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homelessness 100 reasons to care rescue mission 2012 annual report


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Donna Haynes, CPCU, President

Ron Thompson, Vice President

Bruce Bodine, Treasurer

Dennis Davenport, Secretary

Terry Brink Larry Geringer Jim Freisheim, Ph.D. Mark Taylor Kevin Phelps Kandi Crawford Karen Vialle Katie Bering

LEADERSHIP STAFF David Curry CEO

Elis Taylor COO

Mar Corpuz

Institutional Philanthropy Officer

Christopher Croft

Adam St. Family Campus Director

Todd Corigan

Tyler St. Family Campus Director

Brian Eggers

Bob Killmer

Facilities Director

Emergency Services/Operations

Jann Sonntag

Les Doyle

Executive Assistant, PR

New Life Program Director

Juliet Wallin

Ellis McDaniel

Donor/Community Relations

Holly Knoll

Creative Director

Kari Engelson

Director of Volunteers

Challenge Learning Program Director Thank you for joining our cause!


The Rescue Mission has been a core part of Tacoma and Pierce County for 100 years, providing tangible solutions to poverty, homelessness, and addiction. Hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children have been impacted by the loving and caring people who have supported and served at the Rescue Mission over the past century. Where would these people be, and what would our community look like, without the Rescue Mission’s essential service? Think of the lives that would have been lost, had the Rescue Mission not been here. Think of the lives that were spared, the homeless that were set back on their feet, and the threatened who were made to feel safe, because our doors were open every day. And consider the great force of consecrated men and women - board members, donors, volunteers, staff, and community supporters - who gave of themselves to make this good work possible. Over 100 years, the driving purpose of the Rescue Mission has remained constant: We were, are, and always will be a haven for the hungry, homeless, and lost. In honor of our anniversary, the following pages offer 100 new reasons to care about homelessness.

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

1


4 the issues of

1 In any given year, almost twice as many students from low-income homes (defined as the bottom 20% of all family incomes) drop out as do students from middle-class backgrounds

homelessness are complex

5

THREE GENERATIONS RECEIVE THEIR GED TOGETHER

7

In Pierce County, Homelessness increased from 2010-2011 by 14.4% * 2011 Pierce County Homeless Survey

8

-Challenge Learning participants

(Preventing Future High School Dropouts, National Education Association (NEA), 2008. p. 70)

Approximately

1.6 million

children in the United States will experience homelessness over the course of a year.

2

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

every person & situation is unique

3 Case management for homeless clients provides accountability and support to help individuals and families set goals, and gain the confidence and skills to live a life of self-sufficiency.

KELLY IS GIVING BACK

6

Kelly graduated from the New Life Program, has her own housing, and is volunteering her time to help those in need. -Kelly, Mission Alumni

9 Due to fear and stigma, people fail to ask for help until their lives bypass a state of disrepair and fall into the harsher realities of family breakdown, financial collapse, and emotional devastation.


10

the power to act is ours

12

15

The people who make a difference are not the ones with the credentials, but the ones with the concern.

RICHARD HAS A NEW HOME

–Max Lucado

13

“. . .By us receiving this apartment. . . our family has been strengthened. It’s not just a place to live, it’s family. They provide for our needs. . . but the concept of doing that is to release us of our burdens so we can concentrate on the problems that got us here.” –-Richard, Adams St. Family Campus resident

Based on new evidence about increased poverty and future economic trends, the Homelessness Research Institute at the National Alliance to End Homelessness estimates that in the next three years homelessness in the United States could increase by 5 percent, or 74,000 people.

14

11 “Give yourself entirely to those around you. Be generous with your blessings. A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal.” - Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free

16

Homeless families

comprise roughly 1/3 of

the total homeless population * The National Center on Family Homelessness

Many people think homeless youth choose to live on the streets. But when you consider what their home environment was, you can see why a lot of these young people prefer homelessness to living in a place where they are abused or neglected.


17

20 To the world you may be just one person, but to one person you may be the world.

From 1967 to 2010, the poverty rate for young families with children soared 14.1 percent to 37.3 percent.

