 lutter@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution, Clean Air Act Food and Agriculture: Food Safety Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Regulation

Randall Lutter joined RFF in 2010 after more than 20 years of senior experience in the management and evaluation of programs regulating health, safety, and environmental risks, having served in three different federal agencies, including service as the chief economist and deputy commissioner for policy at the US Food and Drug Administration. His current research interests include regulation of genetically engineered animals, food safety, the valuation of health improvements from better nutrition, and the quality of economic analysis of regulations. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Cornell University, 1986 •  BA in economics, University of California, Berkeley, 1977 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Fetal and Early Childhood Undernutrition, Mortality and Life-Long Health (with C. Lutter), Science, Sep. 2012. Uncertain Benefits Estimates for Reductions in Fine Particle Concentrations (with A. Fraas), Risk Analysis, Aug. 2012. Efficient Pollution Regulation: Getting the Prices Right: Comment (with A. Fraas), American Economic Review, 2012. Do Some NOx Emissions Have Negative Environmental Damages? Evidence and Implications for Policy (with A. Fraas), Environmental Science and Technology, Aug. 2011. On the Economic Analysis of Regulations at Independent Regulatory Commissions: Would Greater Use of Economic Analysis Improve Regulatory Policy at Independent Regulatory Commissions? (with A. Fraas), Administrative Law Review, 2011.

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MOLLY K . MA C A U L E Y Vice President for Research and Senior Fellow 202.328.5043 macauley@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Pricing, Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, Forest Carbon, Satellites Ecosystems: Ecosystem Management Energy: R&D Technology Forests: Forest Carbon, Global Forest Monitoring Policy and Analysis: Valuation Risk Management: Extreme Events Space: Satellites, Space Debris Waste Management: Solid Waste and Recycling

Molly Macauley’s research interests include space economics and policy, the economics of new technologies for research and understanding of the interactions between people and natural resources, the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation, climate and earth science, and recycling and solid waste management. She serves on the Space Studies Board and numerous special committees of the National Research Council and on advisory boards for several federal agencies. Macauley also serves on the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Board of Advisers for the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy at the College of William and Mary, and the Women in Aerospace Scholarship Committee. Macauley has testified extensively before Congress and is the author of more than 80 articles, reports, and books. EDUCATION •  PhD (1983) and MA (1981) in economics, Johns Hopkins University •  BA in economics, College of William and Mary, 1979 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Value of Information: Methodological Frontiers and New Applications (ed., with R. Laxminarayan), Springer, 2012. Forest Carbon Economics: What We Know, What We Do Not, and Whether It Matters (with N. Richardson), Climate Change Economics, Dec. 2012. Space Infrastructure: Issues in the Theory and Practice of Estimating Costs, Space Policy, May 2008. Using Economic Incentives in Regulating Toxic Substances (with K. Palmer and M. Bowes), RFF Press, 1992.

Water: Flooding, Water Quality

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J A N W. MA R ES Senior Policy Advisor 202.328.5144 mares@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Pricing, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Adaptation, Climate Mitigation Electricity: Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Energy Security, Natural Gas, Nuclear Energy, Oil, R&D Technology, Shale Gas Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Emissions Pricing, Incentives Risk Management: Disasters, Extreme Events Transportation: Alternative Fuels and Vehicles

Jan Mares was previously a business liaison and deputy director at the Private Sector Office of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). During the Reagan administration, Mares was an assistant secretary of commerce for import administration and a senior policy analyst at the White House, where he was involved with environment, energy, trade, and technology issues. He also served as assistant secretary of energy for international affairs and energy emergencies; assistant secretary of energy for policy, safety and environment; and assistant secretary of energy for fossil energy. For six months, he was the acting under secretary of energy. Before entering federal service, Mares was with Union Carbide Corporation for 18 years, half in the Law Department, working on antitrust compliance and purchasing issues, and half in its chemical business, including leading an effort for three years to create a chemicals joint venture with a Middle East government company and being the operations/ profit manager for several groups of industrial chemicals. Subsequent to his service in the Reagan administration, he worked with the Washington, DC, law firm Shaw Pittman, the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association, and the EOP Group (a Washington DC environment, energy, and budget consulting firm). EDUCATION •  LLB, Harvard Law School, 1963 •  MS in chemical engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1960 •  BA in chemistry, Harvard College, 1958

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VIR GIN IA MC C ON N E L L Senior Fellow 202.328.5122 mcconnell@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Land Use: Urban Sprawl Policy and Analysis: Incentives, Regulation Transportation: Alternative Fuels and Vehicles, CAFE Standards, Vehicle Pollution

Virginia McConnell’s research focuses on the effects of pricing and regulatory policies on environmental and economic outcomes, primarily in the areas of transportation and land use. She has recently worked on issues related to energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector, focusing on fuel efficiency standards and alternative vehicles and fuels. Her work in the area of land use has focused on modeling the externalities of land-use decisions, including the effects of open space provision, large lot development, and infill development, and on developing policies that best address these externalities. McConnell is a professor of economics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and has recently served on a number of National Research Council Panels, including the Committees on Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels and the Fuel Economy of Light Duty Vehicles. She has previously served on other NRC committees, including several for the Transportation Research Board. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Maryland, 1978 •  BA in economics, Smith College, 1969 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels, Report of the Committee on Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels, Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, National Research Council, National Academies Press, 2013. Zoning on the Urban Fringe: Impacts on Land Prices, House Prices, and Spatial Patterns of Development (with N. Magliocca, M. Walls, and E. Safirova), Regional Science and Urban Economics, Jan. 2012.

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R IC HA R D D . MOR G E N S T E R N Senior Fellow 202.328.5037 morgenstern@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Global Trade, State and US Regional Policies International: China, Mexico Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Regulation, Taxes Transportation: Alternative Fuels and Vehicles

Dick Morgenstern is an expert on the economics of environmental issues and on the use of economic incentives to address air pollution, global climate change, and other problems. He was formerly a senior executive at the US Environmental Protection Agency and the State Department, and has conducted design and evaluation studies, including benefit–cost analyses, in the United States and abroad. He has been involved in the design and evaluation of an international climate change regime for more than 20 years. Recently, Morgenstern has been analyzing competitiveness and trade issues at international, national, and state levels, as well as the economics of expanded natural gas use. He also has worked in China on establishing an emissions trading system and has advised the Colombian and Mexican governments on a range of environmental management issues. EDUCATION •  Postdoctoral studies, Columbia University School of Business, 1974 •  PhD in economics, University of Michigan, 1970 •  AB in economics, Oberlin College, 1966 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS The Impact on Japanese Industry of Alternative Carbon Mitigation Policies (with M. Sugino and T. Arimura), Energy Policy, forthcoming. Climate Policy Design with Correlated Uncertainties in Offset Supply and Abatement Cost (with H. Fell, D. Burtraw, and K. Palmer), Land Economics, Aug. 2012. Did the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Really Improve Air Quality? (with W. Harrington, J.S. Shih, and M.L. Bell), Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 2012. Reforming Institutions and Managing Extremes: US Policy Approaches for Adapting to a Changing Climate (with D.F. Morris, M.K. Macauley, and R.J. Kopp), RFF Report, May 2011. Reforming Regulatory Impact Analysis (with W. Harrington and L. Heinzerling, eds.), RFF Press, 2009.

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DA N IEL F. MOR R IS Center Fellow 202.328.5003 morris@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Clean Air Act Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Forest Carbon Ecosystems: Coastal Resources, Deforestation Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing Water: Fresh Water

As part of RFF’s Center for Climate and Electricity Policy, Danny Morris focuses on the policy and economic implications of a wide suite of climate change issues, many related to land use, human development, and natural systems. He is currently working on carbon pricing, including aspects of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, domestic climate adaptation policy, water supply, forest resources, ecosystem services, and international climate policy development. Morris has also recently investigated the potential impacts of EPA regulations on the US electricity sector. EDUCATION •  MS in environmental science and management, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2008 •  BS in environmental science, Northern Arizona University, 2005 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Modeling the Electricity Sector: A Summary of Recent Analyses of New EPA Regulations (with B. Beasley), RFF Discussion Paper 12-52, Nov. 2012. Setting the Carbon Bar: Measurement, Reporting, and Verification in Bilateral Forestry Agreements (with A. Riddle), RFF Issue Brief 11-11, Sep. 2011. Importing Climate Mitigation: The Potential and Challenges of International Forest Offsets in California Climate Policy (with N. Richardson and A. Riddle), RFF Issue Brief 11-12, Sep. 2011. Reforming Institutions and Managing Extremes: US Policy Approaches for Adapting to a Changing Climate (with M.K. Macauley, R.J. Kopp, and R.D. Morgenstern), RFF Report, May 2011.