23

–State of America’s Children 2012 handbook

the moment to act is now

24

21

–Josephine Billings

24 million US jobs (one-fifth of all jobs) do not keep a family of 4 out of poverty

Children are the poorest age group in the United States and are almost two-and-a-half times as likely to be poor as senior citizens ages 65 and older –State of America’s Children 2012 handbook

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

18 love your neighbour

25

as yourself Mark 12:31

19

92%

of homeless mothers have experienced severe physical and / or sexual abuse during their lifetime. * The National Center on Family Homelessness

22 CHRISTY IS GETTING HER EDUCATION

Before living at our Tyler Campus, Christy’s last educational experience was in the 6th grade. She now attends Tacoma Community College.

Government alone cannot solve the problems we deal with in our correctional facilities, treatment centers, homeless shelters and crisis centers - we need our faith- based and community partners. –Dirk Kempthorne


26

Case Management is an important critical ingredient leading to positive treatment retention and housing outcomes for homeless individuals.

32

30

23

KATIE HAS HER DAD BACK

MONTHS

27

-Adams St. Family Campus residents

Is the average wait for public housing * The National Center on Family Homelessness

31 Nutritional deficiencies often lead to high rates of weight problems and obesity in homeless children. * The National Center on Family Homelessness

28 “You assume that a homeless person is something that you’re not, but it can happen to anybody.” – Cinnamon, Rescue Mission Client

LEE FOUND HELP

29 88¢ of every dollar donated to the Mission goes directly to services and facilities for the homeless

I was a single mom, got sick, lost my job, and had no place to live. After I moved to Tyler, I got accepted into a masters program at UW. I’m able to focus on my girls and education. -Lee, Tyler Campus Resident

33 In Washington, the Fair Market Rent (FMR) for a twobedroom apartment is $944. In order to afford this level of rent and utilities – without paying more than 30% of income on housing – a household must earn $3,147 monthly or $37,766 annually. Assuming a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year, this level of income translates into a Housing Wage of:

$18.16 In Washington, a minimum wage worker earns an hourly wage of $9.04. Copyright © 2012 by the National Low Income Housing Coalition


37

34 Those fleeing domestic violence are more likely to become homeless or have a problem finding housing because of their unique and often urgent circumstances. * The National Center on Family Homelessness

homelessness is a lonely journey

40

Homeless children experience food insecurity, with one-third reporting that they skip meals. * The National Center on Family Homelessness

38 41

53%

According to those surveyed, in 2011, there are

2,068

of homeless mothers do not have a high school diploma

homeless men, women, and children in Pierce County

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

* 2011 Pierce County Homeless Survey

35 rebuilding lives

takes time.

36

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. –Leo Buscaglia

39

42 38%

Pierce County has seen a increase in students experiencing homelessness, over the past 4 years. * School District Homeless Data Report, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI)

Give justice to the weak and the fatherless; maintain the right of the afflicted and the destitute. Psalm 82:3


43 CHRISTIAN IS NO LONGER HOMELESS

“Before I came into the Mission I was sleeping in bushes, I was homeless. I heard about the program and it took me two months to get here due to the struggles on the streets. Going through the classes gets you back into society. I always thought I was always going to be the same person, I never thought I could change.”

45

homeless prevention saves taxpayer dollars

ALEX & HIS MOM DON’T SLEEP IN THEIR CAR ANYMORE. -Alex, Tyler St. Family Campus

KYLA HAS A BETTER FUTURE

“Our daughter, Kyla is four years old and attends the program downstairs. She comes home and is counting, doing her abc’s, telling me how to use my manners. It’s been going good for her.” -Family at the Tyler St. Family Campus

46 PHILLIP IS REBUILDING HIS LIFE. -New Life Program client

-Christian, Rescue Mission New Life Program client

44

48

47

49 “We know statistically from surveying our adults, that 40% of the adults that come into the shelter were homeless as kids.” – Rescue Mission CEO, David Curry

Pierce County’s homeless families list unaffordable rent, job loss, and domestic violence as the most common causes of homelessness.