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LU C IJ A A NN A MU E H L E N B AC H S Visiting Scholar muehlenbachs@rff.org

EXPERTISE Energy: Natural Gas, Oil, Shale Gas Policy and Analysis: Information Disclosure, Markets

Lucija Muehlenbachs focuses on energy-related topics as part of RFF’s Center for Energy Economics and Policy. Her research focuses on issues pertaining to the oil and gas industry. Recent work includes empirical estimation of externalities associated with shale gas development in Pennsylvania. She has estimated the impact of shale gas wells on property values and impacts of shale gas development on downstream water quality. Her research also involves studying the effectiveness of enforcement of environmental compliance. She has estimated the determinants of incidents, such as oil spills, injuries, or fatalities, on offshore production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the effectiveness of inspections and enforcement actions. Recent work includes studying the effect of public disclosure of environmental violations by the US Environmental Protection Agency. EDUCATION •  PhD in agricultural and resource economics, University of Maryland, 2009 •  MS in agricultural and resource economics, University of Maryland, 2008 •  BS in physical sciences and Japanese, University of Alberta, 2002 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Shale Gas Development and Property Values: Differences across Drinking Water Sources (with E.B. Spiller and C. Timmins), RFF Discussion Paper 12-40, Jul. 2012. Strategic Release of News at the EPA (with E. Newcomb Sinha and N. Ranjan Sinha), RFF Discussion Paper 11-45, Oct. 2011. Preliminary Empirical Assessment of Offshore Production Platforms in the Gulf of Mexico (with M.A. Cohen and T. Gerarden), RFF Discussion Paper 10-66, Jan. 2011.

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S HEILA M. OLMS T E AD Nonresident Fellow 202.328.5163 olmstead@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Adaptation, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation Energy: Shale Gas Forests: Wildfire Management International: Asia Land Use: Green Infrastructure Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Information Disclosure, Regulation, Valuation

Sheila Olmstead is an associate professor at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on natural resource management and pollution control, with a particular emphasis on water resource economics. Her current research projects examine the environmental externalities associated with shale gas development in the United States, adaptation to the water resource impacts of climate change, the influence of federal fire suppression policy on land development in the American West, and free riding in dam placement and water withdrawals in transboundary river basins. EDUCATION •  PhD in public policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 2002 •  MA in public affairs, University of Texas at Austin, 1996 •  BA in political and social thought, University of Virginia, 1992 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Moving Pollution Trading from Air to Water: Potential, Problems, and Prognosis (with K. Fisher-Vanden), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 2013. Shale Gas Development Impacts on Surface Water Quality in Pennsylvania (with L. Muehlenbachs, J.S. Shih, Z. Chu, and A. Krupnick), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Feb. 2013. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1213871110. The Value of Scarce Water: Measuring the Inefficiency of Municipal Regulations (with E.T. Mansur), Journal of Urban Economics, Feb. 2012.

Water: Clean Water Act, Drinking Water, Water Quality

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A R IEL ORT IZ- BOBE A Fellow 202.328.5173 ortiz-bobea@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Adaptation Food and Agriculture: Agricultural Land Use Risk Management: Extreme Events, Uncertainty Water: Groundwater

Ariel Ortiz-Bobea’s current research focuses on agricultural sustainability and resource issues. Much of his recent work has assessed the impacts of climate change on US agriculture and analyzed potential adaptation mechanisms and policies. In general, his research interests include water sustainability, risk management and natural disasters, and genetically modified crops, with the work involving econometric analysis based on large environmental spatial datasets. His ongoing research suggests that the US agricultural sector has greater room for adaptation to climate change than the economic literature currently indicates, pointing to more optimistic prospects for key areas of the sector. Although Ortiz-Bobea’s contributions are primarily methodological in this area, upcoming research will expand to subtropical areas where climatic constraints are different. Earlier in his career, he served as special assistant to the minister of the environment of the Dominican Republic, where he managed the minister's office and support staff and ensured the coordination of key ministry-wide initiatives. EDUCATION •  PhD in agricultural and resource economics, University of Maryland, 2013 •  MS in agricultural and resource economics, University of Maryland, 2011 •  MPA in international and development administration, Syracuse University, 2006 •  ME in agronomy, AgroParisTech, 2004 •  BS in life sciences, Paris-Sud University, 2001 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Modeling the Structure of Adaptation in Climate Change Impact Assessment for Agriculture (with R.E. Just), American Journal of Agricultural Economics, forthcoming.

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K A R EN L. PA LMER Research Director, Senior Fellow, and Associate Director, Center for Climate and Electricity Policy 202.328.5106 palmer@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Clean Air Act, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, State and US Regional Policies Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Energy Efficiency, Natural Gas, Renewable and Clean Energy Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Regulation

Karen Palmer has been a researcher at RFF for more than 20 years and specializes in the economics of environmental and public utility regulation, particularly on issues at the intersection of air quality regulation and the electricity sector. Her work seeks to improve the design of environmental regulations and technology policies that influence the electricity sector. To this end, she identifies cost-effective approaches to regulating carbon emissions and efficient ways to promote the use of renewable sources of electricity. She also studies the size and determinants of the energy efficiency gap and the role of policy in addressing it. Palmer’s research has direct links to debates on the design of federal policies to control greenhouse gases, including carbon taxes, regulations under the Clean Air Act and clean energy standards, and to debates around regional climate programs, including the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and AB32 in California. Palmer previously served as an economist in the Office of Economic Policy at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Boston College, 1990 •  BA in economics, Brandeis University, 1981 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Secular Trends, Environmental Regulations, and Electricity Markets (with D. Burtraw, A. Paul, and M. Woerman), The Electricity Journal, Jul. 2012. Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs (with T. Arimura, R. Newell, and S. Li), The Energy Journal, 2012.

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A N T HON Y PA U L Center Fellow 202.328.5148 paul@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution, Clean Air Act Climate: Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, State and US Regional Policies Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Natural Gas, Renewable and Clean Energy Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies

Anthony Paul works with RFF’s Center for Climate and Electricity Policy, focusing his work on environmental policies in the electricity sector as the manager of the Haiku electricity market model. His recent research has addressed the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) recent rule on emissions of air toxics from electricity generators (MATS) and a potential federal clean energy standard. His current work relates to the implementation of EPA regulation of carbon dioxide emissions from existing electricity generators. Another current research thread is on cooling water demand by electricity generators under changing climate and policies to mitigate carbon emissions. EDUCATION •  MS in economics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2006 •  BS in civil and environmental engineering, and engineering and public policy, Carnegie Mellon University, 1997 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Reliability in the Electricity Industry under New Environmental Regulations (with D. Burtraw, K.L. Palmer, B. Beasley, and M. Woerman), Energy Policy, forthcoming. Modeling a Clean Energy Standard for Electricity: Policy Design Implications for Emissions, Supply, Prices, and Regions Energy Economics (with A. Paul, K. Palmer and M. Woerman), Energy Economics, 2013. Cost-Effectiveness and Economic Incidence of a Clean Energy Standard (with B.K. Mignone, T. Alfstad, A. Bergman, K. Dubin, R. Duke, P. Friley, A. Martinez, M. Mowers, K. Palmer, S. Showalter, D. Steinberg, M. Woerman, and F. Wood), Economics of Energy and Environmental Policy, Sep. 2012. Secular Trends, Environmental Regulations and Electricity Markets (with D. Burtraw, K. Palmer, and M. Woerman), The Electricity Journal, Jul. 2012. Retail Electricity Price Savings from Compliance Flexibility in GHG Standards for Stationary Sources (with D. Burtraw and M. Woerman), Energy Policy, Mar. 2012.

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NIGEL PU R V IS Visiting Scholar 202.470.3022 purvis@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Adaptation, Climate Mitigation, Forest Carbon, Global Trade Development and Environment: Deforestation, Sustainable Development Electricity: Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Energy Security International: Europe

Nigel Purvis is a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future. He is the founder and CEO of Climate Advisers, a strategic consulting firm specializing in US climate change policy, international climate change cooperation, global carbon markets, and climaterelated forest conservation. He is also a nonresident senior fellow in the Global Development Program at the Brookings Institution. Purvis directed US environmental diplomacy, including most recently as deputy assistant secretary of state for oceans, environment and science. In that capacity, he oversaw US foreign policy on climate change, biodiversity conservation, forests, international trade, toxic substances, and ozone depletion. His essays and interviews on climate change, environmental diplomacy, international assistance, and foreign affairs have appeared in leading news outlets and academic journals. EDUCATION •  JD, Harvard Law School, 1990 •  BA, University of Minnesota, 1987 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Carbon Market Crossroads: New Ideas for Harnessing Global Markets to Confront Climate Change (with S. Grausz and A. Light), Center for American Progress and Climate Advisers, Apr. 2013. Climate of Despair? The Future of US Climate Policy and Global Negotiations, German Marshall Fund of the United States, Apr. 2012. Energizing Rio+20: How the United States Can Promote Sustainable Energy for All at the 2012 Earth Summit (with A. Jones), Center for Global Development, Apr. 2012. The World Bank and Coal Aid (with A. Jones and A. Stevenson), The Brookings Institution, Oct. 2011.

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NAT HA N R IC HA R DS O N Resident Scholar 202.328.5054 richardson@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Clean Air Act Climate: Climate Change, Climate Mitigation, Greenhouse Gases, State and US Regional Policies Energy: Natural Gas, Oil, Shale Gas International: Europe Land Use: Public Lands Policy and Analysis: Regulation, State and US Regional Policies Risk Management: Liability, Risk Regulation

Nathan Richardson is an attorney and has been a researcher at RFF since 2009, specializing in environmental law and economics. His research has examined environmental liability, environmental federalism, and the relationship among law, regulatory institutions, and policy design. He has published research on law and policy related to climate change, including EPA regulation of greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act. Other research areas include regulation and liability rules related to oil and gas development. Richardson is also managing editor of RFF’s environmental policy and economics blog, Common Resources. EDUCATION •  JD, University of Chicago Law School, 2009 •  BS in foreign service, Georgetown University, 2001 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Aviation, Carbon, and the Clean Air Act, RFF Discussion Paper 12-22, Jul. 2012; Columbia Journal of Environmental Law, 2013. Playing without Aces: Offsets and the Limits of Flexibility under Clean Air Act Climate Policy, RFF Discussion Paper 11-49, Dec. 2011; Environmental Law, 2012. Tradable Standards for Clean Air Act Carbon Policy (with D. Burtraw and A. Fraas), Environmental Law Reporter, 2012. Banking on Allowances: The EPA’s Mixed Record in Managing Emissions-Market Transitions (with A.G. Fraas), NYU Journal of Environmental Law, 2012.

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HEAT HER L. R OS S Visiting Scholar 202.328.5114 ross@rff.org

EXPERTISE Energy: Energy Security, Oil Policy and Analysis: Regulation Risk Management: Risk Analysis, Risk Regulation

Heather Ross’s research at RFF has focused on regulatory reform and energy policy. She brings to this work a background in government, industry, and public policy analysis. Her government service includes appointments as senior economist of the US Senate Committee on the Budget, deputy assistant secretary of the US Department of the Interior, and special assistant to the president for economic policy. She worked for 10 years in the international oil industry, including positions as vice president of BP America and assistant director of BP Europe. Her earliest employment was in think tanks, as a thesiswriting fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior research associate at the Urban Institute. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1970 •  BA in mathematics, Vassar College, 1963 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Precursor Analysis for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling: From Prescriptive to RiskInformed Regulation (with R. Cooke and Adam Stern), RFF Discussion Paper 10-61, Jan. 2011. Getting Off Oil, Resources 164, Winter 2007. Producing Oil or Reducing Oil: Which Is Better for US Energy Security? Resources 148, Summer 2002. Clean Air—Is the Sky the Limit? Resources 143, Spring 2001.

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S T EPHEN W. S A LAN T Nonresident Fellow 734.764.2370 ssalant@umich.edu

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Greenhouse Gases Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Markets, Regulation

Stephen Salant is an applied microtheorist with a specialization in the fields of industrial organization and natural resource economics. Before joining the economics faculty at the University of Michigan in 1986, he worked at the Federal Reserve Board and the RAND Corporation, where he served as the first editor of the RAND Journal of Economics. Among the subjects he has addressed in his research are the appropriate interpretation of government statistics on the duration of unemployment, the effects of anticipated and actual government policies on the price of gold, the cause of speculative attacks on government buffer stocks, the effects of catch-sharing partnerships and other potential solutions to the common-property problem, and the economic decisions of organizations (agricultural marketing boards, cartels, international commodity organizations, prorationing boards, and so on) that select quantity restrictions by voting processes. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1973 •  BA in mathematics, Columbia University, 1967 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Cap-and-Trade Programs under Delayed Compliance: Consequences of Interim Injections of Permits (with M. Hasegawa), RFF Discussion Paper 12-32, Aug. 2012. Alternative Climate Policies and Intertemporal Emissions Leakage: Quantifying the Green Paradox (with C. Fischer), RFF Discussion Paper 12-16, Apr. 2012. Willpower and the Optimal Control of Visceral Urges (with E. Ozdenoren and D. Silverman), Journal of the European Economic Association, 2012.

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ROGER A . S ED J O Senior Fellow and Director, Forest Economics and Policy Program 202.328.5065 sedjo@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Carbon Sequestration, Climate Mitigation, Forest Carbon Ecosystems: Deforestation, Ecosystem Management Forests: Biomass and Plant Biofuels, Timber and Forest Product Markets, Tree Biotechnology International: Asia, Europe, South America Policy and Analysis: Markets, Regulation

Roger Sedjo has directed RFF’s Forest Economics and Policy Program for more than 25 years. He is an expert on forest economics and policy, including public and private forestland management and international forestry. He was among scholars who shared a Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for contributions to a number of major Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports addressing climate change and forests. Sedjo’s work involves both issues of wood as a commodity and environmental issues related to forests. He has focused on modeling domestic and international timber supplies, followed the changing position of US industrial competition, examined the environmental impacts of management and harvest, and evaluated the effects of forest plantations on timber supply. Recent work has focused on issues of measuring and monitoring deforestation and forest change, the potential of wood for bioenergy, and the carbon neutrality of biomass. He also studies tree biotechnology, including the regulatory processes and the potential costs and benefits of genetically modified trees. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of Washington, 1969 •  MA in economics, University of Illinois, 1963 •  BA in economics, University of Illinois, 1961 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS An Investigation of the Effects of Wood Bioenergy on Forest Carbon Stocks (with X. Tian), Journal of Environmental Protection, Sep. 2012. An Economic Approach to Assess the Forest Carbon Implications of Biomass Energy (with A. Daigneault and B. Sohngen), Environmental Science & Technology, Apr. 2012.

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L EONA R D A . S HA B M AN Resident Scholar 202.328.5139 shabman@rff.org

EXPERTISE Ecosystems: Clean Water Act, Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure Land Use: Agricultural Land Use Policy and Analysis: Incentives, Markets, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies, Voluntary Programs Risk Management: Disasters, Extreme Events, Risk Analysis, Risk Regulation Water: Flooding, Water Quality

After three decades on the faculty at Virginia Tech, Len Shabman joined RFF in 2002 as a resident scholar. His research and communications efforts are focused on programs and responsibilities for flood and coastal storm risk management, design of payment for ecosystem services programs, and development of evaluation protocols for ecosystem restoration and management projects, with special focus on the Everglades, coastal Louisiana, and the Chesapeake Bay. Among the specific topics related to these broader themes are applied research on permitting under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, creating market-based incentives for water quality management and provision of ecosystem services, and design of collaborative water management institutions. In 2004, Len was named an associate of the National Academy of Sciences. EDUCATION •  PhD in agricultural economics, Cornell University, 1972 •  MS in agricultural economics, Cornell University, 1969 •  BS in food and resource economics, University of Massachusetts, 1967 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Moving from Concept to Implementation: The Emergence of the Northern Everglades Payment for Environmental Services Program (with S. Lynch), RFF Discussion Paper 13-27, Aug. 2013. The Realities of Federal Disaster Aid: The Case of Floods (with C. Kousky), RFF Issue Brief 12-02, Apr. 2012. Rhetoric and Reality of Water Quality Trading and the Potential for Marketlike Reform (with K. Stephenson), Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Feb. 2011.