57

53

50

JUAN HAS AN EDUCATION

“I never finished school, and now I have the opportunity to get my GED.”

education can provide a path to a better future.

51 homelessness can

happen to anyone

52

65%

of them live with at least one of their children

54

56

7%

of them live with at least one of their children

Chronically Homeless Veterans make up 40 % of the chronically homeless population that was surveyed. * 2011 Pierce County Point In Time Homelessness Survey

55

107,000

Among homeless men, 41% have children under age 18, but only

-Juan, Adams Campus

According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, about

veterans experience homelessness on any given night.

Among homeless women, 60% have children under 18, but only

58

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

a simple meal could mean the world to someone in need Poverty, and all the conditions it creates, is the single most powerful demographic factor that increases students’ chances of dropping out of high school. -Preventing Future High School Dropouts, National Education Association (NEA), 2008. p. 70

“We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.” –Winston Churchill


59

62

Treatment for mental illness & homelessness is costly, but lack of treatment is even more costly.

64

In October of 2012, 11 out of 27 families at our Tyler Family Campus were attending higher education.

We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved and uncared for is the greatest poverty. We must start in our own homes to remedy this kind of poverty.

60 you can make

a difference in someones life.

– Mother Teresa

63 61

42%

65 Homeless families comprise roughly 1/3 of the total homeless population * The National Center on Family Homelessness

HEATHER HAS A NEW SENSE OF PRIDE. –Heather,Adams Campus resident

of children in homeless families are under age six * The National Center on Family Homelessness


It costs the Rescue Mission only

69

66 Physical and/or sexual abuse and neglect by a family member are common reasons why youth leave home. At Covenant House, the largest youth-service provider in the country, one-third (35.3%) of interviewed youth had experienced physical abuse and one-quarter (25.5%) had been victims of sexual violence.

$2.42

Estimates indicate that three to six months of education are lost every time a child moves.

to provide a meal to someone in need

70

jason never thought he was smart enough for college. but he got accepted into college after completing his ged at the mission.

73

– Uncensored: American Family Experiences with Poverty and Homelessness Summer 2012

67

72

CASSIDY HAS A FAMILY

“My mom is finally clean and sober, I got to spend some holidays with her.” -Cassidy, Adams Campus

One person can break the chain of poverty and change future generations.

71

68 BRANDY IS MOVING FORWARD

“The New Life Program is more than shelter, it’s a stepping stone.” -Brandy, Adams Campus

The number of children living in communities with concentrated poverty (poverty rates of 30 percent or higher) rose by 25 percent, from 6.3 million to 7.9 million, from 2000 to 2010. Almost three out of four children living in areas of concentrated poverty have at least one parent in the labor force * The National Center on Family Homelessness

74

often, people need help to see a better future.


75

We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt

78 “No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.”

81 A typical sheltered homeless family is comprised of a mother in her late twenties with two children * The National Center on Family Homelessness

– Charles Dickens

76

29%

of adults in homeless families are working

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

77 A nutritious meal can be the first step to a better future.

79

people deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. 80 Among industrialized nations, the United States has the largest number of homeless women and children. Not since the Great Depression have so many families been without homes. * The National Center on Family Homelessness

82 DARLA FOUND HOPE

“I didn’t know how much longer I could make it. I have a support system now.” -Darla, Adams Campus resident


83

BRANDON HAS A CHANCE TO BE A KID.

86 For it is in giving

that we receive.

–Brandon, Adams St. Family Campus

-Mary, Tyler Campus resident

“The dreams I have after I leave the program are unlimited! There are no limitations to what we can do and what we can’t do. It’s not what I’m going to do, it’s how many things am I going to do?” -Zack, New Life Program Client

* The National Center on Family Homelessness

care is ignored and high risks of health problems increase.

“After the experience of homelessness that my family has endured, my perception about homeless people has changed.”