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P HIL S HA R P President 202.328.5000 sharp@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Clean Air Act Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation, State and US Regional Policies Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Energy Efficiency, Energy Security, Natural Gas, Nuclear Energy, Oil Policy and Analysis: Emissions Pricing, Markets, Regulation

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Phil Sharp became president of RFF in September 2005, following a long career in public service that included 10 terms as a member of the US House of Representatives from Indiana, from 1975 to 1995. During his 20-year congressional service, Sharp took key leadership roles in the development of landmark energy legislation, including the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. He served on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, where he chaired the Energy and Power Subcommittee. From 1995 to 2001, Sharp was a lecturer at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and he also directed Harvard’s Institute of Politics from 1995 to 1998, and again in 2004 and 2005. He was appointed to the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on America’s Climate Choices (2008–2011) and to the Secretary of Energy’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future (2010–2012). Currently, Sharp is a member of the Boards of Directors of the Duke Energy Corporation and the Energy Foundation. He serves on the MIT Energy Initiative External Advisory Board and chaired advisory committees for MIT studies on the future of nuclear power, the future of coal, and the future of solar. EDUCATION •  PhD in government, Georgetown University, 1974 •  BS in foreign service, Georgetown University, 1964

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


D A NIEL S HAW HA N Gilbert White Fellow 518.331.6186 shawhd@rpi.edu

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation, State and US Regional Policies Electricity: Electricity Markets and Regulation, Energy Efficiency, Renewable and Clean Energy Energy: Coal, Renewable and Clean Energy Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Cap and Trade, Discounting, Emissions Pricing, Incentives, Markets, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies

Much of Daniel Shawhan’s research focuses on predicting and estimating the effects of electricity policies, including environmental ones. He has played a leading role in developing a new set of capabilities for simulating how power grids, power plants, and pollution levels will respond to potential changes in policy. The same simulation capabilities can be used to evaluate the effects of potential new power plants and transmission lines. In related statistical work, Shawhan has examined whether power plant startups and ramping greatly increase emissions, whether wind farms really reduce emissions from fuel-burning power plants, and whether the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative cap-and-trade program has increased emissions in the neighboring coal-rich state of Pennsylvania. He also has an interest in electricity market design and environmental policy design. Before becoming an academic, Shawhan was a consultant to state governments, crafting electric industry reforms and first-in-the-nation policies for hybrid vehicles, energy efficiency, green buildings, and renewable energy. EDUCATION •  PhD in applied economics and management, Cornell University, 2008 •  BA in economics, with honors, Grinnell College, 1995 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Does a Realistic Model of the Electricity Grid Matter? Estimating the Impacts of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (with J.T. Taber, D. Shi, R.D. Zimmerman, J. Yan, C.M. Marquet, Y. Qi, B. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky, R.E. Schuler, and W.D. Schulze) revise and resubmit at Resource and Energy Economics, 2013. An Experimental Test of Automatic Mitigation of Wholesale Electricity Prices (with K.D. Messer, W.D. Schulze, and R.E. Schuler), International Journal of Industrial Organization, 2011.

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J HIH- S HYA NG S HI H Fellow 202.328.5028 shih@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Climate: Climate Adaptation Ecosystems: Green Infrastructure Energy: Shale Gas Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Incentives, Voluntary Programs Risk Management: Risk Analysis Space: Satellites Waste Management: Solid Waste and Recycling

Trained as an environmental systems engineer, Jhih-Shyang Shih focuses his research on developing tools for environmental management and policy analysis. He has extensive experience with modeling to study air quality, water resources, and solid waste management, and has studied the costs of environmental protection, technology adoption, and renewable energy. Shih’s recent research has focused on water quality modeling, shale gas development, ozone and PM control, recycling, small water systems, and space solar power. His other interests include climate change and air quality, risk management, and cost–benefit and uncertainty analysis, as well as energy and environment issues. The combination of a technical background and public policy research enables him to bridge the science, engineering, and policy communities. EDUCATION •  PhD in system analysis and economics for public decisionmaking, Johns Hopkins University, 1991 •  MS in environmental engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, 1983 •  BS in environmental engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, 1981 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Shale Gas Development Impacts on Surface Water Quality in Pennsylvania (with S. Olmstead, L. Muehlenbachs, Z. Chu, and A. Krupnick), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Feb. 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1213871110. Terrestrial Fluxes of Sediments and Nutrients to Pacific Coastal Waters and Their Effects on Coastal Carbon Storage Rates (with B.A. Bergamaschi, R.A. Smith, and M.J. Sauer), in Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the Western United States, Z. Zhu and B.C. Reed (eds.), US Geological Survey, Nov. 2012.

Water: Drinking Water, Water Quality

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RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


HILA RY S IGMA N Nonresident Fellow hsigman@rutgers.edu

EXPERTISE Policy and Analysis: Regulation, State and US Regional Policies Risk Management: Liability Waste Management: Waste Liability, Waste Regulation

Hilary Sigman is a professor of economics at Rutgers University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). She conducts research on the empirical effects of environmental policy. Her current work focuses on the law and economics of brownfields, international water resources, and the environmental implications of decentralization of public policies. She has served on the Environmental Economics Advisory Committee of EPA’s Science Advisory Board and the Board of Directors of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1993 •  MPhil in economics, Cambridge University, 1988 •  BA in economics and studies in the environment, Yale College, 1986 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution Levels and Variation, Land Economics, Feb. 2014. Management of Hazardous Waste and Contaminated Land (with S. Stafford), Annual Review of Resource Economics, 2011. Environmental Liability and Redevelopment of Old Industrial Land, Journal of Law and Economics, May 2010. International Spillovers and Water Quality in Rivers: Do Countries Free Ride? American Economic Review, Sep. 2002.

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J U HA S IIK A MÄ K I Associate Research Director and Fellow 202.328.5157 juha@rff.org

EXPERTISE Air Quality: Air Pollution Climate: Carbon Sequestration, Climate Mitigation Ecosystems: Biodiversity, Coastal Resources, Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services Forests: Forest Carbon, Forest Conservation, Global Forest Monitoring, Tree Biotechnology

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Juha Siikamäki works primarily on biodiversity and ecosystem services, including their economic valuation and assessing options for their conservation and management. His work is purposed to help governments and other organizations make prudent decisions about the use and conservation of nature. Siikamäki has recently examined global economic potential of preserving the carbon storage in mangroves and other coastal habitats. He has also developed new approaches to evaluate benefits from outdoor recreation resources in the United States and the cost-effectiveness of the protection of biodiversity, as well as developed survey and other approaches to valuing ecosystem services in many different contexts. His work encompasses policy issues in the United States and elsewhere around the world. EDUCATION •  PhD in environmental policy analysis, University of California, Davis, 2001 •  MS in agricultural and natural resource economics, University of California, Davis, 1998 •  MS in agricultural policy analysis, University of Helsinki, 1995

Land Use: Outdoor Recreation; Parks, Refuges, and Wildernesses; Public Lands

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Global Economic Potential for Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Mangrove Loss (with J. Sanchirico and S. Jardine), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Jul. 2012.

Policy and Analysis: Environmental Accounting, Regulation, Valuation

Contributions of the US State Park System to Nature Recreation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2011.

Potential Biodiversity Benefits from International Programs to Reduce Carbon Emissions from Deforestation (with S.C. Newbold), Ambio, Feb. 2012.

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE


K EN NET H A . S MAL L Nonresident Fellow ksmall@uci.edu

EXPERTISE Transportation: CAFE Standards, Fuel Taxes, Public Transit, Traffic Congestion, Vehicle Pollution

Ken Small is one of the nation’s leading experts on urban and transportation issues and environmental economics. Among his recent research topics are urban highway congestion, measurement of value of time and reliability, effects of fuel efficiency standards, road and public transit pricing, and fuel taxes. For four years, he served as associate editor of Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, and he remains on the editorial boards of that and four other professional journals. He previously was North American coeditor of the international journal Urban Studies. Small has served on several study committees of the National Research Council, examining, among other things, benefit–cost analysis and the equity of new transportation finance mechanisms. His book Urban Transportation Economics was recently updated in a new edition (Economics of Urban Transportation) and has become a widely cited standard reference in the field. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of California, Berkeley, 1976 •  MA in physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1972 •  BS, AB in physics, mathematics, University of Rochester, 1968 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Energy Policies for Passenger Motor Vehicles, Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 2012. Should Urban Transit Subsidies Be Reduced? (with I. Parry), American Economic Review, 2009. Does Britain or the United States Have the Right Gasoline Tax? (with I. Parry), American Economic Review, 2005.

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MA R GA R ET A . WA L L S Research Director and Senior Fellow 202.328.5092 walls@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Climate Adaptation, Climate Change Ecosystems: Ecosystem Management, Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure Energy: Energy Efficiency Land Use: Green Infrastructure, Outdoor Recreation, Parks, Refuges, and Wildernesses, Public Lands, Urban Sprawl Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Environmental Accounting, Regulation, State and US Regional Policies

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Margaret Walls’s current research focuses on issues related to urban land use, ecosystem services, parks, and energy efficiency. She has analyzed transferable development rights programs for managing land use in urban fringe areas, assessed the value of different types of parks and open space, and investigated energy efficiency issues in buildings. In 2008 and 2009, she was the study director for the Outdoor Resources Review Group (see www.rff.org/orrg). From 2010 to 2013, Walls was the first appointee to the Thomas J. Klutznick Chair at RFF. Walls has published widely in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Public Economics, National Tax Journal, Journal of Urban Economics, and Journal of Economic Literature, among others. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1988 •  BS in agricultural economics, University of Kentucky, 1981 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Strategically Placing Green Infrastructure: Cost-Effective Land Conservation in the Floodplain (with C. Kousky, S. Olmstead, and M. Macauley), Environmental Science and Technology, Apr. 2013. Paying for State Parks: Evaluating Alternative Approaches for the 21st Century, RFF Report, Jan. 2013. Borrowing to Save Energy: An Assessment of Energy-Efficiency Financing Programs (with K.L. Palmer and T. Gerarden), RFF Report, Apr. 2012. Zoning on the Urban Fringe: Results from a New Approach to Modeling Land and Housing Markets, (with N. Magliocca, V. McConnell, and E. Safirova), Regional Science and Urban Economics, Jan. 2012. The Role of Land Use in Adaptation to Increased Precipitation and Flooding: A Case Study in Wisconsin’s Lower Fox River Basin (with C. Kousky, S.M. Olmstead, A. Stern, and M.K. Macauley), RFF Report, Nov. 2011.

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ZHON GMIN WA NG Fellow 202.328.5036 wang@rff.org

EXPERTISE Energy: Natural Gas, Oil, R&D Technology, Shale Gas International: China Policy and Analysis: Green GDP, Incentives, Information Disclosure, Regulation Transportation: Gasoline

Zhongmin Wang’s research focuses primarily on energyrelated economic issues. He has studied pricing, competition, regulatory, technology, and environmental issues related to oil, gasoline, natural gas, and alternative transport fuels. He has recently studied the economic history of shale gas development in the United States, and has also started to research China’s energy and environmental issues. His work has appeared in the Journal of Political Economy. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Georgetown University, 2002 •  Coursework in American studies, Johns Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies, 2002–2003 •  MA in petroleum management, China University of Petroleum, 1994 •  BE in management (major) and petroleum engineering (minor), China University of Petroleum, 1991 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS (Mixed) Strategy in Oligopoly Pricing: Evidence from Gasoline Price Cycles Before and Under a Timing Regulation, Journal of Political Economy, Dec. 2009. Station Level Gasoline Demand in an Australian Market with Regular Price Cycles, Journal of Agricultural and Resources Economics, Oct. 2009. Assessing the Degree of Spot Market Integration for US Natural Gas: Evidence from Daily Price Data (with J. Cuddington), Journal of Regulatory Economics, Mar. 2006.

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R OBERT ON C . W IL L I AM S I I I Senior Fellow and Director, Academic Programs 202.328.5031 williams@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Carbon Pricing, Climate Mitigation Policy and Analysis: Benefit–Cost Analysis, Cap and Trade, Discounting, Emissions Pricing, Incentives, Markets, Subsidies, Taxes

Rob Williams studies both environmental policy and tax policy, with a particular focus on interactions between the two. In addition to his role at RFF, he is an associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously an associate professor at the University of Texas, Austin; a visiting research scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research; and an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Williams has served as a coeditor of both the Journal of Public Economics and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. EDUCATION •  PhD in economics, Stanford University, 1999 •  AB in economics, Harvard University, 1994 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Growing State-Federal Conflicts in Environmental Policy: The Role of MarketBased Regulation, Journal of Public Economics, 2012. The Choice of Discount Rate for Climate Change Policy Evaluation (with L.H. Goulder), Climate Change Economics, 2012. How to Design a Carbon Tax (with I. Parry and R. van der Ploeg), in Fiscal Policy to Mitigate Climate Change: A Guide for Policymakers, R. de Mooij, I. Parry, and Michael Keen (eds.), International Monetary Fund, 2012. Setting the Initial Time-Profile of Climate Policy: The Economics of Environmental Policy Phase-Ins, in The Design and Implementation of US Climate Policy, D. Fullerton and C. Wolfram (eds.), University of Chicago Press, 2012. Moving US Climate Policy Forward: Are Carbon Taxes the Only Good Alternative? (with I. Parry), in Climate Change and Common Sense: Essays in Honour of Tom Schelling, R. Hahn and A. Ulph (eds.), Oxford University Press, 2012.

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MIC HA EL W OLOS I N Visiting Scholar 202.470.3022 wolosin@rff.org

EXPERTISE Climate: Cap and Trade, Climate Change, State and US Regional Policies Development and Environment: Sustainable Development Forests: Deforestation, Forest Carbon

Michael Wolosin manages Climate Advisers’ forest carbon policy practice, focusing his research on US and international climaterelated forest policy. Since joining Climate Advisers in 2010, Michael has served as the program director for the bipartisan Commission on Climate and Tropical Forests. Wolosin previously focused on US climate and deforestation policy at The Nature Conservancy, bringing the organization's on-the-ground experiences to bear in the US policy process and representing the organization in multi-stakeholder coalitions and through direct outreach. Before this, he was a policy fellow at the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. He did his doctoral research in forest ecology at Duke University, studying light competition and growth using advanced remote sensing and statistical techniques, and is coauthor of a number of peer-reviewed papers published by top academic journals. EDUCATION •  PhD in ecology, Duke University, 2007 •  AB in mathematics, Brown University, 1995 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS US Forest–Climate Assistance: An Assessment, RFF Report, Sep. 2012. Should REDD+ Be Included in the CDM? Analysis of Issues and Options (with R. O’Sullivan, C. Moore, and D. Lee); prepared for the CDM Policy Dialogue, Jun. 2012. A Whole-of-Government Approach to Reducing Tropical Deforestation (with A. Riddle and D.F. Morris), RFF Discussion Paper 11-28, Jul. 2011. International Forest Conservation: A Survey of Key Staff in the 112th Congress (with P.T. Jenkins), RFF Issue Brief 11-05, May 2011.

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RFF UNIVERSITY FELLOWS The RFF university fellows program was established to foster closer working relationships between RFF researchers and the wider academic community. Outstanding scholars at universities around the world are appointed by the RFF president on the advice of senior management and with the understanding that substantial benefits to the research of both RFF and the university fellow can be expected. John F. Ahearne

Sigma Xi | 919.547.5213 | ahearne@sigmaxi.org

John Ahearne, a former RFF vice president and senior fellow, is executive director (emeritus) of Sigma Xi, an international honor society of research scientists and engineers, and an adjunct professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University. His primary areas of work are nuclear reactors, nuclear waste, and nuclear weapons. From 1978 to 1983, he was a commissioner of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and served as chairman from 1979 to 1981. Previously, Ahearne was deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense and served in the White House Energy Office and as deputy assistant secretary of energy. He has served on or chaired more than 25 study committees of the National Research Council and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control. He is chair of the Advisory Group for the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for Engineering, Ethics, and Society. He holds memberships in the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his PhD in physics from Princeton University. John M. Antle

Oregon State University | 406.994.3706 | john.antle@oregonstate.edu

John Antle is a professor in the Department of Applied Economics at Oregon State University and a former Gilbert White Fellow at RFF. He received his PhD in economics at the University of Chicago, served as a senior staff economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and is a past president and fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association. His research interests are in production economics, environmental economics, econometrics, and international development. His current research addresses the sustainability of agricultural production systems in both industrialized and developing countries, including impacts of alternative technologies and policies on food security and poverty, economic feasibility of agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation, payments for environmental services, and impacts of climate change on agriculture. Antle also serves as a principal investigator for the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project, a

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global consortium aiming to improve agricultural systems science and its use for food security and climate change assessment. Jesse H. Ausubel

The Rockefeller University | 212.327.7917 | ausubel@.rockefeller.edu

Jesse Ausubel’s interests include industrial evolution, industrial ecology, and the conservation of land and sea. He directs the Rockefeller University’s Program for the Human Environment and also serves as a science advisor to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and guest investigator at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Previously, he served as director of programs for the National Academy of Engineering, a staff officer with the National Research Council Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and a research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. Educated at Harvard and Columbia, Ausubel was a main organizer of the first UN World Climate Conference in Geneva, in 1979. He initiated and led three major biodiversity programs: the Census of Marine Life, the Barcode of Life initiative to develop DNA identifiers for animals and plants, and the Encyclopedia of Life to develop a web page for every species. While continuing studies of waste minimization in energy and sparing of land for nature, he also now is a leader of the international Deep Carbon Observatory, examining the quantities, movements, origins, and forms of carbon deep in Earth’s crust. Gardner M. Brown, Jr.