91 Families experiencing homelessness are under considerable stress. They may double-up in overcrowded apartments throughout the time they are without a home. Others sleep in cars and campgrounds or send their children to stay with relatives to avoid shelter life. Homelessness also increases the likelihood that families will separate or dissolve, which may compound the stress the family feels.

stable housing, pre-existing 84 Without conditions are aggravated, routine health

IT COULD HAPPEN TO ANYONE

unacceptable

– St. Francis of Assisi

87

85

90 Homelessness is

88 It costs the Mission just $9.12 to provide a bed to someone in need at our Downtown Tacoma Campus

89 The percent of Tacoma residents living below the federal poverty level is 17.1% compared to 12.1% statewide * City of Tacoma 2012 Community Data Report

92 As recently as 2 or 3 decades ago, the homeless were mostly adult men. That demographic has changed dramatically, however, as the number of women and children who are homeless has increased at an alarming rate.


“Success to me is having my family and loved ones able to see me for 93 what I am and not what I was.” - Rescue Mission Client

94

There is a lot that happens around the world we cannot control. We cannot stop earthquakes, we cannot prevent droughts, and we cannot prevent all conflict, but when we know where the hungry, the homeless and the sick exist, then we can help. – Jan Schakowsky

95

you can help alleviate suffering

96

Childhood poverty costs the United States about

99

$500 Billion per year

* State of America’s Children 2012 handbook

People experiencing homelessness have complex health problems. Healing and recovery are nearly impossible without a home. Bed rest, healthy food, refrigeration for medications and the ability to stay out of the weather are critical to good health. -National Health Care for the Homeless Council

97 47% of the Rescue Mission’s revenue is from donations by concerned individuals in the community.

98

Life on the streets is brutal and short. The average age of death for homeless people is 30 years less than that of housed people. —James J. O’Connell, Premature Mortality in Homeless Populations: A Review of the Literature.

100

For 100 years, the Rescue Mission has provided Help, Hope, and Healing. But needs remain in our community, today. To meet these needs, we need your support. Thank you for partnering with us.


a year in review It’s been a wonderful year at the Rescue Mission. Our 100 Year Anniversary provided many opportunities to reflect upon and celebrate our legacy of service to Tacoma and Pierce County. For a century we have been meeting the needs of the hurting, hungry, and homeless in our community. God has been faithful to us throughout the decades, and we are grateful for His goodness. His provision has included dedicated and passionate volunteers, donors, and staff, who are faithful to serve those in need. This year, as the economy continues to struggle, we have seen an increase in the number of people seeking the Rescue Mission’s help. We are serving more meals than ever before, and our waiting list for housing is longer than it’s ever been. Even with the recent addition of new facilities and beds, it is difficult to meet the needs of those coming to us for help. Despite these challenges, we are reminded that scripture says, “Don’t get tired of doing good.” I’m more optimistic than ever that we are making a critical difference in the lives of those we serve. The homeless mother who brings her children to the Rescue Mission looking for hope, the man living in despair due to addiction, the family reeling from layoffs and economic turmoil. The Rescue Mission will continue to reach out to those who are threatened, hurting, lost and cold. Thank you for supporting us with your prayers, service, and financial support. Looking forward to 2013,

Dr. David Curry Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

13


a Tacom

Tyler St. Family Campus 3202 S Tyler St. Tacoma, WA 98409 Transitional housing and programming for families with children

5

Downtown Tacoma Campus 425 S Tacoma Way Tacoma, WA 98402 Good Neighbor Cafe, New Life Program, Men’s shelter, Challenge Learning, & Need-A-Break Program

19th St 21st St

Administrative Office 702 Pacific Ave Tacoma, WA 98402 Yakima Ave

25th St

5

2

n Av

4

Center St

Unio

Tyler St

e

16

1

Jefferson Ave

6

705

15th St

Ave

Colonial Apartments 701 Commerce St. Tacoma, WA 98402 Low income affordable housing

11th St

Adams St. Family Campus 2909 South Adams Tacoma, WA 98409 Transitional & emergency housing & programs for families with children

Ave

4

a Tacom

3

Jefferson Apartments 2336 S Jefferson Ave Tacoma, WA 98402 Drug and alcohol free studios for people with special needs

9th St

Pacific

2

Ave

our locations 1

6 3

Center St

ma

y

Wa

o ac ST

N W

E S

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

14


this year at the mission we...