University of Washington | gbrown@u.washington.edu

Gardner Brown is a professor emeritus in the Department of Economics at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he was chair from 1985 to 1990. He specializes in natural resource economics and applied microeconomic theory, and has reviewed damage estimates for many hazardous waste or oil spill events, including the Exxon Valdez. Brown also has held visiting appointments at the University of Gothenburg and the University of Cambridge. His recent work has focused on the economics of antibiotics, predator-prey population dynamics, waterfowl and wetland preservation, and the economics of ocean resources. Brown received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1964 and his AB from Antioch College in 1959. Mark A. Cohen

Vanderbilt University | 615.322.0533 | mark.cohen@owen.vanderbilt.edu

Mark Cohen is an expert on government enforcement of policy mandates, having published more than 85 articles and books on such topics as the effect of community right-to-know laws on firm behavior, why companies reduce toxic chemical emissions, benefit–cost analysis of oil spill regulation and enforcement, whether it “pays” to be green, and judicial sentencing of individuals and firms convicted of corporate crimes. He has served on various governmental advisory panels, including Tennessee’s Envi-

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ronmental Justice Steering Committee and the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board Panel on Illegal Competitive Advantage and Economic Benefits. He is a member of the Stakeholder Council of the Global Reporting Initiative and serves on several academic editorial boards, including the Journal of Benefit–Cost Analysis, Environmental Economics, and Managerial and Decision Economics. He was previously vice president of research at RFF and served as a staff economist at the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Federal Trade Commission, and the US Sentencing Commission. He co-founded and directed the Vanderbilt Center for Environmental Management Studies, and from 2003 to 2005, he was a senior associate dean of the Owen Graduate School. Sir Partha Dasgupta

University of Cambridge | partha.dasgupta@econ.cam.ac.uk

Sir Partha Dasgupta is the Frank Ramsey Professor Emeritus of Economics and past chairman of the faculty of economics at the University of Cambridge, as well as a fellow of St. John’s College. He also serves as a foreign associate at the US National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the Royal Society. His research interests have covered welfare and development economics; the economics of technological change; population, environmental, and resource economics; game theory; and the economics of malnutrition. Dasgupta was knighted by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 2002 for “services to economics” and was co-winner of the 2002 Volvo Environmental Prize and the 2004 Kenneth E. Boulding Memorial Award of the International Society for Ecological Economics. Robert T. Deacon

University of California, Santa Barbara | 805.893.3670 | deacon@econ.ucsb.edu Robert Deacon is a professor of economics and environmental science and management at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has served as chair of the Departments of Economics and Environmental Studies, is past managing editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and presently serves on several editorial boards. Deacon has served as a consultant for US and international agencies, as well as in the private sector, including major energy companies and international conservation organizations. He has held postdoctoral fellowships at PERC, Resources for the Future, the Hoover Institution, and Osaka University. Over the last 10 years, his research has focused on property rights approaches to marine resource management and the role of political institutions in policy design. Hadi Dowlatabadi

University of British Columbia | 604.822.0008 | hadi@sdri.ubc.ca

Haid Dowlatabadi, a former RFF fellow, is the Canada Research Chair and a professor of applied mathematics, integrated assessment, and global change at the University of British Columbia. His research interests range from interactions among energy, 54

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environment, and public health to quantitative treatment of uncertainty and new approaches to decisionmaking under deep uncertainty. Previously, he taught in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, directed the National Science Foundation’s Center for Integrated Study of the Human Dimensions of Climate Change, and designed the environment program at the Rockefeller Foundation. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge. Lawrence H. Goulder

Stanford University | 650.723.3706 | goulder@stanford.edu

Lawrence Goulder is the Shuzo Nishihara Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Environmental and Energy Policy Analysis Center. His research covers a range of environmental issues, including green tax reform, the design of cap-and-trade systems, climate change policy, and comprehensive wealth measurement (“green” accounting). He has served as a co-editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and on several advisory committees to the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board and the California Air Resources Board. Goulder graduated from Harvard College with an AB in philosophy in 1973 and earned a PhD in economics from Stanford in 1982. W. Michael Hanemann

University of California, Berkeley | 510.642.2670 | hanemann@are.berkeley.edu Michael Hanemann is the Chancellor’s Professor of the Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he directs the California Climate Change Center. His research interests include nonmarket valuation, environmental economics and policy, water pricing and management, demand modeling for market research and policy design, the economics of irreversibility and adaptive management, and welfare economics. Hanemann is a member of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Economics Advisory Committee and the California Bay-Delta Public Advisory Committee on Drinking Water. He received a PhD in economics from Harvard University in 1978. Charles D. Kolstad

Stanford University | 650.724.1463 | ckolstad@stanford.edu

Charles Kolstad is a professor of economics at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. A former president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, Kolstad is an environmental economist specializing in uncertainty and learning in environmental regulation, particularly as applied to climate change. He is a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a member of the National Academy of Sciences committee evaluating the US Climate Change Research Program, a co-editor of the journal

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Review of Environmental Economics & Policy, and the author of numerous scholarly articles and books. His most recent book, edited with Jody Freeman of Harvard Law School, is Moving to Markets in Environmental Regulation (Oxford, 2007). His textbook Environmental Economics has been translated into Spanish, Japanese, and Chinese. He is also a research associate in the Environment and Energy Economics Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Kolstad has been a faculty member at the University of Illinois, Stanford University, MIT, and the New Economic School (Moscow), as well as a staff member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana. Jon A. Krosnick

Stanford University | 650.725.3031 | krosnick@stanford.edu

At Stanford University, Jon Krosnick is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences; a professor of communication, political science, and psychology; and principal investigator of the American National Election Studies. He conducts research in three primary areas: attitude formation, change, and effects; the psychology of political behavior; and the optimal design of questionnaires used for laboratory experiments and surveys. Krosnick has taught courses on survey methodology around the world at universities, corporations, and government agencies. His survey research has explored the American public’s views of environmental issues, with a special focus on climate change, since 1995. He holds MA and PhD degrees in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Simon A. Levin

Princeton University | 609.258.6880 | slevin@princeton.edu

Simon Levin is the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton University. His principal interests are in understanding how macroscopic patterns and processes are maintained at the level of ecosystems and the biosphere, in terms of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that operate primarily at the level of organisms. Much of his research is concerned with the evolution of diversification, the mechanisms sustaining biological diversity in natural systems, and the implications for ecosystem structure and functioning. The work integrates empirical studies and mathematical modeling, with emphasis on how to extrapolate across scales of space, time, and organizational complexity. Current systems of study include plant communities, as well as marine open-ocean and intertidal systems. In related work, he has explored the self-organization and evolution of strain structure in influenza A, and the dynamics of collective motion. He is deeply involved in the interface with management, sustainability, the resilience and robustness of coupled ecological and socioeconomic systems, and, more generally, the linkages between the ecological and economic dimensions of and perspectives on management.

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John A. List

University of Chicago | 773.702.9811 | jlist@uchicago.edu

John List received his PhD from the University of Wyoming and is currently the Homer J. Livingstone Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. List has been at the forefront of environmental economics and has served as senior economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers for Environmental and Resource Economics. He is best known as one of the world’s leading experts on experimental economics. List has pioneered work using field experiments in which he developed scientific methods for testing economic theory directly in the marketplace. He received the Kenneth Galbraith Award in 2010 and the 2008 Arrow Prize for Senior Economists for his research on behavioral economics in the field. His work has provided insight on such issues as pricing behavior, market structure, the valuation of nonmarketed goods and services, the impact of environmental regulation, the economics of charitable giving, and the impact of incentives on education and weight loss. Anup Malani

University of Chicago | 773.702.9602 | amalani@uchicago.edu

Anup Malani is the Lee and Brena Freeman Professor of Law at the University of Chicago and a professor at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine. He is an editor of the Journal of Law and Economics and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Malani teaches law and economics, health law, food and drug law, insurance law, bankruptcy, contracts, corporations, and federal budget policy. His research interests include law and economics (welfare evaluation of legal rules and empirical methods); health economics and policy (valuing health insurance and medical technology, control of infectious disease, medical malpractice and pharmaceutical products liability, conflicts of interest in medical research, placebo effects, and drug regulation); and corporate law and finance (the role of nonprofit firms and corporate philanthropy). He has had research articles published in major law, economics, medical, and science journals, including the Harvard Law Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the Archives of Internal Medicine, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. His writing can also be found in popular media, such as NPR, Forbes, and the Chicago Tribune. Malani has a JD and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. In 2001, he served as a law clerk for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor on the US Supreme Court. He serves on the boards of the American Law & Economics Association and the University of Chicago Press. Wallace E. Oates

University of Maryland | 301.405.3496 | oates@econ.umd.edu

Wallace Oates is distinguished university professor, emeritus, at the University of Maryland. Previously, he taught at Princeton University from 1965 to 1979. He has

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served on numerous advisory groups for public policy and as president of the Eastern Economic Association and the Southern Economic Association. He received his PhD from Stanford University in 1965. His major research interests have been in two fields: public finance with a special interest in fiscal federalism and environmental economics. Currently, his research efforts address the international dimensions of environmental policy and issues concerning fiscal decentralization in both industrialized and developing countries. He is the editor of two editions of The RFF Reader in Environmental and Resource Policy. William A. Pizer

Duke University | 919.613.9286 | billy.pizer@duke.edu

Billy Pizer is an associate professor at the Sanford School and a faculty fellow at the Nicholas Institute, both at Duke University. His current research examines how public policies to promote clean energy can effectively leverage private sector investments, how environmental regulation and climate policy can affect production costs and competitiveness, and how the design of market-based environmental policies can address the needs of different stakeholders. Previously, he was a fellow and then senior fellow at RFF for more than 10 years. From 2008 to 2011, Pizer was deputy assistant secretary for environment and energy in the US Department of the Treasury, where he created and led a new office responsible for the department’s role in the domestic and international environment and energy agenda of the United States. He served as senior economist for the environment on the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 2001 to 2002. Pizer earned his PhD and master’s degree in economics at Harvard University in 1996 and a bachelor’s degree in physics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1990. Stephen Polasky

University of Minnesota | 612.625.9213 | polasky@umn.edu

Stephen Polasky holds the Fesler-Lampert Chair in Ecological/Environmental Economics at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include integrating ecological and economic analysis, ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, game theory, common property resources, and environmental policy. He was the senior staff economist for environment and resources for the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1998 to 1999. He has served on the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board and committees for the US Department of the Interior and National Research Council and is currently co-lead for mapping and valuing ecosystem services for the Natural Capital Project, a member of the Board of Directors for the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, and a member of the Science Council and Board of Directors of The Nature Conservancy. He was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2007 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009. He received his PhD in economics from the University of Michigan in 1986.

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Paul R. Portney

University of Arizona | 520.621.2028 | pportney@eller.arizona.edu

Paul Portney, a longtime RFF senior fellow who served as president from 1995 to 2005, is a professor of economics at the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. He was dean of the Eller College from 2005 to 2011. He has long been interested in the role of economic analysis in energy and environmental regulation, especially the regulation of automobiles, power plants, and other industrial facilities. In 2001, he chaired a National Academy of Sciences panel on the future of CAFE standards. From 1979 to 1980, he was chief economist at the Council on Environmental Quality in the Executive Office of the President. He received a PhD in economics from Northwestern University in 1973. James N. Sanchirico

University of California, Davis | 530.754.9883 | jsanchirico@ucdavis.edu

James Sanchirico received his PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Davis, in 1998. After working for nine years at RFF, he returned to UC Davis, where he is currently a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy. His main research interests include the economic analysis of policy design and implementation for marine and terrestrial species conservation, the development of economic–ecological models for forecasting the effects of resource management policies, and the control and prevention of invasive species. Sanchirico is currently an associate editor of the Journal of Theoretical Ecology. In 2012, he was the 38th recipient of the Rosenstiel Award for Oceanographic Sciences, which honors scientists who, in the past decade, have made significant and growing impacts in their field. Past public service includes a National Research Council (NRC) committee evaluating the effectiveness of the fish stock rebuilding requirements in the 2006 Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act, six years on NOAA’s Science Advisory Board, the editorial board of Ecology Letters, and an NRC committee to review the US Ocean Acidification Research Plan. V. Kerry Smith Arizona State University | 480.727.9812 | kerry.smith@asu.edu Kerry Smith is a Regents Professor and the W.P. Carey Professor of Economics at Arizona State University. He is also a distinguished sustainability scientist with the Global Institute of Sustainability at ASU and a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research. Smith is a former RFF senior fellow and has taught previously at several other universities, including North Carolina State University, Duke University, and Vanderbilt University. His research interests include nonmarket valuation of environmental resources, the role of public information in promoting private risk mitigation, environmental policy and induced technical change, water resource management and conservation, general equilibrium characterization of the effects of

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environmental policies, and adaptation and climate change. In 1989, he was awarded the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists Distinguished Service Award. He is a fellow in both the American Agricultural Economics Association and the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has a PhD from Rutgers University, awarded in 1970. Brent L. Sohngen

Ohio State University | 614.688.4640 | sohngen.1@osu.edu

Brent Sohngen is a professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State University. His research interests include modeling land-use and land-cover change, examining impacts of climate change in the forestry sector, analyzing the economics of nonpoint source pollution, and valuing environmental change. Prior to his appointment at Ohio State in 1996, he was a Gilbert White Postdoctoral Fellow at RFF. Sohngen also leads an extension and outreach program in environmental and natural resource economics. The program focuses on linking research on natural resource and environmental economics to natural resource policy and management issues in Ohio. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the Department of Agricultural Economics at Cornell University in 1991 and a PhD from Yale University in 1996. Robert N. Stavins

Harvard University | 617.495.1820 | robert_stavins@harvard.edu

Robert Stavins is the Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government at the Harvard Kennedy School, director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program, director of PhD programs in Public Policy and Political Economy & Government, co-chair of the Harvard Business School–Harvard Kennedy School Joint Degree Program, and director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and former chair of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Economics Advisory Board. His research has examined diverse areas of environmental economics and policy, particularly climate change, and he is the author of numerous books on energy and climate. Stavins directed Project 88, a bipartisan effort co-chaired by former senator Timothy Wirth and the late senator John Heinz, to develop innovative approaches to environmental problems. He has been a consultant to government agencies, international organizations, corporations, and advocacy groups. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Thomas Sterner

University of Gothenburg | 46.31.786.1377 | thomas.sterner@economics.gu.se

Thomas Sterner, a former RFF Gilbert White Fellow, is a professor of environmental economics at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and a founder of the Environment

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for Development initiative, where he is a research fellow. Sterner has written widely on the design of policy instruments, discounting, energy and climate, natural resource management, fisheries, and issues relating to industrial and transport pollution. Previously, he worked in the Environment Department of the World Bank, and much of his current work focuses on developing countries. Sterner serves on the scientific committee of the Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy in Africa Network and on several other regional networks in developing countries. During 2012 and 2013 he served as visiting chief economist at the Environmental Defense Fund in New York. He received his PhD in economics from the University of Gothenburg in 1986. John E. Tilton

Colorado School of Mines | 303.273.3485 / 56.2.354.7224 | jtilton@mines.edu / jtilton@ing.puc.cl