437

Provided

We have

177,098

beds at our various facilities, and sleep an extra 200 people on mats and cots during cold winter nights.

bed nights

188 16,185

Served students in our Challenge Learning Center with a total of hours

Our Adams St. Family Campus Case Mangers served over 300 people, and moved 210 into housing for a

70% success rate

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

15


$.88 of every dollar donated goes directly to services for our clients.

EACH DAY AT THE MISSION WE... Run 13 full-time programs ➜ Alumni Program

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

➜ Challenge Learning Program ➜ Men’s Shelter ➜ Food Service ➜ Youth Program ➜ Need-A-Break Program ➜ Family Life Program ➜ New Life Program ➜ Midway Program ➜ Applied Living Program ➜ Case Management

Served

had a total of

unduplicated clients in our various programs

volunteers

1,750

7,670

➜ Emergency Services

Each da

➜ Veterans Resource Center

e average w y

330 260 staff hours

Intership hours

1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢ 1¢

Distributed over

64,099

items to those in need through our donation center

we fed

297,778 people in need Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

16


2012 revenue Foundations

8%

Wills and Trusts

1%

United Way

2%

Government Grants

21%

Rents

13%

Interest

0%

Miscellaneous

8%

Donations

47%

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

17


2012 expenses 10% 13%

Emergency Services

14%

Family Life Program

7%

Adams St. Transitional Housing

14%

Affordable Housing

9% 5%

New Life Program

12%

Food Services

4%

Need-a-Break Program

8% 4%

Development

Family Shelter

Challenge Learning Services

Management & General

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

18


a year in review The firm of Dwyer, Pemberton & Coulson, P.C. Certified Public Accountants conducts an annual independent audit of Rescue Mission finances. The auditor’s report is available for viewing at the Mission’s administrative office. The information below shows sources and uses of Rescue Mission funds as a percentage of the total income and expenses as of June 30, 2012. We are pleased to report that the combined total of administrative and development expenses is only 12%, meaning that 88¢ of every dollar goes directly to services and facilities for the homeless.

EXPENSES Program Services

Support Services

Emergency Services....................................................$561,942

Development............................................................. $434,846

Family Shelter............................................................ $747,402

Management & general............................................. $221,046

Family Life Program.................................................... $772,714 Adams St. Transitional Housing................................ $381,747

Total Support Services......................................... $655,892

Affordable Housing..................................................... $781,117 New Life Program........................................................$519,031 Challenge Learning Services .....................................$281,396 Food Services............................................................. $636,506 Need-a-Break Program................................................$231,257

Total Expenses..................................................... $5,569,004

Total Program Services.................................... $4,913,112

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

19


REVENUE Public Support

Other Income Rental Income............................................................. $732,893

Donations............................................................... $2,594,366

Miscellaneous.............................................................$418,622

Foundations............................................................... $446,719

Interest Income.............................................................$6,408

Wills & Trusts.................................................................$45,211

Realized loss on assets.................................................. $5,795

United Way.................................................................... $91,617

Unrealized gain from trusts......................................($14,082)

Total public support.......................................... $3,177,913

Government Agency Grants Total Government Agency Grants................. $2,594,366

Total Other Revenue.......................................... $1,149,636 Total Public Support & Revenue..................... $ 5,464,141

Rescue Mission 2012 annual report

20


What we do The Rescue Mission provides help and hope to men, women and children who need shelter, food and assistance with life changes that lead to self sufficiency.

How we do it

Guided by our Christian faith and belief in the human spirit, the Rescue Mission works with people at all stages of addiction, homelessness or other life challenges, offering proven services, support and facilities.

Where we’re going Originally founded to serve homeless men in Tacoma, the Rescue Mission has grown to serve women and children in all parts of Pierce County. We lead by learning, nurturing, innovating and partnering.

253.383.4493 | Rescue-Mission.org


The Rescue Mission 2012 Annual Report