John Tilton divides his time between Chile, where he teaches mineral economics in the Department of Mining Engineering at Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, and the United States, where he is a research professor in the Division of Economics and Business as well as professor emeritus at the Colorado School of Mines. His recent research examines the role of mining in economic development, the environment and mining, the long-run availability of mineral commodities, and the recycling of metals. He is a past RFF visiting scholar and has served on various boards and committees of the National Research Council, including the Panel on Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting. Tilton received his PhD in economics from Yale University. Jonathan B. Wiener

Duke University | 919.613.7054 | wiener@law.duke.edu

Jonathan Wiener is the William R. and Thomas L. Perkins Professor of Law at Duke University’s Law School, a professor of environmental policy at the Nicholas School at Duke, and a professor of public policy at Duke’s Sanford School. He is the author of numerous books and articles on risk regulation, climate change policy, instrument choice in environmental policy, comparative regulatory studies, and related topics. He is co-editor of the RFF Press/Earthscan/Routledge book The Reality of Precaution: Comparing Risk Regulation in the United States and Europe (2011), as well as Risk vs. Risk (Harvard University Press, 1995). In 2008, he served as president of the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA), and in 2012 he co-chaired the World Congress on Risk. In 2003, he received the SRA Chauncey Starr Young Risk Analyst Award for career contributions to the field by a scholar aged 40 or under. From 1989 to 1993, Wiener served in both the first Bush and Clinton administrations, including as senior staff economist for environmental and regulatory matters on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, as well as at the Office of Science and Technology Policy, at the US Department of Justice, and in the Americorps National Service Program. There he helped negotiate the Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992) and helped

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draft Executive Order 12866 on regulatory review (1993). In 1987 and 1989, he was a law clerk to federal judges Stephen Breyer and Jack Weinstein. He received his AB in economics in 1984 and his JD in 1987 from Harvard University, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. JunJie Wu

Oregon State University | 541.737.3060 | junjie.wu@oregonstate.edu

JunJie Wu holds the Emery N. Castle Endowed Chair in Resource and Rural Economics at Oregon State University. His research extends to several fields in economics, including resource and environmental economics, agricultural economics, regional science, and urban economics. A central theme of his research focuses on land use and land–use patterns and their impacts on ecosystem services provision. Wu has received several awards for his work, including the Quality of Research Discovery Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association and the Outstanding Published Research Award from the Western Agricultural Economics Association. He is an editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and has served on the editorial council for several journals, including the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and Land Economics.

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ABOUT RFF Founded in 1952, Resources for the Future (RFF) is an independent, nonpartisan organization that conducts economic research and analysis to help leaders make better decisions and craft smarter policies about natural resources and the environment. Public, private, and nonprofit decisionmakers around the world call upon RFF experts to design, analyze, and evaluate policies; advise government officials on policy options; develop tools for efficient decisionmaking; create methods to accurately value intangibles; and convene thought leaders and stakeholders to discuss current and emerging issues. OUR CORE VALUES

With a focus on environmental economics, RFF is committed to utilizing research excellence and independent analysis to deliver practical solutions. OUR EXPERTS

RFF brings together PhD economists and other leading experts focused on environmental, natural resource, and energy issues. OUR GOVERNANCE

RFF’s Board of Directors includes industry and environmental leaders, as well as former policymakers and preeminent scholars. OUR SUPPORT

As a 501(c)(3) organization, RFF is supported by donors who understand the role that rigorous, objective research plays in formulating sound public policies.

HOW WE STAND APART

• Recognized as independent and nonpartisan • Focused on the economics of environmental and natural resource policy • Trusted by public, private, and nonprofit leaders • Located in Washington, DC, only minutes away from the White House and Capitol Hill • Committed to intellectual excellence and practical solutions

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS W. Bowman Cutter, Chair Senior Fellow and Director, Economic Policy Initiative, The Roosevelt Institute John M. Deutch, Vice Chair Institute Professor, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Philip R. Sharp, President Resources for the Future Anthony Bernhardt Northern California Director, Environmental Entrepreneurs Trudy Ann Cameron Raymond F. Mikesell Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics, University of Oregon Red Cavaney Alexandria, Virginia Elaine Dorward-King Executive Vice President of Sustainability and External Relations, Newmont Mining Corporation Linda J. Fisher Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer, Dupont Environment and Sustainable Growth Center C. Boyden Gray Partner, Gray & Schmitz, LLP David G. Hawkins Director, Climate Center, Natural Resources Defense Council

Peter R. Kagan Managing Director, Warburg Pincus, LLC Sally Katzen Senior Advisor, Podesta Group RubĂŠn Kraiem Partner, Covington & Burling, LLP Robert B. Litterman Chairman, Risk Committee, Kepos Capital Richard G. Newell Director, Duke University Energy Initiative; Professor, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Henry Schacht Managing Director and Senior Advisor, Warburg Pincus Richard L. Schmalensee Howard W. Johnson Professor and Dean Emeritus, Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Robert N. Stavins Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University Lisa A. Stewart President & CEO, Sheridan Production Company, LLC Joseph L. Stiglitz Professor of Economics, Business, and International Affairs, Columbia University School of Business Mark R. Tercek President & CEO, The Nature Conservancy

Rick Holley President & CEO, Plum Creek

CHAIR EMERITI Darius W. Gaskins, Jr. Partner, Norbridge, Inc. Robert E. Grady Managing Director, Cheyenne Capital Fund

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Lawrence H. Linden Founder and Trustee, Linden Trust for Conservation Frank E. Loy Washington, DC


RFF LEADERSHIP Phil Sharp, President sharp@rff.org or 202.328.5000 Edward F. Hand, Vice President, Finance and Administration hand@rff.org or 202.328.5029 Molly Macauley, Vice President for Research macauley@rff.org or 202.328.5043 Lea Harvey, Vice President, Development, and Corporate Secretary harvey@rff.org or 202.328.5016 Peter Nelson, Director of Communications nelson@rff.org or 202.328.5191

RFF CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE CENTER FOR CLIMATE AND ELECTRICITY POLICY Researchers working in RFF’s Center for Climate and Electricity Policy (CCEP) analyze and help develop domestic and international policies that address global climate change while promoting economic growth. They have expertise in topics such as electricity generation and emissions, low carbon and renewable energy, design of emissions trading systems and other regulatory mechanisms, carbon pricing policies, climate adaptation, and state and regional climate policies. For more information, contact Ray Kopp, CCEP Director, kopp@rff.org; or Kristin Hayes, CCEP Assistant Director, hayes@rff.org. www.rff.org/ccep CENTER FOR ENERGY ECONOMICS AND POLICY Researchers working in RFF’s Center for Energy Economics and Policy (CEEP) help develop smart approaches for the efficient use and sustainable development of energy resources. They have expertise in topics such as risk analysis of energy development, energy regulations and markets, alternative vehicles and fuels, oil and gas development, energy development in emerging markets such as China, and energy policy design. For more information, contact Alan Krupnick, CEEP Director, krupnick@rff.org; or Kristin Hayes, CEEP Assistant Director, hayes@rff.org. www.rff.org/ceep CENTER FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ECOLOGICAL WEALTH Researchers working in RFF’s Center for the Management of Ecological Wealth (CMEW) help develop innovative and cost-effective environmental management solutions for the sound stewardship of natural resources. They have expertise in topics such as sustainable international development, ecosystem management, forest markets and biofuels, land use, water, and climate adaptation strategies. For more information, contact James Boyd, CMEW Director, boyd@rff.org; or Anna Brittain, CMEW Manager, brittain@rff.org. www.rff.org/cmew

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CONNECT WITH RFF There are numerous ways to stay up to date on the latest research at RFF: • Get involved in RFF’s social networks on Facebook and LinkedIn. • Follow RFF on Twitter to keep up with the latest RFF news and events: @RFF_org. • Attend an RFF First Wednesday Seminar or watch live on the Web and tweet your questions using the hashtag #AskRFF. • Subscribe to RFF’s free podcast series on iTunes to hear about the issues directly from RFF experts. • Sign up to receive the RFF Connection, a periodic e-newsletter about RFF research and events. • Download any of RFF’s discussion papers, issue briefs, and reports, all of which are available for free at www.rff.org.

Visit RFF's blog, Common Resources, where experts provide up-to-date commentary on the latest research, analysis, and debates surrounding environmental and natural resource policy issues—in DC and around the world.

JOIN THE DISCUSSION AT WWW.COMMON-RESOURCES.ORG.

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Resources for the Future 1616 P St. NW Washington, DC 20036 www.rff.org


RFF Directory of Experts 2014